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The BLUE & ROYAL

The one-man

VOL. 1

NO. I

1970

Colonel-in—Chief.‘ Her Majesty The Queen,

Colonel and Gold Stick: Field-Marshal Sir Gerald Templer, K.G,, G.C.B.,

anti-tank g

FOREWORD

G.C.M.G., K.B.E., D.S.O., D.C.L. Deputy Colonel: General Sir Desmond Fitzpatrick, K,C.B., D,S.O,, M.B.E.,

SPRING 1970

MC. The Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding The Household Cavalry and Silver

Stick: Colonel l. B. Baillie.

missile

Commanding Officer: Lieutenant-Colonel R. M. H. Vickers, M.V.O,, M,B.E. Officer Commanding Household Cavalry Regiment (Mounted):

This Journal

is

the

last

of the

“firsts". Throughout the past year the new Regiment has been carrying out many tasks for the first time. Each has presented its difficulties either

because of lack of familiarity with the

Lieutenant-Colonel D. J. Daly.

task or because of lack of familiarity with the other people engaged in it. Yet every one has been tackled with

BATTLE HONOURS

tremendous enthusiasm, with humour,

Tangier

(1662-1680).

d'Onor,

Peninsular,

Tel

el

Kebir,

Dettingen, Warburg,

Waterloo,

Relief

of

Balaklava,

Kimberley,

Beaumont, Willems, Fuentes

Sevastopol,

Paardeberg,

Egypt

Relief of

(1882),

Ladysmlth,

and with the capacity for hard grinding work, Every single task has been

achieved

with

the

highest

possible

standards.

South Africa (1899—1902). Le Cateau, Marne (1914), Messines (1914), Ypres (1914), Gheluvelt, Ypres (1915), Frezenberg, Loos, Arras (1917), Ypres (1917), Somme (1918), Amiens, Hindenburg Line, Cambrai (1918), Sambre, Pursuit to

Mons, France and Flanders (1914-1918). Souleuvre, Brussels, Nederrijn, Rhine, N. W, Europe (1944-1945), Iraq (1941), Palmyra, Syria (1941), Knightsbrldge, EI Alamein, Advance on

Tripoli, North Africa (1941—43), Sicily (1943), Italy (1943-1944).

CONTENTS Amalgamation Vesting Day Parade A Squadron B Squadron C Squadron Command Squadron

.

Headquarters Squadron L.A. . . Mounted

Squadron

Band

Vigilant is deadly against the heaviest tank yet has the mobility of a machine gun and the . readiness of a rifle. Vigilant is the only man-portable anti—tank weapon capable of knocking out the most powerful ' ' tank at 200 to 1500 yards range over a 340° arc of fire. Vigilant has been tested and proved under all climatic conditions. _

' to any known comparable an ti—tank. weapon system. Vi' 'ilant 'is superior

Vigilant can be mounted on light reconnaissance vehicles, armoured cars or any tactical vehicles. ‘

' coun ter-measures. Vi' 'ilant 'IS ‘immune to all known electronic

.

hits Vigilant is easy to operate and control: inexperienced operators have frequently achieved . _ . ' ’ _ . 'th their first training missiles. Arabia. Saudi and Libya Kuwait, Finland, Britain, Great of armies the with Il/VIgilant is in service

Training Squadron .. WO's and CsoH Mess Corporal's Mess .. Serving Personality—ROM D. L. Cass Household Cavalry Museum

Hohne Soltau Major Generals Inspection

Alpine Ski Team The Weser Vale Hunt Kaiser William H The Last Dragoon Arnhem 1969 Sport Affiliated Regiments Nominal Rolls . Marriages, Births and Obituaries . . The Blues and Royals Association Association Annual Report

aerospace company in

GUIDED WEAPO NS DIVISION

STEVENAGE

HERTS

Europe GWV 24A

This edition will also show the extent of The Blues and Royals, not just in Detmold. but world wide—the key personalities of the Regiment, its affiliated Regiments, the training base. and some of its supporting organisations. I hope this will give all readers. serving or not. a better understanding of the breadth and depth of the new Regiment, Finally, perhaps for the last time —for it is now a thing of the past—can I mention the Amalgamation? We, the serving Regiment. wish to pay tribute

to the wisdom, the tolerance and the decision of those senior officers (whom I will not name) who planned the formation of The Blues and Royals.

That plan has worked—one hundred

Zandvoorde

per cent—and we are grateful. We are equally grateful for those responsible

What is a Soldier?

for

“The Blue and Royal” printed and published by Service Publications Ltd.. Caxton House, Shoreham-by-Sea, Sussex.

amalgamation—that of the Regimental Association. It is a great source of strength and comfort to know from the start that we have the united support of our predecessors.

BRITISH AIRCRAFT CORPORATION the most powerful

I hope this edition will show to its readers the high standards which we have set for ourselves and which we will maintain. We are rightly proud of them and I believe the Regiment has proved within its first year that in the field in Germany it forms a well organised and effectite armoured Battle Group. and that in Barracks its standards of presentation, administration, hospitality and sport are difficult to equal.

another

astonishing

and

historic


THE COLONEL

Field-Marshal Sir Gerald Templer

Portrait Study by Annigoni

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN THE COLONEL-lN-CHIEF

K‘G" G.C.B., G.C.M.G.. K.B.E., D30” D.C.L.


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AMALGAMATION

VESTING DAY PARADE - THE BLUES 82 ROYALS

#

DETMOLD

-

31st MARCH 1969

Colonel Gerald first read out the Loyal Address and The Queen's reply, after which he said “We must remember those words." “Now, Gentlemen of The Blues and Royals.

LOYAL ADDRESS TO HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN FROM FIELD MARSHAL SIR GERALD TEMPLER, K.G., G.C.B., G.C.M.G., K.B.E., D.S.O., D.C.L., COLONEL OF THE BLUES AND ROYALS

a new Regiment “On this day, which marks the formation of The Blues and Royals, of the Royal Horse Guards in Your Majesty’s Household Cavalry, formed by the amalgamation Officers, Warrant Officers, (The Blues) and The Royal Dragoons (ist Dragoons), we, the offer our Loyal Greetings to Non-Commissioned Officers and Troopers of The Blues and Royals shall continue to bear true Your Majesty, our Colonel-in-Chief, assuring your Majesty that we example of the two ancient allegiance and strive faithfully to uphold the honour and high

regiments from which we are formed.”

i don’t think that a speech is really necessary this morning because we all know what it's about—and what we‘re at, but there are one or two things i must

say.

Up till the day before yesterday, we were two proud, and individual Regiments, each with three centuries of loyal, and distinguished service to our Sovereign, and to our country. We now enter in to another phrase of our being—as The Blues and Royals (Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons), The late Blues are immensely proud to wear the eagle, and the Dettingen black of The Royals. And I know the late Royals are equally proud, to wear the embellishment of The Blues.

THE PARADE

history and traditions of these two famous Regiments. future.“ United you may go forward with confidence into the

I hope you noticed how I addressed you as “Gentlemen—of The Blues and Royals’. That is an old fashioned form of address in the British Army, which the officers and men of both our Regiments have always observed. Long may it continue. For me, it is a great honour to have been appointed your Colonel, and it is an especial satisfaction to me that, with the approval of Her Majesty, General Sir Desmond Fitzpatrick is the Deputy Colonel. Between us,

I can assure you all, we will do our best for the wellI most certainly want to congratulate you on a first-class parade this morning from every point of view, and as an old soldier I realize very well the difficulties entailed because the two component parts have been together for so short a time. Well done—all of you, and great credit, indeed, is due to all those primarily responsible.

REPLY BY HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN

Non-Commissioned Officers and “I send my sincere thanks to all Officers, Warrant Officers, ' greetings. Troopers of The Blues and Royals for their message of loyal of ation amalgam the by formed today in welcoming you all as members of the new Regiment I know that you will be faithful to the The Royal Horse Guards and The Royal Dragoons,

It is indeed a privilege for us all to form part of the Household Troops, and that honour carries with it corresponding responsibilities, as you all well realise.

being of the of you.

Regiment—as

I

am

quite

aware

will

all

I think it is significant that the day after tomorrow, at the Horse Guards in Whitehall—Her Majesty The Queen will inspect The Queen’s Life Guard—the first time this has ever happened in the life-time of any Sovereign— and that on that day the guard provided by the Regiment will consist both of former Blues and former Royals. I think you will agree—a great portent for the future. l have not the slightest doubt that our new Regiment will not only maintain the traditions of the past, but will

set the highest standard of loyalty and military efficiency in the future. Gentlemen of The Blues and Royals—it is Up to us to achieve that—and l have no doubt that you—the serving members—will ensure it.”


