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Dear Members, The past several months have marked an extraordinary time in our shared history. We’ve all been challenged like never before to adapt to unexpected circumstances. Everyone has been impacted in his or her own way, and many have found peace in the great outdoors. Hundreds of new visitors have enjoyed the sights and sounds of Reynolda’s vast landscape. I’m deeply thankful to Reynolda Gardens for giving back to our community; by cultivating healthy produce during the summer season, Reynolda has contributed an average of 200 pounds of fresh food each week to Project HOPE in Winston-Salem. As the pandemic has taken hold of our nation, a movement for racial justice has sparked new conversations about deeply-rooted issues in this country. Reynolda remains committed to fostering dialogue and inclusion as an institution. Included in our FY2021 strategic goals is the intent to better reflect our community by becoming a measurably more inclusive and equitable place for staff, volunteers, and visitors. As I write this message, museums in our state have not yet received the green light to open their doors. Nonetheless, Reynolda will share the extraordinary exhibition, Tiffany Glass: Painting with Color and Light, with you as soon as we are able to do so safely this fall. While we don’t know what shape this experience will ultimately take, we will continue to create digital content, programming, and resources that bring the beauty of Reynolda to your home. On the farther horizon, we are thrilled to share plans for upcoming exhibitions within the pages of this guide. Although we may look and feel a bit different as we safely adapt to a new normal, our mission remains unchanged. We have never been more committed to sharing the complexity of the American story with you, our most important supporters. It’s through coming together that we create community, connection, and compassion. I thank you for your continued support as we employ new approaches to ensure that Reynolda is a place where all are welcome to learn and reflect.

Allison Perkins Executive Director, Reynolda House Associate Provost for Reynolda House & Reynolda Gardens Wake Forest University


Museum reopening

We can’t wait to see you. We’ve been working hard behind-the-scenes to ensure that the health and safety of our community is front and center. The Museum intends to open its doors as soon as it is permitted by governing agencies to do so safely. Face masks for children and adults over 11 will be required in order to visit the Museum and we will have limited visitation capacity. As we amplify our cleaning practices, we will be asking visitors to stick to groups of four or fewer when visiting the Museum, and to keep a safe distance from others. In addition, you’ll need to secure a timed ticket online at reynoldahouse.org in order to visit the Museum. In the meantime, we hope you enjoy all of the Reynolda programs taking place this fall. Questions? Contact us at reynolda@reynoldahouse.org.


New Acquisitions

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Youth & Family FA L L P R O G R A M S

September October November Holidays

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Membership Stewards of Reynolda

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Shopping & Dining Directory

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Exhibitions through NOV

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Tiffany Glass: Painting with Color and Light Tiffany Glass: Painting with Color and Light, is organized by the Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass in Queens, NY. The first exhibition of its kind at Reynolda, it includes five windows, twenty lamps, and several displays showing how Tiffany glass was manufactured, how the lamps were assembled, and how collectors today can distinguish between authentic lamps and forgeries. As a painter, Louis C. Tiffany was captivated by the interplay of light and color, and this fascination found its most spectacular expression in his glass “paintings.” Using new and innovative techniques and materials, Tiffany Studios created leaded-glass windows and lampshades in vibrant colors and richly varied patterns, textures, and opacities. The exhibition features some of the most celebrated of Tiffany’s works. Chosen for their masterful rendering of nature in flowers or landscape scenes, they exemplify the rich and varied glass palette, sensitive color selection, and intricacy of design that were characteristic of Tiffany’s work. This exhibition also highlights some of the key figures at Tiffany Studios who made essential contributions to the artistry of the windows and lamps—chemist Arthur J. Nash and designers Agnes Northrop and Clara Driscoll. To complement the exhibition, Reynolda has created a special installation of Tiffany blown-glass vases once owned by Katharine Smith Reynolds. The floral themes of Tiffany’s iconic works will also carry over to Reynolda Gardens, where visitors will be invited to enjoy blooms in the four-acre formal garden as well as the greater grounds of the Reynolda estate.

