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‘A good long tenure’ Gorrell to retire from district in June 2021 KIMBERLY WETHAL Unified Newspaper Group

Verona Area School District superintendent Dean Gorrell hasn’t yet conceptualized what he’s going to do after he retires on June 30, 2021. While he made the announcement of his impending retirement in an email to district parents Wednesday, Jan. 8, Gorrell said there’s still so much work left to do in his last 17 and a half months. He said thinking about life postVASD isn’t something he’s considered much. “I don’t anticipate retiring and putting my feet up … I’ve told my wife I’m going to take a ‘gap year,’” Gorrell said with a laugh. After 16 years with the district, he will have spent his final four years guiding the district through the planning, building and opening of a new high school, the implementation of resulting new attendance boundaries for the

elementary and middle schools – as six schools are changing locations – and restructuring the district’s administrative team. Multiple factors a r e d r iv i n g retirement, Gorrell said. When the time comes, he’ll be 58, having spent Gorrell 36 years in education. “It’s really a 24/7 job, and it’s tiring,” he said. “I’m a pretty high energy guy, and I have been my entire life, my entire career, but as you get a little bit older, the energy requirement gets a little harder to fulfill – no surprise there.” In June 2015, during an interview about his 10 years with the district, he told the Press he didn’t see himself ending his career here, but he wasn’t yet focused on going elsewhere. That apparently had changed by the next year, however, as he had applied for at least three other jobs.

Turn to Retire/Page 14

‘They are just people’ Salem UCC photo exhibit highlights stories about immigrants, refugees BY EMILIE HEIDEMANN Unified Newspaper Group

Sarah Pundt wanted to tell a story – or stories, rather. The Salem United Church of Christ Director of Christian Education sought to highlight the experiences of people like Chaplain Clementina M. Chery, of Honduras; Gladys Jimah, of Ghana; and Mary Kakesa and her family, of the Democratic Republic of the Congo – all immigrants

or refugees who came to the U.S. seeking a better life. Their portraits, among many others, adorned Salem UCC’s walls in a photo exhibit Sunday, Jan. 12, for people to make connections with. Pundt said that was the purpose of the exhibit, titled “Building Bridges: Portraits of Immigrants and Refugees.” The public can view the exhibit at UCC until Sunday, Feb. 2. To kick off the exhibit, Plymouth United Church of Christ from Madison presented on its trip to the U.S. southern border, shedding light on the conditions Mexican immigrants endure when they make the risky trek across the border.

Turn to Exhibit/Page 13

Verona Area School District

Photo by Kimberly Wethal

Volunteer Christopher Brown helps Glacier Edge Elementary School third graders tape paper on their box during a work session on the Box City project on Thursday, Jan. 9.

A city of their own Students learn urban planning skills with ‘Box City’ project BY KIMBERLY WETHAL Unified Newspaper Group

There’s not quite “a million” boxes sitting in the corners of Glacier Edge Elementary School third grade classrooms, as one student estimated last week, but there’s a couple hundred, so it’s pretty close. They’re being used to teach third graders how to design their own model city for the upcoming Terrace Town event at Monona Terrace next month. And when you’re building a city, third grade teacher Kayleen DeWerd said, getting the boxes is the easy part.

the Terrace Town event from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 1. Held at Monona Terrace, the event aims to get kids involved with architecture, What: Glacier Edge and New Centudesign and city planning through the ry School Box City exhibition construction of a model city made out of boxes. Terrace Town happens When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, every other year since its inception Feb. 1 in 2000, tourism coordinator Heather Where: Monona Terrace, 1 John Sabin wrote in an email to the Press. Nolen Drive, Madison The event will include 15 schools, Info: mononaterrace.com including New Century School in the Verona Area School District, as well “Parents are amazing because we as schools from Sun Prairie, Madsay we’re doing this project, and we ison, Middleton-Cross Plains and need boxes,” she said. “We have so Oregon, Sabin said. DeWerd said when she and third many boxes, it’s been great.” The box city will be on display at Turn to Box/Page 16

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Community orchestra to hold first concert Jan. 29 NEAL PATTEN Unified Newspaper Group

A community orchestra composed primarily of Oregon, Verona, and Mount Horeb residents is busy practicing for its inaugural concert. The group has been rehearsing since mid-August. This concert,

which begins at 7 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 29, at the Verona High School Performing Arts Center, 300 Richard St. is its first public performance. The Verona Area Community Orchestra was created to fill a void for community members who play, but not professionally. Co-director Leyla Sanyer said the orchestra was

created after people felt there wasn’t a good fit for them elsewhere in other area orchestras. “There are a number of people who had put their instrument away for a few years and needed to get comfortable with it again, some who

Turn to Orchestra/Page 13

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Doll tea party provided warm break from winter weather BY NEAL PATTEN Unified Newspaper Group

On Friday, Jan. 10, and Saturday, Jan. 11, children and their guardians attended an American Girl doll tea party at the library. The kids were encouraged to wear “fancy attire,” with many of the girls wearing dresses. Cookies were served with tea, and classical music was played in the background. Ribbon, cardboard, stickers and other craft supplies were provided for girls to make hats for themselves and their dolls. Originally only scheduled for two seatings on Saturday, a third seating was later scheduled for Friday due to a high number of registrations.

Annie Garcia, 7, beams as she hugs her doll at the library’s American Girl Tea Party on Friday, Jan. 10.

Photos by Neal Patten

Hazel Kemnitz (left) and Evelyn Metras (right) tie a hat that made onto their doll. Amelia Uang shows off the hat she made.

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Town of Verona: Two register for two seats Neither seat has contested race BY KIMBERLY WETHAL Unified Newspaper Group

California company takes over crossing guard management RENEE HICKMAN Unified Newspaper Group

On Jan. 2, All City Management Services began c o o r d i n a t i n g Ve r o n a ’s crossing guards, bringing with it some new policies for students and parents. The California-based company, which bills itself a s t h e n a t i o n ’s l a rg e s t provider of school crossing guards, picked up the recruitment and management duties the Verona Police Department had previously been responsible for. The department turned to the California company after struggling to recruit crossing guards within the school district, Verona police chief Bernie Coughlin said. The Common Council authorized spending up to $125,000 for the service, which covers all costs of the guards, in its 2020 budget. Coughlin told the Press that the problem had been going on for several years, often forcing the police department to pay overtime to staff. The issue became

more urgent last spring after alders took a closer look at school crossing safety when a 12 year old was hit by a car on the way to an after school program at Badger Ridge Middle School. “We made the change because we had to,” Coughlin said. Tom King, a regional manager with All City, said that while most procedures and policies remain the same as before, the company does have some additional policies students and parents could notice. For one thing, children and adults being crossed at the guards’ postings are now required to wait until the guard has gained control of the intersection before crossing. This occasionally causes students to wait longer than they had been. In addition, adults such as parents at an intersection with guards will need to be crossed with the assistance of the guard, rather than being able to cross by themselves. King, who is based in Michigan, said the new policies are sometimes an

adjustment. “Crossing guards are in the process of retraining the kids,” King said. Coughlin other communities in Wisconsin who use the company to staff their crossing guard posts – Sun Prairie, in particular – referred VPD to the company. Verona police officers have still had to step in to assist at some posts so far, Coughlin acknowledged. A provision in the contract lowers the city’s cost by $40 for every hour not covered by its crossing guards. Coughlin said the department has been providing help to All City as needed and would continue to do so to ease the transition between the police department and the new management, but it had not committed to a specific transition time period. Though several crossing guards quit when All City took over management from the police department, King said the company had found replacements for those employees and expected all crossings to be fully staffed by next week.

Administrator candidates narrowed to four BY KIMBERLY WETHAL Unified Newspaper Group

The Town of Verona has narrowed its options for the administrator/planner position to four people and will begin contacting candidates this week. The town is looking for a new administrator/planner after Amanda Arnold announced in December she will be taking a job as a senior land use planner for JSD Professional Services, a civil engineering, land use and planning company that has a regional office

on Horizon Drive in Verona. Arnold will be leaving at the end of January, a few months short of eight years with the town after being hired in May 2012. While Town Chair Mark Geller did not provide identities of the final four candidates by press time Tuesday, he told the Press that the Town Board had narrowed down the number of candidates to four from the initial 24. Geller said he and Arnold each narrowed down the original pool of candidates to seven, and the Town

Board then narrowed them to four last Saturday. The town’s ideal candidate is someone who has good communication skills, experience in administration management and land m a n a g e m e n t ex p e r t i s e , Geller said. “We’re looking for a well-rounded individual,” he said. “There are big shoes to fill.”

JIM FEROLIE Unified Newspaper Group

The City of Verona has narrowed its search for a new planning and development director to two candidates, both of whom have extensive municipal planning experience. . Jason Valerius is a senior planner and team leader at MSA Professional Services Inc., which serves many municipalities with engineering and planning services. He served as the Town of Verona’s municipal engineer for many years in this capacity, having started at MSA in 2005. The Lawrence University graduate has a master’s degree in urban planning and architecture from UW-Milwaukee Jeffrey Towne is an

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The person who takes the position will succeed Sayre, who was promoted to interim administrator nearly a year ago after the forced resignation of Jeff Mikorski. Sayre became the permanent administrator in August. During that time, community development specialist Katherine Holt, effectively the city’s assistant planner, has been taking over many of Sayre’s planning duties, and Sayre has been doing double duty for others.

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economic development specialist with the City of Racine. According to his LinkedIn profile, he has served in that role since May 2017, and before that, he spent 15 years as the principal planner for the City of Appleton. The UW-Milwaukee graduate has a master’s degree from Arizona State University in sustainable tourism. City administrator Adam Sayre told the Press the city narrowed the candidates the second week of January.

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Haven Estates, which earned town approval for 16 lots in 2018. Wiederhoeft said she’s also concerned about natural resources and the condition of the town’s roads. There are a lot of bikers in the area near where she lives, Wiederhoeft said, and she is worried about the condition of the roads for those cyclists and drivers. “Before the election, I plan on driving a lot more of the town’s roads to see how other areas are affected,” she said. Maxwell, who is also the chair of the Town’s plan commission, told the Press Monday he decided to run again after town administrator/planner Amanda Arnold announced she was leaving the town for a job as a senior land use planner for civil engineering firm JSD Professional Services. With the turnover in the town planner role, Maxwell added, he wanted to ensure someone with experience was going to be around to implement the town’s comprehensive plan and work on its subdivision ordinance. Verona Press editor Jim Ferolie contributed to this story

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Crossing guards help Badger Ridge Middle School students traverse North Main Street on Jan. 6. The service, previously run by the Verona Police Department, is now under private management.

Two candidates have registered to run for two seats up for re-election on the Town of Verona Board of Supervisors. Incumbent Doug Maxwell was the only person to turn in candidacy papers for his Supervisor 4 seat, and newcomer Phyllis Wiederhoeft registered to run for the Supervisor 3 seat being vacated by Manfred Enburg. Enburg will not be running for re-election after spending two decades as a supervisor. Wiederhoeft registered after the Press’ deadline for publication last week. The spring election, which will also serve as the primary election for the November presidential election, will take place Tuesday, April 7. The two-year supervisor terms will start Tuesday, April 21. Both Maxwell and Wiederhoeft are concerned about maintaining the town’s expenses, as well as ensuring responsible growth, they both told the Press. Wiederhoeft, who retired in June after 17 years as the executive director of Christian fundraising organization ALDE, said she decided to run at the encouragement of the neighborhood association for her Sunset Drive and Beach Road subdivision. Wiedenhoeft said watching her neighbors get “energized” when they feel like they have a voice is something she values, and that she wanted to bring that to the Town Board. Residents on Sunset Drive have been active over the past decade or more in response to two development proposals in that area, one for the Brown farm, which has not advanced, and another for Deer

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Letters to the editor policy Unified Newspaper Group is proud to offer a venue for public debate and welcomes letters to the editor, provided they comply with our guidelines. Letters should be no longer than 400 words. They should also contain contact information – the writer’s full name, address, and phone number – so that the paper may confirm authorship. Unsigned or anonymous letters will not be printed under any circumstances. The editorial staff of Unified Newspaper Group reserves the right to edit letters for length, clarity and appropriateness. Letters with libelous or obscene content will not be printed. Unified Newspaper Group generally only accepts letters from writers with ties to our circulation area. Letters to the editor should be of general public interest. Letters that are strictly personal – lost pets, for example – will not be printed. Letters that recount personal experiences, good or bad, with individual businesses will not be printed unless there is an overwhelming and compelling public interest to do so. Letters that urge readers to patronize specific businesses or specific religious faiths will not be printed, either. “Thank-you” letters can be printed under limited circumstances, provided they do not contain material that should instead be placed as an advertisement and reflect public, rather than promotional interests. Unified Newspaper Group encourages lively public debate on issues, but it reserves the right to limit the number of exchanges between individual letter writers to ensure all writers have a chance to have their voices heard. This policy will be printed from time to time in an abbreviated form here and will be posted in its entirety on our websites.