The Guldon and Standard

Padre Hall—The Consecration

The Colonel, Adjutant and RC‘M. lead the March Past

The Guidon and Standard

The Service—Sir Peter Studd Alderman of City of

Parade in London

D.R.A.C., attended by Cornet Gill, Major J. N. P. Watson; Major D. S, A. Boyd reading the address

London 4th from lelt

14

‘5


A SQUADRON

Major Bouclter, Captain Roberts, Capla‘n Davies, Sollau. Lieutenant Rogers. Trooper Greer, Trooper Haley

The formation of “A" Squadron, The Blues and Royals, put one in mind of the first chapter of Genesis. “Let there be an ‘A‘ Squadron was decreed from on high and there was an ‘A‘ Squadron. And the evening and the morning (and most of the night as well) were the first day”. The succeeding fortnight was spent in trying to ensure that the

One troop has had a particularly outstanding record over this period Fourth Troop under Mr. Wyburd and Corporal of Horse Hayward has won everything in sight in the field of tactics and gunnery. Their professional skill has been of a very high order.

during an N.C.O.‘s Cadre, is not likely to recover as quickly as had been hoped. We wish him a speedy return to full health. Corporal Calden has sadly not yet recovered and will not be joining us again.

Major Lane. cheerful and selfless hard work of Squadron Corporal see the arrival of to horrified were us among Dragoons ex-Royal The terror into the this very large figure who seemed designed to strike

There has been a big change around of personalities in the Squadron with a wide variety of E.R.E. jobs on offer for those who volunteer. Corporal of Horse Matthew, who must have ”engaged and

bayonets.

However,

from

the first drill

parade

he seemed

to

time get even the most B-minded trooper to have a go, and by the a show of of the amalgamation parade we were able to put on quite foot drill. tr00p have The Squadron Quartermaster Corporal and his small

prompt also done well for the Squadron and this is not only in the arrival of Harry Black on a hot exercise consistently good.

Our administration has been

As we write these

notes we hear that Trooper Slade, of 4th Troop, who was taken ill

Squadron Corporal Major Lane

destroyed" enough tanks to equip an army in the last few years has left us. on well-deserved promotion. Corporals Coleman and Smithers are gomg to try recruiting. Lance-Corporals Allsop and Tompkins ha\e been lured by the prospect of travel and adventure in Arabia. We were very sorry to say goodbye to Lance-Corporal Best who did so much hard work on the tanks, and to Troopers Callaghan and Talbot who also did the Squadron well.

When this article is printed each one of you in "A" Squadron will have the chance to judge whether we have achieved the high standards

The deal

set for us by our Colonels and Commanding Officer. if you think we have not, does the cure lie, in any way, in your hands? If we have

furnished, remains to be done, We hope to see it better decorated and The and colour television is in demand. More parties could be held. from Club is a painless method of extracting money for the Squadron

then how can we maintain and improve on the standards of the last

used for redecorating those who drink there, and the profits have been

is just not good enough. Everybody must get down to it and swell the profits of the Squadron Club to the point where we can buy some new tanks before the P.R.E., and pull down the Block and build a

Club

Clerk

hours their husbands have had

0 wor .

Craftsman Corp to set his F.S.C. on fire. The way in which the Squadron settled down happily from the to the start, in spite of a bewildering pressure of work, was largely due

at hearts of those of us who were more handy at fixing a tank than

Chessher, Squadron

from tlhe barracks and with the long

Corporal always seem to collect in the back of the 432. The Squadron Smith and Major soon tired of this exercise and persuaded Trooper

fixing

Lance-Corporal

We are very lucky to have had

thanks for their patience in putting up with houses at some distance

of hope that we may have come somewhere near it. All this in spite waSp, the serious injuries caused to Captain Davies by a passing which was attracted no doubt by the smell of the “goodies" which

Chamberlain,

decoration and general improvement.

such honest and hard-working barmen in Troopers Shaughnessy and Hutchinson.

Whether this has been achieved

Squadron's is for others more senior than the writer to judge, but the rise for performance on the Brigade Exercise “TOp Twenty“ gives

Trooper

It is a very valuable

their work and see that it was good. In effect they reserved judgement the best and gave us up to the end of the training season to be

armoured regiment in the British Army.

Squadron Headquarter Troop, Corporal of Horse Stephenson, Trooper van der Bilt,

minor payments for the good of the Squadron.

asset, but its future success does depend on everyone helping in its

. Perhaps those who most deserve praise are the very many who With.very slight knowledge of tanks, have adjusted themselves to conditions in Germany, and shown remarkable skill and enthusiasm in the handling of the Iron Monsters. To the wives also we owe our

Almighty in the form of the Colonel and Deputy Colonel would survey

Major Boucher

"A" Squadron

Club. At this stage it is appropriate to mention the Squadron However, a great has been well attended and popular.

paying for rooms and the Block, for small comforts on exercises, for to any particular losses and breakages which cannot be attributed and a host of person, and for paying for sports subscriptions, charities

year?

The answer is quite simple.

According to the Squadron Quarter~

master Corporal we consume 1,712 bottles of beer in ten days.

better one before the visit of the Major General.

This

Lieutenant Whefherly, Chapp/e. Lance-Corporal Williamson

Lance-Corporal Cap/e, Trooper

17 16


SQUADRON

“B” Squadron Chieftain

”8” Squadron Club

Field Training Exercises, September, 1969.

Squadron

Headquarters Troop: Trooper O’Toole, Trooper Collett,

Trooper Scott

“B” Squadron Swimming Team

Squadron Headquarters Troop, December, 1969 Left to Right: Trooper Clews, Trooper Scott, LanceCorporal Rose, Corporal of Horse Thomas, Squadron Corporal Ma/or Mackay, Lance-Corporal Back Lieutenant Couper, Trooper Garrett, Trooper Burne’

Corporal Scammel/

“B" Squadron, The Blues and Royals, in common 1969.

by

the

and his replacement Captain Hewson to become Adjutant.

We

have

had,

one

can

now

safely

say,

a

very

successful first year as a squadron, with good reports On tactical training the from Hohne and the PRE. Squadron has acquitted itself well, has learned a tremendous amount and has been throughout completely integrated with our friends “A” Company 2nd Royal Green Jackets. We had the lion’s share of the final F.T.X. in the Autumn and for the thick of the exercise there more

than

fifty

callsigns

on

the

combat

team

With topping up individual training courses during

this winter almost all crewmen in the Squadron will be Bi and we should be well set for the next training season.

,

Lieutenant Matthews has gone on a course with a view

to becoming R.S.O. and Cornet Corbett has been lent to The Life Guards. Squadron Quartermaster Corporal Peck has taken on the task of Officers’ Mess Steward. Corporal of Horse Hawley after a course on our resident has

blacks

a highly trained professional soldier.

Corporal Gregory, Trooper Ratclifte, Cornet Corbett Lance-Corporal Michell, Trooper Hogan, Lance: Corporal G/bbs, Lance-Corporal Hamilton, Trooper Fry

Captain

arrivals.

After the years of uncertainty and the months of

on

Serviceman, it was a very real novelty to find a squadron fully crewed, with every seat in every vehicle filled by

net.

numbers

Hamilton—Russell has left to go to the Indian Staff College

born

planning, at last the new Regiment was a going concern. Having been used to previous times of shortages of manpower, and before that of half-trained National

were

in

matched

been

31st March,

with a few other squadrons was

Hohne, June, 1969 Left to Right: Trooper Garrett, Trooper Roberts, Lance—

gone to

the

Mounted

Squadron

as

become a B1 tradesman by the Spring, having completed

to have filled many of the key position in Regimental

a Gunnery, Signals and Gunnery Bi

teams. In Cricket we had in the Regimental Team Squadron Quartermaster Corporal Cox. Corporal of Horse Melbourne, Lance-Corporal Hamilton and LanceCorporal Gibbs. In Football, Corporal of Horse Livingstone and Lance—Corporal Gibbs. In Hockey Corporal of Horse Melbourne (also a B.A.O.R. player), Squadron Corporal Major Mackay, and Lance-Corporal Butler (L.A.D.). In Swimming Lance-Corporal Gregory and Trooper Garrett. In Rugby Cornet Corbett, Trooper

upgrading Course

In the space of this one Winter.

have

Corporal Idle and Lance-Corporal Reed. Corporal Parkes is about to leave for Sharjah, Corporal Docherty has been posted to the Orderly Room, Corporal McKenna to the Officers’ Mess, LanceCorporal Cox as a potential pilot, and Sergeant Walker (L.A.D.) to the fitter section “C” Squadron,

SOCIAL The Squadron has been remarkably well looked after in the field by a tireless Squadron Quartermaster Corporal. Sustenance has appeared at the most unlikely times and places, and at quiet moments smokers enjoyed

Captain Tweedie

has

arrived

the Mounted

from

. Squadron and Cornet Carter rejoined us from Bovington

Corporal of Horse Grinyer has come to the Squadron from M.T., Lance-Corporal Fox from the Mounted Squadron and Sergeant Kesby (L.A.D.) from Headquarters

In various woods. The Squadron gave the first dance of the Christmas series, setting a cracking pace with a

Ward (also selected for the divisional trials), Squadron Quartermaster Corporal and Trooper Garrett.

