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THE JOURNAL OF

THE ROYAL DRAGOONS NUMBER 21

JUNE 1962


THE ASSOCIATION OF SERVICE NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISEMENT PAGES, 67/68 JERMYN STREET, ST. JAMES’S, S.W.I. TEL. WHITEHALL 2504

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SUPPLEMENT No. 2—PAGE ONE


THE ASSOCIATION OF SERVICE NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISEMENT PAGES. 67/68 JERMYN STREET, ST. IAMES’S, S.W.'I. TEL. WHITEHALL 2504

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MALAYA

No. 21

THE EAGLE Dragoons The Regimental Journal of the Royal Editor — MAJOR T. A. K. WATSON

CONTENTS Editorial Lieutenant-Colonel K. F. Timbrell, M.C. Captain W. H. Yates Captain L. R. Burnside Captain A. W. McQueen, R.E.M.E. Sergeant M. F. Hatch “A” Squadron Notes “ B ” Squadron Notes “C ” Squadron Notes HQ. Squadron Notes The Band Light Aid Detachment Adventure Training!? Recruiting Report Equitation Notes Taken for a Ride Sergeants Mess Notes The Far East Golf Circuit Sports Notes The Regimental Association nry Kent and County of London Yeoma Obituary Captain H. L. Webb Births . Marriages Regimental Gazette Extra Regimental Employment List

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL K. F.

TIMBRRELL, M.C.


THE

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ROYAL

DRAGOONS

TERCENTENARY PARADE, 21st OCTOBER, 1961 Spectemur Agendo

{gilloria/ NOTHER Eagle, another editor and planning commencing within the Regiment for yet another move. The new editor, slightly daunted by the prospect of producing an Eagle to succeed Major Wilkinson’s splendid Tercentenary edition, can at least start this record of the Regiment’s activities in 1961/2 with the good news that we should be arriving at Southampton about 16th November. News has just come to hand that our successors in Malaya, The Queen’s Royal Irish Hussars, are due to relieve us in Ipoh and Singapore on the 6th October and the Regiment will embark at Singapore on T.T. Oxfordshire on 22nd October. No doubt Old Comrades will greet this news as joyfully as we do out here and all will be looking forward to reunion in England and the postponed Tercentenary celebrations in 1963. But first things first. The year under review covers the period 1st March, 1961, to 30th April, 1962. Then as now the Regiment was deployed with one Squadron in Singapore and the remainder of the Regiment at Ipoh, in the state of Perak in North Malaya, over 400 miles away. Until 9th August, 1961, the detached Squadron in Singapore was “A” Squadron and was then exchanged with “B” Squadron. By the time of the Regiment’s relief “B” Squadron will have had fourteen months in~ dependant duty. It is of course every Squadron’s ideal to be as far away from R.H.Q. as possible but in this instance everyone is agreed that the length of this separation has been too long for the well being of the Regiment and has only been endured by manpower and administrative difficulties. The ever reducing numbers of men in the Regiment in the latter part of 1961 and early 1962 has probably been the biggest problem the Regiment has faced in the past year. This has been caused by the end of National Service. Although one stalwart National Serviceman now remains, for all purposes the Regiment is 100 per cent. regular. The winter months saw the departure of successive drafts of time expired National Servicemen with, at that time,

only the smallest trickle of reinforcements and returning regulars to compensate. Until December it was all rather depressing and then, thanks largely to that great old Royal, Major “ Spud ” Lewis and his regular recruiting team in England, good, young regular recruits began to arrive. Elsewhere in this edition there is a separate article which shows the dramatic change that has, and still is, taking place on this subject. Another memory of the past year was the change in the command of the Regiment. Lt Col P. B. Fielden, M.C., relinquished com— mand in July. Colonel Philip did not have an easy tenure. Taking over as he did in Hertford in B.A.O.R. he had the difficult tasks of moving the Regiment to England and then on to Aden. Thereafter followed a year when command over a widely dispersed Regiment would have tried the patience of a saint. As if that was not enough Aden was followed by the move to Malaya and further Regimental dispersal. However with his enthusiasm, strong personality and loyal care the Regiment has enhanced its reputation. We are very sorry to lose Lt Col Fielden and his charming wife and we Wish them every success and happiness in the future. We welcome the return of Lt Col K. F. Tim— brell, M.C., in command. To both the serving Regiment and Old Comrades little need be said about this well known and respected figure. Suflicient to say that the Regiment is in good hands. Yet another problem of the past year was the many changes among Squadron Leaders. The first was the unfortunate medical evacuation home of Maj ‘Owen Lewis, who was suffering from some obscure ailment he had picked up some years previously in the Persian Gulf, To replace him in “B” Squadron went Maj Bay Hodgson which left R.H.Q. deficient of a Second—in-Command. During this period Majors Marc Noble and Tom Watson were in great demand by Headquarters 28 Common— wealth Brigade and Headquarters 17 Gurkha Division for Exercise Planning Teams, and so were largely ineffective to the Regiment for long

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THE

4

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periods. Then Maj Bill Wilson Fitzgerald forsook “ A ” Squadron for marriage requiring Capt Bill Boucher to be transferred from “ B” Squadron to “A” Squadron until he too departed in January for Staff duty at G.H.Q. Singapore. Maj David Wilkinson in “C ” Squadron looked like a fixture amidst these many changes until early in April he was informed that he had to go at short notice to a staff job in East Africa. Simultaneously Maj Bay Hodgson left for home, also for a staff job, being relieved by Maj Peter Reid, fresh from England.

ROYAL

\W. T. Cambell, C.B.E., Brigadier J. A. H. Moore, 0.B.E., Major General Odling, 0.B.E., M.C., our Divisional Commander, Major General W. C. Walker, C.B.E., D.S.0., the new Commander-in— Chief FARELF, Lieut General Sir Nigel Poett. K.C.B., D.S.O., Brigadier R. G. S. Bidwell, 0.3.5., and to our special pleasure, Major General Desmond Fitzpatrick, C.B., D.s.o., M.B.E., M.C., the senior serving Royal. In 1962 we had visists from the Adjutant General, General Sir Richard Goodbody, K.B.E., C.B., n.s.o., and further Visits from Brigadier Bidwell and Major General Walker.

During the past year the Regiment was priviledged by the visit of several distinguished 'visitors. On 25th May, General Sir Richard Hull, G.C.B., 0.3.0., departing the Far East to become C.I.G.S., paid us a farewell visit. This was rather a special occasion and the Regiment provided an Honour Guard under Capt Bill Yates. Other visitors in 1961 included Brigadier F. G. Hassett, D.s.o., M.v.o., 0.13.5, Brigadier

JOURNAL

DRAGOONS

LtCol

and

Mrs Fielden de-

parting lpoh, 14th July, 1961.

Finally, this Editorial would be incomplete without mentioning the happy news of the marriage of the Colonel of the Regiment. The serving Regiment and the Old Comrades wish Brigadier and Lady Rachel Pepys all future happiness. It was indeed a lovely touch that the Tercentenary Year was marked in such a splendid way. (Below).

*

Major - G e n e r a l

Fitzpatrick with the Sergeants’ Mess, December, 1961.

Lieutenant Colonel K. F. Timbrell, MC. LIEUTENANT COLONEL K. F. Timbrell, M.C., enlisted as a Trooper in the Royal Horse Guards in 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the 1939-1945 War. He was commissioned in December, 1942, and joined the Regiment in the Western Desert in 1943. He served as a troop leader and Second-in~Command in “ B ” and “ D ” Squadrons more or less continuously throughout the campaigns in North Africa, Italy, and North West Europe including Den— mark until 1945. He was mentioned in dispatches in the London Gazette and awarded the Military Cross on the Ioth May, 1945. Between 1946 and 1949 he served with distinction in the Sudan holding the appointment of El Bimbashi in the West Darfur province. He rejoined the Regiment in B.A.O.R. in 1950 and served as “ A” Squadron Leader in both the Middle East and B.A.O.R. from 1953 to 1956. He joined Mons Oflicer Cadet School as chief instructor of the R.A.C. wing in 1956 and remained there until 1958 when he rejoined the Regiment as Second-in-Command. In November, 1959, he was appointed DAA and QMG, The Sultan of Muscat’s Armed Forces in Oman and Arabia. He assumed command of the Regiment vice Lt Col P. B. Fielden, M.C., on 14th July, 1961.

Captain IV. II. Yates HE departure of Bill Yates to civilian life in September, 1961, left a gap in the Regiment which will be very hard to fill. Bill arrived in the Regiment after a distinguished career at Sandhurst, in March, 1956. He immediately made his mark as a very able horseman. Spurning initially, racing and polo, he concentrated in B.A.O.R. on Hunter Trials and show jumping, in which he was eminently successful. Latterly, in Malaya, force of circum— stances tumed his attention to racing and polo, where he was equally proficient. His tremendous enthusiasm and drive in running the stables, coupled with the encouragement

OF

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Captain A. W. McQueen R.E.M.E. NDY McQueen, who commanded the Royals’ L.A.D. for 3‘, years, left the Regiment in January, 1962, on promotion to the Command Workshops, York. Andy, was very much

an armoured car E.M.E., having been “broken-in” by the 12th Lancers as their L.A.D. commander between 1952 and 1957. He was commissioned in India in 1948 and served in Malaya and B.A.O.R. before joining the Regiment in Herford in May, 1958. He entered wholeheartedly into all regimental activities as indeed in all he undertook. He was a first-class .22 shot and led the regimental team with success in B.A.O.R.; he made quite a name for himself in motor rallies in Malaya; he got the L.A.D. branch of the R.E.M.E. Association going in Ipoh, and his Sunday Go-Karting Socials were a great success. Without paradox to the last attribute, he was also a staunch member of the local Presbyterian Church. When he left us, he must have been one of the great living experts on the brakes and hydraulic systems of Saracens. We certainly gave him enough material. We wish Doreen, his charming wife, Andy himself, and their two boys, good fortune in the future. We look forward to meeting them again in England, or even Scotland.

@hituary

Sergeant M. F. IIateh The C-in-C, General Sir Richard Hull, inspecting the Guard of Honour, May, 1961.

On the 23rd of May, 1962, Mark Farnish Hatch was tragically killed in a traffic accident during an Internal Security exercise in Singapore. He joined the Army at the age of 18 in 1955, and the Regiment in Wesendorf on 11th December, 1955. He served with the 11th Hussars and 15/19th Hussars as an Instructor from July, 1958, until rejoining the Regiment on 14th May, 1961, with “A” Squadron. He was a brilliant instructor in radio and gunnery. Indeed in all respects he was a soldier of infinite promise, an NCO whom his Officers relied on implicitly and who was liked, respected and admired by all ranks. His high moral code was an inspiration to everyone, he was a regular churchgoer and an accom— plished organist. He had many outside interests not least of which were amateur . dramatics and singing. His death is a great blow to “A” Squadron and to the entire Regiment. We extend our deepest sympathy to his parents and his sister. VALETE

he gave to all oflicers and their wives, were instrumental in our polo and racing successes in Malaya. Bill was a staunch member of “C” Squadron, having first of all been a Troop Leader and latterly Second-in-Command. During the Regiment’s tour in Aden, he was a very successful and popular A.D.C. to the Governor, Sir William Luce. We wish Bill every success in his career a a land agent, where his personal charm and ability to get on with people will be not the least of his assets.

Captain L. R. Burnside T was very sad to say goodbye to Bob and Jill Burnside in July, 1961. Bob Burnside joined the Regiment in Egypt as a Second-Lieutenant from Mons O.C.S., in 1952. He served as a very successful M.T.O. in M.E.L.F., and later as a Troop Leader in “C” Squadron in B.A.O.R., being “wounded” on Exercise “Battle Royal,” when an infuriated Belgian threw a lighted thunder flash into his Daimler Armoured Car. In 1956 Bob went off to be an Air Photograph Interpreter, which he did for two years before rejoining the Regiment as Regimental Paymaster in 1958. He held the Regiment’s “purse strings” for three years (1958-61) where his intimate knowledge of all parts of the Regiment was invaluable. Bob was essentially an “aqua” oflicer, showing great enthusiasm for swimming, water polo and sailing. He was very popular with all ranks, his infectious laughter could be heard emanating from the Officers’ Mess at all hours of the day and night. His large, red face, steamed—up spectacles and perpetual good humour won him many friends in the Regiment. We wish Bob and Jill the very best of luck in civilian life and look forward to seeing them in England.

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flllll||llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll||lllllllllllll|IlllllllllllllllllllIIlIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllll||ll| o GOING

OUT?

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Keep in touch with old friends and old times.

Order your

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THE E A G L E

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Why not place an order for a copy of the Journal now .7

Help by attending Reunions and buying the Eagle! llIllIlllllllllllllllllIlIIIIllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllfi

.1

lllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllll


THE

JOURNAL

OF

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DRAGOONS

THE

jOURNAI.

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.,W A SQUADRON

9

3

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NOTES—

NCE dug in at Singapore, we proceeded to go on never-ceasing LS. exercises. The sight of either 2nd or 3rd Troops walking around in “battle—bowlers,” with rifles, reminded one rather of the Retreat from Moscow. At these times S.H.Q. used to make a bee—line for the Orchard Road police station, only occasionally moving out for a tactical milkshake at the Mont d’Or. In March, Exercise “Bandobast,” a 99 Brigade exercise, took place on the East Coast, at Mersing, with 1st, 2nd, 4th, and “ fighting fifth,” as enemy, taking part. Lt Hobhouse was once seen heading strongly seawards over the beaches until brought to a halt by sand coming over the tops of his wheels; while Sgt Rooke, with some highly accurate verey-light fire, practically brought down an enemy Auster. April was a month of inspections, terminating with the Queen’s Birthday Parade at Seletar airfield. The Singapore Infantry Regiment, with their colourful “tummy-warmers,” the Gurkhas with their shorts as wide as the Firth of Forth, and the feu—de-ioie from six hundred rifles made the parade very impressive The six immaculate armoured cars, under Lt Chilton, provided a fitting escort for the C.-in-C., General Sir Richard Hull. All the Troops managed to get up into Malaya at least once for a week, the best of these being S.H.Q. and Ist Troops, who went from Singapore to Pekan in an L.C.T.; also in the boat were (ssssh!) the polo pones for the Pahang Polo Tournament. Ist Troop exercised with “B” Squadron, north of Kuantan, and S.H.Q. drove from Pekan to Mersing in Land Rovers (no roadsl). At this time we had a visit from Lt Dhanaraiata of the Royal Thai Army. On Squadron Parade, the SSM had to be helped off when he saw him arrive wearing “ Winkle—pickers.” The Inter-Troop Athletics, in June, went well and were won by the combined L.A.D. and Royal Signals Troop. Brigadier Bredin, Commander, 99 Brigade, and Miss Binny kindly presented the prizes. This was closely followed by the Singapore Base District Minor Units Athletics, in which we were runners-up by only one point. In the tug-of-war, ably coached by Sgt Rooke, we reached the semi—final, with our rather unorthodox method of having the smallest man, Cpl O’Dwyer, as the anchor. In early July, the Squadron took part in an island-wide I.S. exercise. For many this was the first time they had used a regimental wireless net, as “ C ” Squadron joined us from Ipoh. An interesting phenomenon during the exercise was an incident report from 4th Troop stating that Tpr Massey’s Saladin must now know its own way from the Causeway to Bukit Timah circus, as he had been asleep on the last patrol. Exercise “Dragonfly,” our finale’ whilst at Nee Soon, was against the Singap‘ore Armoured Car Squadron, during their annual volunteer fortnight. We knew the S.A.C. fairly well by this time, having often given them demonstrations, and through Sgt Abbas and other N.C.O.s, who spent many months working with the Squadron.

l. “Cause . . . . 2. . . . and Effect.” Among those present at the bogging of Tpr Docherty’s car were—Messrs Smith. Sexton, Cpl O’Dwyer, McDerInott. Borley. McLaren, Reeves, the host himself. and Young. 3. “Banana Time,” ch1 Love, ZLt Haworth-Booth, Ward, Read, Massey and chl Burns.