See something wrong? The Verona Press does not sweep errors under the rug. If you see something you know or even think is in error, please contact editor Jim Ferolie at 845-9559 or at veronapress@wcinet.com so we can get it right.

Thursday, Jan. 16, 2020 • Vol. 55, No. 35 USPS No. 658-320

Periodical Postage Paid, Verona, WI and additional offices. Published weekly on Thursday by the Unified Newspaper Group, A Division of Woodward Communications, Inc. POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to The Verona Press, PO Box 930427, Verona, WI 53593.

Office Location: 133 Enterprise Drive, Verona, WI 53593 Office Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday Phone: 608-845-9559 • FAX: 608-845-9550 e-mail: veronapress@wcinet.com Circulation customer service: (800) 355-1892

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In memory

Community Voices

Making something with your hands has real benefits

L

ast month, the library hosted a program on beginning woodcarving, and within days, registration was full with a long waiting list. It seems that woodcarving is seeing a resurgence in popularity as a hobby. But it isn’t just woodcarving; arts, crafts and culinary pursuits are really growing in popularity, especially with adults. At a point in history that very few people need to make things by hand, it turns out that a lot of people still want to. According to Forbes, crafting is a $36 billion a year industry and the majority of crafters are millennials between 18-34 years old. At the library, we incorporate crafts into most of our story times for children. Not only is it an opportunity for creative expression, but it also helps develop their fine motor skills, dexterity, hand eye coordination, cognitive development and even their pre-math and language skills. Kids learn by doing, but they aren’t the only ones. Adults can get real benefits from creating things, too. Research shows that creating, tending, and making things with your hands is great for reducing stress and anxiety and improving mental health. Doing routine actions,

like knitting, painting, or even chopping vegetables can put your mind into a flow state where we become absorbed in the Burkart task and lose self-consciousness and pass the time in a contented state. Years ago, a friend of mine was in the hospital for two months on pregnancy-related bed rest. Her days were going by very, very slowly. One day, when I called to check in on her, she sounded unusually cheery. I could hear her positively beaming on the phone when she told me someone came in and taught her how to macrame that afternoon. Stuck in a bed day after day, it was such a relief to her to be able to do something, to make something with her hands instead of just watching TV. “It was so much fun!” she said. In the next few months, the library will be offering programs for adults on bookmaking, printmaking, building a terrarium, learning to make origami boxes and more. We are also going to be expanding our selection of kits for adults this year to

include things like supplies for knitting, crochet, birdwatching, podcasting, cooking and papercrafts. So if you want to give a new hobby a try, the library may have a program, supply kit, or books to get you started. The Internet also makes learning new skills and hobbies much easier. This fall, as I watched the black walnuts start to fall out of the tree next to my house, I got inspired to figure out what to do with them. After watching a quick YouTube video, I learned how to harvest, clean, and shell black walnuts. I should also have listened to the advice to wear gloves! It wasn’t easy and made a real mess to get those things out of their shell, but it was also satisfying to learn a new skill and gather free delicious food from my own yard. So whether it is learning to roll sushi, knit a scarf or build a birdhouse, it is never too late to learn something new. There’s a lot of evidence that making something yourself has the value of the things you’ve created but may also add to your happiness and satisfaction. Stacey Burkart is the director of the Verona Public Library.

UNG Reporter Amber Levenhagen (1994-2019)

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January 16, 2020

USRWA volunteer day set for Jan. 25 BY NEAL PATTEN Unified Newspaper Group

The Upper Sugar River Watershed Association will host a volunteer day to restore the Sugar River Wetlands State Natural Area from 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday, Jan. 25. Volunteers will help remove invasive species including buckthorn and honeysuckle, treat native plants with herbicide and help burn brush piles. People of all ages and abilities are invited to participate. Volunteers will meet project leaders where Epic Lane turns into County View Road. An approximate address is 2517 Country View Road. USRWA is working to remove all woody invasive species on the west

If You Go What: Upper Sugar River Watershed Association Volunteer Day When: 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday, Jan. 25 Where: 2517 Country View Road Info: Call (920) 8506902

side of Military Ridge State Trail in 2020. Volunteers are encouraged to dress for the weather and bring a pair of work gloves. Boots are recommended. Any work tools needed for the project will be provided, but volunteers are also welcome to bring their own equipment such as hand saws and loppers. Hot chocolate and refreshments will be provided. For information, call (920) 850-6902.

Board game night for a good cause BY NEAL PATTEN Unified Newspaper Group

Badger Prairie Needs Network, 1200 E. Verona Ave., will provide a space for groups to come play board games together from 6-10:30 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 21. For a donation of $10 and one canned good item, you may bring a board game to BPNN and play it with family and friends. Games will not be provided. There will be raffle prizes awarded throughout the night. Raffle tickets are a suggested $1 donation each. Patrons are welcome to bring food and drink to

If You Go What: Board game night fundraiser When: 6-10:30 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 21 Where: Badger Prairie Needs Network, 1200 E. Verona Ave. Price: $10 and a non-perishable item per person Info: Call 848-2499 enjoy while playing their games. All proceeds will benefit BPNN. For information, call 848-2499.

Celebrate the Year of the Rat BY NEAL PATTEN Unified Newspaper Group

A celebration of the Lunar Chinese New Year will be held from 1 0 - 1 1   a . m . , S a t u r d a y, Jan. 25, at the library. Attendees can ring in the Year of the Rat with Mandarin Chinese stories, Chinese language practice, songs, crafts and refreshments presented by students and staff of Verona Area International School. VAIS teacher Lumei Huang will read a version of “Twelve Zodiac

If You Go What: Lunar Chinese New Year celebration When: 10-11 a.m., Saturday, Jan. 25 Where: Verona Public Library, 500 Silent St. Info: 845-7180

Unified Newspaper Group

Badger Ridge Middle School students compete in a school-side GeoBee.

Students participate in GeoBee BY NEAL PATTEN Unified Newspaper Group

A Badger Ridge Middle School seventh grade student could compete at the state GeoBee after winning the school-wide competition. Ten Badger Ridge Middle School students participated in the school-wide competition of National Geographic’s GeoBee on Thursday, Jan. 9. Charlene Hermanson, a seventh grade student, won

first place, and Maria Tsoilis, an eighth grade student, took second place. Kirsten Lonksi, a sixth grade student, finished in third place. Hermanson will take an online test to determine if she is eligible to participate in the state GeoBee against up to 100 of the top test scorers from across Wisconsin. The National Geographic GeoBee is an annual geography contest that’s been held every year since 1989. It was created in response

to concern about the lack of geographic knowledge among young people in the United States. More than 10,000 schools across the country participate each year. During the competition, the students were asked questions in seven topic areas including cultural geography, economic geography, physical geography and geographic comparisons. The other competitors were Talia Wagner, Levid

Celestino, Daniel Pelayo, Deacon Macrostie, Hannah Le, Ben Yoss and Grayson Palmbach. The winners of the state GeoBees have all expenses paid to travel to and participate in the national GeoBee championship this spring. At the national level, winners from each state compete for cash prizes, scholarships and an expedition to the Galápagos Islands aboard the National Geographic Endeavour II cruise ship.

Qigong class at senior center begins Jan. 23 BY NEAL PATTEN Unified Newspaper Group

The senior center is offering a new class, Qigong, from 3:304:30 p.m. beginning Thursday, Jan. 23 and continuing for three consecutive Thursdays. Qigong is an ancient Chinese martial art that blends mindfulness with s i m p l e exe r c i s e s . I t i s completed without the need for special attire, mats or equipment. Qigong combines attention to breathing, movement and thought to help increase your strength, balance and energy. The four-part class will be taught by certified Qigong instructor Dr. Claire Holland. Holland is an avid practitioner of

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their abilities. Qigong has been scientifically proven to reduce pain, anxiety, depression, What: Qigong classes blood pressure and inflamWhen: 3:30-4:30 p.m., Thursdays, Jan. 23, 30; Feb. 6, 13 mation; and improve cogWhere: Verona Senior Center, 108 Paoli St. nitive performance, the immune system and qualiPrice: $20 per person ty of sleep. The cost for all four classes is $20. Qigong, Tai Chi and Yoga o r f l ex i b i l i t y, t h e r e i s For information, call and is a former family a c u s t o m i z e d a p p r o a c h physician. available to accommodate 845-7471. For people who have reduced mobility, strength

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January 16, 2020

The Verona Press

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Coming up VACT presents “Mamma Mia!”

Verona Area Community Theater will present the hit musical “Mamma Mia” for two weekends Jan. 17-19 and Jan. 23-25. The show will be at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 17, and Saturday, Jan. 18, as well as Thursday, Jan. 23, to Saturday, Jan. 25. The show on Sunday, Jan. 19, will be held at 2 p.m. The performances will be held at the Verona Area Performing Arts Center, 300 Richard St. Tickets are $12 for seniors ages 65 and over and for K-12 students. Tickets for adults are $17. For information and to purchase tickets, visit vact.org

Ben Jackson Foundation fundraiser

The Ben Jackson Foundation provides financial assistance to recently enlisted military members to help them visit home from their first permanent duty station. Those wishing to support the cause can participate in a bingo fundraiser starting at 5:30 p.m., Friday, Jan. 17, at the Wisconsin Brewing Company, 1079 American Way.

Churches For information, visit benjackson foundation.org.

Historical society meeting

Learn about the Vroman family, early settlers of Verona and Fitchburg, in a presentation at the senior center at 10 a.m., Saturday, Jan. 18. The presentation will show how this early pioneer family shaped the community including building the first mill and gave the area its name of “Verona.” Following the presentation, the annual historical society meeting for 2020 will be held and new officers will be elected. For information, call 577-5525.

Women’s craft night gathering

Crafters of all levels and ages are welcome to join the Wisconsin Women’s Hive craft night from 6-8 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 23, at the Sow’s Ear, 125 S. Main St. The group describes itself as an “intersectional community of socially and politically minded artists and activists who are working to create positive change locally as well as globally.” On Jan. 23, the group will be working on bullet journaling and art journaling.

Attendees are asked to bring pens, markers, colored pencils, stickers, washi tape and notebooks. Those not into journaling are welcome to bring whatever creative projects they are working such as crocheting, knitting, cross stitching, embroidery, painting, cricutting, scrapbooking, card making and jewelry making. The group welcomes people of all ages and skill levels to come enjoy the company of other crafters. For information, call 616-0432.

Journaling for stress relief workshop Jean Skinner, a registered nurse, will introduce the practice of journaling as a coping technique for stress from 6:307:30 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 22, at the library. She will also discuss chronic stress and its impact on physical and mental health. The workshop will include a stress assessment and journaling exercises. Registration is required. For information, visit veronapublicl ibrary.org.

Community calendar Thursday, Jan. 16

• 4-5:30 p.m., Anime and manga club, library, 845-7180 • 6:30-8:30 p.m., Bingo, Fisher King Winery, 1105 Laser St., 4971056 • 7:30-9 p.m., Comedy show: James Uloth ($10-$13), The Hop Garden, 6818 Canal St. in Paoli, 848-6261

Friday, Jan. 17

• 10-11 a.m., Computer how-to: Sending videos to a family member or friends using the internet, senior center, 845-7471 • 10 a.m. to noon, Verona Area Historical Society meeting, senior center, 845-7471 • 1-3 p.m., Chat with beekeeping experts, Blain’s Farm & Fleet, 600 Hometown Circle, 848-4968 • 12:30 pm., Live music: Tony Rocker (Elvis impersonator), senior center, 845-7471 • 5:30-8 p.m., Bingo fundraiser for Ben Jackson Foundation, Wisconsin Brewing Company, 1079 American Way

• 5:45-8 p.m., Movie screenings: “Lion King” and “Toy Story 4,” Sugar Creek Elementary School, 420 Church Ave., 845-4700 • 6:30-8:30 p.m., NERF games for adults, library, 845-7180 • 7-9 p.m., Live music: Johnny Maasch, Fisher King Winery, 1105 Laser St., 497-1056 • 7:30 p.m., VACT presents “Mamma Mia!” ($10.75-$15.75), Verona Area High School Performing Arts Center, 300 Richard St., vact.org • 8-11 p.m., Live music: Elizabeth Mary Band, Riley Tavern, 8205 Klevenville Riley Road, 845-9150

Saturday, Jan. 18 • 6-8 p.m., Live music: The Darling Daughters, Paoli Schoolhouse Bistro, 6857 Paoli Road in Paoli, 848-6261 • 7-9 p.m., Live music: The Change, Fisher King Winery, 1105 Laser St., 497-1056 • 7-11 p.m., 90s music party, Hop Haus Brewing Company, 231 S. Main St., 497-3165

• 7:30 p.m., VACT presents “Mamma Mia!” ($10.75-$15.75), Verona Area High School Performing Arts Center, 300 Richard St., vact.org • 8-11 p.m., 90s music dance night, Riley Tavern, 8205 Klevenville Riley Road, 845-9150

