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Richland Library Friends’ 2013 SUMMER READING

HALLENGE

Children, Teens & Adults

Read every day. Read a new way.

June 1-August 17 Spo nso red by Ge ige r O ’Cain Adve rtis in g R I C H L A N D L I B R A RY. C O M /SU M M ER


summer reading challenge guide

summer reading challenge guide

Finding Our Summer Stride Raise A Reader With Good Books Rebecca Kolb | Youth and Family Services Supervisor

How to

Tony Tallent | Director of Literacy and Learning

Sign Up

The very thought of summer

Many think that it is only up to our school systems to support

brings up all sorts of activities

reading and learning. We believe that it is the responsibility and

to mind. Picnics. Vacations.

purpose of all our community organizations to make a brighter

are few things that make us smile

Plowing through that list of

world for children. The Summer Stride is an unprecedented

like helping a child find just the right

summer must-reads. And, of

initiative for public libraries in our region, and perhaps

book. And with almost 1 million books

course, plowing through that

nationally. We will be chronicling both the successes and

summer garden! Summer is an

challenges of our weekly efforts that this IMLS grant is allowing

active time, indeed.

us to explore. Through this process it is our sincere desire to see

A children’s librarian’s favorite words? “I want some good books!” There

in our collection, Richland Library has a lot of good books! We know that

Earn prizes by reading for 25 hours or

reading is not only fun, but also very

completing your own personal challenge

important.

this summer between June 1 and August 17.

“By the time a child is five, he will have heard 90% of all the words that

1

how the public library can play a more active and notable role With all its possibilities, for

in helping children become stronger readers and learners. We’ll

many children, summer is not

keep you posted.

an active time of reading and

Sign up at any Richland Library

learning. Over the past few

During the Richland Library Friends’ Summer Reading

he will ever know.” -Jim Trelease, The

location or register online at

years we have found out more and more about the effects of

Challenge, we offer innumerable ways for all ages to keep their

Read Aloud Handbook

richlandlibrary.com/summer.

summer reading loss—often called “The Summer Slide”—for

minds active. We encourage you to find your own stride—

young children who are not encouraged and supported to

challenge yourself to read in new ways—whether switching

continue reading and learning through the summer months.

over to a book of poetry or nonfiction from your usual novel

Good books are important no matter your age, but the first five years are crucial in a child’s vocabulary and literacy development. The more

2

Start reading! Keep track of

or reading aloud with your friends and family once a week.

books you read to your child, the more words he will hear. Reading

your hours online or on your

Think of it this way: what if you were trying to learn a brand new

You may want to challenge yourself to find out more about the

should happen every day and all through the day.

Summer Reading Challenge

skill, one that you could be struggling with, and then suddenly

composer or rock band you are listening to or find the writing

record.

you had to stop practicing for almost three months. When you

that inspired your favorite movies. There are so many ways to

started back, it would be very much like starting from scratch.

read. So many ways to learn. If you need a little inspiration—

You’d likely be frustrated, bored and maybe even want to give

turn to your library. That’s why we are here.

Here are some easy ways to incorporate reading into your family’s daily life: • •

3

Read for 25 hours? Celebrate

Read to your child every single day. Fill your home (and car!)

and claim your prize at any

with library books. You can check out 60 at one time.

Richland Library location.

for your child. Find time to talk. Point out things in the world and ask your child questions. • •

are not supported in continuing to build their reading skills

By the way, if you are interested in becoming a reading tutor for

during the summer months often fall drastically behind.

a child who needs help, please contact the Midlands Reading

Read books about ABCs, shapes, numbers, colors and sounds.

Consortium at 803.758.6983.

Library staff are experts. We’ll help you pick out books just right •

up. This is what the Summer Slide is like. Young children who

I am happy to announce that this summer, Richland Library is

Or Create your Own Challenge! • Set a personal goal: “I will read all the

undertaking an ambitious project to see how public libraries can support young readers through the summer gap. With funding from a National Leadership Grant through the

Sing, play and draw with your child. Just a few minutes every

books in a series.” Or “I will download

Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), our library

day will make all the difference.

and read three books on my e-reader.”

will be partnering with The United Way’s Midlands Reading

Or “I’m going to finish War and Peace

Consortium, Richland One School District, University of South

Schedule a daily reading time. There’s nothing better than a bedtime story.

this summer!” • Meet your goal and claim your prize at

This summer, I hope you’ll make the library part of your weekly routine.

any Richland Library location.