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While in Singapore, we managed to play almost all sports very successfully. The Squadron basketball team were close runners—up (our speciality) in the Singapore Base District Minor Units Competition, and in the Singapore division of the FARELF CUP for Minor Units We were knocked out in the semi-final, an excellent performance. We also had flourishing football, hockey and rugby teams, who played many varied matches against teams from the Naval Base or the locals. We also played many basketball games against our friends at the Beach Road Community Centre. In August we moved north, as part of the Squadron change-over, and in September we were on the East Coast (Exercise “ Mock Turtle”) where we accomplished some much needed training before being prematurely recalled to Ipoh. We then spent the next two months shaking down into air-portable troops, which meant getting rid of our Saladins and Saracens, and during the end of the year provided a demonstration air-portable Troop for the visits of General Sir Nigel Poett, C.—in—C. FARELF, Major—General Desmond Fitzpatrick and the Adjutant General. At about this time the Squadron put up a very creditable performance in Exercise “ Lone Scout ”-——a scout car and Land Rover rally—by taking first (Tprs Melbourne and Bliss) and fourth (Cpl Evans and Tpr Pimm) positions with the Ferrets and second (Tprs. Massey and Horton) in the Land Rover section. In October we said goodbye to Maj Wilson-Fitzgerald, who went back to England to get married. The Squadron presented him with a silver cigarette case, and we wish him all happiness in the future. We welcomed in his place, Capt Boucher from “ B ” Squadron, who saw us through a difficult period, up to January, 1962. Early December found the whole Squadron in the cool of the Cameron Highlands, at Brinchang Camp. Here, on a diet mainly of curry and glutinous porridge from our 24hour packs, we sampled our first taste of jungle-bashing, culminating in a memorable climb up Gunong Brinchang, and delved into the mysteries of the new voice procedure under the able guidance of Sgt Hatch. This year promises to be a busy one. Since January the Squadron has provided half the personnel for the C.—in-C.’s guard, a Troop on a 63 Brigade exercise around Malacca, S.H.Q. Troop on a 28 Brigade exercise, and been on a regimental exercise on the East Coast. We have at present only three Sabre Troops and are eagerly looking forward to getting some regulars to swell the Squadron. The faces in the Squadron seem to have changed more than usual during the past year, due to the departure of our National Servicemen. Amongst those leaving, we would like to mention Sgt “ Pop” Dawson, a real “old and faithful,” who has had to return home to England. Capt Amery has gone to “ B” Squadron; Lt York and SSM Watorski shortly go to Bovington, while Lt Connell and Sgt Corcoran have also left us. We welcome in their stead Maj Watson and Capt Lockhart as Squadron Leader and Second-in-Command respectively, SSM Crabb, and Lt Hughes and Sgt Callaghan from the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. Finally, as these notes go to press, the Squadron has just completed a successful Highlights of the training exercise in North Malaya, between the 12th and 29th March. exercise included 3rd Troop’s almost classic bogging of three cars simultaneously in the same hundred yards. Docherty, driving the leading car, managed to put it completely on its turret in a swamp, while not damaging it; Cpl Aitchinson wielding a verey pistol with great élan, much to the Squadron Leader’s fury; the Officers and Sergeants becoming Divisional Commanders and improving on the dispositions made at the 1942 Action at Gurun; the football match against the Gurkha Training Depot, where Cpl Payne, ch1 Melbourne, Love, Reeve, Saxton and the others, discovered that playing football in plimsoles in the rain just is not funny.

THEN AND NOW *

1.

“New

Entry,”

Tprs

de

Carteret and

3.

Tpr Beddingfield.

McDermott on their first exercise.

4.

Tpr Taylor (605).

chl Macey.

“Terrible old ruflians they were. Their language would have shaken the Devil off his throne and they drank whiskey like water.”—Not a description of M.T. Troop but a description of Waterloo veterans still serving in t‘ie Regiment some twenty years after the battle.


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SQUADRON NOTES ROM Air Portability to Internal Security has been the role of the Squadron since arrival in the Far East. Whilst in Ipoh, the highlight of our air portability role was undoubtedly Exercise “Trinity Angel.” Well over half the Squadron took part, alongside Commonwealth Troops in this countrywide exercise. Though a few of our cars were actually airborne in Beverly aircraft, the majority practised backing into taped—off areas at Malacca Airport that represented the cargo hold of a Beverly. Kuantan exercises, inaugurated by Maj O. J. Lewis and continued by Major B. J. Hodgson, were great favourites of the Squadron. When such tactics as snake patrols and ambushes had been practised, we were able to relax in the warmth of the South China Sea, bordering our leaguer area. Our thanks is given to 2 Recce Flight, A.A.C., for providing a realistic touch to the exercise by use of their Auster light aircraft. A lighter side to one exercise was an occasion when a thunderflash was dropped by Ist Troop Leader, into his own car. The driver, apparently, was the only one who didn’t see the joke. Serving with the Regiment again, after our detachment in Sharjah, gave us the chance to carry out an impressive training programme. “C” Squadron, the Regimental Training Squadron, complained that we were putting them out of business with all our courses. Perhaps the most popular courses were when twelve members of the Squadron were detached with the Jungle Warfare School for two weeks, and an explosives course organised by the Engineers. Certainly nobody suffered ill effects from either course. We said goodbye to Maj O. J. Lewis, who had to return to U.K., where we are glad to hear he is fully recovered, and Major B. J. Hodgson succeeded him in oflice in July. SSM Joe Titmarsh also replaced SSM “Spud” Brennan. Two sad goodbyes and two welcome hellos. August, 1961 came, and with it, the Squadron moved to Singapore. The Squadron Leader commanded the Squadron down by road, stopping the night at Seremban. En route from Seremban to Singapore, “B” and “A” Squadrons met and leaguered for a short time to exchange news and views for a short time over a “ brew.” Singapore was a welcome sight after the long drive and monotonous panorama of rubber estates. On arrival in Nee Soon, the Squadron Leader insisted that we all became conversant with Singapore, and troops were very quickly poring over maps and thundering through the city in their cars. It didn’t take anyone long to get lost in the maze of one—way streets, no right turns, and red and green lights. One car, however, knew the way round, and much to the delight of the crew, arrived at the Britannia Club.

Sgt Boakes, Cpl Melia and Tpr Carter.

2Lt Roberts.


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The Tercentenary was marked by a short parade, during which Padre Booth addressed us and prayers were said, followed by swimming sports, ably organised by Sgt Mackay and 2Lt Roberts; Tpr. Lee (705) and “Dollar Ten” Leigh gave good performances. Later the Squadron had an excellent lunch. Internal Security duties soon claimed us and it was not long before we were called out to assrst the police. However after the mad scramble of getting the cars ready, crewed and then deploying to our vantage points, we were told it was a mistake and had to pack up and return to camp. Though for us it was an anti-climax the children that throng the city had a wonderful time examining us and our cars. In December the Squadron was engaged in the island wide 1.8. Exercise, which place in two phases. In the first phase we formed a body of rioters. Oflicers and men dressed in the most disreputable clothes and sallied forth to battle. A police order to the gates of a station was out of place as we had just taken them ofi. 2Lt Sturge proved self a true rioter and would have stood trial as a ringleader had it all been real.

took alike close him-

Phase two found us in our proper role as the Squadron spent a sleepless night patrolling from Tyersall Park and controlling in Orchard Road. Capt Amery and Cpl Pain when going for a “bite to eat” came across some curfew breakers and gave chase, but to no avail. However they considered that they had done their bit. Despite the excitement, the routine had to continue. We survived our Inspection before Christmas and a C.I.V. for which we got an “excellent.” ‘Aspro’ were used in the efforts to tidy up the bumpf. Despite the lack of time available, we managed to present a fairly decent face to the Inspecting SQMS survived, but we feel only by the virtue of his Confused Club.

Administrative A great many clerks and the team. Even the

Visitors are not uncommon to our small domain. The Squadron lines see a never ending stream of V.I.P.s, A.D.C.s and their retinues. Many races, colours and creeds have trodden our much weeded paths. Squadron training has developed from A.F.V. courses to unarmed combat, demolition and jungle treks. At the time of writing, half the Squadron has just returned from a five day in the “Deep.” Those who participated certainly got to know the feel of a pack and the swing of a machete. The general opinion was that even if the jungle is unpleasant it is certainly a change from routine. In the sporting world our biggest triumph came from our cross country team led by Tprs McCrea and Smoker, which swept the board at the Regimental meeting. Tpr Crabbe runs the basket ball team which has had many good matches, including some against the Youth Club, Singapore, whom we entertain. The hockey team enjoyed a good season and played the first eight games of the season without defeat, one scalp being that of the Singapore Minor Unit champions; SQMS Simpson and Sgt Thornton each scored a good goal. At the time of writing the football and cricket seasons are just opening and with Sgt Wood and Cpl Pettit playing Army football trials and the Squadron Leader, Tprs Smoker and Curtis playing cricket we look forward to the new seasons with hope of success. Lt Black and partner won the I7 Gurkha Division Tennis Open Doubles, a very good effort indeed. We hope this is the last year in which we say “a great number of changes have taken place since . . .”. We are about to lose our last National Service Trooper McCrea, and soon our competent Cpl Morgan, R.A.P.C. To them, and all who served the Squadron so well. we few who carry on, say, “ Thanks, and the best of good luck to you.”

_PRONTO, ARE YOU LISTENING T: A recent visitor to an oflice at Divisional Headquarters asked what all the shouting was about in the next ofiice. He was told that a Brigadier was talking to Singapore. “Why,” asked the visitor, “ does he not use the telephone?”

SQUADRON NOTES— AST year we thought we would be clever and started keeping a Squadron Diary. The idea, said the Squadron Leader wisely, was to make writing The Eagle Notes a matter of copying from the Diary. Only too easy. Unfortunately like all good intentions the idea (and the diary) quietly expired some time around September and the Squadron Leader is once again called upon to write up the year’s activities from memory. The past year has provided the Squadron with many interesting challenges and in twelve months we have probably achieved as much as in any similar peacetime period in the history of the Squadron. The greatest event has been the achievement of a 100% Regular Squadron, which occurred in March of this year and has brought to an end a period of Conscription and National Service lasting some 23 years. It is fitting to pay our tribute to those who were forced to forego part of their civilian life to serve with “C ” Squadron. We thank all of them for their enthusiasm, their cheerfulness and the hard work they put in when we were so short of Regulars. The last year has seen our role change from that of Training Squadron to a fully opera— tional Squadron, while still retaining some responsibilities for Regimental trade training (mainly running B I Courses). During May and June, 1961, individual troops went out on small scale exercises, including the old 5th Troop (now 2nd Troop) to the East Coast with “B” Squad— ron. At the end of June We had our first Squadron exercise, Exercise “Far Flung,” which consisted of a drive to Taiping, a day of umpired troop actions, a day of LS. training and a This was a good opening for Exercise “Last Lap,” the night drive into Squadron leager. annual I.S. exercise in Singapore. At mid—day on 1st July we were put at four hours notice to move, and orders came through at 7.30 pm. on 4th July for an immediate move. Despite time spent in ferrying in married soldiers from scattered quarters, drawing rations and carrying out other final preparations we moved 2% hours later. Driving throughout the night we reached Seremban early next morning where we had an administrative halt, then pressed on to Johore Bahru where we arrived safely though very tired just under 24 hours after receiving orders to move and with 400 miles on the clock. Next morning we drove on to Singapore island, took part in the exercise and returned to Ipoh again on 8th/9th July. This exercise was particularly gruelling for the drivers and in most cases commanders took over the wheel for part of the journey. In July and August troops were again on exercises. Two composite troops took part in Exercise “ Trinity Angel” on traffic control duties. Some troops spent a night on the river near Sungei Siput and on one occasion the Squadron Leader took S.H.Q. and the Echelon to this area. Unfortunately the 3-tonners fouled a railway bridge near Chemor during the drive up and we all had a chance of seeing how a 3—tonner can lose six inches in height by letting all the air out of the tyres. Eventually we arrived and Tpr Barr gave us a demonstration of river fording, driving his Mark I Ferret Scout Car neatly across the river—and back.


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Later in August the Squadron went to Lumut for the weekend and the Squadron families visited us by bus on the Saturday. A launch trip was arranged from Lumut Peir which every— one enjoyed, and those who stayed behind bathed in the sea and relaxed under the palm trees. In September a Regimental Scout Car and Land Rover Rally was held, many senior ranks of the Squadron assisting as officials. A road run of 65 miles, including some tricky map reading through rubber estates, weeded out some competitors; acceleration, braking and reversing tests stumped a few more and not everyone completed the cross country course. All who took part learnt a considerable amount. Our best crews were Tpr Lee and chl Strud— wick who were placed 3rd in the Scout Car Section, and Tprs Mason and Bloomfield were not far behind. Cpl Clark and Tpr McClair had the bad luck to be disqualified after skidding into a bogged Scout Car on the cross country course. They had been doing well up to that point. At the end of September 6th Troop went to the East Coast with “A ” Squadron. At this time, too, we introduced more cross country driving into the Squadron training programme, using the rally course. Troop movement generally however had to be restricted due to the annual Administrative Inspection which was closely followed by the C.I.V. Inspection. In addition the Tercentenary Parade on zlst October needed some preparation and practice. Finally we had to concentrate on completing the assimilation of all crewmen to the new 1960 R.A.C. Trade structure, which necessitated a large number of courses and a lot of map reading instruction. In November we were visited by the C.—in—C. FARELF, General Poett, and an escort was provided from vehicles of 4th Troop. The accent was then shifted to F.M.R. shooting in preparation for the Ulu Tiram ranges, and from 27th November to tst December twelve crews were away firing from “B” Squadron’s cars. On 7th December we paraded for Maj Gen G. R. D. Fitzpatrick and showed him the F.M.R., Gunnery Wing and Radio Wing. Here he met Sgt Lloyd, an old acquaintance of Canal Zone days. Other activities before Christmas were two days on the rifle range, the Inter-Squadron cross country running competition and a senior ranks jungle initiation march—the latter run by Sgt Saxton, our Jungle Training expert. At the end of the year the finals of the Inter—Troop football competition were played off, our team (“C ” 3) losing to Q.M. group after a good game.

ClllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHllllllIlll

Squadron

Another sporting success which followed soon after was our win in the Inter-Squadron Novices Boxing competition, by a very convincing margin. Early in the New Year a number of inter—Troop postings had to be made to keep the Squadron balanced. At this time, too, we welcomed Capt Keightley as Second—in—Command, taking over from Lt Aylen who forsook us for the gay lights of Singapore and moved to “ B ” Squadron. We were sorry, too, to say goodbye to SSM Kimble and wish him good fortune at Lulworth. In his place we welcomed SSM Ransom on his return to the Regiment from T.A. duty with the Sharpshooters. At the end of January we again provided an escort troop, this time for the visit of the Adjutant General (General Goodbody). He was also shown crews firing in the F.M.R. In February we had a very enjoyable exercise on the east coast near Kuantan, known as Exercise “Hard Top.” After four days concentrated troop training we had a half day, and the Padre, who was visiting us, held an outdoor church service in the evening. Later on we had a camp fire on the beach. We ran a most successful two-day umpired exercise before returning to Ipoh, two troops of “A ” Squadron acting as a gallant enemy. For the last few days three Naval Oflicers stayed with the Squadron and we were able to show them how we live and operate in the field. They were somewhat surprised. On return to Ipoh we instituted a series of weekly jungle marches, to familiarize ourselves with moving and living in primitive jungle. The mountains of Upper Perak are covered with thick jungle, rising steeply from the Perak River plain to over 600 feet in the Cameron Highlands, so training could start right on our doorstep. It is hardly surprising that some of our uniform is not now fitting us!

Jungle Trophy—a 10ft. python.

“Nautical

The

Contact

courtesy

of

Report.”

the

road.


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5th Troop—Lumut Cpl

Squires,

Tpr

Benn, Lepl

McKenzie, Tpr Heal, Lt Lamach-Jones, Tpr Leech, chl Best, Tpr Ratley, Sgt Hearn.

Very little wild life has been seen so far, but some of the routes taken have led through fascinating though rugged country. Patrols have penetrated some distance into the hills, often using river valleys to gain access to the difficult country lying above the thousand-foot contour line. Marching on com— pass bearings, with no land marks visible, they have cut their way through dense bamboo, ferns and other undergrowth. Some of the undergrowth is covered with vicious thorns which easily penetrate all clothing. One patrol was unlucky enough to disturb a hornets nest: Cpl Gardner had over a dozen stings but was little the worse for the experience, Descending mountain streams can be a hazardous business and many a uniform has been torn to shreds (as the SQMS knows to his costl). Mounted training continues of course despite the attractions of “ulu bashing” and in March 2nd Troop accompanied “A” Squadron to the Alor Star area. Here Cpl Cox came under point-blank fire from the enemy and although peppered with bulleted blank he lives to tell the tale. As these notes are being written we have just had a visit from the Divisional Commander, Maj Gen Walker, who took great interest in the jungle training which he was shown. We are now preparing for the major exercise of the year, due to take place in May and June and which will doubtless be reported on in next year’s Eagle.

By order of the Astronomer Royal? “Depending on the state of the moon the Regimental Contractor and all his departments (except dhobi) will close on 17th and 18th March, 1962 (Regimental Orders, March, 1962)

And who pays for their passage? “ All ranks will hand in alternative next of kin to the Squadron Office” (“C ” Squadron Orders, February, 1962). 1.

Squadron Leaguer—overhead camouflage no problem. 2. “So that’s what the jungle is S.S.M. Kimble. 3. Capt Bill Yates, LS. Operations, Singapore.

like,"


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SQUADRON NOTES E are still looking at the verdant covered hills of Malaya, with our throughts now turn— ing to England, home and beauty. Most of us have seen other parts of Malaya during 1961, and some have leagured in a cocoanut grove on the shores of the South China Sea near Kuantan. Others have only got as far as the night leaguer area, ten miles up the road near Tambun. Some travelled the 80 miles to Brinchang Camp in the Cameron Highlands, where they tackled the lofty hills on foot. The trail was blazed by 851 Dixon leaving clear indications for all well trained Boy Scouts to follow. Unfortunately the SSM “went into the rough” and conquered the wrong peak. In the sporting field, SQMS Cameron led the Squadron basketball team to victory, while the football and boxing teams were second. SSM Blackaller and Tpr Stimson make a good job of keeping the Squadron going, as Squadron Leaders now remain in office for such short periods.

RJI. Q. Troop INCE last appearing in print, the role of RHQ has changed little. We have been prepared to produce a Headquarters at short notice at all times, and elements have participated in almost every exercise in various capacities. Some of the older members even seem to remember the Adjutant sleeping out for a night in the dim distant past. However we have seen every facet of Malaya—some pleasant, some not so pleasant, some amusing as in the case of the early part of a major I.S. exercise in Singapore being conducted from the dress-circle of the Lido cinema. At the moment we are deeply enmeshed in the problems of how to extract an immense quantity of power for the new radio equipment from an infinitesimal supply. The population has been a fluctuating one; Cpl Tatham has gone to the R.A.C. Signals School, ch1 Harris goes shortly to the cookhouse to give to the masses the benefits of the cooking which only the select few have been able to enjoy for the last seven years, and by the time this is in print Sgt Jubb will have been relieved by Sgt Lloyd after two years sterling service.