Sunday, Jan. 19

• 2 p.m., VACT presents “Mamma Mia!” ($10.75-$15.75), Verona Area High School Performing Arts Center, 300 Richard St., vact.org • 2-11:30 p.m., End of an era appreciation party, Riley Tavern, 8205 Klevenville Riley Road, 8459150

Tuesday, Jan. 21

• 6-1:30 p.m., Board game night fundraiser ($10 and canned goods donation recommended), Badger Prairie Needs Network, 1200 E. Verona Ave., 848-2499

Wednesday, Jan. 22

• 9-10 a.m., Monthly Circle Time for children 3 years old and younger, CI Pediatric Therapy Center, 305 S. Main St., 819-6394

All Saints Lutheran Church 2951 Chapel Valley Rd., Fitchburg (608) 276-7729 allsaints-madison.org Pastor Kristin Woelk Sunday: 8:30 & 10:45 a.m. The Church in Fitchburg 2833 Raritan Rd., Fitchburg (608) 271-2811 livelifetogether.com Sunday: 8 & 10:45 a.m. Memorial UCC 5705 Lacy Rd., Fitchburg (608) 273-1008 memorialucc.org Interim Pastor Laura Crow Sunday: 9:30 a.m. Good Shephard Lutheran Church ELCA (608) 271-6633 Madison: Raymond Road & Whitney Way, Madison Sunday: 8:30 & 10 a.m.. Verona: Corner of Hwy. PD & Nine Mound Road, Verona Sunday: 9 & 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m. Damascus Road Church – West The Verona Senior Center 108 Paoli St., Verona (608) 819-6451 info@damascusroadchurch.com, damascusroadonline.org Pastor Justin Burge Sunday: 10 a.m. Memorial Baptist Church 201 S. Main St., Verona (608) 845-7125 MBCverona.org Lead Pastor Jeremy Scott Sunday: 10:15 a.m. Redeemer Bible Fellowship 130 N. Franklin St., Verona (608) 692-2046 redeemerbiblefellowship.org Pastor Dwight R. Wise Sunday: 10 a.m. family worship Resurrection Lutheran Church – WELS 6705 Wesner Rd., Verona (608) 848-4965 rlcverona.org Pastors Nathan Strutz and Andrew Ewings, and Assistant Pastor Seth Krueger Thursday: 6:30 p.m. Sunday: 9 a.m. St. Christopher Catholic Parish St. Andrew Church 301 N. Main St., Verona St. William Church 1371 Hwy. PB, Paoli (608) 845-6613 stchristopherverona.com Fr. John Sasse, pastor Saturday: 5 p.m., St. Andrew, Verona Sunday: 7:30 a.m., St. William,

Paoli Sunday: 9 & 11 a.m., St. Andrew, Verona Daily Mass, Tuesday-Saturday: 8 a.m., St. Andrew, Verona

St. James Lutheran Church ELCA 427 S. Main St., Verona (608) 845-6922 stjamesverona.org Pastors Kurt M. Billings and Peter Narum Office Hours: 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday; 8 a.m.-noon Wednesday Saturday Worship: 5 p.m. Sunday Worship: 8:30 and 10:45 a.m. Salem United Church of Christ 502 Mark Dr., Verona (608) 845-7315 salemchurchverona.org Rev. Dr. Mark E. Yurs, Pastor Sunday school for all ages: 9 a.m. Worship: 10:15 a.m. Fellowship: 11:30 a.m. Springdale Lutheran Church ELCA 2752 Town Hall Rd. (off Hwy ID), Mount Horeb (608) 437-3493 springdalelutheran.org Revs. Loren and Linda Schumacher Sunday: 8:45 a.m. with communion Sugar River United Methodist Church 415 W. Verona Ave., Verona (608) 845-5855 sugar.river@sugarriverumc.org, sugarriverumc.org Pastor Gary Holmes 9 & 10:30 a.m. contemporary worship. Sunday School available during worship. Refreshments and fellowship are between services. West Madison Bible Church 2920 Hwy. M, Verona (608) 845-9518 www.wmbiblechurch.org Pastor Dan Kukasky Jr. Sunday Worship: 9:15 a.m. Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Zwingli United Church of Christ Hwy. 92 & G, Mount Vernon (608) 832-6677 Pastor Brad Brookins Sunday: 10:15 a.m. Zwingli United Church of Christ Hwy. 69 & PB, Paoli (608) 255-1278 paoliucc.com Pastor Rich Pleva Sunday: 9:30 a.m. family worship

What’s on VHAT-98 Saturday, Jan. 18 8 a.m. — Common Council from 01-13-19 11 a.m. — Vintage Verona Sports 1 p.m. — 2018 Wildcats Football 4:30 p.m. — Badger Prairie Cemetery at the Historical Society 6 p.m. — Common Council from 01-13-19 9 p.m. — Vintage Verona Sports 10 p.m. — Badger Prairie Cemetery at the Historical Society 11 p.m. — Eleanor Maher at Senior Center Sunday, Jan. 19 7 a.m. — Hindu Cultural Hour 9  a.m. — Resurrection Church 10 a.m. — Salem Church Service Noon — Common Council from 01-13-19 3 p.m. — Vintage Verona Sports 4:30 p.m. — Badger Prairie Cemetery at the Historical Society 6 p.m. — Common Council from 01-13-19 9 p.m. — Vintage Verona Sports 10 p.m. — Badger Prairie Cemetery at the Historical Society 11 p.m. — Eleanor Maher at Senior Center

Monday, Jan. 20 7 a.m. — 4 Seasons Theater at Senior Center 1 p.m. — Bird Brothers at Senior Center 3 p.m. — Vintage Verona Sports 4 p.m. — Ellis Island at Senior Center 5 p.m. — 2018 Wildcats Football 9 p.m. — Hindu Cultural Hour 10 p.m. — Ron, Rosie & Rodger at Senior Center 11 p.m. — Eleanor Maher at Senior Center Tuesday, Jan. 21 7 a.m. — Ron, Rosie & Rodger at Senior Center 10 a.m.- Zumba Gold 9 a.m. — Daily Exercise 10 a.m. — Eleanor Maher at Senior Center 2 p.m. — Zumba Gold 3 p.m. — Daily Exercise 4 p.m. — 4 Seasons Theater at Senior Center 5 p.m. — Ellis Island at Senior Center 6  p.m. — Resurrection Church 8 p.m. — Knee Pain at Senior Center 9 p.m. — Bird Brothers at Senior Center 10 p.m. — Badger Prairie Cemetery at the Historical Society

Wednesday, Jan. 22 7 a.m. — 4 Seasons Theater at Senior Center 1 p.m. — Bird Brothers at Senior Center 3 p.m. — Vintage Verona Sports 5 p.m. — Common Council from 01-13-20 7 p.m. — Capital City Band 8 p.m. — Vintage Verona Sports 10 p.m. — Ron, Rosie & Rodger at Senior Center 11 p.m. — Eleanor Maher at Senior Center Thursday, Jan. 23 7 a.m. — Ron, Rosie & Rodger at Senior Center 8 a.m. — Zumba Gold 9 a.m. — Daily Exercise 10 a.m. — Eleanor Maher at Senior Center 2 p.m. — Zumba Gold 3 p.m. — Daily Exercise 4 p.m. — 4 Seasons Theater at Senior Center 5 p.m. — Ellis Island at Senior Center 6 p.m. — Salem Church Service 7 p.m. — Knee Pain at Senior Center 8 p.m. — Daily Exercise 9 p.m. — Bird Brothers at Senior Center 10 p.m. — Badger Prairie Cemetery at the Historical Society

Effective altruism Altruism, the unselfish concern for others, is hard-wired into most of us. We feel an instinctive pull to help others in distress, especially those who are most vulnerable. Even those who don’t have this altruism built into them can learn to be altruistic, and it demonstrably benefits them to do so. Many of us choose to be altruistic by giving to charity or donating our time. Effective altruism is the attempt to bring our rational, analytic minds to bear on our compassionate impulses. Not all giving is equal, and while people are certainly free to give when and where they choose, if we are trying to reduce suffering, we should look at where our giving will have the most benefit. The National Philanthropic Trust reports that Americans gave over $373 billion in 2015. The World Health Organization reports that over 9 million children under the age of five die each year, and that approximately 70% of these deaths could be prevented with simple interventions. Clean water, adequate nutrition, access to medical care and simple preventive measures such as mosquito netting could prevent many of these deaths. The next time you open your wallet (and your heart) to give, think about where that money is going. A good place to evaluate charities and to help you be a more effective altruist is the Charity Navigator at charitynavigator.org. –Christopher Simon

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Thursday, Jan. 16 7 a.m. — Ron, Rosie & Rodger at Senior Center 8 a.m. — Zumba Gold 9 a.m. — Daily Exercise 10 a.m. — Eleanor Maher at Senior Center 2 p.m. — Zumba Gold 3 p.m. — Daily Exercise 4 p.m. — 4 Seasons Theater at Senior Center 5 p.m. — Ellis Island at Senior Center 6 p.m. — Salem Church Service 7 p.m. — Knee Pain at Senior Center 8 p.m. — Daily Exercise 9 p.m. — Bird Brothers at Senior Center 10 p.m. — Badger Prairie Cemetery at the Historical Society Friday, Jan. 17 7 a.m. — 4 Seasons Theater at Senior Center 1 p.m. — Bird Brothers at Senior Center 3 p.m. — Vintage Verona Sports 4 p.m. — Ellis Island at Senior Center 5 p.m. — 2018 Wildcats Football 9 p.m. — Vintage Verona Sports 10 p.m. — Ron, Rosie & Rodger at Senior Center 11 p.m. — Eleanor Maher at Senior Center

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ConnectVerona.com

January 16, 2020

7

The Verona Press

VAHS Students perform ‘Macbeth’ BY NEAL PATTEN Unified Newspaper Group

The witches played by Jordan Sommers, Anna Larson and Page Kassner.

The show did not go on, but the snow did. The Fair Verona Area Shakespeare Company, a student-led organization at Verona Area High School, was set to take to the stage for three performances of the tragedy “Macbeth,” one on Friday, Jan. 10, and two on Saturday, Jan. 11. The inclement weather forecasted for Saturday led to the district canceling all school activities for the day, which included the two

“Macbeth” shows. The shows will not be rescheduled. The Friday show was still performed as planned at the VAHS Performing Arts Center. The show featured 61 actors including Macbeth played by Gabe Bowman, Lady Macbeth by Olivia Otremba, King Duncan by Connor Olson, Prince Malcolm by Rory Swanson, Prince Donalbain by Drew Waller, Lord Macduff by Rachel Erickson, Lady Macduff by Claire Miller, Banquo by Caylee Lawrence and the three witches by Jordan Sommers, Anna Larson and Page Kassner.

From left: Ross played Isaac Schroeer-Hannemann, Old Man played by Dominic Deyes, and Lord Macduff played by Rachel Erickson.

Photo by Neal Patten

Macbeth played by Gabe Bowman and Lady Macbeth played by Olivia Otremba. Lord Macduff played by Rachel Erickson.

King Duncan played by Connor Olson chats with Prince Malcolm played by Rory Swanson, while Prince Donalbain played by Drew Waller and Lennox played by Chrystian Soria look on.

Ask the Verona

VETERINARIAN

Q. Do dogs and cats see colors? A. Color vision in pets is interesting, and it does effect the way many veterinarians work with

pets. Some people mistakenly think that dogs are colorblind; in reality, dogs have dichromatic vision and can see much of the range of colors that humans can see (although dogs can’t distinguish colors in the orange/yellow/green range). Dogs can see better in low light than humans can, and they can also see into the ultraviolet UVB spectrum. Cats have color vision similar to dogs; cats see especially well in dim light and in the blue/violet/ultraviolet end of the color spectrum. Dr. Barney Smith This information about pets’ color vision is useful when choosing colors for a veterinary clinic (or for a home, if you are really into your pets!). Soft beige, green, blue and violet colors are calming for pets because they can see these colors better – this color palette is used on the walls of many clinics to help reduce stress and anxiety during pet visits. And doctors are “ditching” white lab coats in favor of more muted colors of clothing that may help pets relax. Color choices – as well as a better understanding of animal behavior – are helping to make veterinary clinics a fear-free place for pets!

203 West Verona Avenue • (608) 845-6700 adno=131250

REAL ESTATE Q. What’s in store for real estate in 2020? A. 2019 was a strong year for Wisconsin real estate with median prices up statewide 7.34% and 6.47% in Dane County. You may hear national headlines about the market softening, and that is certainly the case in some of the large coastal markets such as Seattle or San Francisco. Locally, things continue to look good for sellers; especially for the lower priced homes. Inventory on homes under $350,000 is extremely tight with less than 1.5 months of inventory. This will likely lead to continued competition Keith & Kinsey Schulz among buyers in that price range. Homes priced above $350,000 have about 2.6 Real Estate Team months of inventory in Dane County, which will make that price range a little calmer, but still in the seller’s favor. The bottom line, it’s still a great time to be a seller. If you are a buyer, you will likely face some competition, but interest rates have come back down keeping homes reasonably affordable.