Cox,

Hamilton

In the Summer we played Cricket matches between

exercises and were unbeaten. party which we hope our guests enjoyed as much

Lance-Corporal

During Annual Firing at

as Hohne the Squadron Swimming Team showed only its

we did ourselves.

wash to the other Squadrons. Also during the Summer months the Athletics Team was unlucky not to win

Squadron. because of the indefinite postponement of the competition. The Hockey Team showed its capabilities by

SPORT An

ARRIVALS and DEPARTURES

when

Inevitably the departures from the Squadron have not

interesting

sidelight

for

those

in

the

winning the Inter-Squadron Hockey.

Mounted

Squadron who consider they will be at a disadvantage in the

coming

to the

Autumn

Regiment:

after the

a trooper who

Opening

of

arrived

Parliament will

The

Squadron

is

fortunate

in

holding

a

large

reserve of extremely talented sportsmen and we seem

To prove our wide outlook towards sport the Squadron Corporal Major was seen carrying not cleaning rods but fishing rods during Hohne.

19


SQUADRON

S.C.M. Clark Captain Bell

Soltau. Summer 1969

Soltau, Summer 1969 Charge of the Heavy Brigade

2nd Troop: Cornet Boone From the moment of its birth on the last day of March. 1969. “C” Squadron, The Blues and Royals

approach by hesitant circumspection were negligible. After one dedication service, two parades and three parties to establish that basic foundation, a period of ten

enjoyed a lot although we had the whips out for a lot

days was allowed for nameAlearning and Easter before

The next main training event was two weeks on the ranges at Hohne at the end of June and beginning of July. We had put in a lot of work on the indoor ranges

we rolled into the field, on April 11th, for three weeks'

in barracks under the guidance of Corporal of Horse

the brigade autumn manoeuvre during which we were out

Perhaps there neither is nor should there be any

training at Soltau. Here the real business of the Squadron began (and,

Robson and Corporals Garvey and Brown, and the rewards were quickly reaped when we got to Hohne. The

of permanent training areas and off roads for a breath of air across quite proper country—not without impunity

particular magic about an assortment of some one hundred men becoming a competent armoured squadron

later in the year, damn near ended . . . but read on).

shooting improved rapidly and each troop had at least

but with some relish.

The routine circuit of a year's training for an armoured

one good, confident battle run. Squadron Corporal Major Clark and Squadron Quartermaster Corporal Hearn ensured trouble-free ammunition organisation, Corporal

weeks with 2nd Royal Green Jackets in a good gallop, paired off with an excellent Danish company. against the Regiment. Other than interruptions for controlling purposes, this was a valuable but all too brief three~day burst and a great chance for the Squadron to show its paces, a chance of which we took every advantage.

developed quickly into distinctive character. The growing pains, usually attaching to such precocity, were avoided largely thanks to Squadron Corporal Major Clark who proved himself to be a very competent proctor.

wary inertia. In fact. a quick glance at the year’s training

regiment in B.A.O.R. was well known to about half the Squadron, but this time round was busier than ever. The usual gamut of crew, troop and troop/platoon training was squeezed into two very hard~worked weeks

programmes would

and rounded by troop tests and some training with the

positions (and always to good effect) and most of fitter troop were made to keep their finger nails clean during

gunners.

the automotive respite.

in half a year. knowledge,

Certainly even from the first day a lot of

experience,

and

above all,

willingness was

gathered under the “one roof”; there was no chance for have

shown that the

chances

of

Memories

are

mostly

of

a

longish

bout

of

labour with few dramas and no accidents: By the end of

founded troop to their new leader half way through the

Two weeks at Detmold separated the end of Hohne and the start of our second session at Soltau, this time for Regimental and Battle Group training which was rendered only partially effective by a particularly virulent form of tank pneumonia. In spite of the increasing efforts of the crews and Sergeant Walker's fitters (Staff Sergeant Thomas having deserted us temporarily), one

period. Corporal of Horse Robson was smiled on less kindly by the gods when, within thirty minutes of jumping

by one the majority of the power packs succumbed. The then—current German sick joke—"How to catch a

into his turret with a modicum of zeal and determination, there started a programme of tank recovery which was to

Starfighter? . . . Buy a plot of land" could too easily

it we all knew a lot more about our jobs, the smell of

tanks and the tempers of our companions.

Everybody

made honest efforts to get firmly into the new way of life

and Corporal of Horse Ollington did particularly well with 4th Troop and was able to hand over a soundly

absorb the interest and efforts of his troop for a whole day. Regrettably we arrived at the start line of the troop tests competition in fairly fatigued condition after a long

Field-Training Exercise, September, 1969 Trooper Savage, Troop Leader’s Tank

Stone squeezed himself into some quite extraordinary

bout of non-stop training. This put paid to our chances of winning but, led by 2nd Troop, they finished close together well up the list and completed the course in good order.

of the time. The last major encounter was Exercise “Right Angle",

We spent the first of the two

be adapted—“How to catch a Chieftain? . . . Buy an acre of Soltau”. A depressing chapter. Nevertheless we did get through a fair amount of work with our affiliated battalion, the 2nd Royal Green Jackets, and luckily almost all the vehicles were fit at the stage of the Squadron's “trade test", a thirty-six—hour exercise during which we tackled a wide variety of

situations arranged for us by the Battalion Commander. This was an energetic form of entertainment which we

Soltau, Summer 1969 2nd Troop 41

20


There are three other forms of industry which have contributed much to the life of the Squadron. First the Fitter Troop,

who

under

Staff Sergeant Thomas,

have

never failed to do their damnedest to keep us going; secondly, Administrative Troop, particularly Squadron Quartermaster Corporal Hearn ably assisted throughout by Lance-Corporal Benn; and lastly those, who under Squadron Corporal Major Clark, reorganlsed and ran that essential ingredient of the Squadron’s well being the Squadron Club—Troopers Cooper, Wischhusen, Syme, and many others.

Comparing the Squadron ORBATs of now and April,

it is sad to note how many of the founding members have left us.

Cornet Steel

has retired; Corporal Head

and Trooper Craig have been discharged. A large number have been posted; Captain Campbell to the Guards Depot; Corporal of Horse Burroughs to the Guards Parachute Company; Corporal Munro to Kirkcud-

By Appointmentto H M The Queen Silversmiths & Jewellers

By Appointment to HM Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother Jewellers & Silversmiths

Carrington

bright; Lance-Corporal Wall, and Troopers Scannell and Doubtfire to Bahrein; Lance-Corporal Ayres to Household Cavalry Regiment; Trooper Kemp to Household Cavalry Training

Sonau, Summer 1909 "One off the top"

“Same as yesterday"

Squadron;

Trooper

Elvy

to

Headquarter

20th

the

Regiment—Corporal

Brown,

Troopers

O’Sullivan,

Godding, Young, Buckman and Priestley. And a few have gone on courses from which, if successful, they

Jewellers, Silversmiths 89"

will not return: Lance-Corporal Anderson at the Guards

Watchmakers

Sadly we were without the strength of some of our senior members—Cornet Boone and Corporal of Horse Chap'man from 2nd Troop alone—but even so it was a sound performance and a fitting finale to a year's

inspections, Exercise “Small Pack” and more trade training in November: Such events contributed generously

thoroughly enjoyable field training with the Green Jackets.

towards filling in the time, quite apart from the steady

Depot and Troopers Thomson (82) and Jones (27) parachuting. With them all go our thanks and very

For the second week most of our tanks and crews

round of continuation training and maintenance. Not, of course, that each was involved in all, though certainly several were involved in a few and many in some.

best wishes, and in their places we welcome Captain Wilkinson, Lieutenant Sorby, Cornet Corry-Reid, Corporals of Horse Emery and Fortt, Corporals Bellas and Bright,

returned

to

barracks,

(except

for

a

few

provided

as

stopgaps for “A" and “B” Squadrons) whilst the officers and senior N.C.O.s were deployed in a motley selection of vehicles to umpire the latter half of the exercise. Umpiring is not an activity of universal appeal and does produce problems which any serious student of Cowboy and Indian films will readily appreciate.