Motor Transport Troop NOTHER year, another set of notes and as usual we are being chased by the Editor. The past year has seen many changes in drivers and N.C.O.s. In July we said farewell to Sgt Rochford who left us for Bovington, he was replaced by Sgt Crabb. In October, Lt Barrington Browne left and went home the hard way! (apparently Greyhound buses do not

M.T. Troop celebrate Christmas, 1961. Messrs Tibbenham, Hawkins, Branham, Collins, Ellis, Williams, Norman.

compare with Alfa Romeos for comfort!) We would like also to congratulate him on his marriage. Lt Hamilton-Russell took over from Lt Barrington-Browne. In November the establishment was changed and the Staff Sergeant’s vacancy was filled by Sgt Crabb. In March Ssgt Webster took over from Ssgt Crabb. Cpl. Howell was posted to the Troop in January and was soon busy with worktickets and spanners, the latter much to the displeasure of a certain R.E.M.E. Sergeant! We welcome to the Troop chls Brown and Currie, and Tprs Carpenter, Gadd, Harman, Abbott and Burke. During the year we said goodbye to all our National Service drivers and these included ch1 Christie, and Tprs Heron, Turnbull, May, Pollard, Hawkins, Worrall, Ellis, Flatt and Moscrop. The annual vehicle inspection took place in November and after much sweat and sometimes (nearly) tears we returned to the normal routine but, alas, not for long. With the move of 3 Company R.A.S.C. the Troop became much larger, and with extra commitments We welcomed to the Troop the Malayan Ambulance drivers who think nothing of travelling to Taiping twice a day with hospital cases. During the past year members of the Troop have travelled to Singapore twice to watch the Grand Prix, in the first visit Lt Barrington Browne was racing and came under the eagle eye of the visitors, an unusual reverse. At the time of going to press at least two members of the Troop are under training as Regimental Cooks. In conclusion a sincere vote of thanks must be given to Sgt Jubb and the members of R.H.Q. Troop for their assistance when we have been short of drivers, also we greatly appreciate the help that has been given by Cpls Nicol and Evans of the R.A.S.C.

Quartermaster ’8 Department N spite of having lost Major Lewis’s guiding hand this year, the group again won the younger Inter—Troop Football Competition, making this an annual event. We feel the team was 29! members of the Regiment need to look to their laurels as the average age of the Matthews sets the example—we follow it! Sgt Thorpe The ever increasing number of families bring more furrows to the brow of up as and his furniture removal men. They are seriously considering setting themselves ’——the phrase estate agents and removals combined. ‘Never have so few served so many ‘ newly arrived family’ is liable to send the whole group in hysterics.


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We are sorry to lose ch1 Williams and Tpr Henderson from the football team and Tpr Bonner who did so well in the Inter—Squadron Boxing. We are also sorry to lose the services of chl Hawley, Tprs Swift, Almond, Hunt, Heads who returned to ‘civvy ’ life. We wish them all the best. In their place we would like to welcome Cpl Underwood, ch1 White, Tpr Brown and Tpr Heal and hope their stay with us will be a happy one. Our heartiest congratulations to the Quartermaster and the RQMS for receiving their L.S.G.C. medal. Sgt Leese is still bewildered at losing his comfortable position in “A” Squadron for the everlasting hard work of the Q.M. Group. Even his “’am” radio friends could not save him from that one. Next year should find us colder and probably wetter but nevertheless in our own element, and, we hope, married quarters back to sensible proportions.

Regimental Orderly Room SINCE the last publication of our Notes there have been a number of changes in R.O.R. Staff. Sgt Hall came from the Q.M. Group as Orderly Room Sergeant under Ssgt Leech. Cpl Brandon left for U.K. on medical grounds. Congratulations go to Tprs Theed and Lee on their promotion to Lance-Corporal, also to Tpr Fox on his promotion to chl and sub— sequent posting to “C” Squadron. Capt Jacobs assumed the “hot seat” on rejoining the Regiment from England, with Lt Woodward as 1.0. Lt Woodward having since left for England and then posting to Sultan’s Armoured Forces, Muscat. We trust there are no outstanding traffic accident reports in the I.O.’s cupboard. The R.O.R. furnishings have greatly changed and now we look like a tourist ofiice—en route for C.O.s, not forgetting the red carpet, seating arrangements and the all—seeing mirror on R.H.Q. verandah! The mirror unfortunately crashed to earth on the completion of the Part II Inspection in April, 1962.

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flesh private tuition from Ssgt Leech and Sgt Hall. All clerks have now at least their Class II Trade. Shorthand is the order of the day—but Chinese guard reports seem to prevail amongst certain drafts. Documentation inspections fell hard and fast with two inside 12 months but reports proved that the pale—faced element actually do work b:hind those little wooden desks. chl Theed represented the Regiment in the cross country running at Malacca and although the team was unsuccessful results showed plenty of effort. We congratulate Tpr Symonds on his marriage and wish both of them the best of luck for the future. With the impending move of the Regiment we look forward to the change of air. It is unlikely that the eternal paper sausage machine will cease—but what comes in must go out— somewhere! At going to press our establishment is as follows: Adjutant: Capt D. M. Jacobs; I.O.: Lt A. P. G. Stanley—Smith; Chief Clerk: Ssgt J. C. Leech; O.R.S.: Sgt B. Hall; Part II Orders: chl Theed; C.O. Typist: chl Lee; Documents: ch1 Yendell; Movements: Tpr Roddis; Registration: Tpr Symonds; Civilian Clerk: Mr. Tan. Capt Jacobs will be leaving shortly and we take this opportunity of wishing him and Mrs. Jacobs all the best for the future.

Royal Signals HEN we eventually return to England, there will only be three members who were with the Regiment when it left in 1959. They are WOII Williams, Cpls Middleton and Strang who have contracted, subject to official approval, to spend a further six months with the Royals when they go home. Of the other originals, Cpls Bell, Breach and Harden and Sig McDonald will be posted to other Royal Signals units at the end of the year, as the troop is being considerably reduced in strength.

An all round higher standard of clerical training has been reached through pound-for— Sgt Hiles has been replaced by Sgt Knowles, who is more often heard than seen. Cpl Bell runs the attachment at “B” Squadron with a gang of faithful retainers whose sole occupation seems to be consuming orange juice and banana sandwiches. Recently returned to Ipoh is Cpl Strang, who now sports the only full heard in the Regiment, and possibly in the Army in Malaya. With medical approval, of course. In our main work now of installing new radio equipment, we are grateful for the assist— ance of Sgt Jubb, who not only buys the NAAFI breaks, but has discovered how to produce 12 volts from a 24 volt bank batteries.

.4. C. C. Troop AST year it was our privilege to introduce the first of the A.C.C. Troop notes. With the changing establishment and policy it looks as if these may well be the last, as Regimental Cooks are already underging training in the mysteries of the A.C.C. cuisine. We

The Orderly Room Staff.

wish

the

following, who

served with the Troop and have left since our last notes,

all the best for civilian life: Ptes Peach, Goldstraw, Elkins, Anderson and Moore. To those posted out frotn the Troop we also wish every success, and take this opportunity of welcoming chl Scott, Pte Watson and family, and Pte Gooding. Ptes High and Whiteside represented the Regiment in football, Ptes High and Anderson took part in the Regimental boxing, and chl Bower, we hear, is still running 1n. Despite many attempts to “ exercise ” Pte Welch, when it comes to bacon it can only be served “well done” or perhaps “overdone” but never, no never, burnt in a tin. During the past year reports received do credit to the efforts and team work under the stewardship of WO II Smith and Lt Ayrton, the Messing Officer, and we congratulate Cpl Thompson passing his A1 Trade and ch1 Reid on his B1 success. Congratulations also to Pte Hagan on his promotion to chl.


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“ Stalag 300 9’ DO not know what the Kiwis called it, but it is now known as the “300 Rest Camp, Lumut,” It is a small collection of huts in a jungle clearing on the west coast of Malaya near the Lumut Ferry. All ranks and married families are invited to spend a week—end at the seaside, to get away from the Basha, the Mess and the house and do a spot of swimming and sunbathing. The camp staff consists of an NCO, a cook, a driver, radio operator and, of course, Ran-Chop, the dog. Wild life is often seen and heard prowling in the nearby jungle and even around the camp during the night. Monkeys, lizards, snakes, wild boar, orang—utangs and pythons are just a few which have been spotted so far. One python in particular, “thanks to a shot in the dark” by chl Hore, found out to his regret that it does not pay to hang around the cookhouse at night. The bridge on the track leading to the camp has become almost a legend to certain members of the Regiment and I hear that Sgt Fordham has been asked to star in a sequel to “The Bridge on the River Kwai.” One thing is certain, anyone who has spent a few weeks there will never forget the experience, I know!

The Band NE of the first events to start the ball rolling this year was an invitation for the Band to give a series of six concerts on a monthly basis. The first concert was well attended by about four thousand people. This led to other local organisations immediately enquiring and asking for the services of the Band. It was not long before our activities began to take us further afield to Penang, where we almost became Regimental Band to the 34 LAA Regiment, RA, eventually performing as much in Penang as in Ipoh. This quick succession of Concert, Band and Dance Band engagements led us up to the tercentenary celebrations, when we were called on for most of the celebrations: the highlight being a marching display given in the Oflicers’ Mess grounds for all the guests attending the Polo Week—end. It was for this occasion that a setting of the Cavalry Last Post was arranged to the tune “Abide with Me,” with the solo trumpeter spotlighted and the Band in darkness, this provided a very moving finale to what was considered a precision performance. November, 1961, was our turn for Duty Band in Singapore, having escaped this task for the previous year. We made up for the lost time both in the number of engagements and putting ourselves and the Regiment firmly on the map in Singapore. More concerts in Ipoh and hasty preparations for Christmas entertainment followed. With the pressure of work we had to be content with a Band Concert padded out by Squadrons turns which turned out to be good fun. The enthusiasm shown by “A” and “H.Q.” Squadrons provided a good evening’s entertainment and even in this climate we captured the spirit of Christmas (possibly more spirit after the show). Just before the year was out we moved to the Cameron Highlands complete with families and continued our rehearsals and duties in a more temperate climate. The Band Concerts given in the Camerons were very much appreciated, so rarely did they hear any— thing like a Military Band. The return from the Camerons brought the Band in contact with the Perak Arts Council. The Bandmaster had been invited to be Musical Director and Producer of this Society’s production of the Gilbert and Sullivan opera “Trial by Jury.” The Band accompanied this throughout and special mention is made of Cpl Briggs, who gave an admirable performance as the “Usher.” Soon after this came the coveted trip to the Philippines. The object of the mission was to play at a British Embassy sponsored exhibition held in Manila. Transport from Singapore was by RN and we became guests of the Inshore Flotilla for a period of six days, the Band being split up with five on each of the three minesweepers and 15 on the frigate

Woodbridge Haven.

During these days at sea the members of the Band were given the

_

“300» Camp, Lumut.

3.

2.

Cpl Cawthome, Royal Signals, with an East Coast Resident.

Cpl Breach, Royal Signals. “Ready to Go.“ 4_

Regimental Dance Band.


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previous year and gained himself a year’s free course at the Royal College of Music. He is the first member of the Band to achieve such a course. The return of Sgt Stone and family to England pending release after such valuable service has brought the average age of the Band down. He held the distinction of being the oldest member of the Band for quite some time. We all wish him every success in his new life. TM Whellans sustained a most unfortunate accident and had to return to England Reports are coming through indicating his rezovery. In the meantime, TM Fisher has ably stepped in the breach with his trumpeters. chl “Zoot” Trachy has taken over the percussion, this role affording him an opportunity to give vent to his natural energy, particularly in numbers like “In a Persian Market.” Congratulations to Ssgt and Mrs Darling, and chl and Mrs Whitworth on the increase in the family roll with the birth of daughters.

Light Aid Detachment

Public performance at Manila.

opportunity of firing various weapons and taking part in the ships’ various routines. Bdsm Riley became a little unpopular when he blasted the floating target away with his accuracy and another target had to be launched. The ship’s captain became elevated that he had at his disposal a Band of 30 men, with such a small ship’s complement, when the most an Admiral has had at sea is 25, His moment of glory was the morning the Flotilla pulled into Manila. The complete Band was gathered together on the Poop Deck for the 21—gun salute, followed by the Philippines National Anthem. The other 15 members of the Band being transferred from the mine— sweepers to the frigate by jack-stay. From the moment the Band stepped ashore at Manila and gave its first performance, the Philippinos were with us all the way. We found them very warm hearted and a muSic loving race, whose thunderous applause was tremendous encouragement to every member of the Band to give of his very best. On completion of this tour the RN took us to Hong Kong, where we stayed for six days waiting for an RAF plane to bring us back to Singapore. The item which was always appreciated with rapturous applause, whether it wasOfficers’ Dinner Nights from C—in—C’s Mess down, or at public concerts, was the stereophonic “Post Horn Gallop,” arranged by the Bandmaster. chl Whitworth and Craft are to belcon— gratulated on always producing the goods at all the right times. Under the trying conditions of climate, every member of the Band has done well to keep up the standard during the present tour. The usual turnover of manpower has taken place and we welcome to our midst Bandsmen Turpin, Moloney, Cohen, Creavin, Pyne, Cleaveland, Brittain, Skews, WarWick, Atkinson and ch1 Watts, who has re-enlisted, and we wish them all a happy and busy stay and every success with their music. Away at Kneller Hall on pupils’ courses we have Bandsmen Atkinson, Eatch, Roberts and Hobson. Congratulations to Bdsm Shearn, who completed his Kneller Hall course the

SINCE the last notes were written there has been a complete change of the management. We have said goodbye to Capt A. W. MacQueen, who has taken up his new appointment in York, on promotion to Major, and ASM M. F. Kinshott, who left us in November on receiving his commission. We congratulate them both on their promotion and wish them the very best for the future. In their places we welcome Capt J. G. Till and ASM E. W. Jenno, who both joined us from Singapore. In addition, we have lost some thirty other members of the L.A.D. during the last year and perhaps we will be forgiven if we only mention Ssgt Pitcher, Sgt Happs and Sgt. Davis. To all who have departed, good luck and success in your new Units or civilian life and welcome to our newcomers. Although there are only 43 members of the L.A.D. in Ipoh, we have managed to achieve some success in the sporting field. We providid 10 players for the garrison rugby team during the season and produced two players of note—chl Glister, who represented Perak, and Cfn Taylor, who played for Johore. In addition, we have fielded hockey, football, basketball, badminton and cross-country teams, which have met with varied success against Squadron teams. The Royal Dragoons and Ipoh Branch of the R.E.M.E. Association now have their own premises, and the Branch has developed into a very flourishing concern. It has provided an excellent venue for L.A.D. functions and the fruit machine has improved the physique of many a pennyless man. The work of the L.A.D. repairing the vehicles and equipment of the Regiment continues as ever and we hope that we can leave Malaya with a clean sheet. Combining business with pleasure, Squadron exercises have taken the majority of people on a Cook’s Tour of Malaya, including the famous beaches of the east coast. These tours have not always been fully appreciated, but viewed through rose coloured spectacles from a cold and foggy England, the memories will undoubtedly improve with age. To past members who are experiencing technical problems, we still have the 2—foot diameter armour—plated hole with locking tabs in the welder’s shop and will willingly forward it on request.

Spectemur Agendo The motto came originally from the Spencer family, being used by the Royals as early as 1740. Its use was formally sanctioned by Queen Victoria in 1856.

Eagle Cap Badge Sanctioned by Queen Victoria in 1881 on Officers Forage Caps.


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Adventure Training .' ? FF with the dawn on November 7, 1961. The journey was Malaya to England, the wrong way round. My aim was to hitch—hike the modern way to the United States, see a little of that country and get myself home for a course in early January, 1962. Six months previously it had started as a vague thought. As names and addresses gradually materialised, contacts and plans began to be formed. Now it had become reality, and all the preparations and plans were to be put to the test. An R.A.F. Bristol Freighter was my first mode of transport. As it clattered and roared its way out of Singapore, through the misty golden dawn, I wondered whether I would actually reach my goal. The first sight of land was somewhere near Saigon, in South Vietnam, along whose eastern coast we flew until landing at Turone to refuel. There was practically no sign of life in this area. People do not seem to move further than a couple of miles or so from their villages. There is the ever—present danger of communist guerrillas. At Turone, during the brief stop, I only saw five Vietnamese. Six hours later we arrived over what must be one of the most beautiful sights in the world—through the fading light of evening, lights vaguely marked out by the lines of streets and houses was Hong Kong, lit for Princess Alexandra. We landed at Kai Tak. The first of my addresses, the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank Junior Mess was put to the test. It passed with flying colours. Here, at a height of over 1,oooft., I could look down over the harbour to Kowloon and the New Territories, with the hills of Communist China behind. Now came the preparations for the next stage. After four days of sight—seeing and meeting many people who I had not seen for years, I managed to scramble aboard a U.S. military aircraft bound for Okinawa. It took me a long time to find this place on the map, but it is in fact a little island of the Ryukyu group between Formosa and Japan. In Okinawa I really began to be initiated into the American way of life; not through choice, at this stage, but because the island is completely dominated by American Forces. I was nobly looked after by the Americans and ived in their batchelor oflicers’ quarters and ate in their club. This was fine, until I ran into a bunch of U.S. Marines, who initiated me into a club by drinking flaming Vodka. I still have no idea which club it is, but I am a fullyfledged member. Since I was in Okinawa, I decided to see as much of the island as I could and try to find a true Okinawan. My diary for that day records: “ Dirty, dusty, ramshackle, scruffy, very American. Tried to find them—impossible. Horse transport on farms. Tiny plots of land. Monuments to everyone—they all seem to have died here. Okinawans very much the underdogs. Very pretty girls, but bad legs!” Perhaps this gives a vague picture. At last, after two unsuccessful tries, I managed to get on a charter flight to California. This was entirely due to the travel orders given to me by the Military attache in the U.S. Embassy in Hong Kong. After the DC-7C had refuelled at Tachikawa, in Japan, we flew off on the longest leg of the flight, to Alaska, with a farewell wave from two Scotsmen from Motherwell and Kilmamock, who had somehow joined the U.S.A.F. On this leg we crossed the international date line—Friday, November 17, appears twice in my diary. The moon came up at mid-day, and as I was not used to American meals, I could not work out whether we were meant to be having breakfast, lunch or dinner. Here my administration went badly amiss. At this stage I was dressed in tropical uniform, and looking below I saw what I thought was land. However, on asking where we were, I was

told we were still over the sea—it was frozen!