Making a Difference, One Home at a Time! adno=131284 (608) 492-2272 kschulz@KeithAndKinsey.com • www.KeithAndKinsey.com

If you would like to join our Ask the Professional Section, contact Donna Larson at 845-9559 to find out how!

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8 The Verona Press - January 16, 2020

Ask the Verona

SENIOR CARE

THE CARING CENTER

Q. Can Comfort Keepers Home Care Offer a Safe Alternative for Elders at Home? A. Home care has been proven to be an effective, safe alternative for elders who wish to live at home.

The Caring Center/Verona Montessori House 402 W. Verona Ave. • Verona • (608) 845-8620

579 D’onofrio Dr. #10, Madison, WI 53719

Q. How

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PERSONAL/BUSINESS BANKER

PHYSICAL THERAPY

long has Stellar Rehab been in business and what services do you provide?

A.

Stellar Rehabilitation, LLC is celebrating its 16th Anniversary! Stellar opened its doors on January 19, 2004 in the Prairie Oaks area of Verona with only 2 employees, providing outpatient physical, occupational and speech therapy services for residents in and around Verona. It didn’t take long to realize the need for therapy services in a variety of Independent, Assisted Living and Memory Care Facilities (ALF’s), so Stellar expanded quickly to cover the need. Stellar’s second clinic, on the campus of All Saint’s, has allowed for additional expansion of our therapy services to the senior population. Stellar has additional partnerships with several homecare and hospice Susan Armstrong, MPT agencies to provide in-home therapy services in multiple counties. Stellar Rehab provides physical Physical Therapist therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy services with an excellent team of highly talented professionals. There are several new opportunities and partnerships that will begin in 2020…It’s exciting to see the places we’ve been, the people we have been able to help, and the opportunities that have opened up over the past 15 years. Thank you to the Verona and surrounding cities for their support and the opportunity to do what we love to do – help people. Visit www.stellarrehab.com to learn more about Stellar’s services.

Julianne Therriault

HEATING/COOLING

INVESTMENTS

Q. How do I protect myself against Long-Term Care costs? A. If you’re fortunate, you’ll always be able to live independently. However, if you ever

Q. Why should I have a humidifier for my home? A. During the heating season the average American home without a humidifier can

have a relative humidity in the 10-15 percent range. Humidity levels in this range can adversely affect your comfort, your health, your home furnishings and the cost of heating your home. Low humidity dries out your respiratory passages and allows viruses to thrive, increasing the likelihood of getting colds or other respiratory illnesses. In your home it can cause the walls and ceilings to crack and the trim and wood floors to separate. And the static electricity caused by dry air can be a problem for all sorts of electronic equipment. When dry air evaporates the moisture from your skin, it provides an evaporative cooling effect. This can cause you to need a higher temperature to maintain your comfort level. And you increase your home’s energy consumption by approximately 5 percent for every degree you raise the thermostat setting. For more information or any home comfort questions contact Dave at OK Heating and Air Conditioning.

needed some type of long-term care, such as a stay in a nursing home, would you be financially prepared? All long-term care services, including a nursing home stay, are quite expensive. But you can protect yourself. For one thing, you could self-insure by designating part of your investment portfolio for long-term care – but it would take a lot of money before you could feel comfortable. As an alternative, you could purchase long-term care insurance, which would cover many of your costs. You might also consider a hybrid policy, which combines long-term care benefits with life insurance. If you had this policy and you never needed any long-term care, the policy would pay a death benefit to your beneficiary.

Brendon Diers, AAMS® If you do decide to purchase a long-term care or hybrid policy, you’ll need to shop around, as Financial Advisor

features and costs can vary considerably. There’s no one right choice for everyone – but there’s almost certainly one for you. This article was written by Edward Jones for the use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Brendon Diers, AAMS®, Financial Advisor

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608-845-8494 161 Horizon Dr., Verona, WI 53593

161 Horizon Dr., Suite 107a • Verona, WI 53593 (608) 845-2533 • Member SIPC brendon.diers@edwardjones.com • www.edwardjones.com

DENTIST

ATTORNEY

Q. Tooth Whitening - How does it work? A. Tooth whitening has remained quite popular in the United States.

Q. So you’ve won the Lottery, now what?

An estimated 10 million Americans will spend a staggering 1.7 billion dollars on tooth whitening pastes, products and services this year alone. Although teeth can stain or discolor for a variety of reasons, the “yellowing” that many of us dislike occurs from exposure to a variety of foods and drinks and from age. Tooth enamel is hard and durable but it is also porous, making it susceptible to stains. Surface stains can often be polished off by a dentist and sometimes by whitening toothpastes. Pastes utilize a more aggressive abrasive to serve their function. They do not actively “whiten”. Below surface discoloration can often be treated with topical whitening gels thru the supervision or treatment of a dentist or thru select, Over-the-Counter “whitening strips” products. Whitening Dr. James Sands, DDS gels are carbamide peroxide or hydrogen peroxide-based chemicals that get into the enamel layer and produce a chemical reaction or oxidation that breaks down the staining compounds. When used properly, they are safe and effective. Whitening can cause some tooth and gum sensitivity and in rare cases tooth pain or damage. The potency of these chemicals determines the speed and aggressiveness of the whitening. The type of delivery of these agents is what differentiates the types of whitening, whether it be dentist administered InOffice whitening, dentist supervised Take-home whitening, or Over-the-Counter Whitening Strips. Schedule an appointment and we can determine which one may be right for you.

1010 North Edge Trail • Verona, WI • (608) 848-4000 (corner of Hwy. M and Cross Country Rd.)

Q. How can I repair my credit score? A. There are some events that can damage a credit score. These events include, making late payments, doing too many hard inquiries, using more than 30% of your available credit and having anything in collections. If your credit score is low and you are looking to raise it, the first thing to do is to pay off anything in collections. Some collection agencies are willing to work with you on setting up monthly payments. Secondly, apply for a secured credit card. If you are making on time payments and more than the minimum, that account will report positively to the credit bureau. Third, if you already have multiple credit cards with balances and are struggling to pay them down, consider consolidating into a loan with a lower rate or a credit card that has a promotion of 0% financing.

117 King St. • Stoughton, WI 53589 608-719-6000 Julianne.Therriault@associatedbank.com

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Comprehensive Therapy Services 1049 N. Edge Trail • Prairie Oaks (608) 845-2100 • Verona, WI 53593 • www.stellarrehab.com

Dave Kaltenberg

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(608) 218-4861 • www.comfortkeepers.com

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FACHE, CSA

Instead of receiving care in a nursing home, assisted living or other care facility, seniors receive help with the activities of daily living (ADLs) in the familiar surroundings of their own home, near loved ones. Home care, is commonly provided by family members, often in partnership with professional agencies like Comfort Keepers who come into the home to give family members a respite. Comfort Keepers provide family caregivers the peace of mind that their loved one is in good hands when they cannot be with them. Home care agencies provide services, such as personal care, light housekeeping and help with the ADLs. ADLs include bathing, dressing, eating, incontinence care, using the toilet and moving in and out of a bed or chair. Comfort Keepers partner with families for the optimal amount of care to meet a senior’s specific needs, from just a few hours of care a week to full-time, 24-hour care, assuring the senior’s safety and wellbeing. The amount of service can vary depending on the senior’s need for assistance and the availability of family members to provide care that impact an elder’s ability to continue living independently. In addition, some home care providers also offer technology solutions that supplement home care, providing security for seniors at times when family or professional caregivers are not present. For more information, call Comfort Keepers at 442-1898.

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A. When people suddenly become the recipients of great wealth through

inheritance, a lottery or game show win, or receiving payments for a best-selling novel, they could find themselves on quite a roller-coaster ride. Avoiding the obvious pitfalls by setting aside sufficient amounts to cover taxes and being discrete in whom you confide about your good fortune is just the start of making the most of a lot, or a little. Suddenly there are many opportunities immediately available to you and not all of them will be favorable. If you are thinking of investing in a business opportunity, consult with experts in this area to assess the Terese M. Hansen risks and project the return on your investment. Don’t let someone pressure you Attorney-At-Law into something before you can predict the likely outcome. A financial advisor can help you invest in various financial products and help you diversify your holdings to minimize your risk. With your newfound wealth you will be able to create a legacy of good by providing for future generations of your family by making carefully planned gifts and crafting an estate plan tailored to provide for your loved ones and support those things you value through charitable giving.

Hansen Law

CHIROPRACTOR

ADVERTISING

Q. : I got a Fitness Tracker for Christmas and started working out

Q. You’re an expert in your line of work, and interested in

but I’ve barely lost any weight in two months, any advice to help me lose some pounds?

joining our Ask a Professional page. What should you do?

A.

Barring any medication or physical issues that might prevent you from losing weight; it might be your fitness tracker that’s the issue. We tell all of our clients to disregard the calories burned function when calculating the day’s net calories. Fitness trackers are a fine tool Jill Unwin, Lee Unwin, for tracking activity, but are completely inaccurate at calculating the DC, CCEP BCMT, CSCS calories you’re burning, even worse, they often over estimate totals. The next problem you may encounter with just using exercise for weight loss is that the more experienced you become at exercise, the less, not more calories you will burn. Once you have your true daily number of calories consumed you can start to make changes to the diet. Keep working out, it’s good for just about everything, but remember that no amount of exercise can combat a bad diet, just eliminating one soda is about the same as going for a 30 minute run. For help getting started feel free to contact us at anytime.

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111 E. Verona Ave., Verona, WI 53593 (608) 772-3939 • hansenlawverona.com hansenlawverona@gmail.com

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Stephen Rudolph

Q. We can’t afford a family trip to somewhere warm. Any ideas to break up our winter without hurting our budget? A. “Stay-cations” are a great option. Plan some fun activities in or near your hometown. Think like a visitor. If you were entertaining out of town guests, where would you take them? Check with your tourism office and find some great ideas for places to visit or special events happening locally during the winter. Many hotels and water parks offer day passes to their pools at a reasonable rate if you’re looking for a “beach” experience. With a little bit of planning, you can create some great memories for your family without breaking the bank.

A. It’s simple, just call Donna Larson at (608) 845-9559. We Your Photo Here!

can fill you in on all the details. Don’t miss out on this valuable piece of advertising that runs every month in the Verona Press and Great Dane Shopping News.

Verona Press & Great Dane Shopping News 133 Enterprise Dr. • Verona, WI 53593 • (608) 845-9559 connectverona.com adno=49266 adno=127922


Adam Feiner, sports editor

845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Mark Nesbitt, assistant sports editor 845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com Fax: 845-9550

Sports

9

Thursday, January 16, 2020

The

Verona Press For more sports coverage, visit: ConnectVerona.com

Boys swimming

Wildcats close Natatorium with split ADAM FEINER Sports editor

Ve r o n a A r e a / M o u n t Horeb split a Big Eight Conference double dual at home against Madison La Follette and Madison Memorial on Tuesday, Jan. 7. The Wildcats thumped the Lancers 138-29, but fell to the Spartans 89-81 in the final competition at the Verona Natatorium. VA / M H ’s 2 0 0 - m e t e r medley relay team of sophomores Oscar Best, Luke Bennin and Nathan Rozeb o o m a n d s e n i o r Ky l e Hoppe led throughout and won with a time of 1:51.36. The 200 freestyle relay of Best, Bennin, Rozeboom and classmate Max McCartney won with a time of 1:41.62, 0.1 seconds ahead of a quartet from Memorial. Best breezed to a win in the 50 free (24.44) and touched the wall first in the 100 backstroke (1:05), .4 seconds ahead of Memorial’s Jake Jensen. Hoppe won the 100 butterfly (1:00.63), .11 seconds ahead of Memorial’s Drake Jesse, and also took third in the 50 free (25.43). B e n n i n wo n t h e 1 0 0 breaststroke (1:10.96), .32 seconds ahead of Rozeboom, and placed third in the 100 butterfly (1:02.77). “We left it all in the pool,” VA/MH coach Bill Wuerger said. “There were several close races where we touched first. I give the kids credit for battling. Memorial was just the better team.” Hoppe, McCartney and juniors Ben Wellnitz and Connor Arneson finished second in the 400 free relay

Photos by Adam Feiner

Verona Area/Mount Horeb’s Kyle Hoppe won the 100-meter butterfly with a time of 1:00.63 in a double dual against Madison La Follette and Madison Memorial on Tuesday, Jan. 7, at the Verona Natatorium. with a time of 3:48.77. McCartney placed second in the 100 free (56.33), .63 seconds behind Memorial’s Evan Tucker-Jones. Senior Gabe Piscitelli finished third in the 100 backstroke (1:06.62) and Arneson took third in the 400 free (4:28.56). Wellnitz placed third in the 200 free (2:04.88) and s o p h o m o r e Ave r y B l a s touched the wall third in the 200 individual medley (2:23.08). The Wildcats’ nonconference road dual against Sauk Prairie scheduled for Saturday, Jan. 11, was postponed to Tuesday, Dec. 28, due to inclement weather.

