Page 1

' - ‘

-7lze Zmrnal ' 0

; ,. THE ROYAL DRAGOONS l !


THE ASSOCIATION OF SERVICE NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISEMENT PAGES, 67/68 IERMYN STREET, ST. JAMES’S, S.W.I. TEL. WHITEHALL 2504

8m

S ' v.1 m E 9 z I“ m

2

Deep blue waters . ..gleaming brass...and a cool white packet of Senior Service—Britain’s Outstanding Cigarette. The cigarette that’s always superbly made, always so full and firm, with coolsmoking Virginia tobaccos. And always. .. Senior Service Satisfy.

SENIOR SERVICE li’éE—l Pr Mod m Greal Bnlain

SUPPLEMENT No. l—PAGE ONE


THE OF SERVICE NEWSPAPER ADVERTISEMENT 67/68ASSOCIATION IERMYN STREET ST IAMES‘S $.W'I. TEL WHITEHALLPAGES, 2504

THE ASSOCIAT|ON OF SERVICE NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISEMENT PAGES. 67/68 JERMYN STREET, ST. IAMES'S, S.W.I. TEL. WHITEHALL 2504

lIY llNIAN mum MAIBIIB BEIIEH VALUE ‘ I“ N iniallible tipster

V ague

f

,

named Mose Said, “Watch how new

N , Maxwell House goes. :

1 J

B RITI S H M A D E B V B R VA N T & M AV

BUY noA HZASMZHM 193NI1 3H1 HOLODS

QUEEN ANNE rare scotch whisky

a? \PPLHN‘LMINT m ../ _ HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN e“ ‘ \ nxscur uwrncmm: “K w l x “cos I (n (L’PnoLJ 1.11:.

\

L

calcium

Mn Hm

f

1‘

Mr. Peek and Mr. Frean have been on overseas service since 1857. You’ll find

them in service canteens and Naafis

\ ”loithulb.4 no - , ”I: IN 1N5 UN N'HD

uwam \

nOA HEAEHEHM

One glass and your friends will agree that yours is the finest Scotch in the world. Don’t disappoint them. Place an orde. for more today.

EHV

SUV

n0}

HZABdElHM

no;

HEAEUEHM ZHV -

3H1, islNld HOLODS

HQLODS

HOLOOS iSHNIj 3H1

THE FINEST SCOTCH WHEREVER YOU ARE

J A C O B. S

k

throughout the world.

BRITAIN'S lARGEST-SELLING SCOTCH WHISKY

Peek Frag" 1AM

MakersofFamOUSBISCUltsandChriStmaS”’de

J

.....

-.. nun-unnuou.on...Hun...

And it’s certain to win by a nose.”

LINCOLNSHIRE CANNERS LTD BOSTON LINCOLNSHIRE

A

.....u.-.......u.no........u...............-........ .........u.uunuuu..oun.....u-............

i

It’s thefavourite bet For the best coffee yet,

THE FINEST SCOTCH WHEREVER VOL; ARE ' THE FINEST SCOTCH WNEREVEH YOU ARE

SUPPLEMENT N . 1—PAGE TWO 0

. . . aned '“ Gm' 8””

was—2 Primed in Greal amain

SUPPLEMENT Ne. 2—PAGE ONE


rm“ .

Wfi“ \ kx

THE ASSOCIATION OF SERVICE NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISEMENT 67/68 JERMYN STREET, ST. JAMES’S, S.W.I. TEL. WHITEHALEAfSEOSd

You are welcome at

No. 6 Pall Mall

TO HER MAJI‘S‘I‘ "IIII‘. Ql‘EI-ZN GOLDSmrm & ( Rowx inn [.1 l-ZRE, CARRAKD x «'0. I.'m.. LONDON

financial affairs of officers stationed at at Cox's and King's branch of Lloyds Bank, 6 Pall Mall, S.W.I we ‘ home or abroad.

The GARRARD

have been oflicially appointed Army Agents for over two hundred years and Agents to the Royal Air Force since its inception. Of course you may bank where you please but the reason why so many oflicers open their personal accounts with us is that we have unrivalled experience in dealing with the ‘

‘Service Watoh’ WATERPROOF - SHOOKPROOF NON-MAGNETIC - OHROME AND STEEL OASE LUMINOUS ~ FULLY GUARANTEED 2 YEARS

We have departments specialising in general and kit insurance, in income tax, the purchase and sale of stocks and shares and the safe custody ofvaluables. This full banking service includes facili— ties for serving officers to cash their cheques at any branch of the Bank without prior arrangement.

An officer’s banking transactions are confidential to him and his bank. Our position as Official Agents in no way affects this.

£10 LLOVDS BANK LIMITED COX'S & KING'S BRANCH. 6 FALL MALL, S.W.1

GARRARD The Crown Jewellers 1‘12

REGENT

STREET

W‘l

Telephone WHltehall 7001

Official Agents to the Army and Royal Air Force

REGENT 7020

lllllllllllllI!llllllllllllllllllllilllll[Ill[llllllllllllllllllllllll

lllllllllllllll|l|lllllllllll||lllllllllll||l||lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliilllll|lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilillllllllllllllllllll[Illlllllllllll!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll

SUPPLEMENT No. 2—PAGE TWO

Flinlei In (Ema! Cii‘ain


(ii) 3&2 -.

D>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>~>>>D>>D§>>D>>>DDDDDEI

Tradition in the modern manner H. J. are well known to all regiments as makers of fine Service caps, but not every— one may know that We also offer a range of quality soft felt hats. In fact, we are very proud of our “softs”, and for many years they have been the choice of discern— ing gentlemen who like to feel as correctly -—yet comfortably—dressed off parade as on. We supply hats to suit every occasion and taste. Why not call and see the full range '3 Or write for an illustrated brochure.

I

()FBW

P AR ,

g;

T0:

<1<1<< 1n<1<<<<<<</\

TH E

ROYA L

D RA G O O N S <<

.

m APPOINTMENT To HER M A 15m ms Qumm

DE

cornsm'rns & CROWN JEWELLERS,

I x

.L

I

In goltl and enamel or set with precious stones, a badge brooch is

a gift of lasting charm. Here

Dual—purpose hat, in brown, green or grey. Style 6153

(x

REGIMENTAL CAPMAKERS

'

l

.

is a piece of jewellery which is

always appropriate and always

9R§T;;,§§:§§fiffi§e,

in perfect taste. Write now for

0% details to our military department. / (BOND STREET) LTD.

cm” and Military Hatters

GARRARD & CO. LTD. Crown jewellers

400 LONDON RD., CAMBERLEY (Wednesday afternoons only)

4: 38 NEWBONDST.,LONDON,W.I.Tel:MAYfair0784

k m o.

E %>)§>>DD>9§>>§D

R>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>g

J

§<<<< ”@761

Batters

H

U

£2; Her Majesty The Queen

I‘JD>>>DDDDDDD>>>>>99999999>>

By Appointment to Q \

112 REGENT STREET - LONDON - W.l Telephone: REGENT 7020 (II lines)

Established 1878

G.

THOMAS (Hairdressers) Ltd

Dressing

Gm“

C O L E S .

L T D 0

Shirt and Pyjama Makers

Ladies’ and Gentlemen’s C tH 'd s ‘

0‘”

“” res 8’

Maintain your

11 DUKE STREET, ST. JAMES

131

Sloane

Street.

London

S.W.l

LONDON, S.W.1

serV1ce to

And at 19 HIGH STREET, ETON

Queen and Country

Hosiery

P1707195 SLO- 7564 and at

Pullovers

1 4' 7

K 11 i g h t S h 1‘ i d g e ’ P/IOIM" -

KEN

4798

L 0 11 d 0 ll ’ KEN.

S ' W' 1

8552

Gloves

EXPERT ENGLISH ASSISTANTS ONLY

in

civilian

life

Patroniscd mostly by Officers of H.Ml Forces

“ROYAL YACHT "

Join the British Legion

is :1 very exclusive Hairdressing

*

REGIMENTAL SHIRTMAKERS

“MY AMBROSIAL SHAVING CREAM ,,

IO

‘5‘“9 Bes”°'E“s-"s"a‘l"g Officers of

The Legion co-operates with your regimental association and speaks for all

THE ROYAL nmcooxvs

-

mmm men and women

NeCkwear

THE ROYAL DRAGOONS

and their Families are cordially invited to the above

addresses, where they uili always find best attention given

BRITISH LEGION, 49 PALL MALL, SJVJ.


(W)

PHARMACEUTICAL

T H E

ANDOVER FAMILY lAllNDRY lTD. _

QWW Launderers

INTERNATIONAL STORES

Andover 3600

For

Ludgershall 243

m‘fiéilipféL‘iIZZZ-Li J. & M. WARNER

J. 8: H . C HAlll S

STATWN MAD,

IRONMONGERS

TIDWORTH Tel. 3168

WALLPAPERS

for ALL your

GROCERIES and

*

AND PAINTS

and Cleaners

PROVISIONS

for 25 years

CAMPS & MESSES SUPPLIED

ELIZABETH ARDEN LENTHERIC — YARDLEY

Regular Deliveries in

HELENA RUBINSTEIN COTY MAX FACTOR OLD SPICE, etc.

l6 GEORGE YARD,

all local areas

ANDOVER

STATION ROAD

TELEPHONE: 2684

TIDWORTH - Tel : 3I60

Local Agents for:

Anything Photographic

supplied B & Wand Colour Processing

CALORGAS DEALERS

LUDGERSHALL, ANDOVER H A N T s .

CHEMISTS

WESSEX

MOTOBS

For HOME AND EXPORT DELIVERIES OF ALL B.M.C. VEHICLES

‘ A NAME THAT MEANS

I

17 g;

QUALITY!

of PORTSMOUTH B.M.C. SERVICE . INSURANCE AND HIRE-PURCHASE FACILITIES BRIDGE STREET, ANIMIVEB Telephone 2326

Depot: STONEHENGE ALE STORES, DURRINGTON Telephone No.: DURRINGTON WALLS 203


IS THE

PICTORIAL

HISTORY

OF

THE

REGIMENT up TO DATE?

KENT AND COUNTY OF LONDON YEOMANBY (SHARPSHOOTERS)

We can commission first—Class artists to depict the Regiment’s actions in the last war, its overseas service

since and other momentous occaswns, so that future generations may Visualise the life of the Regiment in our time. If your existing collection needs restoration,

A Reconnaissance Regiment Of the RCSCI'VC Army , Afl‘i/latetl to The Royal Dragoons

‘ ~ w L 7

our expert restorers are at your service. Our large and ever changing stock of military prints, paintings, curios may contain some items of particular interest

‘0 y‘m Regimen“

Ex-Regular :

PICCADH‘LY’ LONDON’ W'1

GALLERY F0 UNDED

1750

National Service

Soldiers whose homes are in London

“ _ l THE PARKER 2 ALBEMARLE STREET,

and

t

l

V 'L

'

or the Home Counties, are invited to

w

.

join the Yeomanry. Full pay of your rank while soldiering, with a tax free

I First or Royal Dragoons 1839

bounty Of up to £20 a year.

Telephone: GROsvenar 5906/7

Over a Century of Service , , , 1853—1963

IN PRINT

WIRELESS :: DRIVING :: SHOOTING MOTOR CYCLING Good Clubs

Social Events

Dances

Like the Services, we also have a long tradition

to uphold. at the same time, again like the Services, taking advantage of scientific progress

Visit us or write to usat.‘

in this age of mechanisation; yet maintaining,

HILL HOUSE’

‘ BROMLEY’

KENT.

(me 6571

RA Vemboz

through a special department, a personal and

helpful link with Service Editors, whom we are ever willing to advise and assist in the production . .

A, SQN: TA CENTRE,

‘B‘ SQN; TA CENTRE,

of thelrioumals-

Ecl’igéiofif‘itm.

MITCHAM ROAD, CROYDON. SURREY.

Tel: Maidslone 4235.

To]: CROJ'dan 2131.

Squadrons ‘7’

F. J. PARSONS -LTD

$332;ng

Lennox House Norfolk Street. WICJ Works: Observer Buildings. Hastings

ST. PETERS LANE. CANTERBURY. Tel: Canterbury 3457‘

'

Temple Bar 6591 Hastings 1157

SON: TA ALBANY STREE T LONDON N.W.1. : - ELr Sum 34 ‘ 7l. TA].


THE EAGLE The Regimental Journal of

THE ROYAL DRAGOONS

TIDWORTH

CONTENTS EDITORIAL Editorial Topics of Interest The Grey Beret 1st Guard Dragoon Regiment Lt Col R. E. Worsley “ A” m e m

Squadron

“ B ” Squadron

—1

v? w _ .n a u (I:

“ C ” Squadron

The General’s Burden “H.Q.”

Squadron

Recent Events Light Aid Detachment The Band Sergeants’ Mess The Regimental Association Corporals’ Mess Equitation K.C.L.Y. (Sharpshooters) Sports Obituary Births,

Marriages

Regimental

Gazette

Extra Regimental Employment

UR starting point, June 1962, saw the departure of the last National Serviceman from the Regiment. It is not inappropriate that we should look back over the fifteen years between 1947 and 1962, in which time some five thousand two hundred of them passed through our hands. Forming, at times, up to three-quarters of our total strength, it is due to them that the traditions and efficiency of the Regiment were maintained so highly. For highly they were, as a glance at old copies Through nine of this journal Will show. years of the exacting standards required in B.A.O.R.; through six years of service in Egypt, Aden and Malaya and the internal security operations in the former two countries. Throughout they provided the bulk of the junior N.C.O.s, the clerks and the accountants; quite apart from the crews of our fighting vehicles. Their sporting achievements too were considerable and it will be some time before many of these are bettered. However great the advantages of the all regular regiment that we now enjoy, we owe the National Serviceman a great debt of gratitude. The full effects of the recruiting drive were not felt in Malaya as many recruits could not join us out there. “A” and “C” Squadrons finished the tour well under strength, priority going to “B” Squadron in Singapore. “A" and “C” Squadrons took part in a large Exercise “Trumpeter” in June and in the only

Regimental Exercise “Saxon Shore,” in July 1962. The lack of men did not prevent the Regiment from entering fully into all activities or from producing a first class handover to the Queen’s Royal Irish Hussars. For their last two weeks in Nialaya, the Regiment staged in transit accommodation in Singapore, whilst H.M.T. Oxfordshire, who brought the relieving regiment out, went on to Hong Kong and back.


THE

JOURNAL

OF

The move home was completed by air and

sea.

A strong advance party was set up at

Tidworth in October. In addition to its normal duties this party absorbed those recruits who had been waiting the Regiment’s return with the 16/5th Lancers, and later, under the Second-in—Command prepared the training wing organisation for tank conversion to start on January the 7th. The most important event has been the conversion to tanks after twenty—one years as an armoured car regiment. Although this may not bear comparison with mechanisation in 1940/41, it has nevertheless been a formidable task amid the difficulties of peacetime soldiering at home. By mid—March sufficient tank crews had been trained in one trade to allow the Regiment to shoot at Lulworth before Easter. By mid-June crews had been trained in their secondary trades and for the first time Squadron Leaders had their full Squadrons together. Prior to this each had started limited troop training and each had taken part in one understrength Squadron exercise. In the first half of July both “B” and “C” Squadrons spent a week out with their affiliated Infantry Battalions; in the second half of the month “C” Squadron took part as enemy in an exercise against 19 Infantry Brigade, and “A” Squadron carried out an amphibious exercise in Dorset. Despite the initial disappointments of the change in role, the Regiment has thrown itself wholeheartedly into conversion and is enjoying the change greatly. Conversion has now been successfully completed and a period

THE

ROYAL

THE

DRAGOONS

of hard individual and collective training in which to “ work up ” lies ahead. LtCol K. F. Timbrell relinquished command on July 29, 1963. This was unexpected after only two years in command. We congratulate him on his promotion and wish him every success in the special appointment for which he has been nominated. We welcome in his place Lt C01 and Mrs. Worsley, from the Rifle Brigade, who were already known to many of us before they came. May we say how de— lighted we are at their joining the Regiment. We hope they will be very happy with us and wish them every success in their tour in command. We are sorry to record the retirement of Capt and Mrs. Jacobs. They have our best wishes for their happiness in civilian life. The Regiment looks like remaining at Tid~ worth for at least another year and meanwhile is making the most of the opportunity to serve at home. A large contingent, including the Band, took part in the Royal Tournament. “ A ” Squadron marched past Her Majesty The Queen at Aldershot on July 26 at the centenary celebrations of the Garrison Church. The Band have played at the Bath Tattoo, and we have been represented in various Army Displays in the South of England. We have held a very successful “At Home ” for members of the Regimental Association on the 24th and 25th of August. This event is briefly reported in this issue and will be fully covered in the next edition. Finally, may I once again thank con— tributors for their support.

JOURNAL

OF

COMRADESHII’ We acknowledge with thanks the original of the following letter sent to us by Sgt. Cantle of The Queen’s Royal Irish Hussars at present serving at the Junior Leaders Regiment R.A.C. at Bovington. The original is now in the Regimental scrapbook but we thought readers might be interested. London and North Western Railway, Marine Department, Superintendent’s Office, January 17, 1885. Holyhead. This is to certify that Corporal Cantle, 1st Lincolnshire Regiment, has been detained at Holyhead until midnight 17th inst., two privates of the Ist Royal Dragoons having been wrecked on the SS. Admiral Morrison and he lent them his kit, theirs having been lost with the vessel until they dried their clothes. *

*

N. HALL, Cashier. *

CONGRATULATORY We congratulate Major-General G. R. D. Fitzpatrick, c.B., n.s.o., M.B.Iz., M.c., on his appointment as Chief of Staff, British Army of the Rhine and General Officer Commanding Rhine Army Troops. We congratulate Capt A. E. Woodward on the announcement of his engagement to Miss Jill Hutchinson. * at * SIDE HATS E.R.E. members of the Regiment may be interested to know that a Regimental Side Hat has now been introduced for optional wear by other ranks. The hats are obtainable from the P.R.I. price 1 guinea.