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conveyance as far as Washington. These buses were most comfortable and keep strictly to the speed limits of 65 mph, stopping only for the occasional “ rest stop ” every two hours. This is hardly necessary, since they have built-in “mod. cons.” In San Francisco I had an address to contact. This was the beginning of a tremendous week. There is nothing I have not seen in the city—the Golden Gate; the steep streets; the cable cars; Lombard Street (the most twisty street in the world); night clubs in the style of 1920; Bob Hope’s golf course on the Monterey peninsula; the crowds after the “Big Game,” which were worse than London on Boat Race night; and I even met an ex—4th Hussars Sergeant, who was a barman in a country club. Los Angeles, my next stop, was not nearly so exciting. I did not spend much time here, apart from seeing Hollywood, with Sunset Strip and Belaire, the famous film star housing

estates, still recovering from the recent big fire, and moved on to Arizona. Phoenix, the capital of Arizona, is rather what its name implies, something that has risen out of the heat of the desert. Originally there was nothing, and it is now a flourishing, expensive, hot, winter health resort. The countryside is similar to that of Arabia—a barren, rocky and desert land. By this time I was thankful to use it as the rich man does, and I rested here for four days before setting off for what is almost worthy of being included in the Seven Wonders of the World. The Grand Canyon, formed by the River Colorado eating its way down through 5,000 feet of rock, is a magnificent sight. The river, barely visible from the rim of the Canyon, carries one million tons of silt past any one point in the course of a day. To reach the bottom, one has to undertake a hair—raising 14-mile journey down precipitous tracks on mules. Time and money were now running out, so I had to push on through the Indian Reservations and plains of New Mexico to Texas, and then into the Deep South to Louisiana. This State must be unique in America, with its bias and strong French influence. In the old part of the town of New Orleans, the houses have enclosed courtyards in which grow glorious sub-tropical plants. The town itself is made up of small, low buildings because, since the land is so wet, they cannot build high for fear of the buildings sinking below the depth of the Missisippi. Georgia provided for me the most enjoyable and interesting four days in the U.S.A. Here I saw American country life on a 9,000—acre estate, with horses to ride and shooting to be had. It seemed odd to me, used to the English customs of shooting, to be allowed to shoot only two duck in a day—a law introduced to prevent the complete annihilation of duck by zealous American hunters. That afternoon I was introduced to the Georgian dove shoot. here again, one’s personal bag was limited, this time to twelve. About 20 guns foregathered at different times during the afternoon dressed in all manner of clothing, from the conventional camouflage to bright red tee shirts. As they arrived, they took up various stands around, and in the middle of an old corn field, and just shot. The birds came, not in any great quantity, but in their ones and twos, some high some low. Each bird was shot at, not by one, but by about five guns; not with one shot, but with as many as their guns held. Occasionally a clove fell. A day is not judged by the number of birds shot, but by the number of boxes of cartridges fired! Unfortunately, I could not find out the bag, but as far as I could judge, each bird probably cost $5 in cartridges. My arrival in Jacksonville, in Florida, gave me my greatest sense of achievement. Now, with 6,000 miles of the Pacific and 3,000 miles of America behind me, there was only the comparatively short distance of the Atlantic between me and my goal. At this stage I turned north for the first time, and my Greyhound bus took me to Washington. Here, I only had enough time to see the White House and the Capitol and

pay a visit to the British Embassy. Then to New York, where I arrived at the worst time of

The twenty-five yards from the aircraft to

the terminal building were a nightmare. It was 30 degrees below. Needless to say, I hastily changed before departing for California. On arrival in California, I divorced myself from the U.S.A.F. and struck out on my own for Sacrimento, the capital of California, a pleasant little country town. After two days here, Iwent on to San Francisco by Greyhound bus, which was going to be my sole method of

the day on the worst day of the year—5 p.m., the Friday before Christmas. This was only a staging point for one night before flying to Boston, where I was given a true New England Christmas, complete with 18 inches of snow. Returning to New York, I spent my last few days making preparations for my homeward flight, while trying to see what I could of this famous city. Here I did my cheapest and most worthwhile trip by taking the ferry, for 5 cents return, from Manhatten to Richmond. On this,


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one can see the New York skyline and Statue of Liberty for which sight many people pay hundreds of pounds on the Queen Mary or Elizabeth. B.O.A.C. brought me to England after two continuous months of travel, a tired and weary passenger, thankful at last to be able to relax and put away suit cases until the next long journey.

Recruiting Report RIOR to August, 1961, the responsibility for regular recruiting for the Regiment had been in the hands of ofl'icers of the Regiment attached to the Territorial Army, or on E.R.E. appointments in the United Kingdom. With National Service, the numbers required were not great, and although efforts were made to obtain more recruits, this had not been done. In 1961, the War Office agreed that each Command in the United Kingdom should have a Headquarters for the Cavalry Regiments in each Command, and whose main task would be recruiting for the various Cavalry Regiments in those Commands. The Regiment is the only Cavalry Regiment with affiliations in Eastern Command, having become affiliated with the Kent and County of London Yeomanry, T.A. (Sharpshooters), and it was therefore agreed that this H.Q. could be formed as soon as possible. The officer selected for the appointment was Maj (Retd.) C. W. J. Lewis, M.B.E. He commenced his duties in August, 1961. To help in this task the Sharpshooters very kindly offered office accommodation at their H.Q. at Bromley. The areas allotted to the Regiment for recruiting are: (a) London (shared with 2 R.T.R.), (b) Kent (shared with 2 R.T.R.), (c) Sussex, (d) Surrey. As National Service was to end at the latter end of 1962, it was important that every effort should be made to ensure that the Regiment should be all regular by that time. It was therefore necessary that at least 15 regular recruits were enlisted each month. Prior to August, 1961, the average number joining the Regiment was approximately four per month. Up to that time only one special recruiter was employed, and that was in the Sussex area. It was therefore most important that a very good team should be mustered to cover all areas, and the following is the present distribution:— Area Army Information Office Name of Recruiter London Blackheath Sgt G. Kerr SQMS E. Weller Forest Gate Kent Canterbury Sgt R. Remfrey Sussex Horsham . . Sgt E. Wallace In addition to our own Special Recruiters, we also have two Army Recruiters in Sgt P. Colyer, at St. Albans, and Sgt F. Ireland at Southend-on-Sea. These last two are not con— trolled by the Regimental H.Q., but come under control of H.Q., Eastern Command. As a result of the extremely hard work put in by the Special and Army Recruiters, and also the help received from other recruiters in our areas, the members increased almost immediately, and the following are the figures enlisted from Augist, 1961, to date. This does not include boys enlisted for the Junior Leaders Regiment or as Junior Bandsmen. August, 1961 8 December, 1961 9 September, 1961 23 January, 1962 53 October, 1961 25 February, 1962 17 November, 1961 28 March, 1962 14 TotalEnlisted 177 It will be noted that there has been a fall in numbers during February and March this year. This was caused by War Office issuing an instruction that as the Regiment was within 95".; of its establishment, recruiting was restricted except for those with family ties, having friends in the Regiment, or who would not join any other Regiment. We should like to thank all those who have helped in reaching this most excellent result, and the latest information received is that the Regiment is now 41 over its authorised establish-

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Equitation Notes 1962 SINCE the last notes were written, the horses appear to have travelled over most of Malaya, and have taken part in some six race meetings and polo tournaments. In the racing, we have managed to have horses placed at each meeting, and in all have had 2 firsts, 6 seconds, 2 thirds and 6 fourths. Of these, 2Lt Haworth Booth rode 1 first, 4 seconds and 1 third. Our other winner was at Kuala Lumpur last June, where Mrs. Fielden rode The Anak into first place in the Ladies’ Racc. In October, we helped to run the polo and racing in Ipoh, but were not helped by the fact that it poured with rain during the three days of polo. In the racing, our success was limited to Pizarro, who came second in the Class I race, ridden by 2Lt Haworth Booth. In our stables in Ipoh, we now have nine horses, of which eight are polo ponies, and one racehorse, Si Manis. Of the grooms from last year, we still have Sgt Cook, ch1 Parnwell, and Tpr Hanratty. Tprs Walton and Catlin have joined the stables, and to all these, we are extremely grateful for having worked such long hours, and for having kept the horses in such good condition—not an easy job in Malaya. Our most recent excursion was to Penang, at the end of March. Even without the polo and racing, this is an interesting trip. From Ipoh, the horses travel 120 miles by train to Prai, which normally takes about six hours, but can take anything from 8 to to hours. From Prai the horses travel by passenger ferry to George Town the capital of Penang. Why the horses do not kick up more fuss over this part of the trip cannot be imagined, but only one has ever jumped overboard. In Penang, the horses are walked for five miles through the centre of the town, and eventually arrive at the Turf Club stables, next to the racecourse. The polo tournament took place on March 23, 24 and 25. We had entered a Regimental Team for the Burma Malaya Cup, consisting of the Colonel, Maj Wilson Fitzgerald, Capt Lockhart and Lt Williams Wynn. In the first round we scraped home against the Penang Polo Club team, but got soundly beaten in the semi-finals by a very fast and hard—riding Pahang team who eventually won the competition.

ment, and full benefit of this will be felt when the Regiment returns to England.

Stables — 1961.


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EQUITATION Also entered in the Heah Swee Lee Cup was the Royal Perak team, ably led by Mr. Patrick Baker, of Frazer and Neave, with Capt Miller, Lt Stanley Smith and Lt Spencer. To everyone’s surprise, and as a result of some very good play, this team won the competition, beating Singapore in the final. The following week-end was the race meeting, our only successes being in the twofurlong scurry, in which Capt Boucher came third on First Choice and Capt Lockhart fourth on Chummy. After this, most of the horses returned to Ipoh, with the exception of Teddy Boy, Si Manis and Belom Tahu, who travelled north into Kedah for the Alor Star meeting. This meeting, run by the Kedah Gymkhana Club, was always a feature of Amateur Racing before the war, and was in fact the first to start up again after the war. However, in 1955, it was forced to close due to a large financial loss, and so this meeting was really a “make or break” for the club. It turned out to be a tremendous success with an enormous crowd, and everyone who was there thoroughly enjoyed it. Our only success was in the Class 3 race, where Belom Tahu came fourth, ridden by ch1 Murphy, who was on leave from Singapore.

Kuala Lumpur Town Plate, 3rd June, 1961.

Which brings us to the present moment. We are now trying to get ourselves and the horses fit for the Kuala Lumpur polo and racing, during the first fortnight of June. We again hope to enter two teams for the polo, but are unfortunate in losing Capt Miller, who is off to Germany, and will undoubtedly soon be playing at Bad Lippspringe. His horse, Sunrise, is now owned by 2Lt Coode, who is just starting on stick and ball. Lt Barrington Brown has taken Spuds off Capt Jacobs—is it my imagination, or does that horse sag in the middle? Si Manis, owned by Capt Lockhart, is, I am told, a hot tip for Kuala Lumpur, provided she starts with the others, which she failed to do at Singapore, Penang or Alor Star.

Mrs Fielden scores on

As these are our last notes to be written before we return to England, I would like to say how extremely grateful we are to all the oflicials of the Malayan Amateur Racing Association and of the Malayan Polo Association. They have given us every assistance during our two years here, and to all of them we say “ Thank you.” Jack Driebergen, with his great knowledge and experience of feeding and treatment, has also been a great source of help to us. Finally, I should once again like to say “ Thank you ” to the grooms, without whom it would not be possible to have any stables at all.

Church Notes The Regimental Band continues to play at the Garrison Church of St. George the martyr, Ipoh, for Morning Prayer, and it is much appreciated by the congregation. Just before Christmas, a Regimental Banner was hung in the Chancel of the Church. This banner is dated 1914 and is beautifully worked. At the Christmas carol service, various members of the Regiment read lessons. On Sunday, 29th April, a St. George’s flag, kindly presented to the Church by the mem— bers of the Warrant Officers’ and Sergeants’ Mess, was dedicated by the Chaplain, and then run up by RSM J. D. Bradley. Flying proudly from the top of its staff by the Church, the flag soon catches the eye of all in the Camp and those who pass through it.

Mr D. S.

Barrington

Browne’s

“Pizarro” winning at Singapore in August, 1961. Haworth-Booth up.

Mr C. N.


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Taken for a Ride BY A. D. \‘VINTLE. 4._j

HEN immediately after the Kaiser’s War, the Regiment composed largely of recruits went out to India, the Colonel and 01:] Tom got down to business.

Old Tom was a magnificent soldier. He had won the Victoria Cross in South Africa, and everything he did was on the same standard. He drew up his plan of equitation, the Colonel approved of it and Old Tom set about the training of the whole Regiment in equitation, start— ing with recruit rides right the way through up to the standard of first class rides of recruits parading with swords, rifles in the rifle bucket, ready to be passed out and to take their place as trained cavalrymen. The whole process took nine months. It was a splendid sight to see some five hundred men and horses parading at crack of dawn, in their separate rides, ready to move off, while Old Tom sitting his horse on top of a monticule, known to us as Spion Kop, monarch of all he surveyed, kept a jealous eye over the whole of the equitation area. Two hours hard training every morning during which the programme went on systematically, by which time the Indian sun became too hot and we dispersed to our breakfasts. There was no doubt that he knew how to make cavalrymen. ‘k

‘k

*

*

*

Then the Powers-That—W’ere sent an officer to the Regiment called John Johnson. He was a Major, senior to Old Tom, he had a Military Cross and he was a Baronet. He had several peculiarities, notably the habit of starting all remarks and ending all sentences with the words “what” and “quite,” used indiscriminately, a twittering voice and an ungainly appearance. He was very punctilious and exquisitely polite and when acknowledging a salute he would never fail to add the words: “Ah, Good Morning, what?” to all and sundry, without regard to colour or creed. In a very short time he was known to the subalterns of the Regiment as: Major Shir John Johnshon, What, Bart., Good Morning, Quite, M.Sheee.” For that was how he Schpoke, what? *

at

‘k

'k

*

One morning soon after his arrival, Major Shir John Johnshon, What, etc., went out riding, training a polo pony, although which was training which was never quite clear. Presently he came to the equitation area. Here, he reflected, was an opportunity of seeing for himself how the recruits of his Squadron were progressing. He rode into one of the manages, where the men, under the guidance of a senior N.C.O., were carrying out the evolu— tions of the particular lesson for the day. In a very short time, Major Shir John Johnshon, Quite, M.Sheee., decided that he was far from satisfied with the progress. What was that man riding that horse, what? And then they were all improperly dressed, wthout spurs. So he took charge of the ride and started to put the recruits through a new system of training of his own devising based largely on a translation from the original Chinese of a book of horsemanship which he had read. To Old Tom, sitting up on Spion Kop, there suddenly became apparent a manifestation of unusual activitity towards the western end of the equitation area. Even as he looked, he was horrified to see two men, under the guidance of some person whom he could not quite discern, engaged in the sacrilegious act of jumping over the manage wall. With a bellow of rage, which caused innumerable vultures to fly into the air, Old Tom put in his spurs and galloped off to investigate. “What the devil’s happening here?”

He roared.

‘Ah, good morning, what?” said Major Johnshon. But I’m not entirely shatisfied . . .”

“It’s only a schmall point,

what?