Verona Area/Mount Horeb’s Avery Blas finished third in the 200-meter individual medley (2:23.08) in a double dual against Madison La Follette and Madison Memorial on Tuesday, Jan. 7, at the Verona Natatorium.

Wrestling

Verona has more pins, but falls to Spartans ADAM FEINER Sports editor

Photo by Adam Feiner

Verona senior Caden Page (left) has his arm raised after pinning Madison Memorial junior Tristin Bird at the 2:42 mark of their 170-pound match Tuesday, Jan. 7, in Verona. The Wildcats won five matches by pin, but lost the dual 42-30.

Verona began its home dual against Madison Memorial with three convincing victories and won five of the nine contested matches, but injuries and absences caught up to the Wildcats. The Spartans rallied for a 42-30 victory on Tuesday, Jan. 7, while Verona dropped to 0-4 in Big Eight Conference duals. “We knew it would be close, and with two kids out sick, we knew it’d be hard to win even if we did everything right,” Wildcats coach Bob Wozniak said. “But we still wrestled well in the contested matches.” Verona jumped out to an 18-0 lead thanks to pins from Ben Grandau (132 pounds), Logan Neuroth (138) and Atticus Marse (145). Grandau, who has wrestled at 120 and 126 this season, pinned

Brody Weiler at the 4-minute mark. Neuroth dominated Zolan Walker and finished off the match in 2:28. Marse trailed 11-6 against Jon Prine, but a takedown set up his pin at the 4:56 mark of the match. Verona’s Caden Page (170) pinned Tristin Bird in 3:19. The 285-pound match featured a pair of ranked wrest l e r s . M e m o r i a l ’s P a t r i c k McDonald entered the dual ranked 11th in the heavyweight division, just ahead of Verona’s Jay Hanson. McDonald defeated Hanson 6-5 at the Mount Horeb Invitational on Dec. 21, but Hanson avenged the loss with a pin in 3:35. Wozniak anticipated the two will meet again at the Big Eight Conference meet, regionals and sectionals. He said a possible sectional matchup could determine who goes to state.

“We knew it would be close, and with two kids out sick, we knew it’d be hard to win even if we did everything right.” Coach Bob Wozniak Verona’s Eric Blum (152), Spencer Lokken (160), Achilles Mendes (182) and Adam Murphy (195) lost by pin. Both teams forfeited at 113 and 126. The Wildcats forfeited at 106, 120 and 220. Cael Wozniak, who had been wrestling at 145, is still out of the lineup with a separated shoulder he suffered at Mount Horeb. His father hopes to have him back before the end of the season. The Wildcats return to action Saturday, Jan. 18, at the Chippewa Falls Invitational.


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January 16, 2020

The Verona Press

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Boys basketball

Gymnastics

Wildcats hoping healthy lineup leads to wins MARK NESBITT Assistant sports editor

Wi t h a key i n j u r y a n d y o u n g d eve l o p i n g guards, the Verona boys basketball team has lost six straight games after dropping two last week. Verona (2-8, 2-5 Big Eight Conference) lost 90-34 at home to Madison La Follette on Friday, Jan. 10. The Lancers are ranked second in the Division 1 Associated Press state poll. “It was an opportunity for the younger guys to play against one of the top-ranked teams in the state,” Verona coach Eddie Singleton said. T h e Wi l d c a t s w e r e coming off a 71-35 road loss to Madison Memorial on Tuesday, Jan. 7. Senior guard Haakon A n d e r s o n , t h e t e a m ’s leading scorer (15 points per game) and rebounder (9.2) has missed the last five games with an ankle injury. Junior Cam McCorkle injured his shoulder against La Follette and did not return. “With the injuries we h ave h a d , o u r h a n d i s f o r c e d f o r d eve l o p i n g the younger guys,” Singleton said. The Wildcats are averaging 42.3 points per game during their sixgame slide and have scored 35 or less in three of those games. Ve r o n a w i l l h o s t Beloit Memorial on T h u r s d a y. S i n g l e t o n held a team meeting with the players ahead of the matchup. “I’m continuing to learn and receive feedback as a coach,” Singleton said. “As coaches, we have to give them better scouting reports.

We h a v e m a d e s o m e scheme changes and as we get healthier, we will be more successful. “I’m hoping Haakon is back for Beloit Memorial. They haven’t won a game and I would like to keep it that way.”

Madison La Follette 90, Verona 34

Juniors Kolson Roddick and Bennett Sherry each scored a team-high six points for the Wildcats, who trailed 50-13 at halftime. Adam Bekx and Sebastian Golden each chipped in four points and grabbed five r e b o u n d s . I t w a s Bekx’s first game back since recovering from a meniscus injury in his knee. Jacob Kisting had a team-high three steals. La Follette seniors Ben Probst and Derek Gray each scored a game-high 18 points. P r o b s t k n o c k e d d ow n four of the Lancers’ eight 3-pointers. K’Shawn Gibbs added 15 points and Isaiah Stewart had 14.

Madison Memorial 71, Verona 35

T h e Wi l d c a t s s h o t 25.4% (13-for-51) from the field and the Spartans finished with a 42-19 advantage on the glass. Sherry scored a teamhigh 10 points. Senior Malik Odetunde added nine points. Roddick and Gavin Farrell each chipped in five points. Memorial jumped out to a 37-21 lead at intermission and clamped down defensively in the s e c o n d h a l f . Ky l e Yu scored a game-high 19 points.

Girls basketball

Murphy, Rupnow lead Verona past Purple Knights MARK NESBITT Assistant sports editor

The backcourt duo of f r e s h m e n M ega n M u rphy and Abbi Rupnow led the Verona girls basketball team to a 54-25 road win over Beloit Memorial on Thursday, Jan. 9. Both Murphy and Rupnow scored a gamehigh 12 points. Rupnow hit two of the Wildcats’ four 3-pointers. Senior Rachel Parman and freshman

Paige Lambe added nine points apiece, and senior Rayna Briggs chipped in eight. Verona raced out to a 26-10 lead at the half. The Wildcats (5-7, 4-5 Big Eight Conference) have won two of their last three games. Ve r o n a ’s B i g E i g h t road game against Madison East on Saturday, Jan. 11, was postponed to Tuesday, Jan. 28, due t o i n c l e m e n t w e a t h e r. The Wildcats return to action Friday, Jan. 17, at Janesville Parker.

Photos by Mark Nesbitt

Verona/Edgewood’s Katie Ryan won the balance beam with a score of 8.775 on Thursday, Jan. 9, against Janesville Parker at Glacier Edge Elementary School.

Verona/Edgewood dominates MARK NESBITT

(33.60), eding Crowley (33.475). Katie Ryan for the first time stuck an aerial and a three-quarter turning jump to win the balance beam (8.775). Dohnal took second on the beam (8.725). Sophomore Noelya Jaime Janaite competed in her first meet after returning from a sprained ankle, finishing routines on the balance beam (7.825) and uneven bars (6.725). She stopped her floor routine after tweaking her ankle. “I landed really weird on the floor when I did my first pass,” Jaime Janiate said. “I tried. I just need to get my strength back.” She made three runs on the vault, but didn’t make an attempt due to the injury. She was more concerned about getting her steps down on her approach before the springboard. “I don’t have enough room for running and I have some really long strides when I run,” Jaime Janaite said. “When I run on vault here, it’s really hard for me to get my momentum and I end up hitting the springboard up close.” Hauser said Jamie Janaite has not been able to practice her vault much due to the injury. “She runs so fast she can sometimes overpower and miss the springboard,” Hauser said. “She just needs more practice with her powerful run.” Fischer did not compete after suffering a concussion from a fall on the uneven bars in practice earlier in the week.

Assistant sports editor

The twist freshman Ella Crowley added to her vault over winter break paid off in the first meet of the new year. Crowley won the vault (8.25) and the uneven bars (8.225) to lead Verona/Edgewood to a 131.40-112.45 home win over Big Eight Conference foe Janesville Parker on Thursday, Jan. 9, at Glacier Edge Elementary School in Verona. “I wasn’t really expecting it,” Crowley said. “I switched some of my bar and vault routines.” In the first two meets, Crowley did a front handspring dismount on the vault. She decided to switch to twisting against Parker. Crowley said she made the change because the twisting finish has a higher level of difficulty. She eliminated the two giants to a flyaway dismount she had done in the past, but she opted for a clear hip this time. The giant requires the gymnast to complete a hand stand, swing around the bars and then repeat it before a dismount. In comparison, the clear hip requires the gymnast to pull themselves onto the bar, swing their body under it, and then bring their body back up and over the bar for a complete rotation. Hauser credited Crowley for being open to change her bars routine. “It’s not her ideal routine but we needed her to compete,” Hauser

Freshman Ella Crowley finished first on the uneven bars with a score of 8.225. said. “She threw together that routine for us and it scored really well. We needed to replace Alyssa (Schmidt)’s score which is usually in the 8 to 8.2 range, and Ellie came through for us.” The Wildcat/Crusaders swept the top three spots on the vault, uneven bars, floor and balance beam. “It was really hit or miss,” Verona/Edgewood coach Rachael Hauser said. “We had some new skills on vault and beam. Adding some of the things we worked on over holiday break was kind of our goal. We were a little more focused on what we were doing and hoped we came out on top.” Senior Hailey Dohnal won the floor (9.1) and the all-around competition

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January 16, 2020

The Verona Press

11

Boys hockey

Wildcats’ winning streak reaches a dozen ADAM FEINER Sports editor

Verona spent its second week as the top-ranked team in Division 1 with a pair of Big Eight Conference wins. The Wildcats improved to 14-1 overall and 9-0 in the Big Eight with 8-0 victories over Janesville and Madison Memorial. Verona’s road game against Beloit Memorial on Saturday, Jan. 11, was postponed due to inclement weather. The Wildcats and Purple Knights will play Thursday, Jan. 30, at Edwards Ice Arena

in Beloit. Puck drop is scheduled power-play goal off assists from Jurrens and goaltender Kaden for 7 p.m. Grant with 31 seconds left in the Verona 8, Janesville 0 period. The Wildcats started fast with Ploc scored 58 seconds into four goals in the first period and the second period off a pass from three more in the second Thurs- Keegan Lindell and on the power day, Jan. 9, at Janesville Ice Are- play at the 4:38 mark off a pass na. from Rufenacht. Jurrens scored Nathan Jurrens started the scor- with 7:02 left in the second off a ing 2:20 into the game off assists pass from Josh Osting. from Reece Cordray and Conrad Ryan Ritter scored a Moline. Cale Rufenacht had a short-handed goal with 10:02 left power-play goal at the 8:57 mark in the third off a pass from Jurof the first period. rens. Cordray scored off a pass from Grant (six saves) and Owen Moline with 3:41 left in the first, Hebgen (nine saves) combined on and Rufenacht scored another the shutout.

Verona 8, Madison Memorial 0

The Wildcats broke through with four goals in the second period and three more in the third Tuesday, Jan. 7, at Verona Ice Arena. Anthony Heinrichs scored on the power-play 5:57 into the second off a pass from Moline, then found the back of the net 2:29 later off assists from Cordray and Moline. Cordray scored with 5:34 left in the second off assists from Moline and Leo Renlund. Ploc scored on the power play 1:02

Softball

later off assists from Moline and Heinrichs. Lindell scored 1:11 into the third off a pass from Rufenacht. Moline scored a little more than three minutes later off assists from Ritter and Osting. Ritter added a goal with four seconds left off assists from Renlund and Calvin Moioffer. Renlund scored with 5:41 left in the first period off assists from Rufenacht and Walker Haessig. Verona went 3-for-4 on the power play and outshot Memorial 68-14. Grant picked up the shutout with 14 saves.

Girls hockey

Verona players play key roles in Lynx victories ADAM FEINER Sports editor

The Madison Metro Lynx girls hockey team entered last week ranked fourth in the Wisconsin Prep Hockey Coaches Poll, and pushed its winning streak to six with a pair of narrow victories. Edgewood senior Sydney Raaths scored both goals in the Lynx’s 2-1 home win over nonconference foe Western Wisconsin on Friday, Jan. 10, at Madison Ice Arena. Verona sophomore Rachel Mirwald scored the game-winning goal in the Lynx’s 4-3 road win over Badger Conference rival Rock County on Tuesday, Jan. 7, at Janesville Ice Arena. The Lynx’s Badger Conference home game against Viroqua on Saturday, Jan. 11, was postponed due to inclement weather.

Photo submitted

Verona junior Alyssa Bostley pitches for Midwest Glory Fastpitch. She verbally committed to Creighton on Wednesday, Jan. 1.