Carolina’s Office of Programs and Evaluations and a host of community tutors to make sure that a large group of students who are currently struggling with reading have the support they need through the summer weeks.

Visit us for storytime and other fun family events. There is something

Knowing that we want to turn around the

happening almost every day! Join the Richland Library Friends’

Summer Slide, we have aptly named this

Summer Reading Challenge and earn prizes as you read. Bring your

project The Summer Stride.

whole family to see us at the library; we’ll have some good books waiting for you!

2

SUMMER READING CHALLENGE GUIDE


summer reading challenge guide

summer reading challenge guide

Finding Our Summer Stride Raise A Reader With Good Books Rebecca Kolb | Youth and Family Services Supervisor

How to

Tony Tallent | Director of Literacy and Learning

Sign Up

The very thought of summer

Many think that it is only up to our school systems to support

brings up all sorts of activities

reading and learning. We believe that it is the responsibility and

to mind. Picnics. Vacations.

purpose of all our community organizations to make a brighter

are few things that make us smile

Plowing through that list of

world for children. The Summer Stride is an unprecedented

like helping a child find just the right

summer must-reads. And, of

initiative for public libraries in our region, and perhaps

book. And with almost 1 million books

course, plowing through that

nationally. We will be chronicling both the successes and

summer garden! Summer is an

challenges of our weekly efforts that this IMLS grant is allowing

active time, indeed.

us to explore. Through this process it is our sincere desire to see

A children’s librarian’s favorite words? “I want some good books!” There

in our collection, Richland Library has a lot of good books! We know that

Earn prizes by reading for 25 hours or

reading is not only fun, but also very

completing your own personal challenge

important.

this summer between June 1 and August 17.

“By the time a child is five, he will have heard 90% of all the words that

1

how the public library can play a more active and notable role With all its possibilities, for

in helping children become stronger readers and learners. We’ll

many children, summer is not

keep you posted.

an active time of reading and

Sign up at any Richland Library

learning. Over the past few

During the Richland Library Friends’ Summer Reading

he will ever know.” -Jim Trelease, The

location or register online at

years we have found out more and more about the effects of

Challenge, we offer innumerable ways for all ages to keep their

Read Aloud Handbook

richlandlibrary.com/summer.

summer reading loss—often called “The Summer Slide”—for

minds active. We encourage you to find your own stride—

young children who are not encouraged and supported to

challenge yourself to read in new ways—whether switching

continue reading and learning through the summer months.

over to a book of poetry or nonfiction from your usual novel

Good books are important no matter your age, but the first five years are crucial in a child’s vocabulary and literacy development. The more

2

Start reading! Keep track of

or reading aloud with your friends and family once a week.

books you read to your child, the more words he will hear. Reading

your hours online or on your

Think of it this way: what if you were trying to learn a brand new

You may want to challenge yourself to find out more about the

should happen every day and all through the day.

Summer Reading Challenge

skill, one that you could be struggling with, and then suddenly

composer or rock band you are listening to or find the writing

record.

you had to stop practicing for almost three months. When you

that inspired your favorite movies. There are so many ways to

started back, it would be very much like starting from scratch.

read. So many ways to learn. If you need a little inspiration—

You’d likely be frustrated, bored and maybe even want to give

turn to your library. That’s why we are here.

Here are some easy ways to incorporate reading into your family’s daily life: • •

3

Read for 25 hours? Celebrate

Read to your child every single day. Fill your home (and car!)

and claim your prize at any

with library books. You can check out 60 at one time.

Richland Library location.

for your child. Find time to talk. Point out things in the world and ask your child questions. • •

are not supported in continuing to build their reading skills

By the way, if you are interested in becoming a reading tutor for

during the summer months often fall drastically behind.

a child who needs help, please contact the Midlands Reading

Read books about ABCs, shapes, numbers, colors and sounds.