EXHIBITION SPONSORS

Major Sponsors The David R. Hayworth Foundation The Charles H. Babcock, Jr. Arts and Community Initiative Endowment

Lead Sponsors Pam and Fred Kahl Contributing Sponsors Mona and Wally Wu Stephens Family Foundation Exhibition Partners Anne Phillips Copenhaver Linda and Ed Kelly

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through NOV

24

Tiffany Glass Tuesdays for Members We’ve set aside every Tuesday afternoon this fall through November 24 for Museum Members to experience this extraordinary exhibition. Once the Museum is able to reopen, reserve your timed admission tickets online at reynoldahouse.org/tiffany to visit on Tuesdays between 2:30 and 4:30 p.m.

Tiffany Studios, New York Poinsettia Library Lamp, ca. 1905 Leaded glass, bronze The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass, Queens, NY


Exhibitions

Gilbert Stuart, Anna Dorothea Foster and Charlotte Anna Dick, 1790-1791, oil on canvas. Gift of Charlotte Hanes in honor of Philip and Joan Hanes, who had the vision of Winston-Salem being the City of the Arts.

OCT

20 2020

MAR

21 2021

8

Girlhood in American Art In this small exhibition planned for the Northwest Bedroom Gallery, we will examine different constructions of girlhood from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. In Gilbert Stuart’s double portrait of two Irish cousins, the artist emphasized the girls’ fine embroidery as evidence of the refinement and accomplishments that will soon make them eligible marriage partners. Similarly, William Merritt Chase’s In the Studio presents a young girl of sophisticated taste admiring a collection of prints. Later works, by artists such as Mary Cassatt, Robert Henri, and Julian Alden Weir, convey a complex range of emotions, from affection to amusement to annoyance. All of the pieces in the exhibition reflect the cultural and social environments the girls inhabited.


Martin Johnson Heade, 1819–1904, Orchid with Two Hummingbirds, 1871, oil on prepared panel. Museum Purchase.

FEB

20 2021

MAY

23 2021

Cross Pollination: Heade, Cole, Church, and Our Contemporary Moment Cross-Pollination takes flight from the the influential series of paintings The Gems of Brazil (1863–64) by Martin Johnson Heade but expands outward to explore pollination in nature and ecology, cultural and artistic influence and exchange, and the interconnection between art and science, extending from the nineteenth century into the twenty-first. This exhibition was created by The Olana Partnership at Olana State Historic Site, Thomas Cole National Historical Site, and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas. Its tour is organized by Crystal Bridges.

SUPPORT FOR THIS EXHIBITION AND I T S N AT I O N A L TO U R I S P R OV I D E D BY A R T B R I D G E S .

ADDITIONAL MAJOR SUPPORT HAS BEEN P R OV I D E D BY T H E H E N RY L U C E F O U N DAT I O N


Exhibitions

Kwame Brathwaite, Sikolo Brathwaite wearing a headpiece designed by Carolee Prince, African Jazz-Art Society & Studios (AJASS), Harlem, ca. 1968. Courtesy the artist and Philip Martin Gallery, Los Angeles.

FEB

4

2022

Black is Beautiful: The Photography of Kwame Brathwaite

MAY

8

Organized by Aperture Foundation, New York, and Kwame S. Brathwaite.

2022 Throughout the 1960s, Kwame Brathwaite used his photography to popularize the transformative idea that “Black is Beautiful.” This exhibition—the first dedicated to Brathwaite’s remarkable career—tells the story of a central figure of the second-wave Harlem Renaissance. In addition to his work in photography, Brathwaite founded two key organizations: the African Jazz-Art Society and Studios (AJASS), a collective of artists, playwrights, designers, and dancers, and the Grandassa Models—the subject of much of this exhibition’s contents—a modeling agency for black women, founded to challenge white beauty standards. 10