Bostley commits to Creighton ADAM FEINER Sports editor

Verona junior Alyssa Bostley kicked off the new year by announcing where she’ll play softball after two more seasons with the Wildcats. Bostley verbally committed to Creighton University on Wednesday, Jan. 1, after attending a camp on campus in Omaha, Nebraska. She also received interest from Kennesaw State, Northern Iowa, Virginia Wesleyan and Trine University. Bostley hit .489 with a

.777 slugging percentage and drove in a team-high 39 runs last season for Verona. She was a firstBostley team all-Big Eight Conference performer and one of four Wildcats to receive all-state honors last season. Bostley and Kasie Keyes were honorable mention selections, while Molly McChesney and Meghan Anderson were first-team picks. Verona went undefeated in the Big Eight and advanced to the Division 1

Metro Lynx 2, Western Wisconsin 1

Raaths scored with 6:01 left in the third period off an assist from Verona senior Alina Yazek to lift the Lynx past the Stars. Raaths converted on the power play with 2:13 left in the first period off assists from Mirwald and Ally Jacobson, tying

the game at 1. Western Wisconsin’s Ellie Brice scored on the power play with 4:06 left in the first off a pass from Bailey Williams. The Lynx (11-2, 3-1 Badger Conference) went 1-for-2 on the power play, outshot the Stars 28-21 and killed five of six penalties. Addie Armstrong picked up the win in net with 20 saves.

Metro Lynx 4, Rock County 3, OT

Mirwald scored the game-winning goal 45 seconds into the extra period off a pass from Raaths to give the Lynx a key conference win over the Fury. Jacobson scored on the power play with 41 seconds left in the first period of a pass from Hannah Kolpien to open the scoring. The Fury tied it at 1 in the second, as Alyssa Knauf scored on the power play 3:51 into the period. Grace Bonnell scored four minutes into the third, and Lauren Johnson scored with 7:08 left in regulation to give the Lynx a 3-1 lead. Rock County’s Anika Einbeck scored with 3:46 to go, and Samantha Wells scored with 42 seconds left in regulation to force overtime. The Lynx went 1-for-3 on the power play and outshot the Fury 40-26. Cam McKersie finished with 23 saves.

sectional finals. Bostley previously played travel softball for the Midwest Glory Fastpitch 16U national team, but joined the Iowa Premier Fastpitch travel team last summer and played on the 18U Gold team. IPF is based out of Des Moines, Iowa and travels to tournaments across the country. B o s t l ey, w h o t h r ow s and bats left-handed, is a pitcher, first baseman and outfielder for Verona, and is expected to be a pitcher and power hitter at Creighton. The Bluejays compete in NCAA Division I’s Big East Conference.

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January 16, 2020

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Library sleepover stuffed with fun NEAL PATTEN Unified Newspaper Group

Local stuffed animals got to enjoy their own “holiday vacation” on Thursday, Dec. 26, at the library. Area children were invited to bring their favorite plush friends to the library in the morning to send them on an overnight adventure. The soft toys and stuffed a n i m a l s h a d a va r i e d sleepover including taking a ride on the book return conveyor belt, checking out books specific to their nature (a Packers book for a Green Bay Beanie Baby, “’Twas the

On the Web To view more photos visit:

ConnectVerona.com Night before Christmas” for an elf, and so on), and were read “Goodnight Moon” by librarian Amy Adams. Their caretakers could pick them up on Friday afternoon and the librarians presented a slideshow of the previous evening’s escapades. Neal Patten, Verona Community Reporter, can be contacted at neal.patten@ wcinet.com.

Photos submitted by library

The animals on the book return conveyor belt.

Marshall from “Paw Patrol” reads a fitting book.

Librarian Amy Adams reads “Goodnight Moon” to the animals.

The animals having fun in cubby holes.

The bee reads a book about bees while Marshall from “Paw Patrol” reads a “Paw Patrol book.

The animals ready for a coloring activity.

Snow arrives too late for the Snowshoe Scurry BY NEAL PATTEN Unified Newspaper Group

A “Snowshoe Scurry” 5K, intended to be ran in snowshoes, ended up becoming a grassy trail race at Badger Prairie County Park on Friday, Jan. 10, due to no snow being on the ground. Organized by Mark and Jackie Hering, the scurries take place in area communities including Mount Horeb and Madison, and are intended to promote getting outside during winter. The Verona race was the kick-off to the seventh annual season of scurries. Just minutes before the race was due to begin, sleet began pouring and combined with freezing temperatures, turning the racecourse wet and icy. Despite the less than ideal weather conditions, over 50 participants still attended. This is the first time one of the scurries were held at night. Runners were provided flashing bracelets and many brought headlamps, although the full moon also helped to

Photo by Neal Patten

Racers competed against not only each other, but also a mix of rain and snow at the Snowshoe Scurry on Friday, Jan. 10. illuminate the course. A fire built in the fireplace inside a Badger Prairie County Park shelter helped dry runners off as they returned, and a campfire outside the shelter provided a space for the onlookers to roast marshmallows and

keep warm. The race helped raise money for the Second Harvest Foodbank, which works to combat hunger in 16 southwestern Wisconsin counties through food distribution and promotion of food assistance programs.

Obituary Donald (Don) R. Woestman Donald (Don) R. Woestman, age 71, of Verona, died peacefully at Agrace HospiceCare on Tuesday, January 7, 2020. Don was born on Sept. 9, 1948, in La Crosse, WI, the first child of Ervin and Carmen Woestman. Don graduated from Healy Memorial High School in 1966 and was proud to serve his country in the US Army as an MP in Korea. After his honorable discharge and graduation from MATC in 1974, he worked for many years at Webcrafters in Madison as a graphic arts estimator and also as the president and treasurer of the employees’ credit union. More recently, he was employed by Miller & Sons, Verona, WI, a job he greatly enjoyed. Don was an avid hunter and outdoorsman, an interest he shared with his

brother Doug and Doug’s c h i l d r e n , B r i t t a ny a n d Blake. Don loved hiking and usually walked 5 to 7 miles per day. Don will be remembered for his kindness and wonderful sense of humor. Survivors include his wife of 48 years, Kris; son, Brian; daughter, Brooke (Dustin); two grandchildren, Iris and Bryson; his mother, Carmen; two brothers, Mike and Doug; three sisters, Norma, Phyllis, and Janice; and many nieces, nephews, and friends. His father and sister, Lois, preceded him in death. The family would like to thank UW Hospital, Agrace HospiceCare, Dr. Mark Beamsley, and special friends, Jerry, Nancy, Bill, Oscar, and Kraig. In honor of Don’s wishes, no services will be held. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Specialty Purebred Cat Rescue at www.purebredcatrescue.org.


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January 16, 2020

The Verona Press

13

Early voting starts March 17 Library and senior center each available for one day RENEE HICKMAN Unified Newspaper Group

The upcoming spring election will have additional early voting locations and extended hours, after the Verona Common Council approved them Monday, Jan. 13. Early voting locations are to include Verona City Center, 111 Lincoln St., the Verona Public Library, 500 Silent St., and the Verona Senior Center, 108 Paoli St. In-person absentee votes will be accepted at the

The Verona Area Community Orchestra will hold its first concert Jan. 29.

library March 21 and at the senior center March 24. All other hours, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. March 17-27 and from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. March 30-April 3, are at Verona City Center. The city may decide to designate more hours at a later date if necessary. The extended hours and locations will be publicized by the city using fliers at various locations and may also be included in emails sent out to people on city lists. Ald. Sarah Gaskell (Dist. 2) suggested that notifications also be sent out with the city’s electric bills to provide an additional opportunity to publicize them.

Orchestra: The second concert will be Wednesday, April 22 Continued from page 1 had formerly played in professional orchestras but retired, some who have been playing all along,” Sanyer said. There are two other conductors directing the group, Kay Black and Scott Vandermeuse. Black is the orchestra teacher to seventh and eighth graders at Oregon Middle School and has taught 4th-12th grade orchestra students in Wisconsin public schools since 1995. The first concert will feature classical works by Bach, Copland, Elgar, Erlach and Peter Warlock, modern string orchestra works by contemporary composers such as Eric Whitacre, and 1940s jazz stylings in the vein of Louis Prima.

If You Go What: Verona Area Community Orchestra inaugural concert When: 7 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 29 Where: Performing Arts Center, 300 Richard St. Info: Call 608-516-1339 The first concert will be less than an hour long. Admission is free, and a reception will follow. Some instruments provide a local flair to the group, such as the hardanger fiddle, a traditional Norwegian stringed instrument. This first year, the orchestra is composed only of string instruments.

Next year, it will expand to a full orchestra by adding wind and percussion. Sanyer said she hopes friends and family of players will attend, but also hopes this concert will bring more people into the orchestra. She estimates there will be around 40 to 45 performers at the first concert. “Numerous members have been saying they are so happy to be playing again,” Sanyer said. “We still have room for more string players this season if anyone is interested in joining us.” The orchestra’s second concert will be Wednesday, April 22. After that, the group will have to go on break until it finds a new performance location as the high school moves locations during the summer months.

City in brief Epic buildings

The Verona Common Council approved the construction of two new office buildings on Epic Systems Corporation’s Campus 5. The buildings, to be named “Mystery” and “Castaway” will be designed after literary themes and provide space for 350 new offices each. The council’s action was a permit to allow more than one building to be built on a single parcel, known as a group development. This is common with all of Epic’s campus buildings. “I’m happy to see Epic succeed and continue to grow,” Mayor Luke Diaz said.

Summit ATM

Alders voted to approve a permit for a drive-thru ATM for the new Summit Credit Union location planned for at 150 West End Circle. Such permits are required for all drive-thru facilities in the city.

Exhibit: The public can view the photo exhibit until Sunday, Feb. 2 Continued from page 1 Madison’s Orchard Ridge United Church of Christ was also there to speak about its position as a sanctuary church, meaning they are open to those seeking refuge in this country. Around 35-40 visitors attended the presentation. Wi t h a c o n g r e g a t i o n t h a t ’s p r e d o m i n a n t l y white, representative of the greater City of Verona, Pundt said it was important to host the event to start a conversation about how we are all immigrants and how similar we truly are, no matter the color of our skin. She said this is the first exhibit of its kind at Salem UCC, and she hopes to have more in the coming years that encompass more topics including gender, sex and mental health. P u n d t d i s c ove r e d t h e exhibits sponsor, the Family Diversity Project, after she asked her board what they would like to see in her Sunday class this year. One congregation member pointed the class to a book titled, “Waking Up White,” a nonfiction story about white privilege. Being struck by that book, Pundt said she a t t e n d e d t h e c h u r c h ’s national conference where

Portraits of immigrants and refugees included people of al skin colors Sunday, Jan. 12.

Photos by Emilie Heidemann

Around 35-40 congregation and community members attended a photo exhibit on immigrants and refugees at Salem UCC Sunday. she found the project, which features exhibits similar to “Building Bridges” that use stories as a means of educating others about hard hitting topics. “(The immigrants and refugees) are just people,” Pundt said. “We are so busy labeling each other that we are not listening to each other.” Next to each portrait is a map pinpointing where each person is from and a

few paragraphs describing their journeys into the U.S. Community and congregation members stopped to carefully scrutinize each photo – likely in an attempt to relate to the human being inside the frame. T h e ex h i b i t i n c l u d e d a world map where visitors could point out where their own ancestors originated before coming to the U.S. According to Kakesa’s portrait description, she

came to the U.S. when she was 27 because her aunt sponsored her. She said her aunt was lonely and wanted more of her family around her. Kakesa said she now lives and works here with her three children, but achieving immigrant status was difficult. She said she is not happy with how our country treats its newcomers – “pushing people out of the U.S. is not the right way to handle things.” Chery came to the U.S.

under her mother’s care to seek a better life when she was merely age 10. But Chery did not become a citizen of her own volition – rather, her son Louis was killed in the crossfire of a shooting in 1993 and decided she needed to become a citizen. “I realized that if I wanted to make a long-lasting impact, I needed to vote,” her description reads. She said she now uses her vote to ensure that she as a Black Latina immigrant has power to affect change in her son’s name. Jimah decided to immigrate to the U.S. to pursue an education, according to her portrait description. She said naturalization was an intimidating

process, but now is studying for her Bachelor’s in nursing while working two jobs. She has two girls, who she hopes to take to Ghana someday so they can learn about their culture. B u t J i m a h ’s p o r t r a i t description reads that she has encountered racism in her new home, making her wonder if she and her girls “truly belong here.” “I always tell my girls to never let anyone put them down and stand up for themselves and for what they believe in,” Jimah’s description reads. “Folks should welcome immigrants, for the beauty if this world lies in the diversity of its people.”