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

REGIMENTAL PROPERTY We gratefully record the presentation of a very fine ceremonial Kukri to the Regiment by Mai A. R. Price, of 34 Gurkha Army Service Corps Company in Malaya. Mai Price served in the Regiment from 1947 to 1950 and must be about the only Royal Dragoon ever to command the L.A.D. *

*

*

VISITORS Among those who have visited the Regiment in the past eighteen months are Brigadier R. G. S. Bidwell, O.B.E., Commander North Malaya Sub-District, Major-General W. C. Walker, 013.13., 13.50., G.O.C. I7 Gurkha Division, Major-General J. A. d’Avigdor-Goldsmid, O.B.E., M.c., Director Royal Armoured Corps, Lt.-General Sir Robert Bray, K.c.B., C.B.E., D.S.O., Commander—in-Chief Southern Command, Brigadier J. K. Greenwood, o.B.E., C.R.A.C., Major—General R._ M. P. Carver, C.B., C.B.E., D.s.o., M.c., G.O.C. 3 Division. * at a: CONTRIBUTORS The Editor is indebted to Lt Col R. North for the article on the Ist Guard Dragoon Regiment and to Capt W. S. H. Boucher for his article, “ The General’s Burden,” both of which appear in this issue. Secondly to Mai D. J. S. Wilkinson and C01 Peter Wilson for articles which we hope to publish in the next edition. The article on the Grey Beret was written by the late Brigadier—General Sir Ernest Makins in the Army Historical Research Journal in 1949. This is the first time the full facts of this matter have been put down in Regimental Records.

Topics of interest THE TERRITORIAL ARMY On this our first tour at home since 1936 we are delighted to see so many old Royals in senior positions in Yeomanry Regiments of the Territorial Army. Among those we have seen or heard of recently are: Lt Col J. N. B. Cardwell, Commanding Officer, and Maj J. Clements, The Duke of Lancaster’s Own Yeomanry; Lt Co] A. B. Houstoun, M.c., Commanding Officer, and Maj W. H. O. Hutchinson, The Fife and Forfar Yeomanry/Scottish Horse; Maj R. H. CarrEllison, Second—in-Command, The Northum—

berland Hussars; Maj R. C. T. Sivewright, Second—in—Command, The Royal Gloucestershire Hussars.

MR. F. HILL We acknowledge with thanks some photographs sent by Mr. Hill, of 32 The Highway, Moulescome, Brighton. Mr. Hill was at one time second servant to the late Brigadier Peake when he was 4th Troop Leader of “A” Squadron in Aldershot in 1925. The photographs have been put into the Regimental scrap— books.

The Story of the Grey Beret of the Royals Car Unit of the T the beginning of 1941, the Royals were mechanised as an Armoured ng Officer selected Commandl the use, in already were berets coloured various As R.A.C. had the advantage of'bemg grey as the Regimental Colour. Not only was it distinctive, but of the R.A.C. showmg up the least noticeable colour in action in the field—the ordinary black car. conspicuously, when oflicers’ or men’s heads appeared above the beret was permitted to Although no official authority was given by the M.E.F., the grey officer for its _manufalcture. be worn, and Colonel Heyworth arranged with a senior ordnance but the bills got arlger The Regiment had to pay for them, though expecting to get refunded, reached 1,5820, when sum the Eventually through. coming ion authorisat and larger without the officers and other ran s or t eir it was agreed to pay this from P.R.I. and start to charge


4

THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

berets. Only one Trooper ever refused to pay. This man came to the Regiment as a reinforcement at Taranto, and was brought up before Colonel Lloyd for refusing to purchase a beret. He was told that it did not matter a bit if he did not wear a grey beret, and he could be the only one in a black one if he wished. Shortly afterwards the Regiment got orders to return to the U.K., and had to leave behind a certain number of men who had only done a short term of service overseas. This black beret gentleman reckoned that he was certain to be left behind, but to his utter astonishment he wasn’t. On arrival he asked for an interview with the Commanding Officer and asked if he might have permission to wear the grey beret, thereafter becoming one of our most loyal adherents. The Royals continued to wear the grey beret with the tacit consent of the Middle East Command. When H.M. the King, Colonel-in—Chief of the Regiment, inspected it at Mid« summer, 1943, he noted the grey beret with approval, and being asked by Colonel Lloyd whether he would get it authorised, he assured him that he would. But on his return to England, he was informed that before leaving for North Africa he had signed an A.C.I. to the effect that all units of the R.A.C. would wear a black beret except the XI Hussars, and there the matter rested. In April, 1944, General Sir Bernard Montgomery (as he then was) took the matter up with the Adjutant General, Sir Ronald Adam, and wrote a very strongly worded letter to him saying that he had been present on the occasion of the King’s visit, and heard what had transpired. He therefore said that the grey beret must (underlined) remain, that Sir Edward Panton, of the Ministry of Supply, had full particulars and there would be no difficulty about supply. General Montgomery summed up: (a) I submit that the Royals must be allowed to continue to wear the grey beret. (b) I recommend it to be officially recognised and paid for. (c) If you cannot agree to (b) the unit will have to pay themselves. (d) Will you amend the attached W.O. letter accordingly? Sir Ronald Adam’s reply stated: “Over 20 other Regiments of the R.A.C. have applied to wear coloured berets through official channels. The Royals have worn one without permission for two years. They will therefore cease to wear it forthwith.” General Montgomery’s covering letter to the Regiment, enclosing a copy of this reply, said: “I see I have been defeated in this battle, but I shall be pleasantly reminded of old times if the grey beret reappears on the Continent.” When the Royals were brought home from Italy for the Normandy landing, the supply of grey berets became difficult, and they have been gradually dying out, except for a few which are still proudly worn. They were known throughout the Army as “The Royals Beret,” and even some Poles, who adopted the colour, called it by that name. As may be imagined, the Royals were, and still are, very sore about not receiving official cognizance of its wear. It will always rankle until perhaps some future Army Councrl may relent.

The Royal Prussian

Ist Guard Dragoen Regiment HIS short account of the history of this Regiment—“ Sister ” Regiment to the Ist Royal Dragoons during the period that Emperor William II was Colonel-in-Chief—has been translated and edited from the book “ die deutsche Kavallerie in Krieg and Frieden,” published in I928. The author of the account, which is the subject of this article, was Lt Col Count George Waldersee

THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

lst GUARD DRAGOON REGIMENT

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

MARCH PAST, BERLIN,

1912.


THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

The Guard Dragoon Regiment was raised in accordance with an order of the supreme cabinet, dated 15th February, 1815, by H.M. King Frederick William III. It was formed from the existing Guard Dragoon Squadron, two Squadrons of the Pomeranian National Curassier Regiment, and one Squadron of the 2nd Curassiers. The newly formed Regiment took part in the advance on Paris and was present there on the occasion of the entry into the city of the three Sovereigns on 22nd April. On 2nd December the Regiment took up its peacetime station in Berlin, which it occupied permanently. During the ensuing years of peace, commanded by excellent officers, and under the interested and watchful attention of three successive Sovereigns, it carried on its training. As a result of the attention paid to it by the high command, two Princes of the Royal Prussian house, Frederick Charles (1852—54) and Prince Albrecht (1862—66) were given command, and Prince Frederick William, later Emperor Frederick, was attached to the Regiment for a year, for the cavalry portion of his training. In 1860. as a second Guard Dragoon Regiment had been formed, the Regiment took the title Ist Guard Dragoon Regiment. In the campaign against Austria in 1866 the Regiment was in the Cavalry Corps of Prince Albrecht, in the Ist Light Cavalry Brigade with the Ist and 2nd Guard Uhlans. At the battle of Koniggratz, whilst with the advance guard of Alvensleben’s Division, they distinguished themselves in an attack on Coudenhove’s Cavalry Division. In 1870 the Regiment, under Col von Auerswald, was in the Guard Cavalry Division in the Army of Prince Frederick Charles. The frontier was crossed on 8th August. “ The 3rd Guard Cavalry Brigade (Ist and 2nd Guard Dragoon Regiments) at the head; the Ist in the advance guard” according to the order. The 16th August was their great day, and one on which they earned undying renown. This was during the memorable battle of Mars-la-Tour in 3rd Cavalry Brigade under General Count Brandenburg. The Commander of the 10th Army Corps requested Count Brandenburg to make an attack to take pressure off Wedel’s Brigade—when Brendenburg remarked that he had only the Ist Guard Dragoon Regiment available, and asked if he might choose the timing of the attack on the unbroken enemy infantry, the General replied, “ The Regiment may not succeed, but if it can hold up the enemy for only ten minutes, and in doing so sacrifice itself to the last man, it will have fulfilled its object and shown itself worthy of its profession.” Col von Auerswald made his attack with three Squadrons forward and one in support. With the commanding ofl'icer in front, and Count Brandenburg on the flank of the first Squadron, the Regiment launched itself on the hesitating French squares in face of their mitrailleuse fire. A short distance only was passed, and dead and wounded lay thick on the field. Col von Auerswald, Maj von Keist and the Squadron Leaders were among the slain. The remnants of the Regiment were assembled. The severely wounded Colonel raised a cheer for the King and fell from his charger, never to rise again—the total losses of the Regiment in this attack amounted to 15 Officers, 2 Cadet Ensigns, 11 N.C.O.s, 7 Trumpeters, 103 Troopers and 216 horses. But this sacrifice had not been in vain—the enemy divisions halted, the line was able to stand firm, and the French advance to the west was prevented. Here is a classic example of how a ruthless advance in a desperate situation can achieve success, not least by its moral effect. French general oflicers, captured later in Metz, said that they had not thought it possible that a Regiment, under the circumstances as they stood, could attack. They had taken it to be the advance guard of a strong formation. Actually, the seven French Divisions present had only needed to march on with sloped arms and the 16th of August would have quite altered the situation of the German Army. The later stages of the war, which took the Regiment to the sea coast at Dieppe, brought further losses in officers and men, but no action of any special note.

Cyrus R. Vance, Secretary Lieut.—General Sir Robert Bray, Lt C. N. Haworth-Booth and the Hon. of the Army of the United States.


THE

THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

9

DRAGOONS

The Regiment received its highest award, on its return to Berlin, from Emperor William I after his inspection on 11th July, 1872, who addressed the Regiment as follows: “You have proved yourselves in war; the Regiment arried out a magnificent attack on 16th August, for which the Fatherland will be ever gratefu It is my wish to express to the Regiment personally my full recognition and my Royal gratitude.” Turning to his entourage he said, “Gentleman, if this attack had not been carried out, who knows if we would be standing here today.” Proud in the knowledge of the Royal speech, the Regiment applied itself enthusiastically to its training in the years of peace which followed. In 1889 Kaiser William II appointed Queen Victoria as Colonel—in—Chief of the Regiment. A privilege carried on by succeeding sovereigns till 1914. On 3rd August, 1914, the Regiment, after rapid mobilisation, departed for the Western Front. On 7th September, 1914, they were engaged in two mounted combats with the British 9th Lancers and 18th Hussars. The account claims both these as successes and gives the scene of the actions as Fretoy. The official history, France and Belgium 1914, does not mention this village. It was probably La Ferte’ Jouarre. The German High Command had now decided on a withdrawal from the Marne to the East. The Regiment suffered considerable losses in the retreat, and were then used dismounted in the ensuing trench warfare. In July, 1915, the fortune of war took the Regiment to the Eastern theatre. Still in the Guard Cavalry Division they were in the breakthrough of the Russian front in Galicia and in the continuous fighting during the advance into Russia, notably round Kobryn and Pinsk. Here a defensive system was built up and the Regiment was employed in the trenches from October, 1915, to November, 1916. In November, 1916, the 3rd Guard Cavalry Brigade was broken up and Squadrons of the Regiment allocated to various Infantry Divisions. The M.G. Squadron remained with the Guard Cavalry Division. Their services with these divisions took them to Galicia, the Ukraine, Serbia, Alsace Lorraine and Northern France—Armentieres, Arras, the Somme and Valen— ciennes. Then came the revolution. The various Squadrons made their way in good order to their barracks in Berlin. The men were discharged. Soldiers’ councils did not succeed in influencing their loyalty. Volunteer formations were formed from all ranks, which took a very useful part in the suppression of the unruly elements in the capital and its surrounding area. In the gradual formation of the Reichswehr a Squadron was formed which has inherited the traditions of the former 1st Guard Dragoon Regiment and is in the 9th Cavalry Regiment at Fiirstenwalde—as its first Squadron. The full dress uniform of the Regiment was cornflower blue with red facings and piping. The pantaloons were dark blue, and the trousers blue—0n the red shoulder straps the monogram VRI in yellow for other ranks, gilt for officers. The black leather helmet bore the eagle of the Guard in yellow metal. The falling plume of the helmet was of white buffalo hair for officers, white horse hair for other ranks. The trumpeters’ plume was red. Like all the German Cavalry the Regiment carried the lance. For Prussian Regiments the pennon was black and white.

Lieut-Colonel R. E. Worsley, IEUTENANT-COLONEL Worsley, who took over command of the Regiment on July 29, 1963, was commissioned into the Rifle Brigade in July, 1942, seeing war service in Italy in 1943 and 1944. He was an instructor at the R.M.A. Sandhurst from 1948 until 1951 and then commanded a Company in The Rifle Brigade before going to the Staff College in 1954. Apart from experience of armour gained with The Rifle Brigade, who were the Motor Battalion of 7th Armoured Division, Lt Col Worsley was G.S.O. 2 of 11th Armoured Division in after leaving the Staff College until joining the joint planning staff for the Suez operation to 1958 1956. He again commanded a Company of The Rifle Brigade in Malaya from 1957 before going to the Staff College as an instructor in 1959. from Lt C01 and Mrs. Worsley are by no means complete strangers to us. Apart to individual friends and acquaintances in the Regiment, they have only moved a few miles January, since Division 3rd of 1 G.S.O. been has Worsley Col Lt where Bulford, from join us 1962.

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL R. E. WORSLEY


JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

99

SQUADRONmWWWWWWWWW

p; \O a _ .2? = H

J O

s. 2 1O

<

..>‘. .. 2‘1 :n a

L I-I 0

m .. m

N n.

5 N a I-

= O I-

'5 L1 = U‘

V) <

4

e.._,

ERHAPS the greatest change of the past eighteen months has been not tanks but the climate. Where in October, 1962, in Ipoh it was 93°, in Tidworth in January, 1963, it was 23°. Before covering the past months in England there are some seven months’ activities to record in Malaya, and this may help to bring the sweat to one or two brows. May, 1962, saw the Squadron on Exercise “ Rat Trap ” on the East coast. This is prob— ably best remembered by “ S.H.Q.” Troop who each night sat down to a delicious curry, the ingredients of which had that day been caught and cooked by SQMS Leese in some Kampong and brought up with the P.O.L. From May to July Ist Troop took to Psychological warfare (fizzy war). The climax to their training—Exercise “ Trumpeter ”—saw Lt Hobhouse and such intellectuals as Cpl Aitchison, Tprs Reeves, Richings and Ward covering many miles with their loudspeaker vehicles trying to tell the Malayans about curfew restrictions. All to no avail as they found later they had been broadcasting in Gurkhali! During May and June, 4th Troop, under Sgt Cummings, and 5th Troop, under Lt Chilton, re—formed as Regulars began to arrive. The Squadron took part in its last Exercise “ Saxon Shore,” against “C ” Squadron in July; incidentally this was the only Regimental exercise in Malaya. In the Regimental Athletics we came third in a close finish, thanks to some fine running by 2Lt Coode, 2Lt Barne, Lt Hobhouse, Cpl Payne, ch1 Melbourne, Tpr Griffiths, Tpr. Reeves, and chl McLaren, who won the hammer. Lt Lloyd and Sgt Bosher won the L.M.G. pairs at the rifle meeting, Cpl (now Sgt) Evans, ch1 Macey and chl Melbourne represented the Squadron commendably in motor rallies, Cpl O’Dwyer and Tpr Renkevic nearly killed themselves in a rolling Ferret on Exercise “ Side Step,” and the Squadron found itself on the way home. Our arrival at TidMaj Watson left for the Staff worth was the signal for a major re—shuffle of personnel. and Capt Lockhart for “H.Q.” Squadron; in their place we welcome Maj Bradish-Ellames Lt Sullivan and Sgt Hughes we had to leave behind in Malaya, Sgt. and Capt Davey. Heller left us for E.R.E. in Singapore, and Sgt Rooke went to 3 R.T.R. at Catterick. Others who left us for civilian life included Lt Chilton, Cpl Payne and Cpl Barker; in the opposite direction Sgt Wallace returned after two years’ recruiting.


THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

Conversion to tanks has gone well. With the Regular reinforcements who joined us on our return, the Squadron, on paper, looks what we have all dreamed of for years. We were first into the field, with deep snow on the ground, in February, and all crews fired at Lulworth in March. In April, 4th Troop spent a week with a Company of Gurkhas; this was an amusing week in which Commanders and Operators learned to receive English in the right ear and Gurkhali in the other. Tpr. Taylor did not take kindly to April I when the gunners started lobbing the odd shell near the exercise against “Cyclops.” 2Lt Bucknall joined the Squadron just in time for an exercise against the Northumberland Hussars. At the end of May Ist Troop took part in the annual R.E. demonstration at Chatham. They enjoyed this enormously, fired a great quantity of blanks, sorely tried the ARK bridge and came back with glowing reports. Finally, in July the Squadron represented the Regiment at the centenary celebrations of Aldershot Garrison Church. Sixty—three officers and men marched past Her Majesty The Queen. As these notes end we are preparing to take our tanks to sea in what promises to be an amusing exercise in Dorset.