C O N T R I B U T E D BY G E N I E C A R R , D O C E N T-VO L U N T E E R S I N C E 2 0 1 0

Tiffany Vase In March, a fifth Tiffany vase joined four vases that are assumed to have been purchased by Katharine Smith Reynolds in the 1910s. They likely showed off their iridescent beauty at the Reynoldses’s Fifth Street house before the family’s move to Reynolda. In a recent Museum lecture, Manager of School and Family Learning Julia Hood said that the vases “were likely purchases in the early nineteen-teens, around when they were made…Katharine made somewhat frequent purchases from Tiffany & Co., and the vases were sold there.” Julia searched the archives for a receipt, but none showed up. The vases have “L.C. Tiffany—Favrile,” etched on the base along with two sets of numbers, the numbers unique to each vase. The word “Favrile” comes from the Old English “fabrile” and indicates that the item was made by craftsmen. It was used by Tiffany for all the products made by Tiffany Glass and Decorating Co., not just glass objects. The iridescence came from mixing the salts of metals into the fluid glass in the furnace. After a few more steps, the metallic salts would be in the surface of the object—which, after it had cooled, would be iridescent. Julia noted that Tiffany loved nature and incorporated objects and views from nature in his work: flowers, streams, trees—peacocks!— and on and on. “Tiffany would bring flowers from his garden at his home into the studio to inspire designers,” she said. The new acquisition, donated by Barbara Babcock Millhouse, Katharine’s granddaughter and Reynolda House’s founding president, will be on view in the Private Kitchen this fall.


J. Edward Johnston portrait by artist Frank Owen Salisbury One day a grandson of J. Edward Johnston visited an antiques shop and saw a face that he recognized: that of his grandfather, whose first wife had been Katharine Reynolds. The grandson knew Johnston, who died in 1951, only from family photographs. In early March 2020, Lawrence White gave the portrait of his grandfather to Reynolda House. The portrait’s painter is also something of a find. Frank Owen Salisbury was English, not American, but he painted a rather well-known set of folks—among them, King George V; King George VI at his coronation; the young Queen Elizabeth II at her coronation; Winston Churchill (more times than any other artist); U.S. President Calvin Coolidge and his wife, Grace; and President Franklin D. Roosevelt for his official White House portrait. As Deputy Director Phil Archer noted in a recent talk about Johnston, Salisbury’s portrait was likely done sometime in the 1920s. Johnston and Katharine married in 1921, after her three years of mourning the death of her husband, R.J. Reynolds. He enjoyed equestrian sports; Salisbury painted him dressed in fox-hunting clothes. Johnston also started a polo club, and Katharine built him a polo grounds on the estate, along what later became Polo Road. Johnston, who graduated from Davidson College and served in World War I, was hired in 1919 by Katharine to be the Superintendent of the Reynolda School. Phil notes that in the painting, Salisbury depicts Johnston as “a figure of privilege and easy athleticism. It may be surprising to learn that Edward was painted by the de facto court painter to the Royal House of Windsor, but Katharine and Edward were true Anglophiles. It’s worth noting, too, that Edward would later receive the Order of the British Empire for his work in liberating prisoners of war during World War II.” 12


Anna Dorothea Foster and Charlotte Anna Dick by Gilbert Stuart The double portrait of Anna Dorothea Foster and Charlotte Anna Dick, young cousins painted by acclaimed American artist Gilbert Stuart in 1790-91, has been well traveled in two hundred years. Stuart painted the girls in Dublin, where he lived for some time and honed his art. Over time, the masterwork visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Gallery of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Yale University Art Gallery, before it settled in North Carolina. The painting was owned by Phil Hanes, the active Winston-Salem industrialist and leader in the arts. Now the work is at the Museum for good: a gift from Charlotte Metz Hanes. Anna Dorothea Foster and Charlotte Anna Dick (1790-91) was the first painting ever bought by her husband, who died in 2011. “Phil was so committed to Winston-Salem’s legacy of the arts, and painting was such an early love for him,” Charlotte Hanes said. “I just knew that the first work that he bought belonged in Winston-Salem. Other museums were interested in the painting…But I thought it should remain in his beloved ‘city of the arts.’ ” Stuart didn’t paint many double portraits. Mrs. Harrison Gray Otis (Sally Foster), 1809, already in Reynolda House’s collection, originally included Sally’s son Alleyne, but for reasons unknown Stuart painted him out. The Foster-Dick cousins, who bear a strong resemblance to each other, remain together and vibrant. Anna Dorothea was reaching the time when she would make her debut in society. Working on embroidery demonstrates that she was refined and accomplished, well suited to make a fine marriage. Charlotte Anna holds a paper pattern for her cousin, whose father John Foster, Speaker of the House of Commons in Ireland, commissioned the portrait.


On-site Family Guides When visiting the Museum with young children, you can request family-friendly activity cards from the front desk to promote careful looking and thinking.

SERIES

Read-Aloud R E P E AT S F R I & S AT, AU G 2 1 , S E P T 1 8 & 1 9 , O C T 1 6 , N OV 2 0 & 2 1 , DEC 11 1 0 –1 0 : 3 0 A . M .