14

January 16, 2020

The Verona Press

ConnectVerona.com

Verona Area School District

Gorrell’s exit comes with restructuring Changes start with director of elementary education hiring in 2020 BY KIMBERLY WETHAL Unified Newspaper Group

The start of the 2021-22 school year will bring not only a new superintendent, but a new administrative structure. Superintendent Dean Gorrell announced Jan. 8 he will retire on June 30, 2021, after 16 years leading the district, and in anticipation of that announcement, the school board and administrators decided to take the opportunity to restructure its administrative team, creating three assistant superintendent positions from existing positions

and and adding two new education director positions and an engagement position, according to a district docBurgos ument. School board president Noah Roberts told the Press in an email the changes are meant to make it more sustainable, help manage the district’s future growth and meet the school board’s 2018-23 strategic plan. “As we have experienced sustained growth as a district, we wanted to ensure that our administrative structure, which hasn’t changed for quite some time, reflected the best possible approach to supporting our staff, meeting the needs of our students and advancing our strategic

plan,” he said. According to the document, a consultant from the Wisconsin Association of School Boards recDurtschi ommended the district revise it to better suit enrollment growth and its “improvement-focused governance.” The audit of the district administration was started prior to board members knowing about Gorrell’s plans to retire, Roberts said. “The study revealed that our current structure is neither sustainable nor the most effective way to support building leadership and staff district-wide,” the document stated. The objectives of the

Just The Facts Restructuring objectives 1. Ensure equity through all levels of decision-making 2. Emphasize instructional leadership 3. Ensure accountability for carrying out strategic plan 4. Provide additional support for building-level leadership and staff 5. Increase engagement with staff, families, community and students restructuring focus on ensuring equity and accountability at the administrative level, increasing support for building-level leadership and staff and engaging with students, families and the community, according to the document. Three existing positions will be converted to assistant superintendents.

Emmett Durtschi, the current director of student services, will have his title changed to assistant superintendent of student services, and Laurie Burgos, the current director of bilingual programming and instructional equity, will become assistant superintendent of academic services.

The third assistant superintendent position, business services, will be vacant until after the new superintendent is hired. Business manager Chris Murphy is retiring from the district for the second time June 30. The two new positions will be directors of education, one for elementary school and the other for secondary school. The district will also create a family, staff and community engagement liaison role. The director of elementary education will be hired for the start of the 2020-21 school year, a transitional leadership plan document on the district’s website stated. The document did not include the timeline for the hiring of the director of secondary education or the family, staff and community engagement liaison director.

Retire: District has already made initial plans for finding a successor Continued from page 1 Before the district’s successful referendum to buy land for the new school in 2016, he was a finalist for a superintendent job in Ohio, but his last contract, signed in 2018, included language that prohibited him from actively seeking other employment opportunities while giving him a raise to nearly $174,000. That deal nominally expires in 2020 but contains an automatic extension to 2021. The district has already made initial plans for finding a successor, having met in closed session in recent weeks to discuss administrative restructuring. The district plans to hire a search firm in the spring, engage parents and the community over the summer and come to a decision by the end of the year. School board president Noah Roberts wrote in an email to the Press that the board has a “large task” ahead of them to try to fill Gorrell’s role. “In addition to his normal responsibilities as superintendent, Dean has spent thousands of additional hours managing the post-referendum process, so frankly I wasn’t surprised to hear he may need some rest,” he wrote. “But, in all seriousness, Dean has served in this role for well over a decade, which means a lot of institutional knowledge will leave with him.” The district has changed significantly in the 15 years since Gorrell’s arrival. His tenure saw the start of bilingual programs, an increase in program offerings and the creation and growth of the 4K program. The district also began building its financial reserves early in his tenure by putting away around $1 million a year while making programming cuts that were at times controversial. The district has had to deal with several challenges in that time, including getting

File by Kimberly Wethal

Verona Area School District superintendent Dean Gorrell lines up a brick on the front of the building on Monday, Sept. 23, 2019, at the new Verona Area High School front entrance. tagged by the state Department of Public Instruction for referring too many minority students to special education and struggles to reduce achievement gaps – the differences in academic outcomes and test scores between black and white students. Other challenges included shifting student demographics and societal changes that required the district to make changes to how they ensure student safety and communicate with families, Gorrell said. The district has taught him a few things since 2005, Gorrell said. He said he’s learned to have humility, to develop collaborative skills and to increase his aptitude for patience and forgiveness. “It just re-emphasizes daily that you need to have empathy for other people, (and understand) their walk in life to the best you can,” he said.”It’s so much more than policy, protocols and procedures – those are all important, for sure, but for me, what’s most important is approaching this with a servant’s heart and empathizing as much as you can with what these policies and practices actually mean and how they impact people.” Former school board member Ken Behnke, who was the board president when Gorrell was hired, said he wasn’t surprised to hear

Gorrell announce his retirement. “(Gorrell) always said that a superintendent has a shelf life,” Behnke said. “The job of superintendent is a tough, tough job, and to serve a district for 16 years is a good, long tenure.”

A district changed The largest difference between the district today and the one Gorrell was hired into, he said, is its size, he said, with the enrollment up by 1,200 students. But education all over the United States has become more complex in the last 15 years, Gorrell said, no matter what role a staff member plays in a school district. One aspect of that is communication, as students now often relay information to their parents or families about what’s happening at their school much faster than the district can get it out to the public. Another is security, as mass shootings at school sites have become more prevalent across the country. The district has taken proactive steps such as camera systems and the hiring of a district school security coordinator to lead initiatives to better protect the district’s students. In Verona, specifically, the demographics of the students have changed, with more socioeconomically

disadvantaged or even homeless students and more complex family dynamics than before. That’s created an entire set of complexities, requiring the district to put more emphasis on equity and collaboration among administrators and rethink its governance structure. Gorrell views those “positive steps forward.” “They force us to think differently, to think more inclusively,” he said. “They’re benefits packaged with challenges.”

Tough times The year 2010 was not an easy year for Gorrell as superintendent, or for many of the school districts across the state. That was the year thenGov. Scott Walker and Republican legislators put Act 10 into law, which mostly removed collective bargaining rights for public school employees in their contract negotiations. A n d w h i l e VA S D ’s school board and the district employees didn’t become as divisive over the new law as much as other districts, Gorrell still said that Act 10’s passage was the most significant event of his career as an administrator. “That was just a hard time for everybody,” he said. “That was so divisive amongst family members, amongst coworkers. It pit board members against teachers … that didn’t manifest as much here, but it was still a hard time.” Another tough time was when an EF-3 tornado struck northwestern Verona in June 2014. The district not only had to rebuild portions of Country View Elementary School, but had to care for its students and educators who had an attachment to the school. “ I t ’s m o r e t h a n j u s t y o u ’ve g o t a d a m a g e d building that can be rebuilt, it’s an emotional connection,” he said.

Search timeline January 2020: Develop and distribute Request for Proposal for superintendent search firms February-March 2020: Interview and select search firm April-June 2020: Board works with search firm on process to engage families, students, staff and community July-October 2020: Search firm engages with families, students, staff and community; Superintendent position is created; position is posted November-December 2020: Board conducts interviews December 2020: Board selects new superintendent June 30, 2021: Current superintendent Dean Gorrell’s last day July 1, 2021: New superintendent officially starts Community efforts helped care for families in the area who were displaced, students sold bracelets, T-shirts and lemonade to raise money for the PTO’s tornado relief fund and quick work by contractors and staff got the school up and running before classes resumed in September.

Leaving a legacy Behnke, who was chair of the personnel committee that hired Gorrell, said one thing that always stood out to him was Gorrell’s “passion” to make sure all students succeeded, regardless of a student’s background. That passion was a driving factor in implementing the personalized learning initiative and encouraging more students to enroll in Advanced Placement courses, Behnke said. “Verona has a sizable student population that starts out at a disadvantage,” he said. “He was an advocate for making sure everyone was doing their best.” Roberts said Gorrell’s advocacy for educational equity will be one of Gorrell’s significant accomplishments, as it will continue to be a district priority long after his retirement.

“Superintendent Gorrell’s most lasting and impactful mark on VASD, as is the case with all of our educators and staff, will be his work to support students,” Roberts wrote. Behnke and current school board member Tom Duerst also commended Gorrell’s business savvy. Each said Gorrell saved t h e d i s t r i c t s i g n i fi c a n t amounts of money with his ability to negotiate with insurance companies and consultants. He also encouraged the board to improve its financial standing to get better interest rates for construction projects. Duerst said he thinks the lasting legacy Gorrell leaves on the district will be rooted strongly in the new high school being still under construction. “If we can open the high school smoothly, I can’t think of anything bigger than that,” he said. “If we can finally get to the end of this road and have everything work next year, how can anything be bigger than opening a new high school and being the guy who was the catalyst behind it?”


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*** VOTING BY ABSENTEE BALLOT 2020 SPRING PRIMARY ELECTION CITY AND TOWN OF VERONA FEBRUARY 18, 2020 Any qualified elector who is unable or unwilling to appear at the polling place on Election Day may submit a request to vote an absentee ballot to their municipal clerk. A qualified elector is any U.S. citizen, who will be 18 years of age or older on Election Day, who has resided in the ward or municipality where he or she wishes to vote for at least 10 consecutive days before the election. The elector must also be registered in order to receive an absentee ballot. Proof of identification must be provided before an absentee ballot may be issued. You must make a request for an absentee ballot in writing or online at MyVote.wi.gov. Contact your municipal clerk and request that an application for an absentee ballot be sent to you for the primary or election or both. You may also submit a written request in the form of a letter or you may apply for an absentee ballot online at MyVote.wi.gov. Your written request must list your voting address within the municipality where you wish to vote, the address where the absentee ballot should be sent, if different, and your signature. You may make application for an absentee ballot in person, by mail, by fax, by email or at MyVote.wi.gov. Making application to receive an absentee ballot by mail The deadline for making application to receive an absentee ballot by mail is: 5 pm on the fifth day before the election, February 13, 2020. Note: Special absentee voting application provisions apply to electors who are indefinitely confined to home or a care facility, in the military, hospitalized, or serving as a sequestered juror. If this applies to you, contact the municipal clerk regarding deadlines for requesting and submitting an absentee ballot. Voting an absentee ballot in person You may also request and vote an absentee ballot in the clerk’s office or other specified location during the days and hours specified for casting an absentee ballot in person. Ellen Clark, Verona City Clerk 111 Lincoln Street, Verona, WI 53593 (608) 845-6495 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (M-F) John Wright, Verona Town Clerk 7669 County Highway PD, Verona, WI 53593 (608) 845-7187 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. (M-F) The first day to vote an absentee ballot in the clerk’s office: Tuesday, January 28, 2020 The last day to vote an absentee ballot in the clerk’s office: Friday, February 14, 2020 No in-person absentee voting may occur on the day before the election. The municipal clerk will deliver vot-

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*** TOWN OF VERONA ADOPTS A NEW BUILDING CODE On Tuesday, January 7th, the Town of Verona Board of Supervisors adopted Ordinance 2020-01 to repeal and replace the Town of Verona Comprehensive Building Code in order to adopt the current standards, procedures, and regulations established under the Wisconsin Administrative Codes as based upon the International Building Code and the National Electric Code (NEC) as published by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). The new local building code for the Town of Verona will become effective the day after publication, January 17, 2020. Copies of the ordinance are available for public inspection at Town of Verona Office, 7669 County Highway PD, Verona, Wisconsin 53593. For more information, please contact the Town Hall office at 845-7187. Published: January 16, 2020 WNAXLP