But

uncomfortable

(ill-

evasion exercise

The

in

Bavaria

Major General’s

in August and September;

parade

in

October and vehicle

off well

with a great win

the Regimental Cross-country race on Vesting Day.

in

Since we

then we have been rather in the middle of the pack and relying on such stalwarts as Lieutenant Hayward. Squadron

Quartermaster Corporal Hearn, Corporal of Horse Chapman, Corporals Pinks and Sibley, Lance-Corporals

it is of interest to see how others use markedly different

Collett, Elliott and Saul, and Troopers Barden, Bramble

manners to achieve markedly similar results. Let it not be thought that in between these four periods of heightened animation the Squadron basked

from

in idleness. crews

and

1

Ferrets)

and

ungratifying

Trade training, the provision of tank trials R.M.G.

firing

at

Staple

in

May;

a

border

patrol and Exercise “Quicktrain” in July; an escape and

established 1780

and Troopers Evans, Guy, Quinn and Coffey. in sports we started

'tempered troop leaders) though it might be, undoubtedly

(Mark

130 Regent Street London

Armoured Brigade and several others to squadrons within

and

Thomson, boxing to

our experts canoeing.

in the Success

Lastly, in a year in which promotions were scarce, congratulate Corporal of Horse Desborough and

Lance—Corporals Saul and Whyte on their elevations.

athletics spectrum in

these

activities

is largely a matter of enthusiasm and time for training, and although there was never any shortage of the former, it did always seem difficult to find enough of the latter. Hopefully next year the balance will be more favourable.

Regimental Jewellers @ Silversmiths

Carrington 59" Co Limited *5 :2: Soltau, Summer 1969

,

Squadron Corporal Major’s FIe/dmouse

22

Soltau, Summer 1969 Mr. Hayward


COMMAND am This Squadron is a new venture for the Household Cavalry, indeed fairly novel for the IfAC. It is as much a "Teeth Arm” as a Sabre Squadron whilst being slightly departmentalized as in Headquarters Squadron. The Year has proved it to be rich in personalities and this reflects itself in the characteristics of the main divisions. i.e.. Reconnaissance Troop. Command Troop (which is also sub-divided into Light and Heavy) and Stalwart Troop. Let them tell their own stories.

1’

._/.«,.....4

-

g 3535;! Command Squadron and approaches.

RECCE TROOP Recce season

troop

during

enjoyed

1969,

which

a

full

and

began

with

varied

training

troop

training

at Soltau in April. After two weeks of growing accustomed to working with each other we returned to Detmold. At

this time we had more chiefs than indlans and could field one officer, three senior N.C.O.’s, five Corporals and four Lance-Corporals.

During the third week of June the troop went to the Winterberg area for radio training which culminated with

Towards the end of the exercise the

troop was given the very enjoyable task of staying behind the opposing forces lines and keeping them awake at night. This was done with great efficiency and treble

the usual amount of enthusiasm. Top Left—Field Marshal Sir Rich From Soltau we moved to Holstebro, Denmark, as the guests of the Jutland Dragoons, in the company of

the recce troop of the 13th/18th King’s Hussars and with a helicopter flight from the Army Air Corps we experienced the joys of working on a bi—lingual radio net. Other joys were also experienced and a number of

Corporal Lloyd doing a modern version of Salome’s dance to the delight of several camping families who asked him for an encore. The end of June saw us

permanent friendships developed with the Danes which appear to have lasted up to the time of writing these

at

regularly proving that the shortest distance between two points (Detmold and Holstebro) is a straight line.

Hohne

for

the

annual

firing

and

the

regimental

swimming competition, for the latter, recce troop provided ninety per cent of the competitors representing command

squadron. Lance-Corporal Norris and other F.S.C. commanders were complimented by the gunnery officials for the best M.G. shoot of the season. July was the busiest month of the year for training. In addition to sending Ferret scout cars on a border patrol, a most exciting course in minor demolition and

notes.

Lance-Corporal Charleton and Trooper Haine are

In November Lance-Corporal Markwick won the Regimental Cross Country competition and the regiment prepared for exercise “Small Pack” during which recce troop rode shotgun escort to the Stalwarts which carried the live ammunition. Lieutenant Wheeler left us in December for greater fame on the concrete plains of Pirbright and we welcome

mine laying was held at Hameln in the Royal Engineers Cornet Boone as his successor. barracks and was attended by Lieutenant Wheeler, Cornet Boone and five N.C.O.'s. Corporals Boon and Lloyd booby trapped the floor of a condemned house and

achieved their ambition of blowing up Corporal of Horse Preece as he entered with less than his usual caution. Battle Group Training during the rest of the month was carried out in weather in complete contrast to that

experienced earlier in the year, being so dry and dusty that

it

could

be

compared

with

desert training.

The

villagers of Oldendorl became accustomed to seeing daily bridge reconnaissance parties doing their recce from the middle of each stream while a sentry watched the towers 24

Our good wishes are

extended to Trooper Freund and his family who became

one of those fabled creatures, a civilian, just before Christmas. in closing, may we make an appeal to all tank commanders in the new year. When you approach a traffic control point, do not make unkind remarks, gestures or do a neutral turn so that we are splashed. It has been noticed that on an approach march quite a few

tank commanders do not check their maps but follow the bloke in front, and one day they might just be directed into a cul-desac or a duck pond.

Wheeler, L/Cpl. Norris

j

ar

'

'

HUI/J Lieutenant

Bottom Left—Reece Troop Cpl. MacEvoy, Cpl. Boon, Tpr. Haine Top Right—Becca Troop (Major General’s Ins pechon ‘ CoH. Preece, L/Cpls. Padgett, Norris, Char/ion, Cpl). Fisk, Tpr. Fisher, Cpls. MacEvoy, Lloyd, Tpr. Freund

Middle Right—— Tpr. Sedger, CoH. Preece, Major Page Bottom Right—Reece Troop


Recce Troop on the firing range Heavy Troop

R.H.Q. TROOP (LIGHT) of It was obvious from the start that R.H.Q. Troop would set and maintain a high standard from the day was to amalgamation onwards. The year has been a very busy one both in camp and out in the field. Our first task of these supply the two Ferrets for the carrying of the Standard and Guidon for the Amalgamation Parade. The drivers vehicles being Tr00pers Howson and Fisher. Trooper Fairey Training. After the glamour of the Parade we began to get ready for the wastes of Soltau and a spell of Troop

we operate. This was an opportunity to train those members of the Troop in the handling of the vehicles and equipment going to be made to It also showed us that to quote a popular saying, for the 00ming Training Season, “we were The Adjutant and Staff Corporal Wood worked it that he only did the first week due to Cavalry Cup football. have it". Standing Regimental about something muttered someone later, week a arrive to managed also Regimental Corporal Major The Bridge Layer Tank

Orders.

Then followed a period in Detmold of Radio Courses, Rhine Army Horse Show, Athletics and Road Rallies. On the sporting side the Commanding Officer and Staff Corporal Wood played Hockey for the Regiment and the latter also plays Football for the Regiment. We have one of the best Rugby players in the Regiment in

During this quiet period we also managed to take our 4323 to Ohr Park to swim across the Weser.

Annual Firing was a comparatively easy time for the Troop.

if doing ammo bashing, maintaining the telephone

lines, operating a Radio Net and a taxi service for the R.O.R., etc., etc. is easy.

Corporal Ford. It is rumoured that Corporal Horan is a past master at the art of indoor games, especially in

Battle Group Training in August We managed to fire our G.P.M.G.s, Rocket Launchers and throw Grenades, did not have things all their own way was an hectic fortnight for the Troop. Our other side of the Troop, the Heavies,

the Corporals’ Mess. It is thought there might be hidden talent in Lance-Corporal Carroll, Troopers Edwards and

and directed with gusto by as regards the Cecil B. De Mille set up that was brought out by Major 0. W. J. Lewis Major 3. E. M. Bradish-Ellames.