66

THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

'13

be comfortable in the jungle from our good friends the Queens Own Highlanders and the 1/2 Gurkha Rifles. We learnt how to play Softball. What of the exercises we went on? That short exercise with the Highlanders when we discovered that they were prey to us at night and we to them by day; we learnt a lot from that exercise and put it to good use when we met them again. Our next exercise was to provide an enemy for the Highlanders who were being airlanded by helicopter from H.M.S. Bulwark into “our country.” The exercise took place about 100 miles north of Singapore on the east coast of Malaya. Highlights of the exercise were the capture of Hie Lan and his two advisers. Tprs Green, Rantell and Stratford who were frog marched off into the jungle by a small enemy party and later helicoptered onto H.M.S. Bulwark for a sea trip home; the ambush of a whole enemy company by our Gurkha Platoon; the rather startled look on the faces of certain SHQ Troop soldiers when the Squadron Leader pointed out some three days old elephant dung in the middle of the Troop leaguer area! And, of course, the swimming in the sea which was most refreshing.

99 """""""""""""""|"IHIllllnnlmummmum SQUADRON ”"”"'"""""

IFE in “ B ” Squadron over the past year has been brimful, we have been kept happy and busy going from event to event. It is sometimes hard to conjure up the past; and to imagine Singapore and Malaya now that we are in Tidworth is difficult. Do you remember the smell of the Kampongs; the lush greenery everywhere, the heat and damp; Johnny Wee trying to sell you a car ‘very cheap’; working on your Armoured Cars in the sun stripped to the waist; Mohammed Ishaq providing you with ice cold drinks at any time of the day or night?

Well, what did we do with ourselves in Singapore between April and October, 1962, when we bearded the troopship Oxfordshire. The Squadron was reorganised to provide three Scout Troops and two Gun Troops; we practiced our Internal Security tasks and on occasions provided a notable and angry “crowd” for others to deal with. We marched into the local ulu every Friday and became quite confident jungle bashers. We learnt how to

the Far The next time the Squadron was out in force was to provide a land enemy for and landEast Fleet; the general idea being that the Far East Fleet would land, by helicopter line com— ing craft, a Commando and Infantry Battalion in our country to sever the coast H.M.S. Ark munications. We had an impressive list of Opponents, H.M.S. Bulwark again, north-east Royal and H.M.S. Tiger to name the main ships. The exercise took place on the to get to coast of Malaya and although scheduled to las: 48 hours it was an exercise in itself 500 To give you some idea of our problems, the exercise area was some the area. route to the miles from our base in Singapore. The Armoured Cars had to go by a different by ferry, many of Scout Cars for a quarter of the distance. We had to cross eight major rivers and positively across taken being Saladin a watch to interesting was it that them so antiquated the exercise area dangerous to be on the ferry at the same time! The First Troop arrived in area was over a nearly 24 hours before the last and finally our replenishment to the exercise there and back return trip of 240 miles which took just under 48 hours. However, we got “B” Squadron have without mishap and are able to say that on the east coast of Malaya


I4

THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

got the farthest north of any Armoured Car Squadron. The exercise area was most interesting and the country, especially along the coast, very beautiful. Points that will be remembered by many of the old hands were the tank attack by 2nd and 3rd Troops, the enemy’s shortage of water, the Royal Navy’s radio procedure, the forest fire, the Malay girls in their sarongs, the petrol lorry’s narrow escape, the wonderful swimming and lastly the Squadron Leader’s interest in tropical birds of the flying sort!

THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

SQUADRONWWWWWWWWWW

Our last trip round Malaya before leaving was also a farewell to Armoured Cars. The Squadron went on an Inter-Troop Rally, some 300 miles from Singapore, with special tasks to carry out at each Control Point. This was a great success and though everyone was tired and weary on return to barracks they all enjoyed themselves. The Rally was won by Lt Roberts’ 5th Troop. We entered 99 Gurkha Brigade sports in the Minor Units and came second; “ Minor Units ” also included two Gurkha A.S.C. Companies of over 400 men, one of which, our hot rival, was commanded by Maj “Bob ” Price who was a Troop Leader in the Regiment be~ tween 1948 and 1950. Notable athletes of the Squadron on that day were Sgt. Mackay in the long jump and 100 yards, Tpr Dufton in the hammer and shot, ch1 Murphy in the 100 yards and pole vault, Lt Roberts in the 120 yards hurdles and pole vault, Sgt Rainger in the high jump, Tpr Pearce winning the 880 yards, our long distance runners Tprs Smoker, Lisney, Reece and Allison and finally the relay team of Sgt. Mackay. chl Murphy, Tpr Lisney and Lt Roberts. Our tug—of—war team, after three very long pulls, managed to win the Minor Units event under the management of Sgt Thornton. One of the frequent, and never to be forgotten events, used to take place in the SQMS’s Basha, his private interviews with soldiers who needed a helping hand. Mohammed Ishaq was always available with a cooling drink for both contestants immediately the interview finished. And so our tour of Singpaore came to an end. I think we were all sad to leave and eager to go. We had been happy and had plenty to do. As the troopship sailed away and we all had our last look at Singapore the most generally heard remark was, “ Do you remember . . .” We had a wonderful summer cruise on board the Oxfordshire until we were rudely awakened by a storm in the Bay of Biscay; since when the sun has simply been a memory. After leave We all assembled in Tidworth 0n the 7th January. We looked at each other, the weather, the barracks and the tanks; used a few of the more common military expletives, spat on our hands and had a go. We drew up some tanks in the middle of January, manned them with whoever was available, and out we went come snow, come rain. Meanwhile the majority went on courses in the Training Wing. At the beginning of March we drew up some more tanks and at the same time we developed a healthy respect for them and even began to like them; though opinions differed after we had slipped off our tracks in the snow once or twice. We had many little exercises during the first three months of the year and finally in April went for a week to the Tank Ranges at Lulworth, and it was here by dint of hard work and many mistakes that “B” Squadron, as an Armoured Squadron, was born. We say goodbye to Capt Amery to H.Q. Squadron, Capt Aylen to “C” Squadron, and Whisky—Whisky, sorry, Lt Williams-Wynn, to H.Q. Squadron. More goodbyes to SSM Titmarsh now with the K.C.L.Y., SQMS Simpson to H.Q. Squadron, Sgt Rainger to Recce Troop, Sgt Mackay to the K.C.L.Y., Sgt Poulter to the Radio School at Bovington, Sgt Bell, Royal Signals, to Catterick, and Cpl Pettit who has left the Army. However we are pleased to welcome Capt Scott, 2Lt Shepherd-Cross, SSM Paul and SQMS Bujko and many new faces who had been trained on tanks while we were still in Singapore.

trishaws and preparaUR commentary begins in Ipoh, the heat, the bashas, cha—wallahs, out and on the way set Squadron the 1962, July, In .” Trumpeter “ tions for Exercise in Singapore. The Squadron “B” by after looked to Malacca we were most hospitably us to carry out a number of disexercise, besides testing us in our normal roles, required stood :15 in good stead. .Towar s mounted patrols. For these our preliminary jungle training in north. Saxon Shore Exercise to on went Squadron the of part exercise the the end of tired, dusty, but Ipoh, in again together were we before weeks east Malaya. It was three considerably more experienced.

Squadron by a small margin. In August we won the Regimental sports beating H.Q. l and became runners—up in ltihe SQMS Shones’ tug-of—war team were particularly successfu handover a number of Troop ral es Divisional sports. In addition to the preparations for training. Crews came to learn the of form useful and popular a were held and these proved several. had to. be rescued after and mines ore iron or difficulties of night navigation in tin spent in tranSit and the voyage driving round and round in circles in them. The fortnight tour abroad. home were a fitting and enjoyable end to our long away inside and outside the The New Year brought us many new faces and took others commanded until Keightley Capt and January in us left tzGerald Wilson-Fi Regiment. Maj and were learncrews and tanks few a had we time this By Maj Evans arrived in February. the Squadron'Leader developed ing the hazards of operating over snow and ice. No doubt of his arrival. We were out his healthy respect for the tanks from his slide on the afternoon permanently on courses crewmen fifteen with but May, and April in able were we as as often middle of June that the the until not was it s instructor as away N.C.O.s and eight officers and lly at Lulworth and ‘successfu fired we May In whole. a as Squadron was able to operate Sedgemoor II ‘ against The soon after we joined forces with “A” Squadron for ExerCise out on the Plain training With The Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry. In July we spent a week For a change the weather was everyone. by enjoyed much was which Rifles Royal Ulster before our block leave, we shortly July of end the at Finally, time. kind to us most of the


THE THE

JOURNAL

THE

ROYAL

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

I7

DRAGOON S

formed part of an enemy force in Exercise “July Handicap,” a valuable and fitting end to the first stage of our conversion to tanks. In the sporting field Sgt Hearn, chl Birt and Tpr Livingstone have regularly represented the Regiment.

The Genera-PS Burden ROM time to time it falls to the lot of Officers of the Regiment to be selected as A.D.C. to some personage of very great importance. More often than not the V.I.I’. is a serving or retired General of a Cavalry Regiment. In my case the distinguished officer I was to serve had retired at the end of the war, loaded with high rank and honours, only to be recalled to duty as a British Governor in Australia where, as personal representative of the Queen, he continues to serve his country with outstanding distinction. Needless to say such a long period of service in high positions had exhausted the supply of A.D.C.s from his own Regiment, and from practically every other source, and he was finally reduced to choosing myself.

E .2 9 o In

In

:-

l— a O {I}

.E

E

3 'E.

U

The P. & 0. Shipping Company, having mistaken my rank of temporary, local, unpaid Captain for that of a Captain R.N., a first class cabin of great comfort was placed at my disposal, and I set sail to take up my duties. The popular image of these duties is that an A.D.C. must be able to flirt eflectively, but not too aggressively, with any of his Master’s unmarried daughters, be able to lose gracefully at tennis or croquet, be competent to mix a dry martini. and own an efficient cigarette lighter. On my arrival, I was soon put right on this. The Official Secretary had a long list of duties, most of which involved the detailed planning of the innumerable official engagements which His Excellency attended, and, sometimes, the collection of material for the excellent speeches which so frequently delighted his various audiences. Daily I would study the enormous diary We kept and work out a programme of the day’s events. Not, you might say, a particularly difficult task, but one which did require a certain precision and care particularly, as was so often the case, when arrangements had to be made with civilian organisations who, by their very nature, could not control the timing of events with military exactitude. My own ability to be punctilious and exact was distinctly meagre, and my boss must frequently have given up all hope for the future of the Army in general, and of The Royal Dragoons in particular. Usually I was saved from disaster by the endless tact and efficiency of the Official Secretary, the vast experience of Ernie, the principal driver, or by the Irish charm of the Lady Secretary to the Governor’s wife. On one occasion, however. none of these came to my aid.

On the day in question the diary shoch an easy morning. One or two official callers, the collection of material for an official report, and a call by the Admiral flying his flag in a visiting Cruiser of the Royal Navy, followed by a luncheon party for a dozen guests. It is the polite custom of the senior officer in visiting ships to call on the Governor, and he, in turn, usually returns the call. Both calls involve being dressed up to the tens. The Governor’s valet was ready with the correct uniform, there would just be time for the Governor to change before his luncheon party, and everything seemed nice and tidy as I waited for the Admiral’s official car to arrive. Exactly at the appointed time there came round the corner of the drive not the familiar black car flying the White Ensign, but a large banner carried by a very black Aboriginal gentleman, which proclaimed that he was in favour of equal rights for Aboriginals. He was accompanied by a numerous deputation. one of whose members carried an enormous, illuminated scroll. Behind these as they slowly advanced came one half of a brass band, then the Admiral’s car, next the other half of the brass band, somewhat out of time with the front half,

then some more of the deputation and directly behind that the cars of the luncheon guests. The whole shoeking mess drew to a halt before the front door, the band still playing as best they could while a very puzzled Admiral, determined to be on time, thrust his way towards me.


THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

THE

In my day dreams I had always supposed that in moments of real crisis I would be calm and fearless, master of myself and of the situation, but here I had made two major errors. First I had got the times of the invitations for luncheon wrong and, worse still, I had forgotten all about the deputation and that the Governo was supposed to give them an address in the ballroom adjoining Government House. Nelson would have known what to do, so would James Bond, but my mind was paralysed with panic. The band had now stopped playing, the Admiral had reached the door. The luncheon guests evidently wanted to come in, the deputation was waiting for something to happen. Letting the Admiral in, I slammed the door on the remainder. The Governor stood in his office looking out at the scene on the drive with something of the look he must have worn when one of his Brigadiers had failed to cross the start line on time. The Admiral was unceremoniously introduced, and I was free to return to the battle. By this time the luncheon guests had forced their way in. There were no drinks arranged for them and the cigarette boxes were empty. There was no sign of their host and hostess. They stood in a little group talking in whispers and wondering if they had come on the wrong day. I managed to find some sherry and left them to it without explanation. Now for the members of the delegation. These had to be marshalled and guided through a back entrance to the great ballroom where they remained in respectful expectancy. Back again in time to see off the Admiral, then to break the news to the Governor that a hundred or so delegates were waiting to hear a speech from him. The Governor showed his true greatness. Without wasting words on me—one look was quite sufficient—he advanced on the delegation, by now completely overawed by their long wait and by the magnificence of his uniform. He received their address and delivered a reply which was entirely to the point, witty, and rendered even more impressive by the absence of any notes. I now had to confess that his luncheon guests were waiting and once more the great man rose to the occasion. Within five minutes he had changed out of his uniform and was apologising to them that he had made an error in the times of his engagements. I was left to wonder whether A.D.C.s are of any use at all and whether the world would not be a better place without them, and without this one in particular.

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

new! _ 3 . ..

5 I-

o n. N M .E m E o L: 9-! U

E:

T.’ N a. O G

T has been an eventful year, with Squadron Leaders changing frequently, and with each new face a period of bustling activity and another new policy. The last few months in Ipoh, under Lt Hamilton—Russell saw the strength of the Squadron drop to just over a hundred. The move home in H.M.T. Oxfordshire was extremely pleasant until we hit the Bay of Biscay (or vice versa). We then realised that we had lost the sun, and up to now have not seen it again. After a well—earned leave, we re-assembled at Tidworth on the 7th January to find that the advance party had done a grand job. Thei main impression was that the camp was the same as when we left it three years before, and some even claimed to recognise the rubbish they had thrown away then. Capt Amery assumed command and the strength increased until once more we are about three hundred. All the square pegs were eventually fitted into round holes, and for a long time Squadron Orders contained inter-Troop postings and a “ Situations Vacant ” column. Congratulations to the athletics team, which won the Scissors Cup. Still serving as SSM, after three years, is SSM Blackaller, still relying on ch1 Stimpson who unfortunately, goes in September to lo Recce Flight. SQMS Cameron still soldiers on without any grey hair


JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS THE

jOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

21

appearing to date. The arms store is still under the care of Adams, George~ who is adept at disappearing at the wrong time. The stories of the year are: The Squadron Leader who asked what a 252 was, and the SSM who went to donate blood but not a drop could be found.

RHQ Troop ,

WITH the run—down of men, the only event of note in our last six months was Exercise “Saxon Shore.”

(,1 m,,-..»,.n,,.,, m. wan/W, ..,,,

THE

Here, apart from losing “A”

Squadron

near the

Thai

border,

and

“C” Squadron’s anxiety to leave the exercise area, all went well. Many were the changes to greet us at Tidworth; new faces, a few; new vehicles, too many; and the only reason we keep getting extra Land Rovers is because of the difficulty the Adjutant has in getting on and off tanks. Our baptism in the field came in February. With the Second-in-Command and the RSM as tank commanders, we braved the snow, and are still the only Troop in the Regiment to turn a tank over. Since then we have been out on as many trips as our continuing shortage of men will allow. We have had fun at night on Larkhill and split our sides to see the Signal Officer’s face after driving closed down from Tilshead to Crossing A. We came fifth in the inter—Troop rally; all praise to ch1 Butler and Tprs Leaney and Ward for their efforts with the Troop Leader’s half-track.

Reece Troop THE Regiment’s first Recce Troop was delivered out of the white hell of an English winter. Slowly, men and vehicles appeared, although a shunting match in the Wilderness of Gloucestershire (does anyone know exactly where?) delayed things for a time. We had several map—reading exercises in the snow to a:climatise ourselves after the jungle, and it was remarkable how quickly Tpr Love and others managed to find the Oak Cafe in Amesbury at the end of the day. Sgt Rainger devised some good exercises by day and night, which everyone eninved, and by April the “tribe” was almost complete. About this time, Sgt Rainger, chl Turner, Tprs Hart, Crowley, Antrobus, Pentecost and Love went film making in Dorset, as yet the film is unfinished, as they are still repairing the camera. This was followed by Exercise “ West End,” in Cornwall, as enemy to SI Brigade. Having only left the “Plain ” that morning, we arrived to see the first waves coming ashore. We suffered badly from air attacks, but retaliated that night with a raid on an enemy Headquarters that solved our petrol problems and amused Tpr Bacon. Soon after, we were again in the West Country, chasing Sandhurst Cadets on an initiative exercise. Tprs Hart and Love caught an “ agents ” car as it was being loaded on to a train at Exeter. One unfortunate Cadet was caught three times, and a number of others were also captured. The highlight of the year was our exercise in Libya with “ The Skins ” Recce Troop and our administrative party under W0 11 Williams. The success of this was due to the assistance and kindness of The Greeniackets, who we exercised against and who supplied our vehicles. For the first few days we acted as enemy to a Company of The Greeniackets, and then with “The Skins,” as enemy to the whole Battalion. Apart from the great value we gained from the exercises, we learned a great deal about a variety of desert conditions, saw a number of gazelle, visited Cyrene, and caught crabs at Appolonia. The vehicles held 0ut—just——and Mr. Williams did wonders to keep our sets going. Since our return, we have had a day at Lulworth ranges and an enjoyable exercise under command of “C” Squadron against 19 Infantry Brigade. We have also had more than our fair share of actions to deter nuclear disarmers from Porton.