Online Family Resources Families seeking to expand their knowledge about Reynolda’s history and art collection can find a collection of PDF and video resources at reynoldahouse.org/athome. The Reynolda Pop-Up Studio video series provides suggestions and directions for art activities. Explore Reynolda cards offer questions for conversation with objects and works of art with simple activities for all ages and guided discovery lessons for pre-K audiences.

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Ages 2-5, accompanied by an adult; younger siblings are welcome. Free; storytime will be a digital program through Zoom until further notice. Visit reynoldahouse.org/readaloud to register for an invitation and see program updates.


Youth and Family M Y T H O LO G I C A L B E A S T

SEPT

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SERIES

Family First R E P E AT S F I R S T S U N O F THE MONTH, SEPT 13, OCT 4, N OV 1 , & D E C 6

2 – 4 P. M .

Classical mythology includes a range of beasts combining different animals. Learn bookbinding techniques to create your own bestiary of interchangeable animals and monsters. Each page turn offers a unique animal creation.

C ATC H T H E L I G H T

OCT Grades 1–6, accompanied by an adult

BOOKBINDING

4

$15 per person; $10 members. Art materials provided; registration required at reynoldahouse.org

Design your own pattern by cutting and arranging vibrant, colored film to create a suncatcher. Participants will also tour Tiffany Glass: Painting with Color and Light.

D E C O R AT I V E L A N T E R N S

Family First workshops will take place outdoors in front of the Museum, with enrollment limited to six families (event is limited to a capacity of 16 people outside). In the event of inclement weather, kits will be available for pick up on-site. If the Museum is open, we will include time for you to visit on your own; otherwise we will provide a family pass for a later visit. For some workshops, there is the option to pick up materials and complete the activity at home, with instructions provided through written or video instructions. Please note that we are following social distancing guidelines and requiring anyone over the age of 11 to wear a face covering.

NOV

1

Design and paint a lantern made from special paper; take inspiration from the colorful designs in glass made by Tiffany Studios. Partial kits will be available.

H O L I DAY WO R K S H O P

DEC

6

See the historic house decorated for the holiday season and create your own card and gift tags in the studios. Cardmaking kits will be available as an alternative to the in-person workshop.


SERIES TUE

1

Tiffany Book Club R E P E AT S T U E , S E P T 1 5 & 2 9 11 A.M.

Free, open to the public Revisit the entanglements of love and artistry behind Tiffany Studios as we discuss Clara and Mr. Tiffany. Published in 2012, this novel of historical fiction reimagines the relationship between designer Clara Driscoll and impresario Louis Comfort Tiffany within the confines of nineteenth-century American society. Plan to meet online with this group for three weeks to discuss a different theme of the book, era, and works in glass. To purchase a book from the Museum Store, please contact Beth Warren at warrenb@wfu.edu. SERIES WED

9

Members Book Club: Of Arms and Artists: The American Revolution Through Painters’ Eyes by Paul Staiti R E P E AT S E AC H W E D T H R O U G H O C T 7 11 A.M.

Join Reynolda House staff over a five-week period for an exploration of America’s origin story through fine art. Three of the five featured artists in Paul Staiti’s Of Arms and Artists: The American Revolution Through Painters’ Eyes–Charles Wilson Peale, Gilbert Stuart, and John Singleton Copley–are represented in the Museum’s collection. The collective stories of these artists from the revolutionary past will offer a deeper understanding of our democracy’s origins and national identity today. To purchase a book from the Museum Store, please contact Beth Warren at warrenb@wfu.edu. To register, please email albertac@wfu.edu.

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Program registration information —

eptember

All Museum and Gardens programs will take place virtually via Zoom unless otherwise noted and will be subject to change. Unless otherwise listed, all program registration information will be provided on reynoldahouse.org and reynoldagardens.org this fall.


Charles H. Babcock flanked by his children (left to right), Betsy, Charles Jr., Barbara, and Katie. Major Babcock served as chief financial officer of the American Headquarters of the European Theater of Operations.

Agnes Northrop, circa 1896. Image copyright The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Image source: Art Resource, NY

THUR

17

Beyond the Glass Ceiling: Agnes Northrup, Designer of Tiffany Windows 7 P. M .