The Regimental Signals Officer, Captain Wilkinson, Corporals Ford and Horan, Lance-

Pritchard!

Corporals Carroll, Wastling and Troopers Edwards and O’Sullivan all got in on the act.

We have said goodbye to Major Bradish-Ellames

built upon and This was the most enlightening time of the year, the potential of the Troop was discovered and Rehearsal", “Dress exercise in involved were we September early In September. in F.T.X. good a to forward we could look a Bde C.P.X.

C.V.1 For this we were joined by the Squadron Leader, who was to grace the luxury of the

Wilkinson. The men in waiting being Corporal Ford, TrOOpers O‘Sullivan and Edwards. worked extremely hard on this exercise.

Bde F.T.X., at the end net, forward or rear. However, and Regimental Signals Officer out for a breath of fresh air, all why he was always being

who has transferred his organising from us to the French

Into the day-to-day life of civvy street have gone Lance: Corporals Wastling and O’Sullivan. To all these we

with Captain

It is true to say that we were

wrsh the very best of luck, knowing that they learnt a great deal in their time in the Troop.

of September was a good exercise from our point of view, never losing contact on any We also noted that the Adjutant we did have our ups and downs on this exercise. hibernated fairly frequently. It was also noted that the crew of C.V.1 frequently scrambled muttering something about the smell of cigarettes. The 2 i/c never did seem to know

left on

HEAVY TROOP

his OWn for short periods of time.

Just when we thought the season was over we were plunged into exercise “Small Pack".

This being a very

The Commanding Officer The Colonel,

Command Heavy Troop was formed as part of Command Squadron on the Amalgamation in March with only half the troop having any knowledge of tank ‘work. Almost immediately, it was Soltau; what a place, when it rains you are bogged in, when the sun shine it’s like

Captain Parker-Bowles, Corporal Ford, Trooper Edwards

troop training.

From our point of view not very strenuous as we had only to large exercise involving all the Troops in the Corps. Signals Officer was loaned to "C" Squadron, much to his Regimental The duration. the for Link Radio provide a was something to behold. tanks on works to chance His joy at having the pleasure!

R.H.Q. Troop for this short exercise. What we do remember is the excellent food and accommodation we had

Our experience

a fond memory for those whose in the Gas Chamber at the hands of Squadron Corporal Major Varga will also remain small vehicle problems. few a with us presented which P.R.E. on us saw November Gas Masks were not in order. 26

a dust bowl.

Nevertheless, it was a good place to start

27


The Bridge-layer and crew were attached to the

At the end of July we took part in combat team

The pleasure of these three days was added to by the really beautiful weather

workings of the bridge, whilst the two tanks attached themselves to "C” Squadron. it was extremely hard

training at Soltau. The first few days of which were taken up in a recruiting programme, hundreds of photographs were taken of various troop activities, we

work, as most of us had to start from scratch. From the word go, Lance-Corporals Mee and Peasegood, and

all now know what it is like to be a filmstar. September the troop was on exercise “Top Twenty",

Trooper Murray made us have it, what with track bashing, track changing, checking this and checking that, it was

plenty of hard work, but good fun, as this was the first time the troop had used tanks away from Soltau. in October the regiment had the Major General’s

it out and the servicing was carried out. It must be put on Record that Mr.

inspection, which was a great success, followed by the

because of this. He was going out anyway. This period increased our faith in the vehicle; it swims like a duck and can enter the water at a truly remarkable

R.E.’s

not

who

long

gave

before

them

we

their

all

got

expert

the

knowledge

message

that

in

the

tanks

were hard work. At the end of the first week we started to look something like a troop, capable of trocp work plus our own job of R.H.Q. protection. Soltau ended with the troop tests, which we were nearly fortunate enough to win. June saw the troop at Hohne for regimental firing,

with the Commanding Officer and Second-in—Command firing from their own tanks. We had two good weeks of shooting

P.R.E.

in

November, with the

Bridge—layer only ge'ting

one B~job.

The last time out was in November, exercise "Small Pack"

in

which

the

whole

regiment

moved

out

and

completely bombed up with ammo, it was a hard four days with the weather terrible, but the troop gained a great deal of experience.

in glorious weather.

and the enthusiasm didn't even wane when they found that a Stalwart with the back plate loose won't swim—it sinks like a stone. The R.E.M.E. were quick to pull

(Corporal) Fielding didn't leave the Army

speed even when fully loaded. Hohne was a rather nice rest period for the Troop. We delivered ammunition as needed, worked very hard and carried out

some interesting trials on the Eager Beaver Fork Lift Truck and some other interesting equipment. The annual R.E.M.E. Vehicle inSpecwhich used to be called the U.E.l.

tion

STALWART TROOP

but has been renamed the P.R.E. (Periodic R.E.M.E. Examination) was one of the highlights of the year. Following very closely as it did after the Major General 's

visit

for which

the vehicles

had

been

prepared to a very high standard in every way. We, nevertheless, continued to work hard through every hour of the daylight,

including weekends up to the morning of the P.R.E. imagine the feeling in the Troop when the Corporal who was to inspect us turned out to be a Drinking

Friend of the Troop Corporal’s and what’s more he knew nothing about Staiwarts! Despite this setback we came through very well. The

final

exercise

of the

year was

like the first, cold and wet, but it was rewarding.

it was as it were the test of

a complete Season's Training—our first. We still had some lessons to learn but having got over the disadvantage of having Rip Van Mullins as Orderly Corporal we were up in time to see the Regiment move out. The Troop made up

Trooper Sedgewick, Trooper Young, Corporal Stevenson

Troop training was cold, wet, miserable and almost a disaster for It wasn't that the Troop, at least that was how it seemed at the time.

morale was low on the contrary it was very high, everyone worked very hard indeed. A lot of new friendships were forged which may last a life time. It seemed that we had gone to Soltau to train and were frustrated all of the time with the words hanging over our heads ”Your job is to replenish the Tanks". Everything else was secondary to this one object. If a Tank wanted Diesel at any time of the day or

with

the

A1

Echelon

and

talking

to

everyone. Possibly the Troop as we know it now was conceived in the Commanding

Officer's mind during this period. We were born as a Troop on the 5th June.

for

this

by

working

harder

than

ever

before. Morale was very high (surprising what a lay-in does for the temper). Almost all was forgiven.

On Monday the 9th of June the New

By

now

the

Training

Season

was

Troop moved to carry out flotation trials

over.

at Ohr Park, a good time was had by all. Under the ever—watchful eyes of Q. Brooker, R.E.M.E. our Stalwart expert and Q. Sawyer RE, the site flotation expert. We spent three days’ swimming the

back to departments, on leave, ski-ing or

although

Sunray

Stalwarts and beat all of the records for

Troop was our technical guide and kept us

Minor knew each one intimately and what’s more he has a nickname

the number of swims per day. Every member of the Troop took vehicles in starting with empty ones to build up confidence and ended up by swimming several times with a full load of Diesel.

on the Road despite everything. Squadron Quartermaster Corporal Whittington has

We felt that the Tanks were getting training all the night it got it. We wanted to be off practicing time whilst we did not get enough.

Road Movement, first—aid chemical warfare or even map reading Heaven knows we needed the latter. There are twenty-two thousand nine hundred and twenty-three six—figure grid references on the Training Area. for each one.

there before.

So it seemed did some of the crews who had been Perhaps we'll meet again on neutral ground one day.

We were very honoured to have a visit from Field Marshal Sir Richard Hull, who confounded

28

everyone by spending some considerable time

The majority of the Troop dispersed

on Courses as instructors or students. We are sorry to lose Q. Brooker who

not strictly a

member of the

left us for a job at Verden, and together with the others who have left the Troop we extend best wishes.

Lance-Corporal Shaw, Trooper Mole


By Appointment to

Her Majesty the Queen

Established 1865

H EADQ UARTERS SQUADRON

NEW & LINGWOOD

The ensuring

ETON

has.

LONDON AND CAMBRIDGE IIIII'fim

has

had

Regiment

a particularly busy year keeps going.

As usual

it

It is certain that without Headquarters Squadron

the Regiment would never get further than the Tank Park gate although no one ever admits this. In general nothing has changed as a result of the amalgamation, there were some new faces but these

now seem to have been with us for ever. The tasks of the Squadron have not changed at all, perhaps the only noticeable difference is the comparative briefness of the Squadron Leaders "0” Groups. There have been many changes during the year,

INSPECTION Q

You are probably now wearing an H. J. Service cap, the best quality cap made today—but how are

3?