*** CITY OF VERONA MINUTES COMMON COUNCIL DECEMBER 16, 2019 VERONA CITY HALL 1. Mayor Diaz called the meeting to order at 7:01 p.m. 2. Pledge of Allegiance 3. Roll call: Alderpersons Cronin, Gaskell, Jerney, Kohl, Posey, and Touchett were present. Also present: City Administrator Sayre, City Engineer Fischer, DPW Jacobson, City Attorney Kleinmaier, and City Clerk Clark. Alderperson Kemp was absent and excused. Alderperson Reekie is expected to arrive later. 4. Public Comment: None 5. Approval of the minutes from the November 18, 2019 Common Council meeting. Motion by Kohl, seconded by Touchett, to approve the minutes of the November 18, 2019 Common Council meeting. Motion carried 6-0. 6. Mayor’s Business: A. Citizen appointment to the Community Development Authority. Mayor Diaz recommended that Brett Polglaze be appointed to the Community Development Authority. Motion by Kohl, seconded by Touchett, to appoint Brett Polglaze to the Community Development Authority. Motion carried 6-0. 7. Announcements: None 8. Administrator’s Report: 9. Engineer’s Report: 10. Committee Reports A. Finance Committee (1) Discussion and Possible Action Re: Payment of bills. Motion by Cronin, seconded by Posey, to pay the bills in the amount of $743,504.14, as well as payment in the amount of $1,076,254.78, which encompasses the payout checks for the TID 8 error. Motion carried 6-0. B. Public Safety and Welfare Committee (1) Discussion and Possible Action Re: A Combination Class “A” Beer and “Class A” Liquor license application from Verona Mart, Inc., d/b/a Verona Mobil, 101 East Verona Avenue, Verona, Wisconsin, Ijaz Afridi, Agent. Motion by Kohl, seconded by Touchett, to approve a Combination Class “A” Beer and “Class A” Liquor license for Verona Mart, Inc., d/b/a Verona Mobil, 101 East Verona Avenue, Verona, Wisconsin, Ijaz Afridi, Agent. Motion carried 6-0. (2) Discussion and Possible Action Re: City of Verona Warming and Cooling Center Policy. Motion by Kohl, seconded by Cronin, to approve the City of Verona Warming and Cooling Center Policy. The policy would designate the Library and Senior Center as warming and cooling centers. Motion carried 6-0. (3) Discussion and Possible Action Re: Agreement for crossing guard services. Motion by Kohl, seconded by Touchett, to approve an agreement with All City Management Services to provide crossing guard services for the City, contingent upon final review by the City Administrator and City Attorney. Motion carried 6-0. C. Plan Commission (1) Discussion and Possible Action Re: Resolution No. R-19-056 approving a precise implementation plan amendment located at 501 West Verona Avenue, 503 West Verona Avenue, 507 West Verona Avenue, and 100 Legion Street that would allow for the construction of 143 apartment units, and 26,000 square feet of commercial space. Motion by Gaskell, seconded by Kohl, to approve a precise implementation plan amendment located at 501 West Verona Avenue, 503 West Verona Avenue, 507 West Verona Avenue, and 100 Legion Street that would allow for the construction of 143 apartment units, and 26,000 square feet of commercial space, with the following condition: 1. Prior to the issuance of building permits, Forward Development Group shall enter into a Developer’s Agreement with the City of Verona. Motion carried 6-0. D. Public Works/Sewer & Water Committee (1) Discussion and Possible Action Re: Project closeout and change order No. 1 for Project ID 2019-101, 2019 Asphaltic Rehabilitation. Motion by Touchett, seconded by Gaskell, to approve the project closeout and change order No. 1 for Project ID 2019-101, 2019 Asphaltic Rehabilitation. Motion carried 6-0. (2) Discussion and Possible Action Re: Project closeout and change order No. 1 for Project ID 2019-102, 2019 Bituminous Seal Coat Project. Motion by Touchett, seconded by Gaskell, to approve the project closeout and change order No. 1 for Project ID 2019-102, 2019 Bituminous Seal Coat Project. Motion carried 6-0. (3) Discussion and Possible Action Re: Project closeout and change order No. 2 for Project ID 2018-107, CTH M/ Thousand Oaks/Liberty Drive traffic signals. Motion by Touchett, seconded by Gaskell, to approve the project closeout and change order No. 2 for Project ID 2018-107, CTH M/Thousand Oaks/Liberty Drive traffic signals. Motion carried 6-0. (4) Discussion and Possible Action Re: Change order No. 1 for Project 2016-123, CTH PD. Motion by Touchett, seconded by Gaskell, to approve change order No. 1 for Project 2016-123, CTH PD. Motion carried 6-0. (5) Discussion and Possible Action Re: Change order No. 1 for Project 2017115, Well 6. Motion by Touchett, seconded by Gaskell, to approve change order No. 1 for Project 2017-115, Well 6. Motion carried 6-0. (6) Discussion and Possible Action Re: Change order No. 2 for Project 2017115, Well 6. Motion by Touchett, seconded by Gaskell, to approve change order No. 2 for Project 2017-115, Well 6. Motion carried 6-0. 7:27 P.M. – Alderperson Reekie now

present. 11. Old Business A. Discussion and Possible Action Re: Ordinance No. 19-954 amending Title 15 of the Code of Ordinances, City of Verona, Wisconsin, relating to the City’s electrical building code. Motion by Gaskell, seconded by Reekie, to approve Ordinance No. 19-954 amending Title 15 of the Code of Ordinances, City of Verona, Wisconsin, relating to the City’s electrical building code. Motion carried 7-0. Mayor Diaz requested unanimous consent to take up items 12.A., 12.C., and 12.D. before items 11.B. and 12.B., for the purpose of convening in closed session for items 11.B. and 12.B. at the same time. There were no objections. 12. New Business A. Discussion and Possible Action Re: Resolution No. R-19-057 approving creation of a 2020 Census Complete Count Committee. Sayre explained the purpose of a Complete Count Committee is to help promote and encourage citizens to complete the Census. Motion by Kohl, seconded by Cronin, to approve Resolution No. R-19-057 approving creation of a 2020 Census Complete Count Committee. Motion carried 7-0. C. Discussion and Possible Action Re: Appointment of Election Inspectors and Special Voting Deputies for the 20202021 election term. For the record, two nominees, Jon Nelson and Roger Remus, were nominated by the Republican Party of Dane County as first choice nominees, which means they must be appointed. The Democratic Party did not submit nominees. Mayor Diaz nominated Election Inspectors and Special Voting Deputies for the 2020-2021 term per the list of nominees provided by the City Clerk. Motion by Kohl, seconded by Reekie, to appoint City of Verona Election Inspectors and Special Voting Deputies for the 2020-2021 term per the list of nominees provided by the City Clerk. Motion carried 7-0. D. Discussion and Possible Action Re: Approval of operator licenses. Motion by Reekie, seconded by Cronin, to approve operator license applications as presented by the City Clerk. Motion carried 7-0. 11.B. Discussion and Possible Action Re: Development Agreement for the Sugar Creek Commons project in Tax Incremental District #9. The Common Council may convene in a closed session, as authorized by Wisconsin Statute 19.85(1)(e), for the purpose of deliberating or negotiating the purchase of public properties, the investing of public funds or conducting other specified public business, whenever competitive or bargaining reasons deem a closed session necessary. The Common council may convene in open session to discuss and take action on the subject matter discussed in the closed session. Motion by Gaskell, seconded by Reekie, to convene in a closed session, as authorized by Wisconsin Statute 19.85(1)(e), for the purpose of deliberating or negotiating the purchase of public properties, the investing of public funds or conducting other specified public business, whenever competitive or bargaining reasons deem a closed session necessary. The Common council may convene in open session to discuss and take action on the subject matter discussed in the closed session. On roll call: Alder Kohl – Aye; Alder Posey – Aye; Alder Reekie – Aye; Alder Touchett – Aye; Alder Cronin – Aye; Alder Gaskell – Aye; Alder Jerney – Aye. Motion carried 7-0. The Common Council convened in closed session at 7:38 p.m. City Attorney Kleinmaier and Public Works Director Theran Jacobson remained for the closed session. CLOSED SESSION. Motion by Touchett, seconded by Reekie, to reconvene in open session at 8:20 p.m. Motion carried 7-0. No action was taken by the Common Council in closed session. 12.B. Discussion and Possible Action Re: Land acquisition for Parcel 5 and 6 for Project 2018-108, Eastside Interceptor Replacement located at 319 and 411 Lincoln Street. The Common Council may convene in a closed session, as authorized by Wisconsin Statute 19.85(1)(e), for the purpose of deliberating or negotiating the purchase of public properties, the investing of public funds or conducting other specified public business, whenever competitive or bargaining reasons deem a closed session necessary. The Common Council may reconvene in an open session to discuss and take action on the subject matter discussed in the closed session. Motion by Cronin, seconded by Reekie, to convene in closed session, as authorized by Wisconsin Statute 19.85(1)(e), for the purpose of deliberating or negotiating the purchase of public properties, the investing of public funds or conducting other specified public business, whenever competitive or bargaining reasons deem a closed session necessary. The Common Council may reconvene in an open session to discuss and take action on the subject matter discussed in the closed session. On roll call: Alder Kohl – Aye; Alder Posey – Aye; Alder Reekie – Aye; Alder Touchett – Aye; Alder Cronin – Aye; Alder Gaskell – Aye; Alder Jerney – Aye. Motion carried 7-0. The Common Council convened in closed session at 7:39 p.m. City Attorney Kleinmaier and Public Works Director Jacobson remained for the closed session. CLOSED SESSION. Motion by Touchett, seconded by Reekie, to reconvene in open session at 8:20 p.m. Motion carried 7-0. No action was taken by the Common Council in closed session. Diaz stated negotiations are ongoing for both closed session items. 12. Adjournment: Motion by Reekie, seconded by Kohl, to adjourn at 8:22 p.m. Motion carried 7-0. Ellen Clark City Clerk Published: January 16, 2020 WNAXLP

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NOTICE The City of Verona Plan Commission will hold Public Hearings on Monday February 3, 2020 at 6:30 p.m. at City Hall, 111 Lincoln Street, for the following planning and zoning matters: 1) Conditional Use Permit amendment to the Epic Systems Corporation “Group Development” to allow for the construction of a workshop located at 1979 Milky Way. 2) General development plan (GDP) for a planned unit development (PUD), known as The Woods at Cathedral Point, located east of Range Trail, south of County Highway M, and west of the Ice Age National Scenic Trail that would allow for the construction of 139 single-family detached homes, 18 twin homes, and 100 multi-family units. 3) Zoning map amendment for the Woods at Cathedral Point subdivision to rezone lots 1 through 158 to Mixed Residential (MR), Neighborhood Residential (NR), and Urban Residential (UR) from their current classification of Rural Agriculture (RA). All outlots would be rezoned to Public Institutional (PI) from their current classification of RA. 4) Zoning map amendment for 515 West Verona Avenue to rezone 0.224 acres from Rural Agriculture (RA) to Urban Commercial. Interested persons may comment on these planning and zoning matters during the public hearings at the February 3rd Plan Commission meeting. The Plan Commission will make recommendations on these matters, which will then be reviewed by the Common Council for a final decision on Monday, February 10th. For more information on this request, please check the City’s website. For copies of the application, please contact Katherine Holt, Community Development Specialist at 608-845-0909 or Katherine.Holt@ci.verona.wi.us. Ellen Clark, City Clerk Published: January 16 and 23, 2020 WNAXLP

Automotive ed ballots returned on or before Election Day to the proper polling place or counting location before the polls close on February 18, 2020. Any ballots received after the polls close will not be counted. Published: January 16, 2020 WNAXLP

The Verona Press

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Legals

January 16, 2020


16

January 16, 2020

The Verona Press

ConnectVerona.com

Photos by Kimberly Wethal

Glacier Edge Elementary School third grade teacher Katie Wallace helps students glue together parts of a playground for students during a work session on the Box City project on Thursday, Jan. 9.

Glacier Edge Elementary School third graders place an American Flag on the top of their airport creation.

Box: Model city will be displayed at Monona Terrace the first weekend of February Continued from page 1 grade teachers Nikki Borchardt and Katie Wallace develop the curriculum for the project, they incorporate as many science, math and social studies elements as possible, bringing in guest speakers to educate students on what a city needs to thrive. Part of the project involves having third graders learn what needs to be in a city so it can operate, and what can be added

to make a city more appealing to live in. As of last week, the student’s fictional model city of Dolphin Bay had many essentials – a fire station, waste treatment plant, city hall, elementary school and a park – as well as extras, such as a Starbucks, an ice cream shop, a senior living facility and a hotel. “They’re really thinking about all of the things that we need,” DeWerd said.

To decide on the name of the model city, students were brought to City Hall, where staff set up the polling booths so students could “vote” on what they wanted it to be called. City of Verona community development specialist Katherine Holt has helped guide students through the process of creating the city and making thoughtful choices about its design. She said students have learned

about zoning ordinances, using the example of jumping on the bed. If you’re not allowed to jump on the bed, she posed to the students, are you allowed to slightly jump on the bed? I t wa s s o m e t h i n g t h e s t u dents pondered over, Holt said, but ultimately decided was a not allowed because of the limitation prohibited it altogether. Holt also educated students on how cities are planned out with residential and commercial

areas and the scale of buildings, and encouraged them to think deeply about what kind of goods and services they use that they should consider including in their model city. “Because they’re children, they think about their world, which is parks and walking and biking, and do you really need to have a car?” she said. “Their wheels, they just start turning and turning.”

Share your smiles in the

Kids & Pets Today pages Send us a special fun photo of your child or pet to be published in the Verona Press on Wednesday, January 30, 2020. • Selfies • Kids with Pets • Any Fun Photo Poses • Voting on Facebook Like your favorite photo on facebook to vote from Friday, January 17, 2020 thru Thursday, January 22, 2020. The top two vote-getters will win a prize and will be announced in the Thursday, January 30, 2020 Verona Press. Children and Pets of all ages accepted

Verona P re

To enter: Complete and return the form below, along with your photo, or visit our website ConnectVerona.com.

ss

Must be received by Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Please print clearly. One entry per child or pet. One form per child or pet.

Mail to: Kids & Pets Today, 133 Enterprise Dr., PO Box 930427, Verona, WI 53593

Or enter online at connectverona.com and click on “Submit an Item.” Child or Pet’s Name _________________________________________________________________________________ Parents’ Names _____________________________________________________________________________________ Phone (for contact purposes only)____________________________ City_____________________________________________ This photo submission constitutes permission to publish. Photos must be received by Wednesday, January 15, 2020 to be included. Please include a self-addressed stamped envelope if you would like your photo returned.

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Photo taken by (if a professional photo) __________________________________________________________________

Profile for Woodward Community Media

1/16/2020 Verona Press  

1/16/2020 Verona Press

1/16/2020 Verona Press  

1/16/2020 Verona Press