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‘Get to Blazes out of here!” Shouted Old Tom. “You forget yourself.” Began Shir John Johnshon. “I am shenior to you, and I must inshist on proper respect . . .” “ In the equitation area here, I represent the Commanding Officer.” Shouted Old Tom. “Clear off out of here, blast you.” Major Shir John Johnshon, What, Bart, Good Mornin, Quite, M.Sheee, realised that it would be useless to oppose his twittering voice to Old Tom, whose voice was capable of drilling a whole Regiment at full gallop in the open. With such dignity as he could muster, he departed. But he determined to report to Regimental Office, this gross breach of discipline on the part of Old Tom, his junior in seniority. *

‘k

k

'A'

*

Old Tom didn’t wait for Regimental Oflice. As soon as he had seen Major Johnshon safely off the premises, he clapped in his spurs and galloped straight off to the Colonel’s bungalow. He found the Colonel having breakfast on the verandah. ‘Hullo,” Old Tom,” said the Colonel. “Have some breakfast.” Old Tom clambered painfully off his horse and sank exhausted into a chair. He allowed himself to be persuaded to consume half a dry biscuit and a small glass of soda water. He sighed deeply. “ I’m afraid I shan’t be able to keep up the pace any longer,” he announced in a broken voice. “ It’s this old back of mine. Full of bullets.” “But I thought they’d all been pulled out,” said the Colonel. Old Tom shook his head dolefully. ‘ Ah, well, you never know.” He replied.” “And we’re getting behindhand with the work. I sometime wonder if we’re training on the right lines. Johnson doesn’t seem to think so, anyway.” “What’s that?” Said the Colonel sharply. “What’s it got to do with him? It’s the programme you drew up and I approved, and there’s an end of it.” “ Well anyway, Johnson doesn’t like it. He keeps on coming down day after day, stopping all the rides, altering the whole syllabus. I’ve implored him to let me carry on, but he won’t hear of it. Of course, he’s senior to me . . .” “That’s got nothing to do with it.” Said the Colonel sharply. “Leave this to me. And in the meantime, you go and get some massage or medicine or something and don’t let’s hear any more talk about chucking your hand in.” Thus it came about that when Major Shir John Johnshon, Bart, What, etc., arrived at Regimental Office, he was surprised at the rapidity with which he was admitted to the Colonel’s presence. Nor was his astonishment in any way reduced by the brief succinct phrases the Colonel used in criticising his appearance, efficiency, and general demeanour, concluding with a short prediction about his eventual fate and a stern order not to infest the equitation area in future. Major Shir John Johnshon then withdrew. It was only later in the day, that he remembered that his original intention in visiting Regimental Office, had been to complain of the insubordination of Old Tom, his junior in rank and seniority. at * * r * A few days later, the Colonel went on leave. Two days later, the Second—in—Command was called away to Army Headquarters. Before departing, he handed over command of the Regiment to the next senior Major. This was none other than Major Shir John Johnshon, What, Bart., Good Morning, Quite, M.Sheee. The very next morning, Major Shir John Johnshon rode his polo pony down to the equitation area, no longer in his personal capacity, but as Oflicer—in-Command of the Regi— ment. Old Tom received him with due ceremony. “Ah, good morning, what?” Said Major Shir John Johnshon. “I have come here to shee that you are carrying out your duties in a shatisfactory manner, and that the programme of training is being properly adhered to, what?”


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“Kindly come this way, Sir,” been put up . . .”

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said Old Tom. “ Now this is a new jump which has just

“No doubt, What, quite, quite,” said Major Johnshon. “But I am not concerned with new jumps. All I want to see is that you are carrying out your duties in a shatisfactory . . .” But Old Tom had that in him which enabled him to read aright in the hearts of horses and of men. For at that moment, apparently from nowhere, galloping as hard as they could lay hoof to ground came the first-class ride of recruits, swords drawn, Scabbards swinging, rifles well home in the rifle buckets. With a crash and a clatter and a roar, riding as a seventeen file troop, the front rank cleared the jump, closely followed by the rear rank. This was too much for Major Johnshon’s polo pony. ~ Putting back his ears, he let out a squeal, gave a frightful buck and shot Major Johnshon high up into the air. The pony had disappeared in the dust before Major Johnshon landed in a sitting position on the ground. The last that was seen of Major Shir John Johnshon, What, Bart, Good Morning, Quite, M.Sheee was an ungainly dismounted figure hobbling painfully off in an easterly direction towards home.

Sergeants Mess Notes THE majority of the Mess Members have now settled down with their families, but some still look back on the good old times in Aden (probably when in the Dog-House). Even so the social life here can be very exacting with one’s next door neighbours whether they be Malayan, Chinese or Indian. For all this we have a great number of dances and games evenings. With the RASC Company moving to Malacca and the ‘Bushwhackers’—No. 2 Federation Workshops—now in Taiping, we now find ourselves the Garrison Mess. We miss the Majestic Hotel for holding ‘big functions, but since the alterations to the Mess have been completed facilities are adequate for most socials. ‘Mike’ Kinshott organised a Grand Easter 1961 Motor Rally, commencing at the Mess at 09.00 hours and finishing at about 15.30 hours. It was a grand day for all, including the children who were bumped around for close on 120 miles. Results: RSM and Mrs Bradley, 1st (car); GSM and Mrs Latham, Ist (motor cycle). We all send our regards to ‘ Mike ’ Kinshott in his new post and take this opportunity of welcoming ASM Jenno and his wife to the Regiment. The Garrison Games evenings between 3 Company RASC, The Bushwhackers and ourselves turned out to be very good evenings indeed. Big Jim Hughes of 3 Company would insist we were constantly changing over our “A” and “B” teams, but one can’t help if a team member is on exercise that particular evening. Try as we would, we could not convince him. Nevertheless we won the Games Shield, Domino Shield and both the Ladies’ and Men’s Darts Cups. Congratulations to Sgt Hayes on winning the Fooks Cup presented to him on 29th December, 1961. The Tercentenary Ball held on 29th October, 1961, was a great success and our thanks must be given to Sgt Heath, Mess Caterer, Sgt Lloyd, the energetic M.C., Sgt Cooke, ‘mounted’ in 17th Century dress, and ‘Smudger’ Smith’s catering arrangements. These to— gether with the Regimental Band made the Ball one to be remembered. Our Dinner Nights are still appreciated by all and we should like to thank the Bandmaster for organising the Band to play during dinner, and Harry Blackallar who ensures everything runs smoothly. On the result of the Sergeants’ versus Corporals’ Mess games night held on 16th March, the Corporals’ Mess got the final score whereby retaining the Ghulam Hassan Cup. On 13th October, the return match, they were relieved of the cup by the Mess. We do look forward to our return to U.K. when we shall have all Mess members together. Joe Ti-tmarsh, who relieved Dick Watorski on the changeover of Squadrons in Nee Soon,

Major-General Fitzpatrick examining

the

North

Tercentenary

Shield.


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arrival. We congratulate him and his wife on the addition to the Titmarsh family. settled down very comfortably in the F.E.T.C. Mess, possibly by being elected PMC on his Congratulations to Harry Blackallar in taking part and bringing home the 17 Gurkha Division foursome golf tournament shield. Once again we have been most fortunate in having attached R.A.A.C. members to the Mess. From all members, we wish Sgt Lindsay and Sgt Callaghan the best of luck and promotion—down under. During the past year we have said goodbye to many old members and we wish them well, wherever they may be, hoping to see them on our return to U.K. These include Lt M. Kinshott, SSM F. Kimble, SSM D. Watorski, SQMS E. Weller, Ssgt E. Pitcher, Sgts Weston, Rochford, Dawson, Stone, Davis, Happs, Corcoran, Hiles, Hales, Millett, Tucker. Also T/Maj Whellans, whom we wish a speedy recovery on his being invalided home. We welcome the following, who have returned to the Regiment—SSM P. Ranson, Sgts Woods, Baillie-Hamilton, and newcomers Ssgts Atkinson, Portsmouth, Porter, Dixon, and Sgts Saxton, Alexander, Hearn, Knowles, Murtagh, Acton, Cooke, Heller, Owen, Priestman, AlcCormack, Thompson and Fordham. We finally would like to congratulate SSM C. Crabb, Ssgt Webster and T/Maj Fisher on their promotion. SERGEANT

THE

HONOURABLE R. A. P. NORTH

In connection with the Tercentenary Anniversary of the formation of the Regiment, Colonel R. North has very kindly presented to the Sergeants’ Mess an enamelled, crested shield to commemorate the service of his father. Waiting for “ Bomber ”

to

pay.

Sgt and Mrs. Thorpe, Ssgt and Mrs. Pitcher, Sgt Hall.

It is interesting to relate that Sgt North, son of the late Lord North, joined the Regiment as a ranker in the late 18805, as his father would not let him have the money to join any other way. He became a member of the Equitation Squad and, in due course, was promoted Sergeant. He was eventually commisisoned into the 7th Hussars. The Sergeants’ Mess possesses a piece of silver presented Colonel North’s presentation is a companion piece.

by

Sgt North himself, so

The Far East Golf Circuit

Some Local Colour RSM and Mrs. Bradley, GRSM Frayor, ASM M. Kinshott, SSM C. C. F. Crabb, Ssgt Sage, Ssgt and Mrs. Farrell, T/ Maj and Mrs. Whellan, Sgt Stone, Mrs. Millett, and guests.

OR the first time in many years, the proximity of a course and the low cost of labour (caddies) enabled those who felt inclined, to play as much golf as they wished. Those who toiled regularly through the burning sun and the inevitable thunderstorms were Maj Watson, 2 Scotsman, who after missing a short putt could normally be heard muttering something about mad dogs and . . . ; Capt Boucher, who brought a few useful polo shots to the golf course and vice versa; Capt Miller; Capt Jacobs, who is thought to be responsible for the shortage of No. 4 irons in the Far East; Lts Hamilton-Russell, Black, Brook and SSM Blackallar, who is reputed to have lost weight—along with a large number of golf balls. The two main events of the season were the 17 Gurkha Div./O.C.L.F. Championships at Kuala Lumpur in February, and the FARELF Championships in Singapore in March. Those involved in the former were Messrs. Watson, Miller, Jacobs, Black, Hamilton-Russell and Blackallar, while the highlight was undoubtedly a most creditable victory for Capt Jacobs and SSM Blackallar in the trophy for Regimental pairs. Both played off a handicap of 24, they humbled a large field to bring home the shield. In addition Lt Hamilton-Russell won an 18—hole handicap medal and was runner—up in a 36—hole competition of the same type. This was a thoroughly enjoyable and efficiently run week, and it was interesting some two weeks later to see how the professionals tackled the same course—~perhaps a somewhat sobering comparison! On to Singapore went Messrs. Hamilton-Russell, Black, Brook and Blackallar, where a stronger opposition and a more difficult course confronted them. However, Lt Hamilton— Russell managed to win a 18—hole competition and once again it was a most enjoyable tournament. Meanwhile golf in Ipoh flourishes and we hope we shall find time to play in England, gain some more recruits and some more successes.


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Football VER the past season, our fortunes in the soccer world have fluctuated from good to bad and vice versa. We managed to reach the third round of the Army Cup, when we were knocked out by 34 L.A.A. Regiment in a very close and thrilling game. In the Ipoh District League, we finished fifth in the First Division, which, with the high standard of football in the league, was considered good. Sgts Hearn and Wood, Cpl Pettitt, Tprs Forsyth and Blaxland all had games with the Combined Services and acquited themselves favourably. We had some good friendly games with local teams and rubber estates, and were always well feted at these events. The Sergeants’ Mess is richer by three silver cups from these expeditions, and the Regiment’s prestige considerably enhanced in the eyes of the locals. We have started off the Army Cup again in fine style by beating the 1/7th Gurkha Rifles by seven goals to nil. Fortunately, we had the services of Blaxland, Forsyth and McClare for this game, they departed on release the following day. We are now in the process of rebuilding the team from our recruits, one or two of whom will be very useful indeed, with the L.A.D. providing a good centre-forward in the shape of chl Kempson, who has been selected for the Combined Services this year. “A” Squadron won the Inter-Squadron Competition after getting a bye into the final. The Inter—Troop Competition was once again won by the old stalwarts, Q.M. Group, and when we say old we mean just that, however, shock tactics won the day. We are hoping to get the new boys fit against the local Malay/Chinese teams before we depart for the UK. This may give us a fighting chance in the Cavalry Cup next season, as the opposition here is very fast and fit. However, more on this when the time comes.

Hockey

Royals

include

Ipoh Garrison lst XV 'l‘pr Chapman, Lt Larnach-Jones. Lepl Glister, Cfn Taylor, Tpr Farrier, Thomas. Capt Jenkins, Lt Hughes, chl Bryant and Tpr Robins.

Cpl

THE Regimental hockey team has taken part in the Ipoh District Hockey League during 1961. Its final placing was fifth out of eleven teams, a creditable result considering that the standard in Malaya is very high.

Cricket 1961

Much of the credit for this must go to Sgt Cummings, who is a first—class goalkeeper, and to SQMS Shone and Sgt Owen who are a difficult pair of full—backs to pass. With a Squadron in Singapore it has not been easy to build up a thrusting forward line, and this has been the main weakness of the side.

THE season in Malaya hardly closes. The Cricket Officer was asked by Y.M.C.A. Captain in Ipoh to play on the second Sunday in January, 1961. Only lack of practice prevented us from playing. This season in fact lasted from February to September. During that time the Regimental team played two or three times a month.

Rugby

Most matches were friendlies but we did take part in the Brander Shield League, consiszing of seven teams in and around Ipoh. We started very well, winning the first three matches but then the climate, soldiering away from Ipoh and our opponents getting used to our bowlers made our task too difl‘icult and we lost the last three. It was a pity that one Squadron was detached, first “ A ” Squadron and then “B ” Squadron in Singapore.

URING the brief 1961/2 Malaya Rugby season, Regimental players played for the Ipoh Garrison XV rather than field a regimental team. The reason for this innovation was to give the opportunity of decent games to players from our smaller neighbours who, had a Garrison XV not been formed, would have had difliculty in obtaining games. The club fielded two teams on occasions during the season. While the sides were not always successful all the games were most enjoyable. Local sides encountered were the Boston Club, The Taiping Tigers, Perak Turf Club, Perak Asians and the Lower Perak Club. In the 17 Gurkha Division Championship the club defeated Royal Engineers, North Malaya, but in the semi—final went down to the 2nd Bn. Royal Australian Regiment. Throughout the season the Garrison XV provided no less than eleven players for the Perak State training squad which in fact won the H.M.S. Malaya Cup; the premier rugby award in the country.

When this match was replayed in Ipoh the scores were Royal 58 all out and New Zea— land Regiment 61. It was an excellent match and the only regret is that we did not have two key players from “B” Squadron.

Our M.O., Capt David Jenkins, represented both the state and North Malaya. Lt LarnachJones and chl Glister also represented the state. Prospects for the 1962/3 season in England look bright. Recent recruits contain some excounty players who should enable the Regiment to field a strong team.

Earlier in March and April a number of piayers took part in Perak State Trials and even— tually for the first match against the State of Selangor. Maj Hodgson played and Cpl Bennett 12th man. For the next State match, Perak v. Penang, Maj Hodgson captained Perak. No commentary on cricket in Ipoh would be complete without mentioning Y.M.C.A. Cricket Club

In the 17th Gurkha Divisional Major and Minor Competition, the Regiment started off by winning the first match v. 1 Royal Australian Regiment. This was a grim game and Major Hodgson had as many bruises as runs to his credit. In the next round the Regiment played 2 New Zealand Regiment. The first match was washed out by monsoon rain, somewhat fortunately for the Regiment. Naturally the Regimental XI suggested that it was their misfortune not to go on! The scores were 2 New Zea— land Regiment 196 for 8 olf 40 overs; the Regiment scored 24 for 3 wickets.


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and the grounds where we played. Y.M.C.A. Club greatly assisted the Regimental team in introducing us to cricket in Ipoh and were always keen to play us. Many keen matches resulted. The Ipoh Padang is a fine setting for cricket with a good grass wicket whilst the Coronation Park is a good example of the playing fields being now made in Malaya. Throughout the season Capt Gill of the Royal Australian Armoured Corps played for the Regiment, we wish him every success in this field on his return to Australia. We are glad to welcome several new players to the Regimental team and hope they will play regularly from now on, 2Lt Hanmer, Bdsm Trachy (wicketkeeper) and Bdsm Atkinson and Tpr Smoker. A regular team is at last in sight. No cricket notes are complete without a mention of our scorer, ch1 Taylor, whose presence at every game gave us great support.

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lack of an exhaust pipe, again came second in his class race but improved his position by one In the Grand Prix. His stafl“ this year in the pits was Cpl Bell—Royal Signals; Cfn Peake, Capt Cochrane Dyet, 9/12th Lancers, and Capt Boucher. Many others have done well in club competitions during their time in Malaya and below are some of their achievements. NORTH MALAYAN RALLY, 1961. Capt A. McQueen navigating for Mr. S. Mcdonald won the cup for the best performance in a Porsche Super 90. Lt Hamilton Russell With WOII Williams, Royal Signals, navigating came second in his class driving an Austin Healey Sprite. 2Lt Windsor Clive with Lt Aylen navigating won his class in a TR3. 2Lt Hanmer and Lt Yorke entered.

JIotoring AST year, “Visit the Orient Year,” Singapore’s Ministry of Culture thought that a suitable tourist attraction would be a Grand Prix. SO, with that in mind, the Singapore Motor Club sat down to some very hard work and produced a course out of natural roads which has since been claimed as the fastest in the Far East. There were many entries from the flourishing motor clubs of Malaya and from as far away as Japan. The Regiment produced two competitors, Lt Williams Wynn in a M.G.A. twin cam and Lt Barrington Browne in an Austin Healey 100/ 6. The former had done a little racing before, the latter nil. Bothhaving completed the scrutineering and practice laps, drove in the sports car races of their respective classes—fifteen laps of three miles a lap. Lt Williams Wynn came 2nd and Lt Barrington Browne 3rd. Lt Williams Wynn then had enough courage to drive in the Grand Prix itself and came 8th; not so the latter who had just got engaged. The two entrants were well administered in the mechanical and timing pits by Cpl Bell—Royal Signals; Tpr Conway, SQMS Simpson and Capt Boucher who had the air of professionals with spanners, stop watches and blackboards at the ready. This year the Grand Prix had become a much bigger thing with Esso donating prize money and free fuel. Lt Williams Wynn, driving the same car, which for weeks previously had been the cause of some annoyance to the inhabitants of Nee Soon Garrison because of the

KUALA KANGSOR GRASS TRACK MEETING, I961. 2Lt Windsor Clive Won his class. Lt Hamilton Russell entered. 2Lt Chilton entered in a TR3. 2Lt Hanmer entered. ROYAL PERAK MOTOR CLUB BOXING DAY MEETING, 1961.