Consortium at 803.758.6983.

Library staff are experts. We’ll help you pick out books just right •

up. This is what the Summer Slide is like. Young children who

I am happy to announce that this summer, Richland Library is

Or Create your Own Challenge! • Set a personal goal: “I will read all the

undertaking an ambitious project to see how public libraries can support young readers through the summer gap. With funding from a National Leadership Grant through the

Sing, play and draw with your child. Just a few minutes every

books in a series.” Or “I will download

Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), our library

day will make all the difference.

and read three books on my e-reader.”

will be partnering with The United Way’s Midlands Reading

Or “I’m going to finish War and Peace

Consortium, Richland One School District, University of South

Schedule a daily reading time. There’s nothing better than a bedtime story.

this summer!” • Meet your goal and claim your prize at

This summer, I hope you’ll make the library part of your weekly routine.

any Richland Library location.

Carolina’s Office of Programs and Evaluations and a host of community tutors to make sure that a large group of students who are currently struggling with reading have the support they need through the summer weeks.

Visit us for storytime and other fun family events. There is something

Knowing that we want to turn around the

happening almost every day! Join the Richland Library Friends’

Summer Slide, we have aptly named this

Summer Reading Challenge and earn prizes as you read. Bring your

project The Summer Stride.

whole family to see us at the library; we’ll have some good books waiting for you!

2

SUMMER READING CHALLENGE GUIDE


summer reading challenge guide

Sing

Read, Talk, Sing, Write, Play

Every Day

• • • • •

Sing a song, no matter your singing ability. Songs soothe, encourage listening

Secrets To Learning Success Laura Kennett | Community Outreach Librarian

and help children hear the sounds that make up language.

We all want our children to be successful in

Sing your way through the day. Having a clean-up song, a bedtime song, etc.

school. Easy, right? Well, my job is to make it

helps establish and maintain a routine.

easy, or at least easier, for children to read and

Recite nursery rhymes. Four-year-olds who know eight nursery rhymes by heart are

be ready for school. First, know that not every

usually one of the best readers at age eight.

day is easy. On those days, take it easy, follow

Share songs to help children learn. Songs build memory and help children learn

the fun and remember that you are doing great!

concepts from the alphabet to counting.

You are the most important person in the world

Sing songs with rhyming words, silly words, and long stretched out words.

to your child, so don’t forget to take care of

Songs are a wonderful way to play with language and all that play leads to

yourself.

language skills. Here is the secret to my learning success: read, talk, sing, write and play every day. It’s free, easy and leads to natural learning. Five practices may sound like a lot, but a little bit

Read •

Repeat, repeat, repeat. Children learn through repetition, so if your child asks

Write •

for Goodnight Moon three times in a row, go for it! •

Read about things your child is interested in and make connections.

Children have an amazing capacity for learning about what they like! •

Build up to reading 20 minutes a day. The 20 minutes does not have to be

done in one sitting, do whatever works for you and your child. •

Use a variety of book styles from photographs to rhymes to bi-lingual books Have a special place for books, it shows that they are important. Show your

to skip. Notice and celebrate the small successes. Your child went from letting you read

Write and scribble together. Talking about what you’re writing helps make the

only one word of a book to a sentence – celebrate it, soon they will be listening to a whole

connection between written and spoken language.

story. Relax and encourage yourself and your child. You will thrive on your praise and so will

Scribble, snip, and glue your way to writing. Making letters takes skill and

your child. Below are my top five tips for the five practices. Enjoy and if you need ideas and

coordination; those random marks are the first step!

support, Richland Library is always here for you.

Use fingerplays! Patty Cake, Five Little Monkeys and Where is Thumbkin? all build hand coordination needed for writing.

to widen your children’s knowledge of the world beyond their daily lives. •

goes a long way. Once you create a routine, it will become a ritual that your child won’t want

enthusiasm for reading and your child will want to read!

Practice best form by starting letters/scribbles at the top of the page. Where do you start your letters? At the top!

Read together!

Start with the letters in your child’s name. Write them in three-inch, upper case

It increases your children’s vocabulary, creates a love for learning, teaches how

letters. Have your child trace the words with their finger. It is easier for children to

words and pictures work together, and gives them knowledge about the world.

write big and upper case letters are easier to make.