'1

FLOREAT 21"“

you 'hatted' Off-parade? Our new fully illustrated

far too many to name. We wish all those who have left the Army or gone E.R.E. the best of luck in their new jobs or careers and welcome all those who have joined

us. brochure for ordering by post shows our comprehensive range of hats and caps to suit every occasion. Send for your free copy by filling in the coupon below.

Squadron that the

We have large ranges of plain coloured. checked and striped shirts in poplins, zephyrs, cotton Oxfords, flannels and silks and other hosiery in materials and designs exclusive to ourselves

We are very sad to see the Royal Signals Troop

leave. They have done sterling work for the Regiment over the years, manning and controlling the Administration Net, ensuring that everyone gets what they want when and where they want it. They have fought off irate

Squadron Leaders demanding to know why they have not received an unobtainable spare or why replenishment they have only just asked for did not arrive yesterday. On average on an exercise they successfully processed

tank or ferret crews and driving understood they quite enjoyed it.

B

vehicles.

It

is

The echelon managed its own training as well

as

its priority of keeping everyone supplied.

38 NEW BOND STREET, LONDON, w.1 Civil and Mi/I'lary Halters. 40a London Road, Camberley. (Wednesday, afternoons only).

r---_-_-

out that during the exercise the

Regimental

tons of ammunition each and the Stalwarts lifted three hundred tons.

Everything is quiet now, for B.A.O.R., apart from S.A.S. Site Guards, Border Patrols, Ski—ing at Wertach and Courses. The current cry is ”Can I have more men I can’t do everything you want me to" to which the inevitable reply is “I am told there are more coming soon”. The Squadron is looking forward to another good,

but we hope, quieter year. Although the chance of the latter in B.A,O.R. is only wishful thinking.

“stand

to”

means,

the

camouflage

M.T. TROOP

it is rumoured that, having been persuaded to get into one

ETON:

118 HIGH STREET.

Once again it‘s Troop Note time and the Squadron Leader is breathing fire as to when are they going to

Tel: WIndSOr 66286

he fell asleep and woke up soaked through, he will never

LONDON: 53 JERMYN ST., S.W.1. Tel: 01-493 9621

again indent for one large enough to be able to claim that ”There is not one to fit me so I can‘t put it on".

CAMBRIDGE: 11 KINGS PARADE Tel: Cam 50191

There were moments when the order came ”Move now” without prior warning. Of course we did in spite of the L.A.D. having various vehicles in small pieces, the

have left us we wish good luck and to those who have joined us we welcome you to the fold. May your stay

Quartermaster (Tech) having spares all over the ground

be a long, happy and accident-free one.

NAME,

REGIMENTAL SHIRTMAKERS ADDRESS

TO THE BLUES AND ROYALS

Eli."— _'; I. .; _

how much each Squadron wanted and how many vehicles

improved beyond all recognition except for the times

what

Regimental Headquarters demands “all your camouflage

P/ease send me 'The Complete Guide to Headwear' I

People now

nets now" and then wonders why the echelon looks like a mass of vehicles in a wood. C.W. suits are now carried by everyone, even the Quartermaster, although

Tel : 01 -629 7177.

Finally they found something suitable if

wet although it was noticed that they kept Regimental Headquarters happy by putting them into the only buildings in the area. The Regimental Quartermaster Corporal and occasionally the Squadron Leader were seen pouring over ammunition figures trying to work out

has

know

"k.

the Regiment”.

Quartermaster Corporal and his fatigue party lifted twenty

purpose felt hats. In rough finish

(BOND STREET) LTD.

seen for weeks before disappearing into the woods round Detmold only to reappear three hours later saying “That‘s hopeless you can't get a Squadron in let alone

worked

T0

Jr

The Squadron Leader and Squadron Corporal Major were

man and drive all the vehicles for every exercise, even

exercise days were over, found they were making up

Herbert folmson

The last exercise for the Squadron was “Small Pack” during which we had to move everything needed for war out of camp. The Motor Transport Officer and Squadron Quartermaster Corporal were heard to say at frequent intervals ”We‘ll never move that there aren't enough vehicles", we did move most of it in the end.

if some people were extracted from their stores and found themselves driving or commanding a vehicle for

REGIMENTAL CAPMAKERS

grfcI/léngg;-(ir§7nbp

in somewhere.

three hundred demands for spares, replenishment and other requirements. As usual we managed, sometimes with difficulty to

THE ‘BURGHLEY' One of our dual

YOUR REGIMENT

big enough for everything with good ways in and out and spent many hours searching usually to return saying “There's nothing suitable”, however, he always got us

were needed to carry it. In the end they seemed to have the answer but were heard to say ”If we ever get it moved and everyone gets what they need it will be more by good luck than good judgement”. It was

the first time in many years. On Exercise “Small Pack” certain gentlemen from the Stables, who thought their

A

last time, they have joined us. The Squadron Corporal Major nearly went mad trying to find woods Or farms

looking for one of the more obscure demands which are always underneath everything else and the Quartermaster in the middle of issuing rations. Why nothing or no one gets left behind on these occasions will never be known.

be finished. Since amalgamation Motor Transport has seen a few changes in

Officers, N.C.O.s, and men.

To those who

On Exercise “Top Twenty", the Brigade Exercise, the echelon at one time consisted of seventy-five vehicles

No sooner had we amalgamated than Motor Transport were straight away in great demand. Goods wagons arriving at the station with M.F.O., people moving into Quarters, welfare cases to be taken to Doctors, hospitals and MI. Rooms, grooms to stables and the like. On all exercises throughout the training season the Troop gave

including three tanks, the first, and it is hoped, the

a good account of itself.

How some Bedfords made it is 31


still a mystery. With Troop Training, Battle Group Training, Annual Firing, Escape and Evasion in Bavaria and the Brigade F.T.X. all behind us we then set about

preparing for P.R.E.

The vehicles took on a new look

and those inspected received a good chalk. cycle then started off again.

The whole

To all those members who served so well with us we say “thank you” and hope that 1970 is as successful as the previous year. To those who would like to come and join our ranks, please come and see how you find us. and the jobs we do. It is not all honey but we

Regiment.

Corporal

The department has settled down well after a very hectic period and we try and oblige all and sundry “The impossible we can do immediately, miracles take a little longer!"

0M. (1.) TROOP Since

hope to give a service to a’l who need us.

Elmslie left us for the 0M. Tech. and

instead of socks and shoes is now a Petrol and Derv expert.

March,

busily engaged

1969

Q.M.

(T.)

Troop

have

been

in the herculean task of ministering to

the needs of an armoured Regiment.

Corporal of Horse

The boast of the Quartermaster‘s Department for 1969 is "We have all been out on Exercise", this is, in fact correct, every member of the Department has been out in the field. On paper we appear to be a large department, but

MacDougall and the G. 1098 Staff continue to unravel the intricacies of the new accounting system, whilst Staff Corporal Hunt retains his reputation for having the largest stock of Chieftain spares outside 15th B.O.D. The exercise season saw us foraying into the field in our usual neat and orderly packet, and whilst continuing to supply our many customers Troopers White and

as

Stainsby

Q.M.’s DEPARTMENT

usual there are never enough hands to go round. The Clothing Stores are now in the hands of Corporal of Horse Howick, Corporal of Horse Best is now preparing

for civilian life. Corporal of Horse Millett has the D.W.O. of Detmold ringing him up to answer queries instead of the other way round. Squadron Quartermaster Corporal Preece and Corporal Clay have placed nearly all our families into

have

proved

themselves as adept with

the

G.P.M.G. as they are with that mightiest of weapons —the pen. As we still spend a goodly portion of our

time sending returns to all and sundry (Only the Chaplain

accommodation and are now thinking of taking over an

General didn‘t want a return about “those" engines) our clerks, Corporal Brandon and Trooper Pyke are kept up to the mark, and the P.O.L. Staff, Corporal Elmslie and Trooper Coram can surely lay claim to having shifted the largest number of cans in B.A.O.R. During the year we said goodbye to Lance-Corporals

Estate

Bickmore and Leach, to help out the OM.

Agents!