M.T. Troop Royal Tournament, 1963. B. Amery in the dress of an oflicer of 1661.

N January, M.T. was centralised into a vast empire of over 50 vehicles; since then we have been trying to find someone to look after them. We are nearly up to establishment now and are waiting for one final intake from “ The Scrubs.” Apparently the reason why we can’t go on block leave is that the Provost would have to go on the dole.


THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS THE

We have done our share of training and all drivers can navigate themselves quite competently (who tried to sample the “real thing” on Larkhill impact areaP). Quite a lot of exercises have been done with Squadrons, and replenishments of every type reach their destination at great speed. A water trailer was observed by a horrified Signal Officer to pass over R.H.Q. at about 450 mph. at a height of zooft. It is now in Workshops. “Molotov Bull” still sits with beady eye in the M.T. Office and manages to convince infuriated transport demanders that “although you may think you can see 20 wagons on the square, in fact you are suffering from hallucinations.” Cpl Howell’s feet are always seen protruding from underneath a 3-tonner, which is about the nearest the writer has come to meeting him. The M.T.O. reluctantly left in August to become a civilian. At the time of going to press, Cpl Bull had lent him 38 Biros since February, and these notes are being written in chinagraph. Anyone giving ‘ Prank’ pep pills will be disapproved of. Sgt Remfrey’s personal weapon is said to be a hydrometer, and at the last blood grouping session, at the M.I. Room, his blood group was stated to be AL 3 . . . He’s a little worried in case he needs a transfusion. Tprs Willson, Harding and Treadaway went on “ holiday ” to Libya, and, judging by the Land Rover they brought back, they had a “smashing” time. Most of us managed BE tests, although the “ Parson ” got lost in the long grass, just after the start of the nine—mile march, rejoining the road just before the finish. The energy he saved will qualify him for a place in the Squadron boxing team. “Fangio” Willson is the only person to have passed an “E” Type on the MI with his 3—tonner. Tpr Parks will no doubt graduate to the “dirt track,” having already “bitten it,” and he has a weakness for trying to show the police cars that his motor-bike will go faster than they can in a 30 m.p.h. limit. ch1 Scott is allergic to flag cars, Tpr Ody to staff cars, and scientists are still trying to calculate how ones leaves a ISO-yard skid mark on the road when “I was doing approxi— mately 15 miles per hour.” The rally team has been active, and Capt Hamilton—Russell, with chl Beddingfield driving, won the 3 Division Rally. Rumour has it that the winning Land Rover had an Alexander Stage 3 conversion on it. The M.T.O. and 2Lt Scott, with Tprs Brown and Tibbenham, also competed, while Cpl Williamson (Tech) and Cpl. Howell sat gibbering in the back. By the time the M.T.O.’s Land Rover had a puncture and had fallen off its jack twice, he was rather out of the running, and Mr. Scott had a brisk Grand Prix with the R.M.P. He lost.

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

Recent Events OUR important events have passed since this edition of the Journal was sent to the printers. These events are covered briefly in the next four pages and will be more fully reported in the next edition to be published in June, 1964.

The Regimental Reunion 24th and 25th August HE serving Regiment were “At Home’ to the Regimental Association at Tidworth and were delighted and proud to be able to entertain about a hundred and twenty Old Comrades and their wives over the week-end. The programme of activities began at midday on Saturday with a cricket match between Past and Present which ended in a convincing win for the Old Comrades. While the match was being played, other visitors assembled for luncheon after which they split up into parties for a tour of the barracks and display of the Regiment’s life and activities. These included tank rides, a display by the Band and of the Regimental silver and visits to barrack rooms, and static displays of vehicles and equipment. In the evening after supper in Messes a Regimental Dance was held in the Gymnasium. On Sunday the weather was poor and the Drum Head Service was held indoors. The service was conducted by the Rev. C. J. Comyns and the Rev. R. W. Miles, both of whom had served in the Regiment. There followed luncheon in the Oflicers’ and Sergeants’ Messes before our visitors departed, after a most enjoyable and successful reunion.

Inter Squadron Novices Boxing. 9th October

The Buckley Trophy

HE Regiment was very honoured at being able to invite Major-General J. Buckley, C.B.E., D.S.O., M.C., to present the trophy, that he himself had presented to the Regiment, to the winning Squadron. After some hard-fought and close preliminary rounds held on the previous two evenings, “C” Squadron won the competition by beating “A” Squadron in the final. Results were: October 7: “C” Squadron beat “HQ.” Squadron; October 8th: “A” Squadron beat “B” Squadron; October 9: “C” Squadron beat “A” Squadron.

March through the City of London 22nd October Congratulations to Tprs Brown, Scott and Percival on their promotion, and we welcome Sgt Bosher, chl Fry and chl Wiflin, who have just joined us. Cpl Burge has just departed to Recce Troop. Tpr Collins alternates between the C.O.’s staff car and Rover, and he is sometimes seen gratefully acknowledging salutes. We are very sorry to lose Tpr Benn to Bovington, but he does occasionally visit us in his limousine. Tpr. Brownless is now our clerk and is at present on a course learning to type by numbers.

Q.M. Group HE return home set off a series of staff changes. Our thanks go to the following for their skilful and untiring efforts in administering and then handing over married quarters in Malaya. Sgt Thorpe who went to “C” Squadron, Cpl Underwood to the M.I. Room, Cpl Squires to Lulworth, and Tpr Heads to civilian life. Congratulations to SQMS’s Leese and Woods who passed through our hands before their promotion. The department is certainly much quieter these days. We wish every success to ch1 Bridge, now in B.A.O.R., and to Tpr Steele, now a civilian. A welcome to Sgt Jubb who now looks after accommodation, Sgt Webster back once more in the carpenter’s shop, and to Cpl Wickenden, Tprs Elmslie, Taylor, Kirkby, Yendell our newest recruits. As can be seen elsewhere ch1 Joe (Batls) Taylor is still soldiering with us and despite the loss of his old sanitary “ Guard ” does yeoman service with indigenous labour.

THE Regiment exercised its privilege of marching through the City of London with Guidon flying, drums beating and bayonets fixed. This was the first common on which the Regiment had been able to exercise the righ since being recognised as a PriVileged Regi—

ment of the City of London in 1961.

.

'

Two hundred and seventy officers and men formed up at Armoury House in City Road and were inspected by the Colonel of the Regiment, Brigadier A. H. Pepys, D.s.o. Led by the Commanding Officer and Adjutant on horse back, the Regiment marched down Moorgate to be challenged at the City boundary by Colonel G. E. P. Hutchins, the City Marshal, who then led the parade doom Moorgate and Lothbury, round the Bank of England and past Mansion House where Sir Ralph Perring, the Lord Mayor, took the salute at noon. The occasion was enhanced by brilliant weither and by the presence of a very large number of serving and past members of the Regiment and their famihes.

The Officers Tercentenary Ball 22nd October OME five hundred past and present officers of the Regiment, their wives and guests attended the ball in Mansion House in the evening. The Regiment was honoured by the presence of Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother and the Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress, Sir Ralph and Lady Perring, who so graCiously consented to the use of Mansion House. The ball, which had been planned for tercentenary celebrations in 1961 and then postponed because the Regiment was serving abroad, was a‘ splendid and memorable occasion and it was further fitting that it should take place as it did, on the eve of the celebrations of the Battle of El Alamein.


THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

Regimental Reunion

= O "U

= O (a

9 >3 q.» 0—!

U 4)

S u

-: GD 5 O l-t

.=: 4-)

S U H

s

the strain.

Guidon Party, “ C" and “ H.Q." Squadrons.

p-J


THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

March through the City of London s

m

L/Cpl Joe Balfs and the Upper Perak Levies.

Regimental Orderly Room APT Stanley-Smith took over Adjutant when Capt Jacobs left the Regiment for UK. and release. Under his guidance our last days were spent in Ipoh preparing and executing the move to Singapore and then on to UK. The move by train to Singapore was perfect except for one small blue suitcase belonging to the organisers. This resulted in the acting chief clerk missing a formal free “do ” in the transit Sergeants’ Mess while his luggage was propelled in a red stock car from Ipoh to Singapore by SSM “ C ” Squadron. Many families were returned to UK. by air including Ssgt Leech, the chief clerk, who left in September to open the advance party. The handover of the R.O.R. and the Band railway warrants, used and unused, went smoothly and all signatures on handover certificates were genuine. The period in transit went well even after a certain attached A.C.C. Sergeant mistook the Tiger Brewery for a soft drink factory that he was visiting. His A.F.B. 120 (fourth sheet) gives the details. On our return to Tidworth we were fortunate, when confronted with 21 documents inspection, to find that the inspector was none other than the late chief clerk of the Q.R.I.H. whom we handed over to in Ipoh. This visit went well and the next inspection will be at the end of August when the results should be even better. We welcome Cpl Wennell, back after two years in the War Office. He would like to confirm that there is no truth whatsoever in the rumour that he broke the official world tea drinking record whilst there. We wish to congratulate W0 11 Leech on his promotion and posting to B.A.O.R. We send our best wishes to him and his family in their new station. We congratulate Tpr Roddis on his promotion to chl and posting to “A” Squadron. Tpr Lee was loaned to H.Q. R.A.C. for a short while in which he managed to take all his leave and returned to relieve Cpl Payne who returns to duty. On our return to UK, we were happy to see Maj Boyd as Adjutant and Capt HamiltonRussell as Assistant Adjutant. The latter looks like becoming a QC. at least; his appearances with and without the accused at recent D.C_M.s only added to his completely unflappable firm


THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

29

When these notes are written next year, there will be a new troop, as all the originals are due for posting, or return to civilian life, in the near future. The new N.C.O. I.C. nominated lS Ssgt Tompkins who is due to make his appearance on Ist November.

A.C.C. Troop CONTRARY to last year’s notes the A.C.C. are still with us and many of the Regimental cooks are now in the process of transferring to the A.C.C., so it looks as if we will be with the Regiment for a few years to come yet! We wish the following, who served with the Troop and have left since our last notes, all the best in civilian life, Ptes Welch, Whiteside, Holloway, Hutcheson. To those posted out of the Troop we wish all the best in their new appointments, Sgts Thompson, Drury, chls Harris and Scott, Ptes Watson and Gooding. We welcome to the Troop Cpl Jetfries and hope his stay with us will be a happy one. We also Welcome the following Regimental cooks and hope they will transfer to the A.C.C. in the near future, Tprs Voce, Hendry, Jones, Freeman, Salter, Hayward and Townsend. We would like to congratulate Tprs Chesterton, Ashford, Chapman and Kestle on passing their BIII Cooks course at Aldershot. We would like to congratulate chl Reid on his recent promotion to Cpl and Pte Robson on promotion to ch1.

Light Aid Detachment

The

Orderly

Room,

June,

1963.

as a rock approach. ch1 Theed has done well in the Training Wing and has played cricket for the Regiment. ch1 Deane, Tpr Lane and the old man in Tech did very well in the Kennedy-type march organised by W.S.H.B. Kennedy junior. Last but not least we congratulate Lt Brook on his promotion. In addition to his most serious duties as 10. he commands that vast R.H.Q. Troop and is being groomed for bigger things to come in lands far far away. Stop press: A late flash illustrates yet another side to the versatile Assistant Adjutant in his capacity as first deputy of Bhurtpore Creek. At dead of night on 25th July, 1963, he successfully captured One-Eyed Smith and Two—Gun Paramor in the act of half inching two of the four-legged friends. Such an outrage to these noble beasts could not have been more timely nipped in the bud by that ever alert No. 1 deputy.—Spectemur Agendo!

Royal Signals Troop N 1959, when the Regiment left Tidworth for Aden, the Royal Signals Troop had a strength of one Warrant Officer and twenty—seven men. When we returned from Malaya in 1962, the troop strength was down to one Warrant Officer and six men. At the time of writing, strength has been reduced by a further two, and now the Royal Signals are represented by W0 II Williams and Cpls Harden, Middleton and Thomas. There are rumours that a new issue of radio operators (Royal Signals) is to be made shortly, so that perhaps the Regimental rear link can be manned once again by its establishment. Sigs Benson and Pilkington have left the Regiment for B.A.O.R., and it is to be hoped that Pilkington is not quite so accident prone in that theatre as he was in the Far East. He will find it difficult to run in to a buffalo or a monsoon drain in Krefeld. Life in the Troop at Tidworth is one long battle between WOII Williams and SSM Blackallar of H.Q. Squadron. The one wants his men to carry out maintenance and repair while the other wants them to do their B.E. tests, education, range qualification, and to pad out the very thin ranks of the Squadron drill parade. Cpl Middleton’s squad was congratulated by the RSM one morning on its smart drill, but Cpl Middleton denies that he has aspirations towards drill instructing.

0 many changes have taken place since leaving Malaya that it is difficult to know where to begin. After a very hectic period, which included the C.I.V., the handover and packing, everyone was glad to arrive in Singapore for a short rest before the voyage home. In Singapore the local trips and visits were most enjoyable, and in particular the visit to the Tiger Brewery. There was only one minor mishap during this period which occurred during a visit to the Seven Sisters Island when Cfn Cogan and a member of the Royal Signals Troop were swept out to sea in a rowing boat. They still insist that they were not trying to join the advance party! After a leisurely voyage back and leave with friends and relations we found ourselves tackling the problems of conversion under the worst climatic conditions for many years. The change of role increased the size of the L.A.D. and we are very pleased to welcome thirty newcomers. \Ve were more fortunate than most within the Regiment in that the majority had previous training and some experience of tanks. With the added experience gained in the early months of this year we now hope that we are in a position to give the Regiment the service that it requires. A lucky few have managed to get abroad again since our return. Cpl Davis and Cfn Shaw went to North Africa with the Recce Troop and spent a month in Cyprus on their way back, putting the exercise vehicles back into a stockpile. Ssgt Brooker, B.E.M., was flown at very short notice to Malaya for two months, but was unlucky enough to be interned in Terendak Camp for most of his stay due to a local cholera epidemic. Having heard so much about the country from the old hands he was rather disappointed and is still searching for the mystique of the East! In June this year we said goodbye to Mr. Jones who left us to attend a course at the Royal Military College of Science. Having spent twenty months with the L.A.D. he had become very much part of the establishment and we would all like to wish him much success for the future. Other old hands who have departed are chl Kempson to civilian life, and chls “ Crasher ” Ashton, Green and Cfn Grieves, Barnes, MacDonald and Stacey, on posting. Our very best wishes go with them all. Since the last edition of The Eagle we have had some sporting successes. At the Regi— mental rifle meeting we won the S.L.R. Cup, The Falling Plate Competition and produced At the athletics meeting in Ipoh, Cfn the champion shot of the meeting, Cfn Dunn. MacDonald won the 440 yards, Cfn Barnes the 3 miles, and Cfn Docherty the hop, step and jump. At the Tidworth athletic meeting we were nowhere near so successful and had to be


THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

me jOURNAL or

DRAGOONS

~‘*3

i

THE

ROYAL DRAGOONS

31

content with Docherty winning the long jump and a successful tug—of—war team, who went on to be runners—up in the 3 Division meeting. We all look forward to the coming year and the possibilities of once more serving abroad.

The Band

High

Commissioner’s Cocktail Party, Malaya.

AVING been at Tidworth several months we have to cast our minds back to Malaya to link up the events chronologically since the last issue of Band notes. We managed to get another month of Duty Band at Singapore and repeated the high standard of performances achieved on the first visit. It was during this month that we were able to play for the wedding of Capt and Mrs. Boueher in The Cathedral at Singapore. This is always a pleasant experience accoustically and what better occasion than for a Regimental wedding. Perhaps the next and final highlight of our Far East activity was being called upon by the Sultan of Perak to play for the state visit of the King and Queen of Thailand during the luncheon at Ipoh. The King took a great interest in the Band due to his own interest in music and being a competent performer on the saxophone. This also marked the last performance on the last day in the Regiment for the remaining National Servicemen—Jones, Riley and Hill. Three excellent men who we were sorry to lose as instrumentalists and hockey players. After the usual round of farewell parties we finally boarded the Oxfordshire on its last trooping voyage to England with a depleted band and minus a Bandtnaster. Ssgt Darling is to be congratulated on bringing the Band home and providing the necessary music on the ship. \Ve quickly settled into our stride at Tidworth with now an all—Regular band and the house in good order. A Kneller Hall inspection took place in May and the result was most satisfactory. It was for this occasion that we managed to complete the Herald Trumpet team of eight, with a change of banners, making a fine picture wi:h Colonel. Lt Colonel and Six Captains’ Guidons which we are proud to produce. Tpr Williams‘ “ C” Squadron.


32

THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS THE

The Band has so far appeared at The Royal Tournament and The Bath Tattoo. other publicity events are on the calendar for the year.

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

Many

Sport is an unknown quantity at the moment. I feel certain we will be challenging on the hockey field in the next season where we hope to repeat the honours brought in Malaya, if only to keep the clock won from “ A” Squadron. Old faces have turned up at Tidworth, which we are always pleased to see, and new faces are now on the scene in the names of Bdsm Cotton and Hobson who we welcome and trust their stay will be pleasant and successful. Returned to the fold from courses, etc., are Sgt Whellans. Bdsm Shearn, Atkinson and Roberts. Sgt. Whellans is now able to take his place in the Band and operate to the full extent. This is a wonderful recovery and we are all very pleased. Bdsm Moloney and Brittain are at present on pupils courses at Kneller Hall and we hope they will maintain the high standard set by previous members of the band. Congratulations to chl Burgess, who has taken the plunge and joined the ranks of the married men. Mrs. Burgess is an ex-member of the Band of the W.R.A.C. It is anticipated that some future musical material will be provided and a good source of recruiting for the Regimental Band.