Sponsored by the Institute for Classical Architecture and Art, North Carolina Chapter Free; offered exclusively for Museum Members and members of the ICAA-NC. Alice Cooney Frelinghuysen Anthony W. and Lulu C. Wang Curator of American Decorative Arts The Metropolitan Museum of Art This virtual lecture will bring to light new research on Agnes Northrop, the only truly independent woman designer Louis Comfort Tiffany employed. Northrop, under Tiffany’s aegis, introduced wholly new subjects to stained glass—landscapes and gardens—for both religious and domestic settings, and designed some of the most memorable windows to emerge from Tiffany Studios. Registration information will be emailed.

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TUE

22

Highlights of the Fall Plant Sale 1 2 : 3 0 P. M .

Free, exclusively for Friends of Reynolda Gardens Not yet a Friend of Reynolda Gardens? Please visit reynoldagardens.org/support for information on supporting the Gardens. Join Gardens staff as they virtually highlight some new additions to plant sale offerings as well as share some background on favorites that you don’t want to miss.

S AT

26

Native Plant Sale 8 A . M . – 2 P. M .

Gardening with native plants is taking part in a collective effort to preserve biological diversity. These plants do the best job of nurturing and sustaining the living landscape for native wildlife. Visit Reynolda Gardens for this unique sale that will feature a wide variety of woody plants and native perennials. Advance appointment sign-ups for timed plant sale visitation outside at Reynolda will be required.

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Secrets of a Well-Seasoned Garden 1 2 : 3 0 P. M .

Free, open to the public

eptember

T U E S DAY V I R T UA L G A R D E N I N G S E R I E S TUE

Join Horticulturalist Michelle Hawks, our own “seasoned” gardener, as she discusses the newly renovated herb gardens and the Gardens’ fresh approaches to maintaining its beloved vegetable beds. Reynolda Gardens is grateful for the support of Pat Michal for restoration of the herb garden.


T U E S DAY V I R T UA L G A R D E N I N G S E R I E S TUE

6

The Magic of Mushrooms 1 2 : 3 0 P. M .

Free, open to the public Wellness advocate Dennis Wiggins will discuss a wide variety of fungi, including tasty spring culinary mushrooms, some that are deadly, and some that can be used for medicine.

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TUE

6

Meet the Author: The Incredible Joy of Collecting African American Art: My Journey from Frog Town S.C. to the National Gallery by Patrick Diamond 3 P. M .

Free, open to the public Advance registration required Hot off the press in July of this year, Patrick Diamond’s multilayered debut memoir describes the tremendous impact of a grandmother’s love and how art educated one young child about his own history and culture. The author will discuss what he and his wife Judy learned over the course of four decades of collecting art; a question and answer session will follow. Diamond is a past member of Reynolda’s National Advisory Council and former Development Director of the Harvey B. Gantt Center for African American Arts + Culture in Charlotte.

T U E S DAY V I R T UA L G A R D E N I N G S E R I E S TUE

13

What’s All The Buzz About? 1 2 : 3 0 P. M .

Free, open to the public

ctober

To purchase a book from the Museum Store, please contact Beth Warren, retail manager, at warrenb@wfu.edu. The first 20 people to purchase will receive a signed copy. In an effort to show our support for those isolated at senior care facilities, please consider purchasing an additional book which we will donate to the community.

Join Gardens Assistant Horticulturist Amy Dixon as she discusses successes and discoveries in the pollinator garden, as well as butterfly larvae host plants and nectar plants.


SERIES WED

14

Reynolda Salon R E P E AT S E AC H W E D T H R O U G H N OV 1 8 4 P. M .

Free, open to the public. Advance registration required. Inspired by Katharine Smith Reynolds’s “salons,” Reynolda House Museum of American Art offers a weekly series for digital engagement — from our sofa to yours. Successfully launched in spring of this year, this interactive series is intentionally designed to stimulate conversations concerning themes of Reynolda’s history and the Museum’s collection of American art. SERIES FRI

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Pastoral Syntheses: Beethoven Days at Reynolda R E P E AT S N OV 2 0

Free with Museum admission Help celebrate Beethoven’s 250th birthday at Reynolda, one of the few places where you can fully experience syntheses between art, music, and nature. On special days this fall, enjoy Romantic-era American art in the Museum while listening to classics of Romanticism in a pastoral setting. Then stroll the grounds and Gardens in search of creative inspiration—just as Beethoven did in Austria 200 years ago. This series is part of the BHTVN Rocks community-wide initiative celebrating Beethoven’s 250th birthday, presented by Mercedes Benz of Winston-Salem. T U E S DAY V I R T UA L G A R D E N I N G S E R I E S TUE

20

The Scent-ual Garden: Creating Four Seasons of Olfactory Delight 1 2 : 3 0 P. M .