Talk to your children often. Children who are talked to and talk about their world have larger vocabularies and a larger knowledge of everything from shapes and colors, to apples and zebras.

Talk •

Talk and talk and talk! Children who are talked to and talk about their world have large vocabularies and a wide range of knowledge.

Wait for it … children can take five to twelve seconds to answer a question. Being patient and waiting allows children to practice responding and to become quicker over time!

Chat about the books you read with your child. Books make great conversation starters.

Make it up! Making up stories together is a great way to practice language and to learn about characters and story structure (beginning, middle and end).

Ask questions about the books you read and the songs you sing. Questions

Play •

Play! Pretending helps children practice real-life skills and gets them talking and telling stories.

• • • •

Sing together every day. No matter your singing ability, the songs you sing will help your children learn the rhythm of language, how different sounds make up words and how certain words rhyme.

Use what you have to encourage storytelling and reinforce concepts. Count off toys,

Write right now!

sort colors, play kitchen, play store, pretend to be a zookeeper or a librarian!

Scribbling, drawing, writing letters and having children see adults write are all

Create letters from string, play dough and sticks. Talk about the letters while children

ways to teach that reading and writing go together.

are playing. What letter does that start with?

Play with children!

Use the words: stop and go to create movement and fun. Children can pretend to be

Playing teaches children how to use their language, how to create and tell sto-

animals, leaves, buses or anything else that goes.

ries, and develop vivid imaginations. When children pretend, they are practicing

Act out feelings. Use dramatic play to practice using words instead of negative actions.

real-life skills.

lead to answers and more knowledge for everyone.

4

SUMMER READING CHALLENGE GUIDE

SUMMER READING CHALLENGE GUIDE

5


summer reading challenge guide

Sing

Read, Talk, Sing, Write, Play

Every Day

• • • • •

Sing a song, no matter your singing ability. Songs soothe, encourage listening

Secrets To Learning Success Laura Kennett | Community Outreach Librarian

and help children hear the sounds that make up language.

We all want our children to be successful in

Sing your way through the day. Having a clean-up song, a bedtime song, etc.

school. Easy, right? Well, my job is to make it

helps establish and maintain a routine.

easy, or at least easier, for children to read and

Recite nursery rhymes. Four-year-olds who know eight nursery rhymes by heart are

be ready for school. First, know that not every

usually one of the best readers at age eight.

day is easy. On those days, take it easy, follow

Share songs to help children learn. Songs build memory and help children learn

the fun and remember that you are doing great!

concepts from the alphabet to counting.

You are the most important person in the world

Sing songs with rhyming words, silly words, and long stretched out words.

to your child, so don’t forget to take care of

Songs are a wonderful way to play with language and all that play leads to

yourself.

language skills. Here is the secret to my learning success: read, talk, sing, write and play every day. It’s free, easy and leads to natural learning. Five practices may sound like a lot, but a little bit

Read •

Repeat, repeat, repeat. Children learn through repetition, so if your child asks

Write •

for Goodnight Moon three times in a row, go for it! •

Read about things your child is interested in and make connections.

Children have an amazing capacity for learning about what they like! •

Build up to reading 20 minutes a day. The 20 minutes does not have to be

done in one sitting, do whatever works for you and your child. •

Use a variety of book styles from photographs to rhymes to bi-lingual books Have a special place for books, it shows that they are important. Show your

to skip. Notice and celebrate the small successes. Your child went from letting you read

Write and scribble together. Talking about what you’re writing helps make the

only one word of a book to a sentence – celebrate it, soon they will be listening to a whole

connection between written and spoken language.

story. Relax and encourage yourself and your child. You will thrive on your praise and so will

Scribble, snip, and glue your way to writing. Making letters takes skill and

your child. Below are my top five tips for the five practices. Enjoy and if you need ideas and

coordination; those random marks are the first step!

support, Richland Library is always here for you.

Use fingerplays! Patty Cake, Five Little Monkeys and Where is Thumbkin? all build hand coordination needed for writing.

to widen your children’s knowledge of the world beyond their daily lives. •

goes a long way. Once you create a routine, it will become a ritual that your child won’t want

enthusiasm for reading and your child will want to read!