F; \0 Q H

Sergeants Mess ROM our comfortable home in Tidworth it is diflicult to take in the many activities of the past eighteen months, looking back as we are through the bitter winter to the hot, humid climate of Malaya. However, this is what we endeavour to do in these notes. The main social event held in the mid-summer of 1952 was the “Western Style” dance at which numerous single elements were well protected behind the camouflage of nets and tiger skins. Shirt ripping and shandy showers were the order of the day. At the end of some social events a new fashion in “Over the cliff” stock car racing has started. Although many versatile drivers are now renowned for their feats of endurance and night chasing escapades, they run a poor second to “ Speedy Gonzalez Blackallar.” Red lead is available for patchwork Applications should be in triplicate and submitted on motors on request to the TQMS. the first Thursday before the second Monday in the month, two years in advance. Owing to intensive jungle training and formation exercises the usual Waterloo Mess function was delayed and a combined Waterloo and Farewell Ball was held in the Mess early in At this ball the RSM Ist/6th September, before families travelling home by air had left. Gurkha Rifles kindly presented the Mess with a plaque.

Mrs. Poulter (“Green Fingers”) was a wonderful helper in the garden in Ipoh, and the After handing over in Ipoh, the Mess was accommodated trellis work was spectacular. with the F.E.T.C. Mess in Singapore. The journey home was broken at three places. First port of call was Ceylon, where Mahomed Ali Wood and Mustapha Hall were taken for a ride (or was Hall conned by Wood? Good for Wood!) and many of the families enjoyed visits to the 200. The second stop was at Aden. Although the shore of Little Aden was clearly visible, time prevented many of us paying another visit. The Royal Scots Greys s:ood the Mess and the families a pleasant lunch at the Mermaid Club, Steamer Point. A lucky few managed to get in some tax—free shopping RSM Norman, of the 9/12 Lan:ers, visited the ship and met many old friends, in Crater. including SSM Crabbe. Our thanks go to both the 9/12 Lancers and the Greys for their great hospitality. Gibraltar was the next port of call, and the list before the Regiment reached home. Greetings telegrams, like “Right hand down after Gib,” found the T.T. Oxfordshire struggling homeward through the Bay of Biscay. This was the last trooping voyage of the Oxfordshire, and at all credit for a most pleasant voyage goes to her staff. A welcoming party boarded the ship

_.>1 H= <—v? =a d) u m0 u == I:

E0 U

E C .-I: 2!

l:

E” 0 .E

F


34

THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

Southampton on the evening of the 18th November, and a happy evening was spent saying “hello” to old friends and farewell to new friends made on the boat. The flow of gin and tonics, smiling waiters, deckchair grabbing, and that perpetual looking over the side had come to an end. Below decks, Sgt Hall, ably assisted by Sgt Wood, issued leave passes and tickets at a tremendous rate.

Well-earned leave followed disembarkation and customs clmrance—-don’t mention customs Settling in at Tidworth was soon accomplished, and we are enjoying clearance to the RSM! meeting our old friends on familiar ground after the long spell abroad. We hope that others who have not yet been to see us will do so before long. Despite long periods of absence, we promise not to charge for back mess subscriptions. The Mess entertained a large party from the Kent and County of London Yeomanry in April for a training week-end. We are taking part in the Garrison Darts League, and have made many new friends among the units in Tidworth. We particularly remember the hockey match followed by a curry lunch with 5 Regiment, R.A. A combined Waterloo Ball was given in Assaye gymnasium on the 6th July by “The Skins ” and ourselves. This was an outstanding success and considered to be one of the finest balls we have ever given.

The Mess was very sorry to see Lt Col K. F. Timbrell, M.c.. leave the Regiment. We take this opportunity of wishing him God Speed in his new appointment and thank him for the many momentoes he presented to the Mess before he left. We congratulate SQMS Bujko on the award of the British Empire Medal for his service in Kuwait, and Ssgt Darling on the award of the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal. We welcome the following new members to the Mess: Sgts Priestman, Evans, Bosher, Best, Chambers, McCormick, Wight, Briggs, and from the R.E.M.E., Sgts. Traynor and Quigley. We welcome the following who have joined the Mess from E.R.E. and those who have joined the L.A.D. attached to the Regiment: SSM Paul, SQMS Bujke, Sgts Webster, Remfrey, Dawson, Tucker, Wallace, Corcoran, Murtagh. Sarll, Best, Church, Hollis, Day, W0 11 Prince, Enzer, Ssgts. Brooker B.E.M., and Porter, and SI Freeman.

The Regimental Association Honorary Secretary: Major C. W. J. Lewis, M.B.E., Home Headquarters, The Royal Dragoons,

Hill House,

Beckenham Lane, Bromley, Kent.

Tele.: Widmore 1939. ____¥——

as E are sad to record the resignation of Mr. W. Thomas after 15 years’ loyal service his honorary secretary. This has been brought about through pressure of work and to his many other commitments. The Association largely owes its present strong position of condedicated service. In offering our gratitude and best wishes we take the opportunity gratulating him on being installed as a Freeman of The City of London.

Colonel The annual re-union dinner of 1963 was held at Albany Street on 4th May. The with more of the Regiment presided. There was a record attendance of 223 at the dinner to see so many members and their wives attending the dance afterwards. We were delighted us an excellent proserving members of the Regiment present, and the Regimental band gave in that wives were gramme of music throughout the evening. The dinner broke precedent have agreed allowed to attend and 28 wives did so. This was such a success that the committee May, 1964. 2nd on Street Albany at held be to dinner next the attend may wives that also far The numbers at the Memorial Parade in Hyde Park the following morning were banner. Association the behind marched members r18 greater than usual, and

Cavalry Memorial Parade. 1963.

The social club, now in its second year, has been gathering strength and is now a most popular event which takes place approximately every six weeks during the autumn and Winter months. We welcome not only our London members but also members and their wives and families from farther afield and, of course, serving members of the Regiment. The committee have agreed that the battles of Waterloo and El Alamein shall in future be celebrated by social functions on the nearest and most convenient Saturday. A very successful Waterloo function has already been held and we are preparing to celebrate the battle of El Alamein on Saturday, 26th October, some four days after the Regiment has paraded through the City of London. Our membership has steadily increased during the year and at the present stands at : Serving and Ex Officers Ex Other Ranks Serving Other Ranks

I61 207 6'7 Total

These figures are most gratifying but number of other ranks who have lost touch 500 members and in our next notes we hope anyone knows of any ex—Royal who is not a

435

the committee feel that there are still a large whose addresses are not known. Our target is to be able to say we have reached this figure. If member would he please inform the Secretary.

One of the aims of the Association is to ensure that cases of ex—Royals requiring assistance are referred to The Regimental Aid Society or to an appropriate authority. During the year many cases have been dealt with. If any one knows of any deserving case they are requested to inform the Secretary.


36

THE

JOURNAL

or

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

On 26th July a party from the Association attended the centenary celebrations of the Garrison Church. Aldershot, when Her Majesty The Queen took the salute.

THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

EQUITATION

It is with the deepest regret that we announce the death of the following ex—Royals. Letters of sympathy and wreaths were sent where possible. Col F. W. Wilson—FitzGerald, D.S.O., M.c. (ex—President of the Association). Col. H. M. P. Hewett. Ex—RQMS (Tug) Wilson. (Later commissioned in the Yorkshire Dragoons). Ex—SSM (Harry) Tate. Ex-Sgt (Pete) Thomson. Ex—Cpl (Joe) Ingham. Ex-Tpr (Darkie) Dawes. Ex-Sgt. (Bunty) Hewitt (ex—Honorary Secretary of the Association). Ex-Tpr W. Bowles (not Charlie Bowles, M.M.). A record is now maintained by the Secretary of those members who wish to employ, and also those looking for employment. Any member interested should contact the Secretary. We thank Lt Col K. F. Timbrell, M.C., on relinquishing command, for all his assistance over the past two years. We welcome and offer our best wishes to his successor, Lt Col R. E. Worsley. Finally, to RSM E. Vowles and the permanent staff of the Sharpshooters, and to the Sharpshooters Squadron at Albany Street, we must say how much we have appreciated your assistance in running Association functions. Without this help these functions would not have been nearly the success that they were.

Corporals Mess LTHOUGH this is the first time for a number of years that these notes have appeared, -L this is no reflection on the spirit and activity of the Mess, which can be described as flourishing. Despite the shortage of families and the isolation of the Regiment in Aden, some very enjoyable functions were held with the junior ranks of the Ist Bn. The Royal Warwickshire Regiment and 45 Commando, Royal Marines. In particular, we remember a supper party given by the Commandos after a tattoo staged by them. This was a perfect finish to a very entertaining evening, and a pleasant gesture of farewell for our move to Malaya. The Queen’s Own Hussars also entertained us to some excellent curry lunches at Bir Fuqum. The presence of the families in Malaya strengthened our activities, overcoming the shortage of manpower and the detached Squadron. It did not take us long to settle in, and a Junior N.C.O.’s Darts League was formed in the Garrison, with teams from the Regiment, the R.A.S.C. and the R.M.P. After some exciting games and the “inquests ” afterwards, our “ A ” team won the trophy. Later on the league fell through, leaving us holders and owners of our very first piece of mess silver. Ghulam Hassan then added to our collection by presenting a cup to be competed for between the Sergeants’ Mess and ourselves. After two games, our hopes were shattered when the Sergeants’ Mess won the final games evening in Malaya. A special “thank you” goes to the RSM and members of the Sergeants’ Mess for the way they looked after us. Home service has reduced our activities considerably, although we did manage to have a pleasant evening with the junior N.C.O.s of the K.C.L.Y. in April. All members were shocked to hear of the death of Cpl Joe Ingham. A grand member, whose advice was always accepted, and who will be missed by all who knew him. We express our sympathy to Mrs. Ingharn and her daughter.

Quite a number of our members have stepped up to the Sergeants’ Mess; these we congratulate and hope to show them soon that, although some of them were our best darts players, we can still regain the Ghulam Hassan Cup.

THE last few months in Malaya were not short of excitement; we had two race meetings at Kuala Lumpur and Singapore and the polo tournaments, which always accompany these meetings. Kuala Lumpur came first in June, our only success being in the Ladies’ Race, which was won by Mrs. Lockhart on Mr. Patrick Baker’s Ankor Wat. This paid $135 on the tote, and I have not yet found anyone who thought of backing it. In the polo, the Regimental team, the Saracens, was beaten by Selangor in a very hard and exciting match, and the Royal Perak team were knocked out in the first round of the low handicap tournament. So ended the Kuala Lumpur fortnight, in which we certainly did not distinguish ourselves, but on the other hand had tremendous fun. In September we all moved ourselves down to Singapore, and here the polo tournament came first, followed a week later by the racing. The Royal Perak team consisting of Baker (Frazer & Neave), Lloyd, Stanley Smith and Coode repeated its success from Penang and won the low handicap tournament. The Regimental team of Timbrell, Wilson Fitzgerald, Lockhart and Aylen were beaten by Singapore in the semi-finals of the main tournament. In the racing we again had no luck. The Colonel’s Kimani, ridden by Lockhart, came fourth in the two—furlong scurry, which was the best we could do. Si Manis broke down in the Ladies’ Race and later had to be destroyed. On returning to Ipoh we handed over the stables and all the ponies, with the exception of Kimani which went to Penang, to the Queen’s Royal Irish Hussars. It was sad to say goodbye to the stables, and especially to Jack Driebergen and the Malayan syces who had done us so well. During the time we were there the horses had

KEEP IN TOUCH When you finish your service keep in touch with the Regiment. We welcome and need your support. Write to the Secretary of The Regimental Association today, Hill House, Beckenham Lane, Bromley, Kent.


ROYAL

DRAGOONS

travelled many hundreds of miles, to all parts of Malaya and Singapore. Full credit must go to Sgt Cooke, chl Parnwell and the rest of the grooms, who often lived in conditions of extreme discomfort, but always, somehow produced the horses in one piece at the far end. We arrived at Tidworth just at the beginning of the freeze-up, and for some time it was impossible to start anything in the way of a stable. All the grooms seemed to have disappeared, but eventually Sgt Cooke and chl Parnwell were unearthed, and soon the stables began to take shape. We now have stabling for ten in the Bhurtpore Stables, and for a further six in the Assaye Stables. At the moment we have twelve ponies in the stables, including two belonging to Capt Scholte, from H.Q., R.A.C. 0 our ten, seven are polo ponies (of sorts), and the remainder hacks. The only competition we have entered for was the Captains and Subalterns polo tournament, which took place on ztst July. The team was Boyd, Lockhart, Lloyd and Amery, and as we were not able to produce enough ponies of our own, 5th Regiment, R.A., from Perham Down, very kindly lent us three. In the first round, and what proved for us to be the last, we were soundly beaten 8—3 by “The Skins,” who were themselves later beaten by the Coldstream Guards. If we are to do any better next year, we need more players, more ponies, and much, much more practice. The grooms are Sgt Cooke, chl Parnwell, Tprs Smith and Catlin—all old hands—and we welcome Tprs Paramore and Boyse who have picked up the job very quickly. It is hoped to send some of these on riding courses in the winter, which will be invaluable for them. I hope everyone realises what extremely long hours they work—from 6 o’clock in the morning to 6 o’clock in the evening, and it must be remembered that horses cannot look after themselves at week-ends. So, from all horse owners, to the grooms—thank you.

KENT AND COUNTY 0F LONDGN YE0lVlANIlY (SHARPSHOOTERS) URING the latter part of 1962 the Regiment suffered a very considerable turnover affecting the Permanent Staff as much as T.A. members. On completion of his tenure of command Lt Col I. R. Mackrill, T.D., handed over to Lt Col H. S. L. Tottenham. This was followed by a change in both the regular officers with the Regiment; Capt (now Major) S. E. M. Bradish—Ellames handed over to Maj M. B. Noble and Capt B. W. Crockett handed over to Capt E. L. Payne, who held the fort until the arrival of Capt W. G. Baker. Amongst the PSI’s similar changes were taking place; at Canterbury SSM Wood handed over to SSM

Titmarsh, Cpl Roberts returned to the Royals, and chl Hore arrived to replace Cpl J. Matthew. In the New Year after the Annual Inspe3tion there followed a series of weekend exercises and training, which kept everyone busy until Annual Camp. Two of these weekends are worthy of mention. The first was in April when all available officers and NCOs of the Regi— ment descended on the Royals at Tidworth. We were most royally welcomed and enter— tained by the Royals, who had gone to considerable trouble and effort in order to make our visit comfortable, enjoyable and instructive. There is no doubt that the weekend was the greatest success, and the links between the two Regiments were further strengthened. The other weekend worth mentioning was in March when we were loaned part of the Recce Troop of “ The Skins ” for our Exercise “ Green Pants.” This took place in the area of the Hogs Back and we practiced establishing O.P.s, advancing to contact and withdrawing. The Skins acted as a controlled enemy against “ B ” and “ C ” Squadrons, and there is no doubt that everyone was very much the wiser at the end of the weekend. The end of May saw us at Annual Camp -—this year at Buckenham Tofts Camp in the Stanford Practical Training Area in Norfolk. Just about everything that could be was squeezed into the fortnight’s programme. We had many visitors, amongst them General Sir Roderick McLeod, K.C.B., C.B.E., A.D.C., C.-in-C. Eastern Command, Major-General E. H. W. Grim-

THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

w;

1962.

THE

Yeomanry.

OF

County of London

jOURNAL

Kent and

THE

Permanent Staff,

38


40

THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

THE

shaw, G.O.C. 44 (Home Counties} Division/District, Major-General J. A. d’Avigdor-Goldsmid, 0.13.11, M.C., D.R.A.C., and the Chairmzn and Secretaries of the Kent and Surrey Territorial and Auxiliary Forces Associations. Having yet again managed to arrange Camp over Whitsun, we were this year without our Padre, however Maj B. E. N. Lyte, our Second—in-Command, changed his shirt sleeve order for the surplice and cassod: of a lay realer and we were able to hold our church parade as in the past. No sooner was Camp over than everyone’s attention was turned towards the 13th July and the Presentation of the Guidon by Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra at Maidstone. 36 Corps Engineer Regiment very kindly lent us not only the Square in their new lines at Invicta Park but several of the buildings in their existing barracks. The parade itself consisted of four Dismounted Guards, one Mounted Guard. the Old Comrades (227 strong) and the Band of the Royals, which had been kindly lent to us for the occasion. The Dismounted Guards——one from each Squadron—consisted of four Officers and 28 other ranks; the Mounted Guard consisted of three scout cars and 10 Land Rovers each with a crew of two, many of whom came from the R.E.M.E. L.A.D. Princess Alexandra arrived on parade at 11.30 a.m., having first been met at Maidstone Station by the Lord Lieutenant of Kent and other civic dignitaries. After the Royal Salute, Her Royal Highness inspected the parade. When the drums and Guidon had been brought on Parade, the Rev A. V. Kingston, O.B.E., Q.H.C., Assistant Chaplain-General Eastern Command. consecrated the Guidon. Capt W. G. Baker then carried the Guidon to Princess Alexandra. who presented it to SSM Turner of “B” Squadron, and then addressed the Regiment. After the Commanding Officer had replied, the Regiment marched past in line, the Old Comrades following behind the Mounted Guard, who drove past in their vehicles. The Regiment then advanced in Review Order on conclusion of which Her Royal Highness left the Parade Ground. After the Parade many members of the Regiment and their families were presented to Princess Alexandra as she walked informally amongst them before luncheon.