Fragrance is a powerful aspect of gardens and too often overlooked in plant selections. Gardens Director Jon Roethling will provide an overview of tried and true plants that will liven the senses year-round.

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Charles H. Babcock flanked by his children (left to right), Betsy, Charles Jr., Barbara, and Katie. Major Babcock served as chief financial officer of the American Headquarters of the European Theater of Operations.

SERIES WED

21

A Threat to All We Hold Dear: Our Community in WWII R E P E AT S W E D, N OV 1 1 & D E C 1 6 7 P. M .

Free, open to the public Reynolda will commemorate the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II with a series of virtual panel discussions. Descendants and historians will discuss the experiences of local individuals who contributed to the war effort. Each session will highlight the sacrifices of veterans, black and white, men and women, both on the front lines and at home.

T U E S DAY V I R T UA L G A R D E N I N G S E R I E S TUE

27

Wicked Plants 1 2 : 3 0 P. M .

Free, open to the public Join Gardens Curator of Education Amanda Lanier as she dives into the dark side of plants.

ctober

Sessions will also be themed as follows: Oct. 21: Wake Forest University; Nov. 11: Forsyth County; Dec. 16: Reynolda.


T U E S DAY V I R T UA L G A R D E N I N G S E R I E S TUE

3

“Fall” in Love With Your Garden 1 2 : 3 0 P. M .

Free, open to the public Adrienne Roethling, Director of Curation and Mission Delivery at the Paul J. Ciener Botanical Garden, will show you how to make sure your garden goes out with a bang. Roethling will highlight perennials and shrubs that will fill your fall garden with color from flowers and fruit. T U E S DAY V I R T UA L G A R D E N I N G S E R I E S TUE

10

The All-America Selections Garden at Reynolda 1 2 : 3 0 P. M .

Free, open to the public Gardens Greenhouse manager Hayden Shuping will discuss the long history of the All-America Selections program and the Gardens’ participation in it.

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17

A Year in the Lower Formal Gardens 1 2 : 3 0 P. M .

Free, open to the public Join Gardens Head Horticulturist Forrest Allred for a journey through the highlights and changes that have occurred over the past year throughout the lower formal gardens at Reynolda.

WED

18

Holiday Plant Sale THROUGH DEC 19

Holiday plants, including cyclamen, poinsettias, paperwhites, amaryllis, and Christmas cactus, will be available for sale. Visit reynoldagardens.org for hours and additional details.

ovember

T U E S DAY V I R T UA L G A R D E N I N G S E R I E S TUE


Holidays at

Mary Reynolds Babcock, seated at center, enjoys cocktails with her husband Charles H. Babcock and friends in Reynolda’s 1936 Art Moderne bar.

“‘til the sun come up” Christmas traditions at Reynolda BY A M B E R C . A L B E R T

Later this fall visit reynoldahouse.org/holidays and our social media channels for more information on our special Holiday program offerings.

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Christmas parties at Reynolda lasted “‘til the sun come up.” During the holiday season, Mary Reynolds Babcock hosted extravagant and (often) boisterous parties at Reynolda. Before her family made Winston-Salem their primary residence, estate electrician Shober Ray “Pops” Hendrix described their typical holiday plans, “They would come down [from Connecticut] at Easter and Christmas and throw big parties and dances for a couple weeks and be gone.” Following World War II, cocktail parties and informal dinners were the most common forms of Christmas gatherings for white middle- and upper-class Americans. Sometimes referred to as the “Great Age of the Chafing Dish,” this era saw party guests dressed in cocktail attire, often sporting Christmas-themed accessories like corsages with bells. Holiday festivities at Reynolda epitomized these traditions. While such parties were celebrations for some, they represented additional work for others. The Babcocks relied on Hendrix to oversee the house’s electrical needs (especially demanding during the holidays) and coordinate parking for party attendees. Paid extra for putting in long hours during Christmas parties, he recalled, “I’d come up here [Reynolda house] at like 7 o’clock in the mornin’ and stay up here ‘til the sun come up the next mornin’.” We may not know what Christmas 2020 will look like, but we hope we can welcome you back to Reynolda to celebrate the holidays.