Lt Barrington Browne and Capt Yates came 3rd in the gymkhana. ROYAL PERAK MOTOR CLUB SPRINT. Capt McQueen produced the second fastest time in a Porsche Super 90 borrowed for the occasion. The owner actually produced the fastest time.

Shooting ALAYA offers much to the keen shooting man, be he after large or small game. The A country has a mountainous ridge of thick jungle running down the centre with cultivated plains on either side. Don’t be misled. These cultivated plains are not the Gardens of England but tin mines, rubber plantations, padi and tapioca fields. The scrub which surrounds them grows extremely thickly. The plains, needless to say, are the most accessible and on these one can shoot anywhere without first seeking permission. The only problem is to find the actual birds. The birds which have given most sport are firstly snipe which abound in far greater numbers than seen in England. These are mostly Pintail but in a few areas a small number Of Painted are found. Their season is a natural one from October until April as it is then, in April after the full moon, that they migrate to the north. Secondly come Green Pidgeon. These are a beautiful bird, green on top with orange, yellow and grey undersides. They fly fast and high like the English Wood Pidgeon and are a difficult shot. Jungle Fowl, the third on the list, is probably one of the most difl‘icult birds to find as he lives in some of the thickest scrub. One can be veritably proud if one has shot a Jungle Fowl since he prefers to run into the most dense bush than fly into an open space. Ground game is not so easy to find. There are otters on the numerous small waterways but these are not shot. Pig require a military operation to find unless one is prepared to sit up and wait in the early morning for them to come out and feed, while one is being bitten alive by man-size mosquitos. The larger game are all in Malaya too but are never seen unless a very special effort is made. There are elephant, tiger, crocodile, the rare one horned and white rhinocerous,

the

seladang—a fierce bufi'alo type creature, and the panther.

During our eighteen months here a total of fourteen officers have from time to time carried guns. Those who have been out most are Lt Barrington Browne, Lt ]. M. Loyd, Lt Hamilton Russell and Lt Black. All the beats are within a radius of 20 miles of Ipoh with one exception. We have been out on 45 days and have shot a total head of 237 of which 207 were snipe. We will not add how many cartridges were fired! Mr

D.

S.

Barrington

Browne—Singapore

Grand

Prix,

1961.


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Colonel

of

the

Regiment

addressing

the

Regimental

Association

Tercentenary

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Dinner,

6th May. 1961.

The Reginwntal Association HE most notable event which has taken place since the publication of our last notes is the formation of the Regimental Association Social Club. It was felt that as the Regiment is now afiiliated with the Kent and County of London Yeomanry (Sharpshooters), and as London is our main recruiting area, it was necessary that other entertainment, beyond our annual reunion, should take place. Maj C. W. J. Lewis, M.B.E., was entrusted with this task, and ably assisted by a very hard—working sub-committee, the Social Club came into being. Two most successful functions have already been held, and a third is scheduled to take place on Saturday, rsth September, 1962. The numbers attending the initial function far exceeded all expectations, and as a result, the drill hall at the Sharpshooters’ H.Q., at Albany Street, London, is now the H.Q. of the Social Club. The success of the functions could not have been possible without the help and co-operation of the Sharpshooters, and we should very much like to take this opportunity of thanking them for all their help. It was thought that the functions would only be attended by members living in the London area, but members from as far afield as Swansea and Leicester have attended. “ Housey—Housey,” now called “Bingo,” together with raffles, and dancing, have been the chief entertainment, and it has been rumoured, but not confirmed, that “Twisting ” members have been invited to show their skill on television. It is hoped that the next social, on 15th September, will be well supported, not only by members and their friends, but also by families of serving members of the Regiment, who are also welcome. Anyone requiring further information re the club, should contact, Mai C. W. J. Lewis, M.B.E., R.H.Q., The Royal Dragoons, Hill House, Beckenham Lane, Bromley, Kent. Telephone: W'idmore 1939. The annual reunion was held on Saturday, 5th May, 1962, and 90 members attended the dinner, and more members and their families attended the party afterwards. Brigadier A. H. Pepys, D.s.o., President of the Association, presided, and during his speech stated that the provisional date for the Regiment to exercise its privilege of marching through the City of London, with “ Swords unsheathed and Guidon unfurled” would be 22nd October, 1963. We were also delighted to have the Commanding Officer of the Regiment, Lt Col K. F. Timbrell, M.C., at the reunion and to have up—to-date news of the Regiment.

(Above).

The

Regimental

Contingent at the Combined Ex ~ Cavalrymen’s Parade —Hyde

0.C.A.

Park,

7th

May, 1961.

(Below).

Window display of

Regimental Hector Full

Trophies —

Powe—May, Dress

Belt,

1961. Pouch,

Subretnche. Sword Knot of General Colonel

Lord of

the

Vivian. Regiment,

1837-1842.


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Kent and County ofLondon Yoomunry @hituarp

(Sharpshooters) INCE our notes appeared in the Eagle we have had two changes of staff, have attended an annual camp and are getting dangerously near to going off for another one. Annual camp took place at Park Camp, Lulworth, in July. We were in fact one of the last Units to occupy this camp. Even then the huts had been sold and tents were pitched on the concrete footings. As the footings were wider than the tents, quite a few had wet lying as soon as it started to rain. There is more comfort to be had by your car in the splendid park at Charborough than lying on a concrete stab under a flapping marquee. After troop and Squadron training came Exercise “ Blue Peter ” set, and directed by our Divisional Commander, Maj Gen Gleadell. General Gleadell’s idea of training—at any rate on this exercise—may be summed up in the maxim “if you teach them to run, they will soon learn to walk.” We did in fact run quite a long way in a short time. The exercise involved, among other things, the search for and final discovery of an abducted Prime Minister (live); a river crossing by the support troops (the helicopter in which they were to have done it had to go to Kuwait at the last moment); the capture and search of an armoured train (actual); the narrow escape of an officer being cut down by a train (British Railways type) and the Commanding Officer and Adjutant not going to bed at all! That completed we returned to Lulwordi, where our Honorary Colonel, Lord Aber— gavenny, visited the Regiment and inspected and addressed a parade. We were very glad to have with us a Royal A.E.R. Officer, Robert Glossop, who in spite of everything, has said he would like to come again this year. During camp we were visited by the D.R.A.C., Maj Gen. Hopkinson, and our B.R.A.C., Brigadier J. K. Greenwood. We were also glad to have a visit from Col Armitage, who was able to combine business with pleasure, if under the latter heading it is possible to include a yeomanry officers’ mess guest night. The assistance we received from the R.A.C. Centre was, as always, invaluable, and John Dimond at the Wireless Wing gave us a tremendous amount of help in all kinds of ways. In early July, Sgt Tucker came home from Malaya to take over from Sgt Remfry as PSI of “C” Squadron. After annual camp Sgt Remfry left to recruit at Canterbury. The early months of 1962 saw us in the throes of preparation both for the C.I.V. and for the Part II Inspection. All departments of the Regiment, particularly the Quartermaster and his staff, were heavily involved. RSIVI Vowles and all P.S.I.s are to be congratulated on the result. Brigadier Greenwood, our B.R.A.C., carried out the Part II Inspection by starting each of his staff officers at opposite end of the Regimental area, giving the word “go,” and getting them to meet at Regimental Headquarters. His report reflects great credit on our permanent staff. Preparation for annual camp is now in full swing. We go to Penhale, near Newquay, from 9th-23rd June. Heads are being counted, Squadron lists made up, extra vehicles indented for. The 19 set, which perhaps some more senior Royals will remember, seemed for a time to have gone out of existance in the Reserve Army and could only be obtained in surplus stores shops, where one enterprising Squadron in fact obtained some. When remonstrated with, the authorities, rather hurt, made an offer of 88 sets instead! Squadron exercises in a nuclear setting are being run before we go to Cornwall. Sgt Tucker, fresh from his course, is now our great nuclear expert. His Squadron, “ C ” Squadron, is the first to take the field. We look forward to seeing how it should be done. In January, 1962, we were sorry to say goodbye to Mr. Ransome. In his place we are very glad to welcome Mr. Wood, who is now fully installed at Canterbury and helping his Squadron Leader to wind up “A” Squadron for camp. The following additions to Royals families serving with the Regiment:~—— Capt and Mrs. Bradish-Ellames~a daughter—Jane Marjorie. Cpl and Mrs. Botting—a daughteriJennet Leslie. Penhale is some way from London both in time and space and by the time these notes are read we shall have probably been and returned from our ‘foreign service.’

Brigadier S. 0. 1101008, 0.8.0., 1’11}. After being educated at Harrow and Christ Church, Oxford, ‘Puggy’ Howes joined zrst (Empress of India’s) Lancers in 1907. He served with distinction with that Regiment in France between 1914 and 1918 being awarded the 13.5.0. and M.C. as well as being mentioned in despatches on three occasions. He transferred to the Regiment in 1922 when the 17th and 21st Lancers were amalgamated, obtaining his substantive majority in 1923 when Lt Col Hodgson assumed command. He left the Regiment in 1929 to assume command of 1st King’s Dragoon Guards. He commanded that Regiment until 1933 when he was appointed to command the

6th Cavalry Brigade, T.A. He was Colonel of the K.D.G. from 1945-1953. Throughout his long military career Brigadier ‘ Puggy ’ retained his great interest in the three Regiments in which he served. He often recalled how happy he had been in the Royals and how impressed he was by the curtesy and under— standing shown him by everybody in the Regiment when he joined in 1922 as a rather senior ‘new boy.’ He will be remembered as a very kind and understanding person, a just disciplinarian and a good soldier. Our deepest sympathy is extended to his charming wife, Vida, and to his family.

Major Robert Houston Born 1883.

Died May 23rd 1961

INGER” Houston, as he was best known to many old comrades, was commissioned in 1904 and joined the Regiment in India, having won the Sword of Honour as a Cadet at Sandhurst. He served with the Regiment throughout its tour in India and took a prominent part in all forms of sport, particularly Pig-sticking, being Hon. Secretary of the Muttra Tent Club when it scored a record bag of 400 pigs, 3 result which was largely due to his enthusiasm and effective organisation. Becoming Adjutant to Colonel Makins, he continued in this office in South Africa, where he served at Pretoria and Potchefstroom, handing over prior to the Great War. In France he saw service with the Regiment at the First and Second Battles of Ypres,

later becoming Brigade Major to 6 Cavalry Brigade for a short period, until he was invalided home. After the war, he served with the Regiment in Ireland, during the Sinn Fein troubles, and later at Aldershot, finally retiring in 1925. Thereafter he lived at Llanforda and finally settled down at Lintrathen, in Angus, where he devoted himself to sport and farming. A first—class shot and an enthusiastic fisherman, he was the best type of sportsman, who loved a horse, a dog and a gun. He took an immense interest in the Lintrathen estate and the care and management of the moors, ably assisted by a devoted staff, whose welfare he always had much at heart. Throughout his career “Ginger” was a genuine Regimental officer who put the traditions and spirit of the Regiment on a very high level. Immensely popular with all ranks, he earned the love and respect of all by his sympathy and understanding. Though none could be more outspoken in his opinions, he had a host of friends and no enemies. A regular attendant at all Regimental functions, no gathering will be complete without him and he will be much missed by his many friends.


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Captain 11. L. Webb The Royal Dragoons UMPHREY LAKIN WEBB joined the Royal Dragoons on 12th November, 1858. The Regiment at that time was stationed in Dublin. He retired from the Regiment in 1895. He died in June, 1923. During his service he was Army boxing champion for two years, and was commissioned as Quartermaster of the Regiment. He held the latter appointment until his retirement. In 1895 when the Regiment was again stationed in Dublin he retired and took over as agent to Inde Coop the brewers, an appointment which suited him very well as he was still able to follow his favourite pastimes of boxing, shooting, fishing and racing. He was a very keen and capable boxing referee and was always to the found at the boxing rings in and around Dublin. He married Sarah Ann Pole, the daughter of Farrier Sgt Pole, also of the Regiment, and they had a total of ten children. The family was always an extremely happy one and Capt Webb set a fine example in the way that he looked after the welfare of the troops and also the whole of his family. His eldest daughter married Bandmaster Charles Hall of the Royals, and a second daughter married John Massey Wood who took over the appointment of Quartermaster on the retirement of Capt Webb. They were indeed a wonderful Regimental family,

and Capt Webb was always ever helpful to those that required help and advice and his ready humour and quick wit was a noted factor. Recently the surviving members of his family presented to the Regiment several very valuable and interesting items which included the silver salver presented to him by the Officers of the Regiment on his retirement, and also his sword, helmet, dress hat and a pair of silver candlesticks. The presentation was carried out at an informal small gathering which took place at Chelmsford recently and the items were accepted on behalf of the Regiment by Maj C. W. J. Lewis, M.B.E. One very interesting item handed over was the sword carried at the Crimea campaign by Farrier Sgt Pole, and which he gave later to Capt Webb. In the official history of the Crimea campaign it refers to Pole as “Pole, the black bearded farrier sergeant.” \We should like to take this opportunity of thanking Capt \Vebb’s daughters for their kindness in presenting these historical items to the Regiment, and can assure them that they will be well treasured. We also wish them all the very best of luck and good health, and hope that when the Regiment returns to England at the latter end of the year that we shall have the pleasure of entertaining them.

Births Capt P. W. F. Arkwright, a son, Dominic, born on 17th March, 1961, in London. Capt D. Miller, a son, Christopher Declan, born on 19th July, 1961, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya. Maj M. B. Noble, a son, David Brunel, born on 25th December, 1961, at District Hospital, Batu Gajah, Perak, Malaya. Capt S. E. M. Bradish-Ellames, a daughter, Jane, born on 11th November, 1961, at Wid— more Road Maternity Home, Bromley, Kent. Sgt Tucker, T. W., a son, Peter Kevin, born on 15th May, 1961, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya. Cpl Hoiles, S., a son, Martin, on 20th May, 1961, at B.M.H., Singapore.

Bdsm Newing, M. J., a son, Melvyn John, born on 4th April, 1961, at King’s College Hospital, Denmark Hill, England. Tpr Black, I., a son, Kevin, born on 6th May, 1961, at Royal Hampshire County Hospital, Winchester, Hants, Tpr Byrne, L. A., a daughter, Amanda Louise, born on 15th June, 1961, at St. George’s Hospital, Hyde Park, London. chl W'hitworth, R. S., a daughter, Angela Payne, born on 22nd June, 1961, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya. Tpr Conway, J. F., a daughter, Karon, born on 28th April, 1961, at St. James’ Hospital, Balham, S.W.17. Cpl Williamson, E. S., a son, Matthew Kenneth, born on 30th June, 1961, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya.

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ch1 White, P. J., a son, Stephen Mark, born 7th July, 1961, at B.M.H., Kamunting,

Perak, Malaya.

Tpr Bovey, T. J., a son, Frank, born on 15th June, 1960, at Torquay, Devon. ch1 Gentile, A., a son, Christopher Kenneth, born on 2nd September, 1961, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya. chl Tatham, P., a son, Andrew Peter, born on 25th April, 1961, at Newquay, Cornwall. chl Straw, N., a son, Martin, born on 15th August, 1961, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya. Sgt Cummings, A. S. R., a daughter, Deborah, born on 22nd September, 1961, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya. Ssgt Darling, R., a daughter, Karen Anne, born on 27th September, 1961, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya. Sgt Owen, W., a daughter, Kathleen, born on 20th September, 1961, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya. Cpl Melia, P. B., a son, Mark Anthony, born on 12th September, 1961, at B.M.H., Singapore. Sgt Rooke, G. E., a son, Kevin, born on 3rd October, 1961, at Batu Gajah Hospital, Perak, Malaya. Cpl Underwood, K., a daughter, Jenifer Ann, born on Ist July, 1961, at B.M.H., Singapore. SQMS Clarke, R. H., a son, Peter, born on 11th October, 1961, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya. chl Sweeney, J., a daughter, Heather Eliza— beth, born on 9th November, 1961, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya. Cpl Cox, W. G., a son, Christopher Graham, born on 7th November, 1961, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya. Sgt Heath, J. M., a daughter, Jacqueline Wendy, born on 19th February, 1962, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya. Cpl Wiffin, R., a daughter, Tina Ann, born on 4th February, 1962, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya. Tpr Ferrier, L., a daughter, Christina Mary, born on 15th January, 1962, at Epsom, Surrey. chl Dunn, C. W., a daughter, Colette Anne, born on 3rd March, 1962, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya. Cpl Falvey, D., a daughter, Stacey Martine, born on 22nd March, 1962, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya. Bdsm Mitchell, K., a daughter, Tina Louise, born on 28th March, 1962, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya.