(Does

anyone

wish

to

rent

a

small

Schloss). Corporal Craig continues good work in the accom-

modation side of things and seems to be always able to get all we need. Corporal Hildred and Trooper Proudfoot paint all our signs (Don't forget Waterloo), and the cartoons on

our corridor walls are well studied. Lance-Corporal

Coles

and

our

Hatherall

can

civilian

tailors

are

now build the

black

horse stable anything from a stirrup to a complete saddle and is quite an expert on whips. Lance-Corporal Kay gives all and sundry help on the

chippies‘

side and

is a

little

more

careful

with the

Regimental Corporal Major's shabraque cases.

Trooper Watson is now the Garrison expert on m'ce and rats, top score being twelve mice in one day. Trooper Smalldon does our butchering for the Master Cook and in his spare moments is quite an expert at painting and decorating.

Corporal scribes

and

Green are

kept

and

Trooper

busy

with

The

Life Guards, and to Trooper Pyne and Corporal Jordon to the Mounted Squadron and J.H.Q. Rheindahlen respectively. We wish them all the best of luck in the future.

COOKS’ TROOP

.

B.A.O.R.'s answer to Burtons, having a full shop every day and even now experts on coveralls. Lance-Corporal

(E.)

Laycock

are

Quartermaster's

our work

and Hunt Cards!

3‘.

am

He was looking forwardkto a “Swan”

New additions to the troop are Sergeant Farnworth, Corporal Sims and Corporal Murphy. Our congratulations to Corporal Sims and wife on the birth of a son,

staff at Larzac.

were only completed by the “Skin of the Teeth" and the

cooks working round the clock. Not rush jobs, but well completed ones were the cakes made for our Commanding Officer and the Quartermaster, so well completed were they that in the picture depicted of

This time we have a team and an individual in this year's

that they could recognise each Hound and Horse pictured

competition.

there, but that may be praising the skill of the cooks too high. Just recently we have had our catering Administration and the D.A.D.A.C.C. went through the place like the

time

is

with

us

once

The team comprising Sergeant MacDonald,

Lance-Corporal Norton and Private Suffolk, W.O.ll Newbiggin is the units individual representative. As considerable success has been enjoyed by both of the Amalgamated units in the past, we look forward with high hopes to this our first year the Regiment has taken part. Hectic preparations are in progress at the moment for the Table D’Honeur Catering Exhibition to be held at

Paderborn. This unit will have a an all time record for one unit for are ardently hoping for success in are high that Lance-Corporal March

total this this will

of six Exhibits Exhibition. We and our hopes once again pull

off the Young Soldiers’ Award.

Just recently the kitchen has said a fond? farewell to Corporal Russell (The Voice) and to Lance—Corporal McLaughlin (The Feet), who have been posted to

proverbial “Dose of Salts”. Change rounds were suggested and have been carried out. Suggestions are still needed as to what to do with The Blues and Royals Dining Hall and a committee is being formed to sort all this out. Any suggestions as to the preference of our customers—apart from “A Bomb" will be gratefully

received by the Messing Officer. At the cooks’ Annual Party, a very good time was had by all, so good in fact that another one was planned

for March. Looking

back,

the

past,

and

first

year

for

the

our two ladies Frau Lamm and Frau Estella, without them

Aldershot

Corporal Russell goes as a Catering Instructor

we

and Lance-Corporal McLaughlin as a Tarmac Technician. Soon we are to lose the Master Cook also to Aldershot

serving the Regiment in the year to come with the fortitude and belief that it will be an even better year.

would

be

in

considerable

difficulties,

their

duties

(Station Fuel and Rations) are only part of what they do for us and their help and cheerfulness in all matters is greatly appreciated. The social highlight of our calendar was the wedding of

Lance-Corporal

Rankin

at Bielefeld

(who was fined

for speeding on route!) We wish Lance»Corporal and Mrs. Rankin all the best and unfortunately have to say farewell as Lance-Corporal Rankin has left us for the Mounted 32

as an Instructor, there must be something about Aldershot

that there isn‘t here in Detmold! We welcome Private Quinney to the fold as the Regiment's first cook replacement and we hope that his

PAY TR OOP

Private Suffolk is a very disappointed man as he

In October we said farewell to Captain E. Brookes, R.A.P.C. who had been paymaster to the Royals for many years and who remained for the amalgamation

has been turned down as a member of the permanent

before being posted to R.C.T.C. Colchester to end his

stay with us will be a happy one.

and to Corporal Hingley and wife on the birth of a daughter, although Staff-Sergeant St. considered it extremely bad planning

John James as they both

arrived at Christmas in the midst of cries of "What about my credits”.

The Bank Credit System is going extremely well with more and more individuals deciding that they like the feel of a cheque book and that they can manage their own finances without difficulty. Captain Clarke, Corporal Hingley and Cpl. Ashley played for theRegimental Rugby team on occasions and Corporal Murphy for the Squadron Hockey team. Now the complaints are filtering in from the troop as the Regiment attempts to turn five foot Paymen into

six foot Guardsmen by the use of P.T. stretching. smiles are broader but the sizes stay the same.

The

FARM NOTES by Captain Commanding the Regimental Pigs In general we have had a good training season. Nevertheless it has been affected by tiresome exercises which have reduced the amount of swill, however, the answer may be to take our independent Squadron out on future exercises and place them in direct support of the Command Squadron The

Cooks' Troop of The Blues and Royals has been a happy one, although a busy one, and we look forward to

No notes would be complete without a mention of

m

of four months in the South of France especially after all the stories that the old “Royals” cooks have been telling him about the beautiful French girls; and the many nudist camps situated on the South Coast. Now he will have to rough it out with the rest of us at Soltau, Hohne, etc. Thank goodness the round of parties, etc., are all over after the Christmas and New Year period. Again the kitchen had such a heavy load of commitments which we never thought we would be able to fulfil. Some

the Hunt on the Quartermaster's cake, it was said that the Riders were easily recognisable. Some even said

Competition

.h—

We welcome in his stead Captain and Mrs. l. C. Clarke and hope their stay will be a long and happy one.

.

again.

Cooking

I

service, on the right side of the bars, in nine months time. We wish him and his family well.

amalgamation

Leader. was

marked

by

a

mammoth

erection by the Royal Engineers, paid for by the German Government. This was, in fact, a new accommodation block near the ammunition compound. Our old quarters, which many people took exception to, were blown up while the

Regiment was at

Hohne.

more notable than our Pakistani officer who had never

We have had several visitors during the year, none before seen domesticated pigs and had to wash (for religious reasons) as soon as he had left. Corporal Jones has run the farm very capably since Corporal Petterson left to round up grouse for the

Scots Greys.

Besides many inevitable deaths we are

proud to announce our first marriage—to a very capable

gunner from down the road, which apparently is due to bear fruit shortly from the time of their first meeting. 33


|..A.D. It was with a certain amount of trepidation that we approached 1969 knowing we were to support the first Household Cavalry Regiment to be equipped with tanks.

The

climax

of

all

our training

was

approaching

To begin at the beginning. The amalgamation was a good one for the L.A.D., our strength and experience

rapidly and soon we were motoring out to, “somewhere in Germany" to take part in exercise “Top Twenty". This involved a road run of seventy miles and many eyebrows were raised when we more or less got there

was boosted. As soon as welcomes and handovertakeover were completed it started. We should hate

in one piece. One tank was seen to stop at the back gate and ask for a new fuel pump. They really are

known it, drill! The parade was held on a pleasant it cold day and lo and behold that terror of terrors, the Regimental Corporal Major. was heard to say he was

polite these chaps! As usual this was a hard tough exercise except for one A.R.V. which threw a track in a

impressed by the standard of the LAB. A few weeks later after intensive indoctrination on the new beast we all headed North towards the cold icy wastes of Soltau. The fortnight passed swiftly as usual and the new L.A.D. found both its feet and skis. The results showing themselves in the good shoot had at annual firing at Hohne. The Regiment had obviously found its feet and we had our usual rest camp except

of tea.

for those fearless gun fitters and technicians who were

inspections.

as tireless as ever. The start of Regimental training in July saw three

because of it. All the sporting

immaculate Sabre Squadrons on route again to Soltau this time, if we were but to realise it, to hot dusty

the L.A.D. taking up a good percentage of places in most

dry Soltau. Shortly afterwards the phrase," Drooped like files, they did" was heard and the A.S.M. was seen

everywhere

muttering,

“Pack

numbers,

engine

numbers, did it have an air cleaner?" in between times he would ask a squadron fitter troop to take out a pack ready to exchange it, invariably last thing at night if not just before the week-end break. During this time we were visited by Colonels, Majors and even A.S.M.s in denims. As a result almost all engines are now new. We then had more or less a rest for a few Weeks with troops going to Bavaria to play spies and others going

to

ltaly,

United

Kingdom

and

other

places

of

interest.

pigsty.