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

41

With the detached Squadron and the move the inter-Tr cop and inter-Squadron competitions could not be held.' On returnin g to UK. We entered the Cavalry Cup and won the first round comfortably, beating the Household Cavalry Regiment by eleven goals to two. In the semifinal we lost to 5 Inniskilling Dragoon Guards, at Tidworth, by two goals to one. In the East Wiltshire League we have to date played and lost three games, but this is mainly due to courses and training. Much credit goes to Sgts Wood, Hearn, Lloyd, Cpl Pettitt, Tprs English IAAcClarfi,dBlaxlland,_ Eugey, Baston, Bdsm Bason and Pte High. Tpr Blaxland, on leaving the plays rmy,regularly a ma 3forWitKingsston Lynn illa and we believe is now playing for Coventry City. ' Pte High ' ‘

Hockey THE Regiment did well in the Ipoh District Hockey League in 1961/62 finishing fifth in a league of eleven teams. The standard of hockey in Malaya was both high and sporting and our play improved from playing in the close season. We never fielded our best team because of exerCises and a detached Squadron, but much credit goes to Capt Miller for training a good team. The Band who kept at the top of the Regimental League provided four regular players in chls Trachey, Jones, Reily and Fellows. Our defence was articularl t ' SQMS Shone, Sgt Cummings and Cpl Owen. P y S rong m ‘ Because of the move there was no hockey in the 1962/63 season beyond some friendly inter-Squadron games. Capt Miller, Lt Hobhouse, Sgt Poulter, Sgt Mackay, SQMS Shone and the three bandsmen have all left. Nevertheless a team will a car f h and will do its best. PP or t 6 I963/64 $633011

There is no doubt that the Parade was a great success and all members of the Regiment fully deserve the praise and tribute paid to them, in particular for their bearing and smart— ness on parade. We are all very honoured that Princess Alexandra consented to make this presentation to the Regiment, and it is a day which will long live in the memories of those who were present. Life now tends to be rather dull and quiet, particularly as the Drill Halls will be less active during the Permanent Staff block leave in August. The year ahead does not hold quite the same kind of excitement for us, but it will be none the less busy, and we hope interesting. We certainly do not intend to rest on any of our recently acquired laurels.

F. A. FRENCH FAMIL Y BUTCHER

DELIVERIES THREE TIMES WEEKLY IN THE

Football

TIDWORTH AREA

HE Regiment entered for the Caldbeck Cup, the main competition in FARELF. We won the first two rounds but were knocked out in the semi-final by B.M.H. Kinrara, after a fast and exciting game, by four goals to two. We also entered the Ipoh League Division I and finished fifth. With the high standard of football in this league, which can be compared with English Fourth Division, this is a creditable place. Notable teams we played and beat were Kinta Indians, Kilat Club, Cheng Wah, and Y.M.C.A. You will be interested to know that these clubs provided most of the players for the Malayan national team. We had some good and friendly games with local teams and the prestige of the Regiment was considerably enhanced in the eyes of the locals as a result. The Sergeants’ Mess is richer by three silver cups from charity matches we also played. At Parit, in Perak, we beat Taiping Prisons the top flight club by three goals to one. This was largely thanks to Bdsm Bason. At Teluk Anson we lost to a lower Perak Xl after a first class game.

0

MESSES SUPPLIED

COLLINGBOURNE DU'CIS Near MARLBOROUGH WILTSHIRE Tpr Thomas relaxes.


THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

THE

Golf URING the final months in Malaya, the move to England and the period of conversion, the golfing fraternity were somewhat widely dispersed and weakened by the departfure to ERE of MZj Watson and Capt Miller and the retirement of Capt Jacobs; there were ew left to curse at the evil winter.

However a deputation took part in the Southern Command meeting and muck}: enjpyed itt, v Wit? fa nliim ernod rtigrefm_ ’ and SSM Blackallar won a foursome competition. while Mr Brook . . games a . economica very and excellent the and autumn the in ' up o' ‘ s loomino in olfgered by the Tidworth club, it is hoped that many more Will soon take advantage of the best course in Wiltshire right on our doorstep. ‘0 ‘ a 'rearguar (1 . action in the . long grass S S'm son and Sat Lloyd are already. fighting “113?:de Jleniio promises> great things. AdVice and aSSistance Wlll gladly be given to all aspirants by Capt Hamilton—Russell.

The Eagle . . . The Future . . . t AS Editor I take this opportunity of appealing to subscribers, segvmg orhretired, 2:335:30; a 15 ‘ there . beheve do I . ution, ' ’ ' owever . contri Any issues. in ' copy for future ‘ the Journal by sending d as . to print it, . . ' welcomed, and although I do not guarantee n' olous is is verytirli:ar€:iew flailce for, a very wide range of material. Our Circulation to past members at; attrac t to those laar e as to the serving Regiment. As a result the magaZine must produce 0 fir(1)tr;e1rerseaderS of gcurrent events, record items of historical interest, and contain material . r no longer serving. To achieve this I do appeal for a good deal more copy

Vigthout pigtiibnlg With the rising costs I am looking for ways of increasing revenue a1; 1ft 1:16p?1t the subscriptions One of the ways may be by increasing a‘dvernsmg revenue o 0 illiht we may return to the issue of two slightly smaller editions a year instea same cost to subscribers.

' ' year, whichiczrirrlierrletarnbut ' ain this Finally I would welcome comments on the cover introduced our re-equ pmm gov“ for some tii'ne to come. The old cover was no longer appropriate after . up-to—date perma it may be that some reader has ideas for a more attractive or more

@hituatp COLONEL F. W. WILSON-FITZGERALD Educated at Eton and New College,.0xford, Frank joined the Regiment in. India in 1908, and going on to South Africa in 1911 he took over Adjutant from Capt Houstoun while coming home to the First World War in 1914. Mobilising at Ludgershall, he embarked with “B ” and “ C ” Squadrons at Southampton, dis— embarking at Zeebrugge on 8th October. From then until November, 1916, he remained as

Adjutant, serving under four Commanding Officers. On 13th May he was one of the only five officers left with the Regiment, all the others . een killed or wounded. ' hagfifirig 1916 he was twice Mentioned in Despatches. For the rest of the war he was first Staff Captain to the 8th and later the. 7th Cavalry Brigade, finally becoming Brigade Major of the 2nd Cavalry Brigade in 1918, be— ing again Mentioned in Despatches in 1918. He was awarded the D.S.O. and MC.

JOURNAL

OF

Rejoining the Regiment in 1919, he was promoted Major and later went as an instructor in tactics to the Cavalry School at Netheravon in 1922, during which year he married Miss Phyllis Greenshields. Returning to the Regiment in 1924 he took over “A” Squadron from Maj Miles, commanding it until he became Second—in-Command when the Regiment went to Egypt in 1927. He finally succeeded to command in Secunderabad, handing over command on the way home from India in 1935. Whether as Adjutant, Squadron Leader or C.O., Frank was always the same. Cool, calm and collected, never flustered. Having made up his mind and determined on a course of action, he never wavered from it. Completely un— rutfled no matter what the situation might be, he was always a tower of strength whether in the oflice, on the polo ground, or in the field. A four handicap at polo, he played frequently for the Regiment and was in the successful team which won the Ezra Cup outright in Calcutta in 1933. He never missed the opportunity of going pigsticking and was a hardworking and unselfish spear. He greatly enjoyed a day after duck or snipe and his instructions to the heaters in fluent if not entirely accurate Urdu will long be remembered. Promoted full Colonel on giving up command he finally retired in 1937, rejoining for service in 1939. He was first appointed G.S.O.2 South Western Area, later he became Commander Devon Sub Area, finally becoming Senior Umpire XII Corps from 1941 to 1943. Thereafter he was Commander N.E. Wiltshire Home Guard until the end of the war. In 1946 he was appointed Colonel of the Regiment in succession to Brigadier General Sir Ernest Makins, handing over to Brigadier Pepys in 1954. During this period he frequently visited the Regiment and worked untiringly on their behalf. For several years he was an active County Councillor for Wiltshire, becoming an Alderman in 1958 and, until the age limit caused his retirement, he was also a J.P. Apart from these activities he was Chairman of the Fire Brigade Committee, worked at least once a week for the SSAFA and continued with his hunting up to within a year of his death. He was not only a fine horseman but a very good judge of a horse and pony and a very difficult man to be in front of you when hounds were running fast. The Regiment has lost a true and staunch friend and offer their deepest sympathy to his widow and family.

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

43

LT.—COL. H. M. P. HEWETT Bunty Hewett, who was born in 1891, joined the Regiment in 1911. He was the son of Sir John Hewitt, at that time Lieutenant Governor of the United Provinces, who, when at Lucknow,

had

been

an

intimate

friend

of

the

Regiment. As a junior subaltern, Bunty was lucky enough to enjoy a season’s pig—sticking at Muttra, when the record bag of 400 pigs was achieved. In the autumn of that year he accompanied the Regiment to South Africa, where we were first of all stationed at Roberts Heights, Pretoria, under Lord Methuen, and later moved to Potchefstroom, on the River Vaal. In 1914 he Went to the Cavalry School at Netheravon, but owing to the war, this course was not completed, and he rejoined the Regi— ment, disembarking at Ostend in October, 1914. During this time the Regiment was heavily en— gaged in the preliminary operations to the first Battle of Ypres, and Bunty was wounded at the important engagement of the Chateau of Holle— beke. He rejoined the Regiment in October, 1915, and assumed command of “ A ” Squadron, with whom most of his service had been passed. At the latter end of the war he was trans— ferred, as an observer, to the REC, and for a short spell went to Russia in command of a flying detachment, rejoining the Regiment in 1919. In January, 1929, he succeeded Pat O’Callaghan as Adjutant, in Ireland, at Ballinasloe, during the Sinn Fein troubles. He handed over to Capt Davies—Cooke in 1921, prior to his retirement in that year. Keen on riding and all forms of sport, Bunty, in his ten years’ service was a highly efficient officer who endeared himself to all ranks. A keen sense of humour enabled him to take the rough with the smooth. After leaving the Regiment, he joined the board of the firm, Andrew Jule, whose business was largely concerned with jute plantations in Bengal. This took him many times to India, a country of which he was very fond and where he was again able to hunt the pig.

He was keenly interested in the Order of St. John, and for many years was Commissioner for the County of Northampton. Latterly, after the death of his father, he lived at The Manor, Chipping Warden. He had the greatest loyalty to the Regiment and was a regular attender at all functions. His loss is deeply felt, not only by Royals, but by his many friends, who will always remember him as one of the best.


OF

THE

COLONEL T. CLITIIEROW Colonel Tom Clitherow died at his home, Hotharn Hall, Yorkshire, on the 1st of May, 1963. He joined the Regiment as Tom Gurney, in August, 1900, and served in the South African War. He transferred to the Life Guards in 1904 and served with them in the 1914—18 When he succeeded his stepfather, he War. changed his name to Clitherow.

Although he only served for four years with the Regiment, he was always a keen Royal and As a attended many Regimental dinners. soldier, his sense of humour brought him into conflict with higher authorities, especially the

Adjutant General; and his lampoons on this unfortunate fellow were well circulated in the Army. He was an old fashioned eccentric and a law unto himself, a warm friend, especially to Royals, old and young. His greatest characteristics were his kindness and his sense of humour. humour.

MR. AUSTIN HOPKINSON Mr. Austin Hopkinson died in London on the 2nd of September, 1962. Born in 1879, he served in the South African War as a Lieutenant in the Imperial Yeomanry. After this he came to control the Delta Engineering Works at He served in the Audenshaw, Lancashire. Regiment in the First World War from 1914 to 1916 as a Troop Leader in “A” Squadron. He returned home in 1916 to supervise his engineering works and projects for the govern— ment. However, in 1918, after the March retreat, he rejoined the Regiment in France as a Trooper. In the Regiment he is remembered as a devoted Royal and a great character with a good sense of humour. He entered Parliament in 1918 and served as Independent Member for the Moseley Division of Lancashire until 1945. In 1940 he was commissioned into the Fleet Air Arm.

SERGEANT G. KERR Sergeant George Kerr died in Tidworth Military Hospital on the zist of January, 1963, from injuries received in an accident in a tank on driving instruction. The loss of this most promising young N.C.O., at the age of 29, coming as it did, at the outset of our conversion to tanks, was a double tragedy for the Regiment.

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

He joined the Army in February, 1952, reaching the Regiment in June. He served as the Adjutant’s driver-operator, until posted home at the end of his National Service, in January, 1954. He then joined the Lanarkshire Yeomanry, with whom he served as a Territorial, until re-enlisting in the Regular Army in October, 1956. He rejoined the Regi— ment in B.A.O.R. in 1957, and by the end of 1958 had become a full corporal and a Class I tradesman in R.H.Q. Troop. He became a driving instructor in 1959, and joined “B” Squadron for their tour in Aden and Malaya. He was medically evacuated from Malaya in 1961, and spent a year as a Recruiting Sergeant at Blackheath, rejoining the Regiment at Tid— worth, in October, 1962. His quiet efficiency, tact, and, above all, his great personal charm endeared him to all who knew him from the time he joined the Regi— ment. In his later service, his basic qualities, combined with his industry and developing sense of leadership, earned him rapid promo— tion, and a promising career ahead of him. We offer our deepest sympathy to Mr. and Mrs. Kerr.

CORPORAL J. INGHAM The death of Cpl Joseph Ingham, in the Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, on the 17th of May, 1963, came as a great shock to the Regiment. He was the staunchest of Royals and an established, well-known personality. He was 39 years of age. Cpl Ingham joined the Army in 1950 and was posted to the 16th/5th Lancers. He had seen war service in the Royal Navy from 1942 to 1946. He joined the Regiment as :1 Lance— Corporal, in August, 1952. After passing a course at the Army M.T. School, in 1953, he served first in H.Q. and later in Sabre Squadrons as M.T. or Technical Corporal, a job he was particularly good at. He was promoted Corporal in May, 1953. He left the Army for a year, in April, 1955, rejoining “ H.Q.” Squad— ron on his return. He served in “A” Squadron in 1958, and in “C ” Squadron from 1959, until his final illness. He served throughout the Regiment’s tour of Aden and Malaya, and it was on the way home, in October, 1962, that he was taken ill at Colombo and admitted to hospital. He was flown to the Military Hospital, Tidworth, in February, 1963, and was trans— ferred to a hospital near his home in April. It was here that he died, whilst on terminal and

THE

JOURNAL

OF

invaliding leave, pending his discharge. He was an extremely popular member of the Regiment, and particularly of “C” Squadron and the Corporals’ Mess~ where he leaves so many friends. His outstanding courage in hospital, during his last illness, was an inspiration to all who saw him there. His comrades mourn him and remember his wife, Mavis, and daughter in their deeper sorrow.

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

45

he was a natural leader. His enthusiasm, smcerity, modesty and charm won him many friends in the short time he was with us, and he, in turn, appeared to really enjoy his soldiering. With all his obvious enjoyment and his plans for rowing and canoeing, it came as a particularly hard blow to his friends to learn of his death in a road accident on the 14th of July, 1963. We offer our depest sympathy to Capt and Mrs. Richardson in their tragic loss.

ZLt. D. G. RICHARDSON Donald Richardson joined the Regiment in June, 1963, and commanded 4th Troop of “C ” Squadron. He came to us direct from Mons O.C.T.U., Aldershot, and in the very short time before his death, he displayed clearly that

MICHELE Daughter of Lance-Corporal Deane The Regiment offers its deepest sympathy to chl and Mrs. Deane in the loss of their twin daughter, Michele, in Tidworth Military Hospital, on the 13th of June, 1963.

Military Essay Competitions, 1964 ElllllIlllll|llllllllllllllllllllllllIllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllll

llllllillll|IIll||llllllllIIllI|lllllllllllllllllllllll'E

BERTRAND STEWART ESSAY COMPETITION, 1964. Prize: £80. Closing date: 22nd June, 1964. Subject: “ In'both Allied and Soviet Armies, improvements in night vision equipment are tending to make movement by night in Battle Area easier, particularly for armoured vehicles, than in the past. At the same time, improvements in battlefield surveillance techniques make this movement easier to detect. The need to conduct operations round the clock at an increased tempo and the difficulties of using the hours of darkness for routine supply, movement and reinforcement to the extent we have done in the past, pose a number of new problems to the commander in the field. Discuss these problems in relation to training, equipment, manpower and morale and state what you consider their effects might be on the Tactics of Global War.” General conditions for this essay competition will be the same as for the 1963 competition and can be found in AOL 399 of 1962.

GEORGE KNIGHT CLOWES MEMORIAL PRIZE ESSAY, 1964. Prizes: ist prize £35, 2nd prize £15. Closing date: 31st March, 1964. Subject: “The modern trend is to make the soldier’s life much more attractive by giving him better accommodation, food, pay and amenities. Yet, at any moment he may be operationally involved in some country like Kuwait or Brunei, where toughness and hardihood are essential. \Without the better conditions it would be difficult to get recruits. Without the hardihood the soldier is not efficient. Discuss the problem of these seemingly irreconcilable requirements.”

IllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllll|||Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll

JOURNAL

IlllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllIlllllllllllllllllllIIIIllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIII

THE

General conditions for this competition will be the same as for the 1963 competition and can be found in A.C.I. 285 of 1962. K-TlllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllIllllllllIlllllllllllllllll|llllllllllIllllllllllIllIIIIIll|llllIlllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllg


THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

THE

Births Cfn and Mrs. Jones, a daughter, Angela Gwyneth on 30th December, 1961, at Perak. chl and Mrs. Bryant, a daughter, Elizabeth Margaret, on 19th January, 1962, at Perak. Ssgt and Mrs. Atkinson, a son, Steven Robert, on 30th March, 1962. in Malaya. Tpr Heal (840) and Mrs. Heal, a son, Paul Weymouth, on Ist May, 1962, at Perak. Sgt and Mrs. Bayne, a son, David Andrew William, on 15th May, 1962, at Perak. Capt P. W. F. Arkwright, a daughter~ Anna— bel, born in London, on 16th May, 1962. Cpl and Mrs. Thomas, a son, Jeremy, on 23rd May, 1962, at Perak. Mai B. J. Hodgson, a daughter, Emma Louise, born at Dover, on 14th June, 1962. Cpl and Mrs. Syme, a son, Kevin Gwyn, on 15th June. 1962, at Perak. Maj D. S. A. Boyd, a daughter, Nicola Clare Diana, born at Seremban, Malaya, on 2nd July, 1962. chl and Mrs. Tyler, a daughter, Susan Marie, on 4th July, 1962, at Singapore. Cfn and Mrs. Farrant, a daughter, Tina Louise, on 9th July, 1962, at Singapore. Tpr and Mrs. Williams, a son, Anthony William, on 18th July, 1962, at Perak. Sgt and Mrs. McCormick, a son, Lester William, on 27th July, 1962, at Perak. Tpr and Mrs. Pain, a daughter, Fatimah Helen, on 2nd August, 1962, at Perak. Maj and Mrs. Watson, a son, Michael Charles Knox, on 6th August, 1962, at Perak. SQMS and Mrs. Leese, a son, Malcolm James, on 13th September, 1962, at Perak. Cfn and Mrs. Piers, a daughter, Julia Ann, on 16th September, 1962, at Perak. Sgt and Mrs. Fisher, a daughter, Yvonne Annette, on 25th September, 1962, at Perak. Tpr and Mrs. Sussex, a son, Mark, on 6th October, 1962, at Ramsgate. Sgt Lloyd, a son, Keith Michael, born at Tidworth, on 14th October, 1962. chl and Mrs. Thorn, a daughter, Anna Rosamund, on 5th November, 1962, at Tidworth.

Cfn and Mrs. Greenfield, a daughter, Kim, on 24th December, 1962, at Cardiff. Cpl and Mrs. Robertson, a daughter, Sharon, on 30th December, 1962, at Perak. Cpl and Mrs. Howell, a son. Peter John, on 2nd January, 1963, at Tidworth. Tpr and Mrs. Roach, a daughter, Nicola, on 10th January, 1963, at Tidworth. chl and Mrs. Macey, a son, Maurice, on 18th January, 1963, at Tidworth. Tpr and Mrs. Abbott, a son, Wayne Edward, on 22nd January, 1963, at Nottingham. Cpl and Mrs. Davis, a daughter, Christine Joan, on 26th January, 1963, at Fordingbridge. Tpr and Mrs. Simmons, a daughter, Dawn Lorraine, on 10th February, 1963, at Derby. ch1 and Mrs. Dawson, a son, Robert, on 16th February, 1963, at Plymouth. ch1 and Mrs. Deane, twin daughters, Michele and Cheryl, on 15th April, 1963, at Tidworth. Capt A. B. T. Davey, a daughter, Eugenie Susanna, born at Tidworth, on 29th April, 1963. Cfn and Mrs. Browning, a son, Anthony, on 14th May, 1963, at Sunderland. Sgt and Mrs. Hollis, a son, Robin Stephen, on 15th May, 1963, at Andover. Maj W. R. Wilson-FitzGerald, a daughter, Camilla Clare, born in Dorcester, on 18th May, 1963. Capt J. J. F. Scott, a daughter, Venetia Lucy, born at Tidworth, on 25th June, 1963. Mai P. D. Reid, a daughter, Philippa Anne Daer, born at Tidworth, on 9th July, 1963. Maj S. E. M. Bradish-Ellames, a son, Peter Montague, born at 10, Lindfield Gardens, N.W.3, on 16th July, 1963. Mai D. J. S. Wilkinson, a daughter, Celia Rosemary Scott, born in Nairobi, on 19th July, 1963. Mai M. B. Noble, 3 son, Charles Richard

OF

Tpr Abbott to Freda Steel, on 20th October 1962, at Nottingham. ) _ Tpr Roach to Ruth Forbes, on 24th November, 1962, at Middlesborough. chl Collingwood to Kathleen Mary O’Brien onr rst December, 1962, at Bermondsey. , 1‘pr Brown (496) to Jeane Collins, on 6th December, 1962, at Chichester. Tpr Sibley to Heather Helen Mears, on 22nd December, 1962, at Wool. Cfn Whiting t0 Sheera Gillian Robertson on 22nd December, 1962, at Petersfield. J chl Turner to Maureen Ann Tubb, on 15th January, 1963, at Lewisham. chl Allsopp, to Marjorie Gladys Braddock on 2nd February, 1963, at Wood Green. J ch1 Carter to Marianne Elfrieds Rudolph on 9th February, 1963, at Schloss—Neuhaus’ West Germany. 5 Tpr Bloomfield to Patricia Eileen Mitchell on 16th March, 1963, at Brentford. ) ch1 Read to Iris Emily Bassett, on 16th March, 1963, at Winchester. ch1 Roddis to Pearl Ann Chapman, on 22nd March, 1963, at Derby. Tpr Brownlees to Elizabeth Quaintrell, on 23rd March, 1963, at Brixton. chl Burgess to Janet Dorothy Mixture, on 23rd March, 1963, at Felstead.

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

Tpr Pain to Rajimah Buiok, on 24th June, 1962, in Malaya. Tpr Harman to Mary Elizabeth Hendricks, on 22nd September, 1962, at Ipoh. Cpl Burge to Philippa Nona Gay, on 13th October, 1962, at Guildford.

47

Tpr Arthur to Margaret Iris Moore, on 13th April, 1963, in Northants. Tpr Allen to Mavis Pauline Banner, on 27th April, 1963, at Leicester. Tpr Lawson to Flora Patricia Betty Brown, on 4th May, 1963, at Brighton. Tpr Hendry to Joyce Evelyn Hobbs, on 18th May, 1963, at Camberwell. Tpr Burroughs to Moira McIntyre, on 18th May, 1963, at Solihull. Tpr Bramwell to Janet Wallstone, on Ist June, 1963, at Mansfield. Cpl Ayles to Helga Maria Grimshaw, on 13th June, 1963, at Deptford. Tpr Shirley to Dorothy Mary Brown, on 15th June, 1963, at Kirby—in—Ashfield. Cfn Richardson to Irene Bailey, on 29th June, 1963, at Grange Town. Cfn Stoneham to Sylvia Vera Ludford, on 29th June, 1963, at Hertford. Lt P. A. Arnison-Newgass to Stella Herklots, on 14th July, 1962, at Chobham, Surrey. Capt W. S. H. Boucher to Jane Durant at the Anglican Cathedral, Singapore, on 8th August, 1962. Tpr Smith (401) to Susan Alice Bullpit, on 24th November, at Arundel.

WEYHILL MOTORS LTD Sales and Service

Austin, born in Edinburgh, on 6th August, 1963. Capt W. S. H. Boucher, a son, Henry Francis, born in Salisbury, on 13th September, 1963.

Marriages Tpr King to Carol Ellis, on 24th April, 1962, at Richmond, Yorks. Tpr Scott (160) to Janet Hall, on 5th May, 1962, at Northolt. Tpr Jordan (223) to Kam Yin, on 5th June, 1962, at Ipoh.

JOURNAL

STANDARD TRIUMPH DEALERS Weyhill Road. Andover. Hants. Telephone : Andover 3405—7


THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS JOURNAL

REGIMENTAL GAZETTE

R.S.O. & Assistant Adjutant, Capt. J. G. Hamilton-Russell.

Capt W. S. H. Boucher

Capt C. B. Amery, 2i/c BAND ADMINISTRATIVE TROOP

SSM H. A. S. Blackallar SQMS D. J. Cameron Sgt Best

W0 I Evans Ssgt Darling Sgt Briggs Sgt Fisher Sgt Whellans

Tpr Ody

chl Roberts Lopl Tyrer

Tpr Pedder

Cfn Browning Cfn Bryant

Tpr Smith Tpr Thompson

Tpr Voce

SERGEANTS‘ Mess

M.T. TROOP

Willson

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Hadfield Harris Hawes Proctor

Tpr Batchelor

chl Trachey

Tpr Fairey

chl Thorn

PROVOST

ch1 Stimson

Cpl Everson Cpl Syms chl Burgess

Tpr Adams

chl Meikle

Tpr G'ange Tpr Glover

Tpr Harman

chl Watts Bdsm Atkinson Bdsm Cleveland

Tpr Jackson

Bdsm Cohen

Tpr Kay Tpr McNicholas

Bdsm Cotton

Tpr Norman

Bdsm Creavin

Bdsm Craft

Ashford Bowditch Callaghan Chapman Chesterton Freeman Hayward Hendry Jones Kestle McGill Salter Smith Townsend

Tpr Quinnell

Cfn Barrett

Sandland Saunter Simpkins

Cfn Cfn Cfn Cfn

Dickenson Farrant Fell Hayward

Todd

Cfn Cfn Cfn Cfn

Hunter Ives Jones James

Tolhurst

Cfn Pennington

Treadaway Welford

Cfn Piers

Snell Stocks (575) Stocks (092) T ibbenham

Sgt McCormick Cpl Sweeney ch1 Judd

Tpr Garvey Tpr Norman REGIMENTAL ORDERLY ROOM

Lt D. W. Williams-Wynn Sgt Remfrey Sgt Bosher Cpl Bull

Woolard Young Tpr Provost

Cpl Howell

TRAINING WING

chl chl chl ch1

Beddingfield Brown Fry Percival

chl Wiffin Tpr Austin Tpr Abbott

Tpr Bardon Tpr Beers Tpr Bramwell

Capt B. J. Lockhart SQMS Simpson Sgt Webster ch1 Marsh chl Theed Tpr Bickmorc Tpr Crimp Tpr Rawlings Tpr Salter

Bdsm Eatch

R.H.Q. TROOP

Bdsm Hutt Bdsm Hobson

Sgt Lloyd Cpl Medd

Bdsm Keyes Bdsm Maytum

Cpl Petterson Cpl Tatham

Bdsm Mexter Bdsm Mexter

Tpr Lane Tpr Ramsay

Tpr Downes

ASM Jenno

ch1 Butler

Bdsm Pyne Bdsm Roberts Bdsm Shearn

Tpr Swannell

Tpr Grinyer Tpr Hanley

WO II Enzer WO II Prince

Q.M. GROUP

Ssgt Atkinson

Bdsm Skews Bdsm Tenderowicx Bdsm Turpin

RQMS J. S. Clark

Tpr Harding Tpr Honeysett Tpr Hurd

Tpr Kenyon Tpr Lawson

Bdsm Warwick Bdsm Williams

Sgt Louch Sgt Thornton

Sgt Quigley Sgt Traynor Cpl Hammil ch1 Bryant

Bdsm Brittain

Sgt Webster

Bdsm Maloney

Cpl Cpl Cpl Cpl

ch1 Cooper Tpr Bolt

Tpr Johnson Tpr Jordan Tpr Leaney

Tpr Mowbray Tpr Parker

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Ward West White Tibbles

Tpr Trowell

RECCE TROOP Lt C. N. Haworth—Booth

M.I. ROOM STAFF Cpl Kinstrey Cpl Underwood Lopl Guerrini Tpr Arthur

Tpr Carpenter Tpr Chapman

Tpr Fiske

Tpr Collins Tpr David

TQMS F. Fletcher Sgt Jubb

ch1 Johnson

chl Turner Tpr Bacon

EQUITATION TROOI’ Sgt Cooke chl Parnwell Tpr Boyce T pr Catlin

Tpr Paramor

Cpl Wickenden

S.H.Q. Maj S. E. M. Bradish—Ellames Capt A. B. T. Davey, 2i/c

Tpr Conway Tpr Elmslie Tpr Gardner Tpr Hart

Tpr Haighton Tpr Heal (840) Tpr Heal (527) Tpr Kirkby

Tpr Smith

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

OFFICERS’ MESS

Tpr Pain

Cpl Owen

Tpr Simmons

Cpl Wiskow Tpr Denton

Tpr Simpson

Tpr Love

Tpr Pentecost Tpr Savage

Tpr Mitchell

Tpr Emmet:

Tpr Taylor Tpr Yendcll

Cfn Shaw Cfn Styles Cfn Taylor

A.C.C. WO II Smith Cpl Barrett Cpl Jefferies Cpl Reid ch1 Hagan Lepl Robson Pte Ashforth ROYAI. SIGNALS

Ssgt Church Sgt Day

Lepl Clark (245)

WO II Williams Cpl Harden

Cpl Middleton Cpl Strang Cpl Thomas Sig Antrobus

R.A.P.C. Ssgt Portsmouth Cpl Horne Cpl Tucker Tpr Ferrier A.P.T.C. STAFF SI Freeman ch1 Crabbe

ch1 Melbourne

" A ” SQUADRON

Cpl Williamson chl Taylor Tpr Alexander

Tpr Barr

Cook Crowley Dean Fullick

Tpr Lines Tpr Mullany Tpr Murphy

L.A.D. Capt J. G. Till 2Lt M. R. Newby

Ellsmore Hildred Hunt Messer

Sgt Rainger

Cpl Bennett Cpl Burge Cpl Strudwick

Tpr Brownless

Cfn Rushby Cfn Richardson

Tpr Hanlon

Tpr Wainwright

Ssgt B. Hall Cpl Wennell chl Deane

Lepl Clark (307)

Roach

Williams Sgt Thorpe Tpr Bocia Tpr Ingram Tpr McCarthy Tpr Renkevic Tpr Webber

chl Currie ch1 Scott

DRAGOONS

Tpr Parkes Tpr Parsons

Paymaster, Capt E. Brookes, R.A.P.C. Medical Officer, Capt L. Henderson. R.A.M.C. R.S.M., WOI J. D. Bradley.

Tpr Sibley Tpr Thomas

ROYAL

REGIMENTAL COOKS

H.Q. SQ UADRON SQUADRON H.Q.

THE

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tipr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

REGIMENTAL HEADQUARTERS 1.0. and RH Q. Troop Leader, Lt P. M. R. Brook. Commanding Officer, Lt 031 R. E. Worsley. Quartermaster, Lt A. S. Ayrton. Second-in—Command, Maj J. A. Dimond, M.C. Adjutant, Maj D. S. A. Boyd.

OF

Capt T. P. Hart—Dyke, 2nd Capt.

SSM C. C. F. Crabb SQMS D. Leese

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Pimm Thomas Holmes Smith Brown (062) McDonald

ADMINISTRATIVE TROOP S.H.Q. TROOP Sgt Evans Cpl Edwards Cpl Carter ch1 McLaren chl Burroughs Tpr Cooper Tpr Sexton Tpr Vallins

Tpr Taylor (674)

Cpl Middleton chl Roddis Tpr Chesson Tpr Coleman Tpr Charman Tpr Walton Tpr Hanratty Tpr Collins Tpr McDermott Tpr King

Tpr Mullins Tpr Docherty Tpr Farmer

R.E.M.E. Ssgt Porter Sgt Hollis Cpl Bceby Cpl Manley Cpl Thomas ch1 Nicholson Cfn Docherty

Cfn Dunn Cfn Cfn Cfn Cfn Cfn

Lackey Levitt Monday Butcher Beard


50

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS JOURNAL

IST 'I‘Roop 2Lt C. M. Barne

Tipr Blazier

Sgt Cummings Cpl O’Dwyer

Tpr \Ward Tpr Lewis Tpr Reed

chl Dunn Tpr Wilson

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Thomson Aldridge Taylor (605) Willson

Tpr Sharkey

chl Reeves

Tpr Glass Tpr Hine Tpr Pearce Tpr Baylis Tpr Starling

Tpr Rantell

Tpr Gadd Tpr Barrett Tpr de Carteret Tpr Youngs

3RD TROOP Lt J. H. Lloyd Sgt \Vallac: Cpl Bell

2ND TROOP

ch1 Roberts

2Lt J. W. L. Bucknall Sgt Priestman

Tpr Robins Tpr Taylor (608)

Cpl Aitchison

Tpr Augustine

’I’pr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Comm Dawson (I05) Embury Hughes

OF

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

“ C " SQUADRON S.H.Q.

R.E.M.F..

Tpr Brown (405)

Maj J. B. Evans Capt J. A. Aylen, 2i/c

Tpr Golding

Capt W. M. G. Black,

4T}! TROOP

SSM P. G. Ranson

Ssgt Willison Cpl Davis Cpl Addison chl Byrne ch1 Corbett chl Glistcr

2nd Capt. SQMS P. C. Woods

2Lt A. H. Scott Cpl Falvey chl Macey Lepl Read Tpr Baker Tpr Ncafscy 'I‘pr Borley Tpr Wilkins Tpr Emery Tpr Thornhill Tpr Blake Tpr Richings

THE

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Cfn Cogan Cfn Clamp

3RD TROOP

S.H.Q. TROOP

Cfn Edge Sgt Heath Cpl Cook ch1 Byme Tpr Carthy

Cfn Stoneham Cfn Stirk Cfn Whiting

Lt J. H. Spencer Sgt Wight Cpl Best Tpr Davis Tpr Birt Tpr Adams Tpr Ford Tpr Jee Tpr Kennedy

Tpr Clifford

IST TROOP

Tpr Bloomfield Tpr Budden Tpr Avery

Tpr Hill (765) Tpr Wade Tpr Boon

2Lt D. P. L. Hewson Sgt Cpl Cpl Tpr

Hearn Gentile Wilkinson Dickenson

Tpr Hill (547) Tpr White

Tpr Freund

Tpr McGinn Tpr Holton (743)

Tpr Sussex (776)

Tpr Cain

Tpr O’Driscoll

4TH TROOP

Tpr Bovey ADMINISTRATIVE TROOP

Cpl La Roche “ B ” SQUADRON S.H.Q. Maj P. D. Reid Capt J. J. F. Scott, 2i); SSM J. A. Paul SQMS H. Bujko

chl Butcher

Tpr Rushbrook Tpr Cole Tpr Lisney Tpr Peckett

Tpr Weeks Tpr Lee Tpr Shaw Tpr Bailey

Tpr Durant

Tpr Doubtfire

Tpr Gibbs

Tpr Westall

Tpr Lawrence

Tpr Pulford

Tpr Jordan (6I3) Tpr Mose Tpr Holton (74o)

Tpr Hamilton Tpr Basson

Tpr Plumb

Tpr Wiles

Tpr Shirley

Tpr Enticknap Tpr Green

Ssgt Brooker, B.E.M. Sgt Fordham Cpl Bartholomew Cpl Freeman Cpl Keenan Cpl Robertson

Tpr Stratford Tpr McGowan

ch1 Curry Cfn Avery Cfn Greenfield

Cpl Searle ch1 Murphy ch1 Cheetham

Cfn Kinley Cfn Quin

chl Hennessey

Cfn Stuart Cfn Warren

Tpr Pearce Tpr Kent

ADMINISTRATIVE TROOI’

Sgt Murtagh Cpl Pain Cpl Campbell ch1 Lee ch1 Butcher Tpr Smith (780)

Tpr Bryant Tpr Durling

IST TROOP Lt N. C. Sturge Sgt Chambers

Cpl Ayles Tpr Cokayne Tpr Hayward Tpr Unsworth Tpr Thomson

Tpr Howell Tpr Short Tpr Crittenden

Tpr Attard Tpr Wilkins

Lt D. G. Hanmer Sgt Hayes Cpl Matthew Cpl Clark ch1 Smith chl Jones

Tpr Sussex (546) Tpr Williams (452) Tpr Fountain

2Lt M. A. E. Casey Sgt Corcoran Cpl Cox chl Curtis Tpr Gray Tpr Tyler

Tpr Barber Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Livingstone Williams (079) Freeman Jordan (784)

0llim'rs and otlwr Ranks at Extra Regimental

Sgt Sarll

Employment OFFICERS

Tpr Heatley

Tpr Grooms Tpr Davis

THE WAR OFFICE Mai C. E. Winstanley

ASSISTANT BRITISH MILITARY ATTACHE, VIENTIANE Maj C. A. Banham, M.C.