Practice best form by starting letters/scribbles at the top of the page. Where do you start your letters? At the top!

Read together!

Start with the letters in your child’s name. Write them in three-inch, upper case

It increases your children’s vocabulary, creates a love for learning, teaches how

letters. Have your child trace the words with their finger. It is easier for children to

words and pictures work together, and gives them knowledge about the world.

write big and upper case letters are easier to make.

Talk to your children often. Children who are talked to and talk about their world have larger vocabularies and a larger knowledge of everything from shapes and colors, to apples and zebras.

Talk •

Talk and talk and talk! Children who are talked to and talk about their world have large vocabularies and a wide range of knowledge.

Wait for it … children can take five to twelve seconds to answer a question. Being patient and waiting allows children to practice responding and to become quicker over time!

Chat about the books you read with your child. Books make great conversation starters.

Make it up! Making up stories together is a great way to practice language and to learn about characters and story structure (beginning, middle and end).

Ask questions about the books you read and the songs you sing. Questions

Play •

Play! Pretending helps children practice real-life skills and gets them talking and telling stories.

• • • •

Sing together every day. No matter your singing ability, the songs you sing will help your children learn the rhythm of language, how different sounds make up words and how certain words rhyme.

Use what you have to encourage storytelling and reinforce concepts. Count off toys,

Write right now!

sort colors, play kitchen, play store, pretend to be a zookeeper or a librarian!

Scribbling, drawing, writing letters and having children see adults write are all

Create letters from string, play dough and sticks. Talk about the letters while children

ways to teach that reading and writing go together.

are playing. What letter does that start with?

Play with children!

Use the words: stop and go to create movement and fun. Children can pretend to be

Playing teaches children how to use their language, how to create and tell sto-

animals, leaves, buses or anything else that goes.

ries, and develop vivid imaginations. When children pretend, they are practicing

Act out feelings. Use dramatic play to practice using words instead of negative actions.

real-life skills.

lead to answers and more knowledge for everyone.

4

SUMMER READING CHALLENGE GUIDE

SUMMER READING CHALLENGE GUIDE

5


summer reading challenge guide

2013 Friends’ Summer Reading Challenge

Featured Events

Richland Library offers books, eBooks, audiobooks and more. Read, download and listen freely this summer!

Read every day. Read a new way.

Visit RichlandLibrary.com/summer for more information.

Orisirisi

Flow Circus

Pigskin Poets

Fran Sanderson

Enjoy this African folkloric storytelling

Blending magic and juggling, Flow Circus captivates,

Get your visors ready! Spurrier’s Gamecocks are taking the

Singing Librarian Fran Sanderson and her traveling

performance that shares the beauty of African

energizes, and inspires audiences of all ages.

field at Richland Library for a morning of stories, games and

guitar make a return appearance for this one-of -

life and culture.

10:30 a.m., Thursday, June 20, Southeast 3 p.m., Thursday, June 20, Sandhills

autographs.

a-kind storytime. Enjoy singing, dancing and

11 a.m., Friday, July 12, Main

stories that are sure to strike just the right note.

10 a.m., Wednesday, June 5, Eastover 2:30 p.m., Wednesday, June 5, St. Andrews

11 a.m., Friday, July 19, Wheatley

Charlie Hope

Tarradiddle Players

Join Charlie Hope as she sings

Tarradiddle Players Children’s Theatre from Charlotte, North

music that inspires children and

Carolina, brings to life The True Story of the Three Little

adults alike to explore the limitless

Pigs, based on Jon Scieszka’s wildly popular book.

possibilities we all have inside of us.

3 p.m., Thursday, June 6, Main

Follow Cara on a hula hooping journey based on The Story

10:30 a.m., Tuesday, June 11, Northeast 2 p.m., Tuesday, June 11, North Main

“Kindie” musician Steve Weeks brings a fun, interactive

Porkchop Productions

show with music, stories and humor for the whole family.

Pork Chop Productions presents a fanciful adaptation of the

10:30 a.m., Tuesday, July 16, St. Andrews 3:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 16, Cooper

classic folk tale, The Three Goats Gruff. Enjoy the live music and audience participation with your family and friends.