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Ssgt Atkinson, A. D., a son, Steven Robert, born on 30th March, 1962, at Batu Gajah Hospital, Perak, Malaya. Cpl Robertson, F. B., a daughter, Sharon, born on 30th December, 1961, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya. ch1 Clark, A. G. F., a daughter, Veronica, born on 5th December, 1961, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya. Cpl Davies, J. C., a daughter, Fiona Marie, born on 10th November, 1961, at B.M.H., Kamunting, Perak, Malaya. chl Nicholson, 8., a son, Henry, born on 12th April, 1961, at Hetton Le—Hole, Co. Durham. SSM Titmarsh, C., a daughter, Sharon, born on 11th March, 1962, at B.M.H., Singapore. Capt A. B. T. Davey, a daughter, Alice Elizabeth Antoinette, born on 22nd August, 1959, at Everest Nursing Home, Swanage. Capt A. B. T. Davey, a daughter, Louise Charlotte, born on 215t November, 1960, at Louise Margaret Hospital, Aldershot.

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.Marriagos REGIMENTAL chl Dunn, C. W., married Anne Archer at St. Christopher’s Church, Nee Soon Camp, Singapore, on 6th May, 1961.

GAZETTE

REGIMENTAL HEADQ UARTERS Lt Col K. F. Timbrcll, M.C., Commanding Officer. Maj T. A. K. Watson, Second—in—Command. Capt D. M. Jacobs, Adjutant. Lt J. G. Hamilton—Russell, Signals Officer. Li. A. P. G. Stanley—Smith, Assistant Adjutant

Tpr Black, I., married Marion Ann Snape at Devizes Registry Office on 20th May, 1961.

Maj T. W. Metcalfe, R.A.Ch.D., Chaplain.

Capt E. Brookes, R.A.P.C., Paymaster. Capt D. G. Jenkins, R.A.M.C., Medical Officer. RSM J. D. Bradley, Regimental Sergeant Major. Mrs. Greta Ferrer, W.V.S. Lady Supervisor.

and 1.0. Cpl Bell, P. G., married Sara Elizabeth \Vest— wood at Parish Church, Bridlington, Yorks, on 15th July, 1961.

H.Q. SQ UADRON Mai M. B. Noble Capt D. Miller

Tpr Dawson, B. J. Tpr Savage, E.

chl Strudwick, J., married Lesley Shelia Allan at St. John’s Chapel, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey, on 8th July, 1961.

ADMINISTRATIVE TROOP SSM Blackallar, H. A. S. SQMS Cameron, D. J. Sgt Woods, P. C. Cpl Kinstrey, P. B.

Tpr Byrne, L., married Valerie Beton at Christ Church. Chelsea, on 17th September, 1961.

Cpl Witfin, R. chl Dunlop, D. E. J. T. Tpr Adams, T. R. Tpr Arthur, R. Tpr Haighton, B.

chl Wilkinson, V., married Yvonne Jeanette King at Parish Church, Hanwell, Middlesex, on 28th October, 1961.

BAND BM Evans, G. E. Ssgt Darling, R. TM Fisher, J. Cpl Briggs, C. Cpl Everson, P. Cpl Syms, D. chl Burgess, P. ch1 Craft, D. chl Meikle, J. chl Thorn, P. ch1 Watts, P.

REGIMENTAL COOKS Tpr Ashford, B. E. Tpr Bacon, A. A.

chl Godfray, W. L. G. chl Middleton, P. S.

Tpr and Mrs Symonds, 2nd March. 1962.

Cpl Evans, W., married Nancy Chcng See Anderson at Church of St. John the Divine, Ipoh, Malaya, on 14th April, 1962. Tpr Glover, G. S., married Delia Ann Foun— tain at Poole Registry Office, England, on 6th August, 1961. Cfn Piers, C., married Patricia Jean Evelyn Buneh at St. John’s Church, Ipoh, on 5th August, 1961. ch1 Clark, A. G. F., married Monika Hensel at Alexandra Church, Singapore, on gist May, 1961. Lt D. S. Barrington Browne married Jaqueline Fay Groome at Chelsea Old Church, London, on 6th March, 1962.

R.H.Q. TROOP Sgt Jubb, J. Cpl Tatham, P. ch1 chl chl Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Harris, R. Hore, D. W. J. Medd, G. Adams, J. D. Arnell, A. Cooper, J. W. Dawson, D. C.

Tpr Jordan, H, Tpr Kent, G. P.

Tpr Leaney, R. F. Tpr Robins, P. A. Tpr Renkevic, A.

Leese, D. Louch, J. E. Thorpe, N. H. Ellsmore, W. J. Hunt, H.

Sgt McCormick, W. G. Cpl Falvey, D.

Cpl Messer, T. G. chl Sweeney, J.

OFFICERS’ MESS Sgt Bayne, D. W. Cpl Squires, G. chl Wiskow, M. A.

Cpl Thomas, T., married Josephine Georgette Massey at Havant, Hants, on 6th August, 1961.

ch1 Newton, K. E.

chl Whitworth, S. Bdms Atkinson, D.

chl Stewart, D. G.

Bdsm Atkinson

ch1 ch1 Tpr Tpr Tpr

Bdsm Bdsm Bdsm Bdsm Bdsm Bdsm Bdsm Bdsm Bdsm Bdsm Bdsm Bdsm Bdsm Bdsm Bdsm Bdsm Bdsm Bdsm Bdsm

Taylor, J. White, P. H. J. Bramwell, K. Brown, R. J. Golding, M. J.

Tpr Heal, B. W. Tpr Heal. T. E. Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Mitchell, K. Pain, M. W. Simpson, E. E. Taylor, A.

TRANSPORT GROUP Ssgt Webster, K. Cpl Howell, J. ch1 Brown, A. W. chl Currie, J. J. chl Deckey, R. E. G.

Brittain, R. Cleveland, T. Cohen, H Craft, D. Creavin, W. Eatch Hill, A. Jones, N. Keys, A. Maytum, R. Mexter, D. Moloney, T. Pvne, P. Riley, R. Roberts Skews, S. Trachy, J. Turpin, R. I. Warwick, H.

ch1 Stocks, R. PROVOST

chl Sowerby, D. C.

Mai W. R. Wilson FitzGerald married Jean Annette Mary Binny, at St. Mary’s, Cadogan Street, Chelsea, London, on 28th November, 1961.

Tpr Roddis, B. L.

RQMS Clark, J. S.

Cpl Williamson, E. S. Cpl Underwood, K.

Chapman, W. Chesterton, A. E. L. Harman. H. J. E. Kestle, R.

Tpr Ferrier, L. G. T.

TQMS Fletcher, F.

ch1 Brannan, J. A. G. chl Bridge, M. J.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Sgt Hall, B. ch1 Lee, P. A. chl Theed, D. J.

Lt A. S. Ayrton, QM

Tpr Voce, J

Tpr Bowditch, J. T.

REGIMENTAL ORDERLY ROOM Ssgt Leech, J. C.

chl Yendell, W. P. QUARTERMASTERS’ GROUP Capt E. L. Payne, QM (T)

Sgt Sgt Sgt Cpl Cpl

Tpr Johnson, E. G. Tpr Stimson, P.

Tpr Symonds, R., married Khoo Siew San at Register Office, District of Kinta, Perak, Malaya, on 2nd March, 1962.

chl and Mrs Dunn, 6th May, 1961.

SERGEANTS’ MESS chl Turner, B. D.

Tpr Harris, W. H. Tpr Proctor, B. E. Tpr Smith, R. V.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Abbott, H. A. E. Bramham, M. J. Carpenter, C. Chapman, R. Collins, R. Ellard, J. T. Gadd, I. D. Jones, D. G. Murphy, J. Norman, D. M.

ROYAL

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WOII Williams, J. V. Sgt Knowles, F. J. Cpl Breach, E. S. Cpl Cawthorne, T. H. Cpl Harden, G. W. Cpl Strang, H. chl Thomas, D. Sig Pilkington, W. B. Sig Wright, H.

Tpr Saunter, R. ’Ipr Tibbenham, H. W.

L.A.D.

Tpr Treadaway, W. E. G. 'l‘pr Wellard, W. G. Tpr Williams, D. B.

Capt Till, J. G. 2Lt Jones, G. P. ASM Jenno, E. W.


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Ssgt Atkinson, A. D. Sgt Fordham, S.

Cfn Hunter, 1“. J.

Cpl Robertson, F. B.

Cfn Cfn Cfn Cfn Cfn Cfn

Cpl Quigley, B. chl Beebey, P. ch1 Bryant, T. J.

ch1 Clark, A. G. E. ch1 Clark, R. G.

Cfn Jones, A. Piers, C. J. Picker, B. Roberts, E. W. Stacey, A. Stuart, I. Taylor, \V. G.

ch1 Green, W. C.

Cpl Barratt, R. E. Cpl Drury, R. H. J. chl Hagan, W. ch1 Reid, J.

ch1 Scott, P. Pte Gooding, D. J.

Pte High, R. C. Pte Holloway, J. P.

Pte Robson, G. E.

chl Kempson, N.

R.A.P.C.

chl Nicholson, S.

Ssgt Portsmouth, T. A. F.

Pte Watson, K. Pte Welch, D. J.

ch1 Richardson, D. E.

Cpl Johnson, G. G. Cpl Reid, M.

Pte Whiteside, J.

ch1 Shaw, R. W. Cfn Barnes, M. K. Cfn Cogan, J.

A.C.C. WOII Smith, J. C.

Cfn Hayward, M. E.

Sgt Thompson, N.

ch1 Love, T. chl hiacey, All. H.

Lt J. R. Chilton Lt M. C. Hobhouse

ch1 Melbourne, D. W. chl McLaren, C. D.

Lt J. H. Lloyd

chl Parnwell, E. H. F. chl Pimm, E. R. Tpr Antrobus, K. Tpr Beddingfield, J. Tpr Beers, M. Tpr Borley, R. J. Tpr Catlin, D. G. I.

2Lt B. H. Coode

Lt B. M. Hughes (R.A.A.C.) SSM Crabb, C. C. F. SQMS Clarke, R. H. Sgt Cooke, E. D. Sgt Cummings, A. S. R. Sgt Heller, W. J. Sgt Priestman, G. A. Sgt Rooke, G. E. Sgt Callaghan, L. P. (R.A.A.C.) Cpl Aitchinson, J. V

Cpl Barker, R. E. Cpl Bell, P. G. Cpl Burge, D. A. S.

Cpl Christmas, C. D. Cpl Cpl Cpl Cpl

Evans, B. W. Jackson, H. W. O’Dwyer, J. A. Payne, R.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Kent, K. Kingshott, S. E. Lawrence, P. E. Lee, W. Lisney, G. M. Lynch, P. McNaughton, I. Murphy, T.

Tpr Chesson, P. H. Tpr de Carteret Tpr Docherty

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Starling. D. W. Stocks, R. Taylor, N. G. Taylor, H. T. Thomson, A.

Tpr Shirley, V.

Cpl Middleton, J.

ch1 Eustace, K. E. ngn Benson, A. F.

Ssgt Randles, D. C.

R.E.M.E. (attached) Cfn Albisron, D.

Cpl Bartholomew, B. E. Cpl Keenan, D. F. chl Keenlyside, C. ch1 Williams, A. J.

Cfn Cfn Cfn Cfn

Ssgt Porter, R. Cpl Thomas, T. A. W. Cfn Cfn Cfn Cfn Cfn Cfn

Carberry, C. Curr, A. M. Docherty, J. Dunn, M. Greaves, C. Pennington, R.

Tpr Smith, B. J.

ch1 Bradley, T.

Capt P. T. Keighley Lt D. S. Barrington Browne Lt T. W. P. Connell Lt D. Spencer 2Lt D. Hanmer 2Lt P. Brook Lt A. W. Larnach—Jones

(R.A.A.C.) SSLM Ranson, P. G.

SQMS Shone, E. Sgt Sgt Sgt Sgt

Acton, Hayes, Heath, Hearn,

G. R. B. W. G. J. M. B.

Sgt Lloyd, C. K. “ B ” SQUADRON Maj P. D. Reid

Cpl Chambers, F. J.

Tpr Bailey, B. C.

Capt C. B. Amery

Cpl Edwards, J. A.

Lt J. A. Aylen Lt D. W. Williams Wynn

Cpl Harty, D. L. Cpl McGinn, H.

2Lt N. M. B. Roberts

Cpl .Melia, P. B. Cpl Pain, C. V.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Sgt Rainger, P. D. Sgt Thornton, D. R. Sgt Wood, N. L. P. Cpl Ayles, E. J.

Cpl Barton, F. W. Cpl Campbell, B.

chl Rigg, R. G. ch1 Thurston, D. R. A. L. Tpr Allison, W. B. Tpr Ash, E. A.

Pte Ashforth, D.

“C” SQUADRON

chl Dunn, C. W.

Sgt Rowland, C. L.

Cfn Peak, R. Cfn Stephenson, P. J. Cfn Warren, A.

A.C.C. (attached) Pte Saxby, D.

Maj W. R. Wilson Fitzgerald

R.A.P.C.

SSM Titmarsh, C. SQMS Simpson, F. A. Sgt Brooks, F. J. Sgt Mackay, J. Sgt Murtagh, M. J. Sgt Poulter, R. L.

Collins, R. G. Parsons, N. Farrant, T. M. Page, D. B.

ngn McDonald, D.

Cpl Morgan, P. J.

Tpr W'elford, F.

ch1 Ashton, G. W.

Cpl Pettit, J. E. Cpl Searle, R. A. chl Allsop, B. chl Butcher, D. R. chl Collinwood, F. chl Crabbe, J. W. chl Hennessey, W. chl Murphy, H. J. A.

Short, D. R. Simpkins, M. Smith, T. Smith, W. M. Smoker, M. F. Stratford, B. T. Thomas, M, W. B. White, P. Wilkins, G.

R.A.P.C. (attached)

Tpr Wilson, D. R. Tpr Wort, E. J. Tpr Young, A. D.

Tpr Reeves, D. Tpr Richings, I. R. Tpr Sexton, G. M.

2Lt C. E. T. Eddison

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Tpr \Vard, R. J.

chl Brown, D. J. ch1 Carter, F. C.

2Lt N. C. Sturge

Panton, J. E. Pulford, S. R. Rantell, A. P. Reece, R. J, Reilly, B. R. Rushbrook, P. L. Savage, E.

Tpr Shaw, A.

Tpr Valentine, J. J. Tpr \Y’alton, K. J.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Tpr Read, R.

DRAGOON S

Tpr Pain, M. W.

A.P.T.C. ssr Dixon, E.

R.EME.

Tpr McQueen, A. B. Tpr Pearce, D. J.

ROYAL

ROYAL SIGNALS (attached)

Tpr Emery, A. W. Tpr Grifiiths, R. E. Tpr Hanratty, J.

Hart, D. R. Nchermott, P. J. A. McDonald, R. T. McIntosh, E. C.

THE

Pte \Wilson, P. J.

“ A ” SQUADRON

Lt E. C. York

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Cpl Bell, E. G.

Cfn Derrick, D. R.

Maj T. A. K. Watson Capt B. J. Lockhart

Tpr Joseph, D.

OF

Basson, C. Bryant, E. M. Butler, J. Cheetham, H. Cokayne, D. T.

Tpr Cole, M. Tpr Conway, J. F. G. Tpr Curtis, M. A.

Sgt Sgt Sgt Sgt Cpl

Plumbly, G. R. Owen, W. Saxton, B. Baillie—Hamilton, B. L. Best, N. D.

Cpl Bennett, D. R. Cpl Cpl Cpl Cpl

Cairney, H. Clark, G. Cox, W. G. Farncombe, D. R.

Cpl Gardner, P.

Tpr Davies, P. A.

Cpl Gentile, A.

Tpr Davis, G.

Cpl Ingham, J.

Tpr Dodman, B. T. W. Tpr Dufton, J. Tpr Durant, G. H.

Tpr Grooms, M.

Cpl Petts, M. J. Cpl Pickett, M. J. Cpl Straw, N. S. Cpl Strudwiek, J. Cpl Wilkinson, V. chl Cook, K. W.

Tpr Hanley, T. P.

Lepl Fox, J. G.

Tpr Eyre, M. R. Tpr Green, M. E. D.

ch1 Jones, S. chl La Roche, J. chl Marsh, G.

chl McGowan, E. ch1 Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Taylor, J. P. Allen, T. E. Avery, P. G. Bardon, A. M. Barr, E. Benn, T. F. Birt, R. V. Bloomfield, P. D. Boon, A. A. Bovey, T. J. Boyd, C. P. Brooks, A. C. Budden, M. T.

Tpr Budgen, D. J. Tpr Byrne, L. A.

Tpr Cain, P. F. M. Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Chamberlain, D. E. Clifford, J. Crowley, C. F. Curtis, A. Davis, J. Dawes, P. D. Dean, G. R. Dickinson, R. Dixon, R. A. Dunkin, L. E. Enticknap, K. L.

Tpr Fountain, B. L. Tpr Freeman, E. Tpr Freund, P. D.

Tpr Austin, S.

Tpr Hayward, P. M. F.

ch1 Gray, D. C.

Tpr Glover, G. S. Tpr Goodchild, T. G. Tpr Guerrini, M. H.

Tpr Austin, W.

Tpr Ingram, P.

ch1 Johnson, E. C.

Tpr Harding, I. G.

Hastings, S. M. D.

Hill, P. H. Holton, M. T.

Hurd, A. W. Hill. B. Jordan, M.

Judd, N. M. King, J. H. Kay, B. D. Livingstone, J.

McGill, W. H. McGinn, M. D. Moor, P. A. Norman, B. M. O’Driscoll, A. Partridge, R. S. Pedder, A. L. C. Pentecost, E. T. A. Percival, G. Ratley, S. Rickerby, E. Rudge, J. Q. Scott, A. B. Symonds, R. Schooley, L. R.

Sibley, S. Simpson, D.