Adapted from the inaugural “Reynolda Christmas Through the Years” tour. Oral histories can be accessed at youtube.com/ reynolda or in the Museum’s archives.

Shober “Pops” Hendrix photographed in Reynolda Village, October 1981.


Membership

Thank you for your unwavering support of Reynolda! Your membership enables us to bring the joys of art, learning, and nature to everyone. From experiencing a world-class exhibit in the Mary and Charlie Babcock Wing Gallery to taking a stroll through the estate’s colorful Formal Gardens or meeting new friends online through our virtual conversation series and book clubs, Reynolda is for all to enjoy. You are Reynolda’s greatest advocate, and as such, our staff continues to work diligently on your behalf to provide you with the most comprehensive access to all that Reynolda has to offer. Please check reynoldahouse.org for the latest information on the Museum’s reopening plans, and special Members-only access opportunities. Questions? Contact us at development@reynoldahouse.org. If you aren’t yet a Museum Member, contact Geoff Puttkammer, membership manager, at puttkag@wfu.edu or 336.758.5029. To become a Friend of Reynolda Gardens, contact Sarah Blackwell, development manager, at blackwsj@wfu.edu or 336.758.5889.

New! Archival Note Cards These beautiful Reynolda note cards (an example is shown above) are made from black and white archival photos of the Gardens. Offered in a boxed set of eight, two each of four designs. The note cards have been individually hand colorized by Rosy Beverly. To learn more, please contact Beth Warren, retail manager, at warrenb@wfu.edu.

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Tiffany Studios, New York, Landscape Hanging Shade (detail), ca. 1905, Leaded glass, bronze. The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass, Queens, NY. SERIES

through NOV

24

Tiffany Glass Tuesdays for Members R E P E AT S E AC H T U E T H R O U G H N OV 2 4

We invite our Members to experience the beauty of Tiffany Glass with us this fall. We’ve set aside every Tuesday afternoon through November 24 for Museum Members only to experience this extraordinary exhibition. Reserve your tickets online to visit on Tuesdays between 2:30 and 4:30 p.m. Please look for an email from Reynolda House with sign-up instructions or contact the Development Office at development@reynoldahouse.org or 336.758.3885 to make reservations. Not able to make it on a Tuesday? We encourage all Museum Members to visit often this season and rediscover for yourself all that Reynolda has to offer.

NOV

12

Museum Members Shopping Day 9 : 3 0 A . M . – 5 : 3 0 P. M .

Museum Members can save up to 20% in the Store, plus 50% off one item. The Museum Store offers items for everyone on your list! Please be on the lookout for additional shopping opportunities for Museum Members this fall.


Membership

Celebrate Reynolda this Fall This October, help support membership at Reynolda by hosting your own Reynolda Rendezvous event. While we won’t be holding our traditional annual fundraiser this November, members are invited to safely host their own Reynolda shindig, either online or in small groups, and share with friends and family all the reasons they should become members of Reynolda House or Reynolda Gardens and support our mission to bring art, learning, and nature to our entire community. To host your own Reynolda Rendezvous, please contact Stephan Dragisic at stephan@reynolda.org or 336.758.5595. The Museum will provide a special Reynolda host packet complete with invitations, membership materials, and a message from Executive Director Allison Perkins. You pick the guest list, select the meal or custom beverage, and enjoy a wonderful time celebrating all that you love about Reynolda. Need some party tips? We’ll connect you with Natalie Scarritt, director of events and visitor experience, for an event consultation. Celebrate Reynolda is set to return in April 2021. Please save the date for the following events: Luncheon for Reynolda Gardens Tuesday, April 20 Dinner for Reynolda Thursday, April 22 30

Reynolda House Party Saturday, April 24


Reynolda Society New and Upgraded Members N OV 2 , 2 0 1 9 – J U N E 3 0 , 2 0 2 0 NEW

Wilba Brady, Director’s Circle Lisa and Alan Caldwell, Hudson River School Circle Leslie Hollan, Director’s Circle Charlyn Logan-Stuart and Jim Stuart, Director’s Circle Lara Hanes Pierce, Director’s Circle Michael Ryden and Arthur Easter, Director’s Circle Kay Triplett, Director’s Circle Claire and Randall Tuttle, Director’s Circle UPGRADED