FARELF Capt P. T. Keightley

S.A.F., MUSCAT Capt J_ M. Loyd Capt A. E. Woodward

41‘}! TROOP

Lt C. E. T. Eddison Sgt Brooks Cpl Melia

H.Q., R.A.C., 3 DIVISION Mai B. J. Hodgson

JUNIOR LEADERS REGIMENT, R.A.C. Lt E. C. York

H.Q., B.A.O.R. Tpr Panton Tpr Quarman

Maj T. A. K. Watson

ARMY AIR CORPS Lt P. A. Arnison~Newgass

Tpr Austin Tpr Davies

Tpr Palin

H. Q., EAST AFRICA COMMAND Maj D. J. S. \Vilkinson

R.A.C. CENTRE Lt T. W. P. Connell

Tpr Bramham

Tpr Walsh

2ND TROOP

Tpr Smith (021)

2Lt J. M. Shepherd—Cross Sgt Wood

Tpr Dixon

3RD TROOP Lt N. M. B. Roberts

Tpr Summerfield

Tpr Reece

Tpr Smoker Tpr Smithers

2ND TROOI’

Tpr Green

Tpr Dunn Tpr Dodman

Budgen Stamper Rudge Toogood Schooley

Tpr Allen

Cpl Pettit

R.E.M.E. ch1 Thurston Lopl Kingslhott

Cpl Newton

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

ch1 Fox ch1 McGinn

Tpr Reilly

S.H.Q. TROOP Sgt Poulter Cpl Harry

Frost Brooks Partridge Moor Dixon Hodges Hawes (057)

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Dufton Savage Baker Webb

KENT AND COUNTY OF LONDON YEOMANRY Maj M. B. Noble

?UNIOR LEADERS REGIMENT, R.A.C. Capt A. P. G. Stanley-Smith


52

THE

JOURNAL

or

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

H.Q., 51 INFANTRY BRIGADE Mai O. J. Lewis

SPECIAL RECCE SQUADRON, R.A.C. I.t B. H. Coode

7 ARMOURED BRIGADE Capt D. Miller

KENT AND COUNTY OF LONDON YEOMANRY Capt LQ.M.) \X’. G. Baker

Talk about Alvis... and you are talking about the Stalwart, specifically developed into a High

R.A.C. CENTRE Capt P. W. F. Arkwright

THE WAR OFFICE Capt (Q.M.) E. L. Payne

ARMY APPRENTICES SCHOOL, CARLISLE

Mobility Load Carrier for the British Army. Its purpose is to replenish all combat armsiincluding tanks—in every part of the world, often over extreme terrain

Capt D. S. Barrington—Browne

conditions. Its performance compares with most tracked vehicles. Amphibious, it is completely capable of operating in open sea as well as inland water.

OTHER RANKS KENT AND COUNTY OF LONDON YEOMANRY

?UNIOR LEADERS REGIMENT) R.A.C. Cpl Farncombc Cpl Petts

...talk about outstanding cross-country vehicles

R.A.C. DEPOT Cpl Brandon

Cpl Jackson R.A.C. CENTRE W.O.II Kimble W.O.II Watorski

KENT AND COUNTY OF LONDON YEOMANRY Cpl Straw

SPECIAL RECCE SQUADRON, R.A.C. W.O.II Leech

HQ.) RHEINDAHLEN GARRISON Cpl Sowerby

R.A.C. CENTRE W.O.II Warren

R.A.C. CENTRE Cpl Squires

WORKS STUDY TEAM W.O.II \Y/ood

468 GROUND LIAISON SQUADRON chl Bridge

ARMY APPRENTICES SCHOOL, TROON SQMS Clarke

R.A.C. CENTRE ch1 Harris

7UNIOR

LEADERS

REGIMENT, R.A.C.

ch1 Allsopp

SQMS Shone H.Q., SINGAPORE BASE DISTRICT Sgt Heller KENT AND COUNTY OF LONDON YEOMANRY Sgt Dawson

Sgt MacKay

KENT AND COUNTY OF LONDON YEOMANRY ch1 Here

R.A.C. CENTRE Tpr Benn Tpr Hastings Tpr Russell

Tpr Rickerby R.A.C. DEPOT

Tpr Simpson

R.A.C. PUBLICITY TEAM

Tpr Burlace

Sgt Plumbly

R.A.C. DEPOT Sgt Millett

SPECIAL RECCE SQUADRON, R.A.C. 3 ROYAL TANK REGIMENT Sgt Baillie-Hamilton Sgt Rooke Sgt Boakes

Tpr Ash

Tpr McNaughton Tpr Weaver

H.Q., RHEINDAHLEN GARRISON iUNIOR LEADERS REGIMENT; R.A.C. Sgt Alexander Sgt Hales

Tpr Wellard

F.V.R.D.E., KIRKCUDBRIGHT F.V.R.D.E.

Tpr King Tpr Chamberlain

Sgt Acton

R.A.C. CENTRE 3 ROYAL TANK REGIMENT Cpl Christmas

Tpr Deckey

2 ARMOURED DEL. SQUADRON Cpl Caimey

Bdsm Brittain Bdsm Maloney

STALWART

ROYAL MILITARY SCHOOL OF MUSIC

ALVIS OF COVENTRY ENGLAND


it .- K

, y; ; ” \f$

Telephone Tidu'orih 327!

Contractorsto

?

.

.

‘overnment

H M C’ ”-7213:-

..v'

B yAppointmenito

i

SERVICE

V _

my

~r

:

Hm"

~\ ‘.

By A ppoin t men tt 0

HM The Queen

HM Queen Elizabeth

.\

Silversmiths& Jewellers

The Queen Mother Jewellers 6.

~ .

..

o

(Tldworth) llMITED

-

Managing Director:

VI:

_

'§3~_ _:__:... "

W> F- LINDLEY. M.|nst.B.E.

"'

Silversmiths

A.A. AND R.A.C. REPAIRERS

1

Ilg hf

Carrington

Ironmongery and Hardware (Tl ”WORTH ) LTD. Stores Electrical, Radio and

’1 O n e9. com b

,

.

T.V. Engineers 130 Regent Street London

GARAGE

,

Austin Car

crisp

. Jewellers, Sllversmlths 899

ROAD - TIDWORTH STATIONHANTS.

‘fi ‘

Dealers In..."

3115025? gaggssll‘gier, BULFORD

0

watChmakerS andPACKWAY

* Genome

LARKHILL

Tel:

TIDWORTH

3232

3“

also at 2’7 Throgmorton Street ‘ in the City of London

‘ By Appolntment to Hi5 Late Majesty King George V.

ROGERS & CO. (MILITARY

OUTFITTERS)

LTD.

Sporting and Mufti Tailors

Huntmg Kit and Breeches Makers

CELLARCRAFT’ has been epertly ractised for over 120 years

. , ,; '

.

.

Reg1mental Outfitters to The Royal Dragoons

WINES SPIRITS & CIGARS are always in absolutely perfect condition

33, BRUTON sr., MAYFAIR, LONDON, w.1

SACCONE

&

SPEED

LTD

899 Sllversmlths .'

'

°

Carungton 899 Co lelted

_

to ensure that our

P Regimental JCW’VQHCI'S

,

i

32 SACKVILLE STREET LONDON W-l

Telephone: REGENT 2061

Telephone: MAYfair 7303 London.

Telegrams: Rogers, MAY. 7303 London.


THE ASSOCIATION OF SERVICE NEWSPA PERS ADV ‘ 67/68 JERMYN STREET, ST. JAMES‘S. S.W.I. TELERuiIElthlt-lgLnggs‘l

WITH CARE ANYWHERE! R E M OVA LS

ESTIMATES FREE

ll

you look at it,

Large“ 33:31:: 335:3??? '88:; Stillilfl |O0.000 cubic feet of our depository is centrally

AND FISHMONGERS ll

Nescafé is

heated.

E. E. RO Y

Special Attention to all 3195595

the best caffee

(DIBLE AND ROY LIMITED) HIGH ST., LUDGERSHALL, Nr. ANDOVER, HANTS. Complete House Furnishers (New and secondhand)

|| T

TOYS AND GAMES

TIDWORTH. HAN TS. Tidworth

Whichever way

’Phone LUDGERSHALL III for our repre— senative to call and give you an estimate with— out obligation. Let our experts do your ! d' d t t 'th th '

E4MIL Y BlfTCHERS

Telephone _

gives:

,

Q

I

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII

3150

And at: WEST ST., ANDOVER. Telephone 2051

Telephone 749

HIGH ST. MARLBOROUGH.

>l< NESCAFE is a registered trade mark to designate Nest/é’s instant coffee

3

POWBI-SIIIICE-Vllllle

_ Quality!

_ ,

_.

.

—Ihul’s what we mean by

W iVariety!

_,

'

" 'l

*

500“ mulls

“°"area'wgoodrum . '”°"’ this"*'°° is the"‘"g' label on the bottle

‘Bulunced Anneul’

Vane!

a

L llhlilgetzlléeaslls

OXFORD SALOON

,

-

OXFORD TRAVELLER

§INC0RPORATED aw MAY .070

,, .

lmpo‘rter for Germany for all Nuffield products

MOWER UXFUHI]

I

_

j

I

I

. \

I

x

'

.,

;

Sherbet FounlaEHS Jelly Babies

f

‘GobStoppers

»

‘Eihcgcrfclzte Nougat & 101 other lines!

Lt—Qfl/f/a/fl} .(Qfl/[f/Qniéz/h/Ky —

J. A. WOODHOUSE & CO

fiuhfiunhl’éagllfumpungnmeIld/nhcllth,

5 Cologn e/Brau nsfeld

at a rangefor children

EDINBURGH !

QUALITY FIRST

RUM

L:

HUDSONQS BAY

Inn compunenm- "win rmmle. nu we! in. world.

N 0 u ga t

3“ We G 1”"

”MW,“ 4/Mmémoa :74yam” ny/muz .7ul/1}:7én//Mh{40fld 421/-

JAMAICA

\

_

f

'

y blended In this fine car. Evlrylhlng you could want cl molorlnu II harmonloull make: ll l0 Iupremely sllislylnn It It. In Incl. the Oxlord's balanced Ippeal Ihnl with IE" or rightAvailable meeting? Io own and drivn. May we arrange an r'nrlral and backod by B,M.C.—lfioldhind Grin. Warrant“! luv ‘2 Manlh§J12.000 miles

,1

>

.

PRODUCE 0F JAMAICA

108-110, Stolberger StraBe

.N

Bar-latts the bottle is in the NAAFI and you know where the NAAFI is S’Hnled In Greal Brrlam

Barrett 4. Co. le., Mayes Road. Wood Green, London N.22 SUPPLEMENY No. 2—PAGE THREE


THE ASSOCIATION OF SERVIC E NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISEMENT PAGES. 67/68 jERMYN STREET. ST. )AMESHS S..Wl TEL. WHITEHALL 2504

Pick the tasty TmaIOIIlAI Kelchup 17, WEE/III made Irom

“YORK” BRAND Canadian Salmon 0

sun—soaked Iomaioas

Canned Vegetables 0 Canned Fruits Polish Canned Meats

‘ \\ \ \\\ mH \\I\

\\\\\\\

jOHN LOUDON & CO. LTD. No. I LONDON BRIDGE, S.E.I. aluminum-um u u an:.mmmumm,mmntm H, mm H I I II um Refreshes after work, Have! and sport

Celebrated “Thistle Brand"

IR I Z ILA\

\\\‘ \ \ \\

asqoupIease

BUTTER-SCOTCH

COAL TAR SOAP E

quality food productx

For Your Enjoyment

Callard & Bowser’s

Wigner.

picked. plump

One of Sharwood’x

CIGARETTE PAPERS

Famous since l837

IDEAL FOR TOILET BATH AND NURSERY

‘Iuin.” 1"“"flip.

SMITHS

rI'he only way to find out if

You may have said it yourself. But, consider. You will probably never have a better opportunity than you have now of putting some money aside for the future. You enjoy good pay—with no overheads—and all the facilities of the Post Office Savings Bank scheme are yours for the asking. What could be simpler?

Mew

have GPlSpneSS Regal Fruit Drops and

n.,.~¢ Iron n..."- ...4 «m c." u. um. w...- u." ".4 spa.

Everton Mints taste

in the bag!

as good as they look

is to

Make saving a good habit. Save as much or as little as you like, but do it regularly. Keep your money in the Savings Bank as long as you possibly can. You will find that it soon mounts up and collects interest—ready to help start you up in the trade you are now learning in the Service, or for furnishing your home when you get married.

TRY THEM! Smiih‘s Paulo Crisps Limited.

Glut WesI Road. Brenil'ovd, Middlcscx,

BULPITT

NRY POTTE

8:

BIRMINGHAM

m: SAUCE nun noes vou GOOD

LTD.,

ENGLAND.

I'II

EIIIIWANABRAN ALUMINIUM ELECTRICAL

HOLLOWARE APPLIANCES

33R °WEsrgum”; Sl'o

" 5:, ”milk/7.7,

iIfl.K

REJOR.

SONS,

All the details of the scheme are in the leaflets illustrated here. Write to me personally, and I will send you a copy of the one that applies to your Service:

Air Chief Marshal Sir Hugh W. L. Saunders, G.C.B., K.B.E., M.C.. D.F.C., M.M.,

Young at every ageIin OfHM Forces Members are given 5‘7 discount on all purchases

I I Gee Fashion Clothes for men .

ec INTERNATIONAL MEN 5 WEAR

Get details of the Club for men Gee 600 Cecil . ,

London, WC2

who apprectate good clothes

”0 Charlng Cross

Road,

Chairman, H.M. Forces Savings Committee,

1, Princes Gate, London, S.W.7 Issued by H. I”. Force: Savings Commilrec

Printed in Great Britain SUPPLEMENT No. 2—PAGE FOUR

Printed in Great Brilaln.

SUPPLEMENT No. l—PAGE THREE


THE ASSOCIATION OF SERVICE NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISEMENT PAGES, 67/68 IERMYN STREET, ST. JAMES’S. S.W.‘I. TEL. WHITEHALL 2504

YOUR

IN

DRINKS

FAMOUS

MESS

WILLIAMS k HUMBERT'S

RUTHERFORD

8:

MILES

01d Trinity House BUAL MADEIRA

HAWKER’S /‘

PEDLAR

_%w%wé

SLOE GIN CH AM PAG N E

JAMES HAWKERECO..LTD‘ Estd. I808

PLYMOUTH

LEMON HART .I:\)I.\I(':\ R131.

These and all other famous

LAMBS M“ RW-

drinks are obtainable

COGNAC

counvmleR

a9 ”a /,

by

u um?

Ma 0/an 535%

If-

(Ill/I

f)

.

V

I

.

through N.A.A.F.l.

vi’k

N O V A I. '957 L A T E

, ,_ . -_

"I”

SOUTH AFRICAN SHERRY

B O T T L E D

The Luxury you can afford

LOOK FOR THE SYMBOL ON THE PACKAGE Your guarantee

of quality and value

Primed m Great Dri ainv SUPPLEMENT No. I—PAGE FOUR


Your LIFE or your CUFFLINKS!

We can insure anything on your behalf free of charge and make certain you obtain fully competitive terms.

TOWRY LAW & CO. LTD. Insurance Brokers

5,

CHEAPSIDE,

LONDON,

E.C.2.

Telephone: CITy 0991

,

i*i

We particularly Specialise in Life Assurance for:

Protecting your family.

Pension Provision.

Helping to provide Educational expenses. Future House Purchase.

Death Duties.

Make enquiries NOW to meet future problems by writing or telephoning personally The Hon. C. T. H. Law.

Produced for the Editor, ”The Eagle." The Journal of The Royal Dragoons. by Combined Service Publications. ltd. 6749*. Jermyn StrueL St. James-Ts. London. S.W,l. Printed in Great Britain by F. J. Pursoth’. Ltd., Lennox Home, Norfolk Street. London. W,('.2. and Hastings and Folkestonc. Advertisement Agents' Service Newspaperx ltd. 6763. Jermyn Street. Sl\\'.l, (Phone: Whitehall 250-1].

The eagle royal dragoons magazines the eagle 1963  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you