Smith, D. Smith, N. Thompson, J.

Tibbles, M. S. Tolhurst, V. A. Tyler, D. B. \Vebber, R. J.

Williams, E. G. Williams, A. L. Young, D. E. Youngs, E. J.


”WWW THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

W

”51%.“

6 R.E.1VI.E. (attached) Ssgt \Villison, N. H.

Cfn MacDonald, J. N.

Cpl Davis, J. C.

chl Levitt, D. J. Cfn Lonie, A.

Cfn Quin, J.

chl Byrne, J. P.

Cfn Dickinson

Cfn Stonham, J. F.

chl Glister, R. S. R.A.P.C. (attached)

Cpl Barker, D. T.

.

4r .

Officers and N.C.0s, at Extra. Regimental

,

.

A“ Z

.

"'

/JM-‘B

Employment ///

W//////////

HEADQUARTERS, EAST AFRICA COMA/IAND Maj D. J. S. \X/ilkinson

EASTERN CAVALRY COMMAND HEADQUARTERS Maj c. W. J. Lewis, M.B.E. (th.)

HEADQUARTERS, I7 GURKHA DIVISION Capt D. S. A. Boyd

Lt P. Arnison—Newgass

ROYAL AIR FORCE STAFF COLLEGE Maj O. J. Lewis

KENT AND COUNTY OF LONDON YEOMANRY Capt S. E. M. Bradish—Ellames Capt (Q.M.) B. W. Crockett

RSM E. G. Vowles SSM Woods, W. R. SSM Brennan, D. Sgt Routley, A. Sgt Tucker, W. Cpl Betting, K. Cpl Matthews, J. A.

ROYAL ARMOURED CORPS DEPOT Capt J. J. F. Scott Sgt Allport, F. M. Sgt Dawson, C. Sgt Stone, H, Cpl Brandon, S.

ARMY AIR CORPS

14th/zoth Cpl Beeforth, A.

S

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THE "Qua . BANK confinn

ROYAL ARMOURED CORPS CENTRE Mai J. A. Dimond, M.C. Capt P. W. F. Arkwright SSM Kimble, F. SSM Watorski, W. L. W.O.II Warren, J. Ssgt Paul, J. A. Sgt Corcoran. E. Sgt Gayler, G. C. Sgt Hales, B Sgt \Vebster, D. A. Cpl W'right, E.

/

//

a" l

HEADQUARTERS, WESTERN COIMMAND Mai C. E. Winstanley Mai J. B. Evans

\\\\\

Cpl Wickenden

\\\\\\\\\%té“ ‘

/"’//

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A

0‘ §\\ \\ \‘ \\\§\ \\\\\\\\\\\\\i\\\‘\\\ \\\\ \ \.\\\s~§““‘

. /

\ \\\ \\ \\ SSRR \\\\WSW \\

HEADQUARTERS, B.A.O.R. Maj B. J. Hodgson

~\\\ \ \

«\‘3‘

Lt J. M. Loyd HEADQUARTERS, R.A.C., 3 DIVISION

\\\\\\\ \\\\\\= \\\\\\\

/

SULTAN OF MUSCAT ARMED FORCES Lt A. E. \Voodward

\\\\v~\\\,«\x \\‘§\..

«

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, F.A.R.E.L.F. Capt W. H. S. Boucher

\\\\\~e\:§

,W

///’,.“-..

'\

THE WAR OFFICE Col G. T. A. Armitage, M.B.E. Cpl W'ennell, D. J.

IlllllllIIIIllllllllIllllllllllllllllIllIllIllIIIIllIllIllllllIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllIll|||IIlllllllIllIIIIIllllllllllllIllllllllllll|Ill|Ill|Illllll|IllllllllllllllIllIIllIIlllIllIlll"WIFE

ANGLO-MALAYAN TRADING (0., ND. 33, CHINA STREET, PENANG.

KING’S HUSSARS

4th/7th ROYAL DRAGOON GUARDS Sgt Sarll, R. F. Sgt Greatrex, L.

R.M.C.S., SHRIVENHAM

T/Maj Whellans, M. Cpl Bull, R. Cpl Dent, H.

F.V.R.D.E. Capt A. B. T. Davey

FODDER

Cpl Ray, J.

lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllll|||lllllIllIII|I|lIIIllllllllllllllllllllll

Capt T. P. Hart—Dyke

SUPPLIERS

PENANG GARRISON RECRUITING SERGEANTS

Sgt Boshcr, J.

AND

Cpl Messer, T. G. Sgt Sgt Sgt Sgt Sgt

Ireland, R. F. Colyer, P. Remfry, D. J. W. Kerr, G Wallace, T.

A.D.C. TO G.O.C., SINGAPORE BASE DISTRICT

GENERAL

Capt W. M. G. Black

IMPORT

MERCHANTS

ADEN PROTECTORATE LEVIES KUWAIT

Cpl Morley, K.

QUEEN’S OWN LngLAND YEOMANRY . .) Cpl Petterson, S. G.

L’ECOLE SUPERIEURE DE GUERRE Mai C. A. Banham, M.C.

I6/5th QUEEN’S ROYAL LANCERS Lt. C. N. Haworth-Booth.

Jmlllllll

R.A.C. PUBLICITY TEAM Sgt Millett, J.

Phone:

(Tables:

PENANG 6068-1.

ANGMALCO "I

Ssgt Bujko, H.

llllllllllllllllIllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIII[IllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllII|IlllIIIIIllllllllllllllllllllIlll E.


FROST SADDLERS

FOR

leading Suppliers in llorse Equipment, Horse Fodder and Horse Medicine

BAWTRY

AND

Please

Nr. DONCASTER, YORKS

.M facturerso f..— ASIEBISLESanu

O U ALIT Y

Wit/i [ompliments

COURTESY

from

PATHY RADIO COMPANY

visit

LYO N & CO.

MU STHAFA’S

l.0Y STREET AH [UMPUR 5 YAP KUALA

THE LEADING GROCERS and Dealers in

48, Anderson Road, Ipolr, Peralr, Malaya

TOYS and NOVELTIES

Telephone No. lPOH 6237

BRIDLES HORSE CLOTHING HORSE BOOTS

Also dealers in Sports Goods, Fertilisers and Electrical

RACING COLOURS STABLE EQUIPMENT REGIMENTAL BELTS

Appliances

101-103 BELFIELD STREET IP O H Phone IPOH 2476

Tel, 33992

no Box |2l

SPORTS GOODS OF QUALITY

LAI WAH

Dealers in :— Radios, Cookers, Refrigerators, Electrical Appliances and Public Address System.

SALES AND SER VICE

ZLIN

SHOE

GAN lEE COMPANY

at the Right Price

Agents for

F0R CRICKET,

BADMINTON,

0/5

FOOTBALL,

ATHLETICS,

eerCe

SHOES, MACHINERY

& LEATHER

146, BREWSTER ROAD,

it?

IPOH

I l I Anderson Road—Ipoh Telez—IPOH 3841

Telephone No. 2118

Place your orders with David’s. It is not possible to obtain better Service and value.

18 Jalan Marqing — Kluang

HOCKEY.

GOLF,

INDOOR

GAMES, ETC.

Tclc:—KLUANG 432

DAVID & CO., No. 43, STATION ROAD, IPOH.

1992 Limbongan — Malacca Tele:—MALACCA 889

it

Shoe Makers and Repairs. Always in Stock, Size 4 to 11

Clarks, Dolcis, Health Brand, Swan Shoes, Kumfort O. K. A. I.

Phone 5647

“E NGAlN CHONG Official Military Photographer

Barratts, John White.


THE ASSOCIATION OF SERVICE NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISEMENT PAGES. 67/68 IERMYN STREET, ST. JAMESHS S..W1. TEL. WHITEHALL 2504

By Appointment to His Late Majesty King George V.

ROGERS & CO. (MILITARY

OUTFITTERS)

LTD.

Sporting and Mufti Tailors BY APPOINTMENT TO HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN GOLDSMITHS 2k CROWN IE\VELLERS,

Hunting Kit and Breeches Makers

GARRARD & CO. LTD., LONDON

Regimental Outfitters to The Royal Dragoons

33, BRUTON ST., MAYFAIR, LONDON, W.1 Telephone: MAYfair 7303 London.

GARRARD OF REGENT STREET

Telegrams: Rogers. MAY. 7303 London.

Along the graceful curve‘bf Regent Street

stands the House of Garrard, where the finest examples of modern and traditional jewellery,

silverware and watches are to be found.

Over a Century of Service . . . 1853-1982 IN PRINT

The tradition of Garrard has been built up over more than 200 years: our designers and craftsmen create exquisite pieces, simple or elaborate, according to your taste. For the discerning people who buy from Garrard, only

the best is selected. Our military department specialises in making presentation plate, mess plate, cups and other trophies: these may be to your own design, from a picture or sketch, or we can produce designs to suit your requirements. We have also the badges of most corps and regiments, in miniature, beautifully fashioned in gold and

Like the Services. we also have a long tradition to uphold, at the same time. again like the Services, taking advantage of scientific progress in this age of mechanisation; yet maintaining, through a special department, a personal and helpful link with Service Editors. whom we are

enamel or set with diamonds.

ever Willing to advise and assist in the production of their journals.

Catalogues are available under the following titles: “Silverware”, “Regent Plate", “Mess Plate”, “Watches" and “Gifts". Tax free export price lists are also supplied upon request.

F. J. PARSONS LTD Lennox House

Norlolk Street

-’..C (,2

Works: Observer Buildings. I'Iistmgs

'

A recent silver stamens created by Garrard in exact detail from life

Temple Bar 6591 Hastings 1157

GARRARD & CO - LTD Crown jewellers H2 REGENT STREET LONDON WJ.

Tc]: Regent 30.71 (11 lines)

Prinled in Greal Britain

SUPPLEMENT Ne. 2—PAGE THREE


THE ASSOCIATION OF SERVICE NEWSPAPERS ADVERTI SEMENT PAGES, 61/68 IERMYN STREET, ST. IAMES'S, S.W.l. TEL. WHITEHALL 2504

QUEEN ANNE RARE SCOTCH WHISKV . THE FINEST SCOTCH WHEREVER You ARE! T '1‘ EST SCOTCH WHEREVER you ARE‘ THE Fl ' .

A, E! THE FINEST SCOTCH WHEREVER YOU A

.

l

/

4

It

'"

3 BULPITT'& BIRMINGHAM

.A

sweets

%‘ , ,

m: an: nun 0055 van GOOD

‘R VOU ARE! THE FINEST SCOTCH WHER/

.

PaSCaLll

I

'‘'

' "

ARE! THE 7’

L

I

I:

C I GAR HIE PAPERS

',

3:;f:;::53;::3:6”

I

.

VOU'VE cor WHAT IT TAKES...

SONS, LTD., ENGLAND.

A "

'

You can really let yourself so as a hostess

S

'/ ' II II WAN é\'BRAN ALUMINIUM HOLLOWARE ELECTRICAL

, irre Si Stlbl e

with Huntley 8a Palmers ‘ '

H JAMES PASCALL LIMITED - MITCHAM - SURREY

"III .

.

”I,I .

oundation for a. host of

TE

f

R

The Walsall Electmal Co., ltd.

tempting spreads.

Refrexlxe: after work, travel and sport

61 BRIDGE 51., WALSALL

Huntley 8‘ Palmer's

..M 7 cm 1335:? _

.

2

SM

'05“ FOR TO'LET “TH AND NURSE"

I TIll ha

Y0" get MOVE

'

_

for mt; :LOIIey

S n VB 0m p 688

Regal Fruit Drops and

I 1 3 APKT

so crisp/y baked z‘o F/NE perfect/on /

s

toef::dyo::yif m W

CORNISHWAFERS

SVilchboards, Switchgear

Tsro LONDON“ ‘

.. 1

Cornish Wafers, the perfect.

0

APPLIANCES

_> I I

I

.

.

Everton Mints taste

Barratts

.

I

I

.

3

,.. ,

_ f

.

NE s CAFE' 1'nstant

. ’

I In the bag -

S I’ ‘7 ee‘ISS

is t° w:

This is how coffee was meant to taste. It’s all

,

MADE IN wooo GREEN LoNocm

Smith‘s Paulo Crisps Limiled,

'

_

coffee

tells you...this is it!

as good as they 100k

Your very first sip of

I

_

.

there...the flavour...

the aroma I I I the feeling

Grant WesI Road. Brenlford. Middlncx.

'

FREE BROCHURE

'

' -

REGIMENTA 0N L WALL SHIELDS write HUNTER a. SMALLPAGE

, . .

-

,

YORK

Callard & Bowsers

......515.....

Celebrated "Thistle Brand"

BUTTER-SCOTCH

of well—being that

.

,

only the very best

. .>

'

0

. ‘

Peacock Brand —___ THE SECRET OF A GOOD CURRY

Famous since 1837

- ,

coffee can give NESCAFE. First taste tells !

*

.

.

I ,fi . t Ma — 0Y5—

_ W ”ORNHY-DUBLO new“; _

,

.

.

4*

.

I

'IA ‘ “In“Y 1

.

,

'

. ~

P Veflca/agfiel/Ums “Hume MAD“, CURRY POWDER

‘ .

\

-

' Britain’s best_loved coffee

I

.

_

.

:1: NESCAFE is a reglstered trade mark to designate Nestlé’s instant ccfl'ee.

SUPPLEMENT No. 2—PAGE POUR PnnIed In Greal Bnlam

primed in 6’“. amain SUPPLEMENT No. I—PAGE THREE


You will probably never have a better oppor-

tunity than you have now of putting some money aside for the future. You enjoy good pay—with no overheads—and all the facilities of the Post Office Savings Bank scheme are

yours for the asking. What could be simpler? Make saving a good habit. Save as much or as little as you like, but do it regularly. Keep your money in the Savings Bank as long as you possibly can. You will find that it soon mounts up and collects interest—ready to help start you up in the trade you are now learning in the Service, or for furnishing your home when you get married.

All the details of the scheme are in the leaflets illustrated here. Write to me personally, and I ' will send you a copy of the one that applies to

comfortably close

with _ Palmolive Every Palmolive shave is close, clean, comfortable. That’s because Palmolive shaving creams contain special beard— softening ingredients for close shaving. Arc light-textured for clean shaving. Contain skilfully blended oils to soothe and condition the skin. You’ll get a close, clean shave and luxurious comfort, every time, with Palmolive.

your Service:

Air Chief Marshal Sir Hugh W. L. Saunders, G.C.B., K.B.E., M.C.. D.F.C., M.M.,

Chairman, H.M. Forces Savings Committee,

1, Princes Gate, London, S.W.7 LATHER OR Issued by HJW. Forces Saving: Committee

BRUSHLESS

A/so sticks, and Rapid Shave # the new instant lather MORE MEN USE PALMOLIVE THAN ANY OTHER SHAVING CREAM

Primed in Great Britain SUPPLEMENT No. l—PAGE FOUR

HEIHWEIW d0

Hammad/fl,“ —— for service plus . . .

2 STATION ROAD, IPOH. Tel. 2 62 1 -4

44 PUDU-ROAD. K. LUMPUR. Tel. 88933-1

GROUND FLOOR, AIR-CONDITIONED OFFICES.

.LSVEI

HVd

by booking with —

3H1.

see for yourself

HHDNHSSVJ

You may have said it yourself. But, consider.

' u’ll .- is’have‘ so

TRAVEL is easy . . .

EIDNHHEIJNOC)

A“ ring“.

I'tlrililins

APPROVED AGENT OF THE INTERNATIONAL AIR TRANSPORT ASSOCIATION

THE ASSOCIATION OF SERVICE NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISEMENT PAGES. 67/68 IERMYN STREET, ST. JAMES’S, S.W.‘I. TEL. WHITEHALL 2504


You are welcome at

No. 6 Pall Mall

at Cox's and King's branch of

Lloyds Bank, 6 Pall Mall, S.W.I we have been officially appointed Army Agents for over two hundred years and Agents to the Royal Air Force since its inception. Of course you may bank where you please but the reason Why so many officers open their personal accounts with us is that we have un— rivalled experience in dealing with the

l 1

financial affairs of officers stationed at home or abroad. We have departments specialising in general and kit insurance, in income tax, the purchase and sale of stocks and shares and the safe custody of valuables. This full banking service includes facilities for serving officers to cash their cheques at any branch of the Bank without prior arrangement.

An officer’s banking transactions are confidential to him and his bank. Our position as Official Agents in no way affects this.

LLOYDS BANK LIMITED COX'S & KING'S BRANCH, 6 FALL MALL, S.W.1 Telephone WHltehall 7001

Official Agents to the Army and Royal Air Force

llllllilllllililllllllllilllllilllilillHHIHIHIHIHIHll|lllHHIHIHHIIHHHHHHillililll[llllllllllliillllillHlllHiiiiHHHIHIHHIHIHIHIlllllllilliHiIi[Hllillll[llll[Hllllllllllill[lillilllIi[IlIi[liIi[Iilillillilililliiillili[iill[HIIHHIHIHHIHHHilililliIiiIi[1H][1iHili[liiiil]iiillilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Produced for the Editor, “The Eagle,” The Journal of The Royal Dragoons, by Combined Service Publications, Ltd., 67-68, Jermyn Street. St. James‘s, London, SiW.l. Primed in Great Britain by F. Jr Parsons, Ltd.. Lennox House, Norfolk Street. London, WC]. and Hastings and Folkcstonev Advertisement Agents: Service Newspapers, Ltd., 67-68. Jermyn Street. S,W,l (Phone: Whitehall 2504).

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