Claire and Hudnall Christopher, Hudson River School Circle


Stewards of Reynolda “Through a gift in my will I am able to give more than I can while I am living, and it is very important to me to support Reynolda House. It is part of the heritage of my wonderful community.” — Sue Wall Thank you to our Stewards of Reynolda. Your legacy giving recognizes the future of Reynolda and the transformational power of art, and shares the Museum with generations to come. Stewards of Reynolda House are friends who have included a bequest to the Museum in their estate plans. Planned gifts help ensure that the Museum and its collections will remain historical and aesthetic resources for future generations. We are grateful to the following donors for including Reynolda in their estate plans. Anonymous Anne and Bruce Babcock John W. Davis, III Stephan Dragisic Frank and Gary Frank Driscoll Connie Gray Frank Borden Hanes Sue and Doug Henderson Richard Earl Johnson Cathleen and Ray McKinney

Blanche Miller Barbara Babcock Millhouse McLean Mitchell Elizabeth Philips Debbie Rubin Susan and Michael Starr Peggy Taylor Louise Thomas Bynum Tudor Sue Wall

To learn more about the variety of planned giving opportunities for the Museum, please contact Stephan Dragisic, Director of Advancement, at 336.758.5595. Reynolda looks forward to hosting a special event this winter to celebrate our stewards, sponsored by Piedmont HomeHealth. Invitations will be mailed.

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Shop 120. A PROPER VIEW Thoughtfully curated eyewear, exceptional eyecare

111. GAZEBO

1 14. P U R E B A R R E

SALE ROOM

Pure Barre technique classes and activewear

1 0 1 . A E R ACU R A SA LO N An Aveda Concept salon

117. J. MCL AUG H LIN Men’s and ladies’ clothing and accessories

1 0 4. A L L T H R O U G H THE HOUSE

Gifts, accessories, and antiques 1 2 0. A R W O R K S H O P Boutique DIY studio

Designer fashions at a beautiful price

1 1 1 . L I N DA W E AV E R ’ S STUDIO

Custom oil and pastel portraits, and photography

111. RINGMASTER JEWELERS

Diamonds, custom jewelry, repair 1 2 2 . S TA R T G A L L E R Y Quality student artwork for exhibition and sale 111. SFEER+CO Furniture and home decor

111. MCCALL S

R E Y N O LDA V I LL AG E

Linens, fine lingerie, children’s wear, gifts, and accessories

Private venue for weddings, social and corporate events

2 1 7. M O N K E E ’ S

A ceramic and canvas paint and party studio

Fine ladies’ clothing, shoes, and accessories

1 14. V I L L A G E

1 0 6 . T H E B A R N AT

9 9. B E L L E M A I S O N Fine linens, lingerie, furniture, home accessories, and gifts

1 1 7. N AT U R O PAT H I C H E A LT H C L I N I C

116. EUROPEAN TOUCH Full-service day spa

Natural, conventional, alternative and integrative healing methods

1 0 7. G A Z E B O Ladies’ designer fashions

1 14. PA I N T E R S ’

1 1 9. U N C O R K E D MASTERPIECE

HAIR DESIGNS

Hair salon 1 1 9. V I L L A G E R E A LT Y Boutique real estate services

PA L E T T E

Art studio and gallery

Dine 1 14. D O U G H - J O E ’ S D O U G H N U T S

1 2 2 . P E N N Y PAT H C A F E

& COFFEE

& CREPE SHOP

Made-to-order cake doughnuts, baked goods, full coffee bar

Savory and sweet crepes, full coffee bar

1 1 3. M AY WAY D U M P L I N G S Chinese noodles and dumplings

reynoldavillage.com

2 2 1 . V I L L A G E TAV E R N Steaks, pasta, pizza, sandwiches, burgers, cocktails


Reynolda House Museum of American Art is supported by the Arts Council of Winston-Salem & Forsyth County

Reynolda House thanks its Annual Sponsor

Reynolda House thanks its Corporate Sponsor

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REYNOLDA ROAD

WINSTON-SALEM NC

2250

Profile for Reynolda House Museum of American Art

Members' Guide: Fall/Winter 2020  

Members' Guide: Fall/Winter 2020  

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