10:30 a.m., Thursday, July 25, Blythewood 2:30 p.m., Thursday, July 25, Northeast

11 a.m., Friday, June 21 Main 3 p.m., Friday, June 21 Blythewood

Cara Zara of the Root Children by Sibylle von Olfers.

Steve Weeks

Summer Reading Wrap-Up Party Wrap up the summer with music, fun and prizes for the

Fish the Magish

whole family. Join us for an outdoor concert featuring

There’s lots of fun and amazement as young and old alike are

nationally known children’s rock sensation Lunch Money!

bedazzled by wonderful storytelling and mind-bending magic.

6:30 – 8 p.m., Saturday, August 17, Southeast

11 a.m., Friday, June 22, Wheatley

Story Squad This band of actors, musicians, and visual artists creates a theatrical and educational

Kazoobie

feast for ears and eyes that will have

The “King of Kazoos” brings music, comedy, and fun together

the entire family rocking.

for everyone in the library to enjoy.

10:30 a.m., Wednesday, June 19 Cooper 10:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 10, Sandhills 11 a.m., Saturday, July 13 Eastover

10:30 a.m., Tuesday, July 9, North Main 3 p.m., Tuesday, July 9, Southeast

ELSKA Join us for a unique musical journey with ELSKA, winner of both a Parent’s Choice Foundation Award and a NAPPA Honors Award. Described as “musically sophisitcated” and “absolutely breathtaking” by Out With The Kids, ELSKA will mesmerize you with her combination of dreamy pop-infused music and heartfelt delivery. Find out more about ELSKA at islandofelska.com. 3 p.m., Sunday, June 23 | Richland Library Main

6

SUMMER READING CHALLENGE GUIDE

SUMMER READING CHALLENGE GUIDE 7


summer reading challenge guide

2013 Friends’ Summer Reading Challenge

Featured Events

Richland Library offers books, eBooks, audiobooks and more. Read, download and listen freely this summer!

Read every day. Read a new way.

Visit RichlandLibrary.com/summer for more information.

Orisirisi

Flow Circus

Pigskin Poets

Fran Sanderson

Enjoy this African folkloric storytelling

Blending magic and juggling, Flow Circus captivates,

Get your visors ready! Spurrier’s Gamecocks are taking the

Singing Librarian Fran Sanderson and her traveling

performance that shares the beauty of African

energizes, and inspires audiences of all ages.

field at Richland Library for a morning of stories, games and

guitar make a return appearance for this one-of -

life and culture.

10:30 a.m., Thursday, June 20, Southeast 3 p.m., Thursday, June 20, Sandhills

autographs.

a-kind storytime. Enjoy singing, dancing and

11 a.m., Friday, July 12, Main

stories that are sure to strike just the right note.

10 a.m., Wednesday, June 5, Eastover 2:30 p.m., Wednesday, June 5, St. Andrews

11 a.m., Friday, July 19, Wheatley

Charlie Hope

Tarradiddle Players

Join Charlie Hope as she sings

Tarradiddle Players Children’s Theatre from Charlotte, North

music that inspires children and

Carolina, brings to life The True Story of the Three Little

adults alike to explore the limitless

Pigs, based on Jon Scieszka’s wildly popular book.

possibilities we all have inside of us.

3 p.m., Thursday, June 6, Main

Follow Cara on a hula hooping journey based on The Story

10:30 a.m., Tuesday, June 11, Northeast 2 p.m., Tuesday, June 11, North Main

“Kindie” musician Steve Weeks brings a fun, interactive

Porkchop Productions

show with music, stories and humor for the whole family.

Pork Chop Productions presents a fanciful adaptation of the

10:30 a.m., Tuesday, July 16, St. Andrews 3:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 16, Cooper

classic folk tale, The Three Goats Gruff. Enjoy the live music and audience participation with your family and friends.

10:30 a.m., Thursday, July 25, Blythewood 2:30 p.m., Thursday, July 25, Northeast

11 a.m., Friday, June 21 Main 3 p.m., Friday, June 21 Blythewood

Cara Zara of the Root Children by Sibylle von Olfers.

Steve Weeks

Summer Reading Wrap-Up Party Wrap up the summer with music, fun and prizes for the

Fish the Magish

whole family. Join us for an outdoor concert featuring

There’s lots of fun and amazement as young and old alike are

nationally known children’s rock sensation Lunch Money!

bedazzled by wonderful storytelling and mind-bending magic.

6:30 – 8 p.m., Saturday, August 17, Southeast

11 a.m., Friday, June 22, Wheatley

Story Squad This band of actors, musicians, and visual artists creates a theatrical and educational

Kazoobie

feast for ears and eyes that will have

The “King of Kazoos” brings music, comedy, and fun together

the entire family rocking.

for everyone in the library to enjoy.

10:30 a.m., Wednesday, June 19 Cooper 10:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 10, Sandhills 11 a.m., Saturday, July 13 Eastover

10:30 a.m., Tuesday, July 9, North Main 3 p.m., Tuesday, July 9, Southeast

ELSKA Join us for a unique musical journey with ELSKA, winner of both a Parent’s Choice Foundation Award and a NAPPA Honors Award. Described as “musically sophisitcated” and “absolutely breathtaking” by Out With The Kids, ELSKA will mesmerize you with her combination of dreamy pop-infused music and heartfelt delivery. Find out more about ELSKA at islandofelska.com. 3 p.m., Sunday, June 23 | Richland Library Main

6

SUMMER READING CHALLENGE GUIDE

SUMMER READING CHALLENGE GUIDE 7


summer reading challenge guide Richland Library Battle of the Books 2013

for ages 9-12

Got trivia? Battle of the Books is Richland Library Friends’ Summer Reading Challenge book trivia competition. The team competition is open to kids between the ages of 9 -12 who enjoy reading and friendly competition. Team registration runs from June 1- June 29. For more information and registration forms, please visit us at participating Richland Library locations or online at richlandlibrary.com.

Battle of the Books Tournament All teams face off in a book trivia tournament at Richland Library Main.

10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Saturday, August 10

Participating Locations and Practice Dates Teams are formed at each location. Practices are held throughout the summer to prep for the final tournament. Richland Library Main

Richland Library Cooper

Richland Library Sandhills

4 p.m., Saturday, June 22

3:30 p.m., Wednesday, July 3

10:30 a.m., Thursday, July 11

4 p.m., Saturday, July 13

3:30 p.m., Wednesday, July 17

3 p.m., Saturday, July 20

4 p.m., Saturday, July 27

3:30 p.m., Wednesday, July 31

10:30 a.m., Thursday, July 25

3:30 p.m., Wednesday, August 7

10:30 a.m., Thursday, August 1

Richland Library Eastover

Richland Library Southeast

10:30 a.m., Saturday, July 20

6 p.m., Monday, July 15

10:30 a.m., Saturday, July 27

6 p.m., Wednesday, July 17

Richland Library Ballentine 4:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 9 Richland Library Blythewood

12 p.m., Saturday, July 20

3 p.m., Saturday, June 15 3 p.m., Saturday, June 29

Richland Library Northeast

3 p.m, Thursday, July 11

2 p.m., Saturday, July 17

Richland Library St. Andrews

3 p.m., Thursday, July 25

2 p.m., Tuesday, July 30

3:30 p.m., Wednesday, July 10 3:30 p.m., Wednesday, July 24

3 p.m., Tuesday, August 6

3:30 p.m., Wednesday, July 31

Battle of the Books 2013 Reading List All questions in this year’s tournament will come from the list below. Superfudge by Judy Blume

Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster

Ramona the Pest by Beverly Cleary

The Great Turkey Walk by Kathleen Karr

No Talking by Andrew Clements

Dinosaurs Before Dark by Mary Pope Osborne

The Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo

The Kite Fighters by Linda Sue Park

Bunnicula by Deborah and James Howe

Christopher Mouse: the Tale of a Small Traveler by William Wise 4/13 15,000

Scan here! Use your smartphone to find out everything that is happening this summer at the Richland Library. RichlandLibrary.com/summer


2013 Summer Reading Challenge