It is rumoured that it did not affect the making

Back in Detmold again the silly season commenced, including equipment inspections by the L.A.D., by inspecting teams, then F.F.R. inspections and barrack inspections

and

all

the

B.A.O.R. is used for. all with flying colours.

organise an

other

things

which

Winter

in

Needless to say we passed them Through it all we managed to

L.A.D. social

as well

as cope with the

It is rumoured Staff has become an A.Q.M.S. activities

are

in

full

swing

with

teams——you name it we're in the team. Crashouts, Ashtrays, Quicktrains, call them what you will have been plenty but it is never any easier to get

up in the early hours for them. We even had one when the outgoing D.E.M.E. was visiting, fortunately it was not repeated when the new D.E.M.E. visited later. All in all we have had a good year. It has been

an

historic

one, the

old

E.M.E.

Captain

Lipsett

has

moved on to better things—it is rumoured he has a Chieftain on his desk, and they say the new one can lift one so it looks as though we are in for another interesting and eventful year.

Finally, we would like to wish all those founder members of the L.A.D. and the new ones as they come and go the best of good fortune in the Years ahead.

First division of The Sovereign's Escort commanded by Lieutenant J. W. B. Robertson entering Carnarvon

in the middle of May we packed our bags again this time to visit Edinburgh for The State Opening of The General Assembly of the Church of Scotland. Half the horses moved in a fleet of boxes and the other half travelled by train over two days. Both methods of travel proved eventful as children stoned the second train on the outskirts of Edinburgh and broke a window in one

of the boxes which upset the horses, and five horses travelling by road took over forty-eight hours to complete the journey because of engine failure in one of the boxes. No sooner had the Regiment returned from Scotland than we were launched into briefings and rehearsals

for

Trooping

the

Colour

and

the

Garter

Service,

Fortunately for our dismounted ordeal, Monday, 16th June, turned out to be one of the cooler days of a very hot summer. Five days later the advance party moved

to Wales to take over the camp which we were to occupy for the investiture of The Prince of Wales.

M 0 U NTED SQUADRON This year has certainly proved to be the busiest for January The Mounted Squadron since the last war. found us with our usual unequal proportion of three

erected

A message

General was followed by a walk and trot past of the mounted troops. In the middle

when they passed out in front of The Commanding Parents and relatives were invited to attend Officer.

Combermere

but

with

the

encouragement

and this has now become a regular feature of passing

out parades. The formation of the new Regiment was marked by a parade on the 31$t of March with the salute being taken by Major General The Hon. Michael Fitzalan Howard, C.B., C,B.E., M.V.O., MC. The parade consisted of three mounted troops, each twenty strong, with two dismounted troops, the one in front gate order and the 34

a

lot of

we moved in to a tented camp, luxurious as far as tented

Darley read the reply to the Loyal Address.

The culmination of six months’ riding were Royals. school for The Royals took place on the 27th of March

man

Estate and thanks to

read the Loyal Address and Lieutenant Colonel M. A. Q.

seventeen soldiers in the trainee troop, of which fourteen

one

his Vaynol

hard work by the Royal Artillery and the Royal Engineers

from The Colonel of The Regiment, read by The Major

to

on

Lieutenant Colonel P. D. Reid

the other in No. 2 dress.

of

horses

Sir

Michael Duff had very kindly allowed a camp to be

of

Barracks

April for

the Squadron the State Visit

moved to of Signor

camps go.

The horses were perhaps best catered for

each with its own loose box. The Squadron moved eighty-three horses from Kensington Olympia to Bangor in three train loads and the reception we received was

remarkable; hundreds of people had turned out to watch us ride from the station to Vaynol Park.

in fact it was

Saragat, President of Italy. This was the first time a visiting head of State had been received at Windsor

typical of the welcome and hospitality bestowed on us throughout our stay. For this period the Regiment

since 1909 and, judging by the crowds, it was a popular

was full stretched as it had to provide a Sovereign‘s Escort, a Prince of Wales’ Escort of two divisions of sixteen, as well as leaving sufficient men and horses in

event which may well be repeated in future if only to prevent the disruption of London's traffic. The President arrived at The Home Park and was escorted through Windsor

and

down

the

Long

Walk

to

the

Castle,

a

journey of three-and-a-half miles. After the escort a rank past, headed by the King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery, took place in the Quadrangle.

London for guard duty at Horse Guards.

The Squadron

Leader had the privilege of commanding The Prince of Wales Escort on this unique occasion and Squadron

Corporal Major Cowdrey rode at the other wheel station. During the escort the atmosphere amongst members of

The Prince of Wales’ Escort was tense and we all heaved a sigh of relief when we delivered Prince Charles, safe and sound, to Caernarvon Castle. It was a memorable day although a long one as the escort returned to Vaynol six-and—a-half hours after it had set out and there

had only been one twenty-minute break in the middle. Ten days after our return from Wales we were on parade again this time to furnish a Sovereign's Escort

with double standard for the arrival of the President of Finland on his State Visit. The temperature was 78° and the escort, both men and horses, returned to barracks visibly slimmer. Camp at Stoney Castle was the next event in our

busy calendar.

This as always proved to be a very

enjoyable fortnight and, although the weather could have

been kinder, it never rained during exercise or stables. We held our ”At Home Day” on the Sist of August which some three hundred and fifty Comrades and their relatives attended. The activities included a Handy Hunter Competition in the morning over an excellent course built under the supervision of Squadron Quartermaster Corporal Doxey: the usual jumping competitions and mounted sports took place in the afternoon.

Many of the

individual prizes were given by Mr. Ernest Champ, a member of the Comrade’s Association, who unfortunately could not be with us on the actual day. Evening

entertainment for the Squadron during Pirbright included a dance, a cabaret and three film shows. of

At the time of writing the last ceremonial occasion the year is now behind us having provided a

Sovereign's Escort for The State Opening of Parliament. Unfortunately hunting prospects for soldiers with the Sandhurst and Bisley and with The Drag have been curtailed because of the rabies outbreak. However, With luck we may be able to send soldiers for the odd days

sport

musrcal ride,

before

we

start

training

for

next

year's


BAND This year has proved to be both busy and rewarding. As usual our duties included performances on the East

Terrace of Windsor Castle.

accompanying

the Guard

Mounting of the Queen's Life Guard (a popular innov vation) and an investiture at the Palace with the orchestra. Outside engagements were as numerous as ever and included concerts in the Royal Parks. Bournem outh,

Shrewsbury Flower Show and several BBC. Broadca sts which were extremely well received. The Band were honoured to play at the Amalgam ation

ceremonies. undoubtedly the highlight of our year. found

We

that after a short spell of rehearsals the music

of both old regiments fitted in well. Several of our senior members have including B.C.M. Braxton, Trumpet Squadron Quartermaster Corporal Croft, Horse Higgins. We wish them well. no

left the Service, Major Watson, and Corporal of doubt we shall

miss these old “Blues”. but look forward to youth coming along eventually to replace the ”old stagers”. We made another L.P. record for Columbia on March 10th, 1970. This record is being released on June 11th. The last recording we made is being deleted, and the Director of Music has made a point of getting a few of these before the deletion takes place. Anyone wishing

to obtain records contact the Band Office.

TRAINING SQUADRON Recruiting has not improved during 1959. indeed it has been marginally worse than last year. However, Lance-Corporal of Horse Slater was fortunate in being able to form a complete Household Cavalry Troop recently. This was the first time for at least twelve months that we have not had to amalgamate with one of the Regimental Companies. Although amalgamated troops have proved a great success they do suffer from living apart in different barrack rooms.

A half on the route to Caernarvon; Trooper Cross— (far right) removes his helmet while Trooper OGe.man (second from right) looks most fed up With the affair

The Escort formed up outside St. Giles' Cathedral

The Squadron moved into its new accommodation in Alexander Barracks on the 18th of August. This consists of a tower. Anglesea Block. for the permanent staff and a two storey block in the shape of a s:ar for recruits. The latter building is shared with the Scots Guards Company in which we each possess two twenty-four man We have. if anything. more than our barrack rooms. When it was originally share of the new barracks. planned the Squadron was still at Windsor and the Junior Guardsmen's Company about one-third its present The impossible task faced by the Commandant size. in trying to squeeze this latter day quart into a pint pot It was finally agreed that the Junior can be imagined. Guardsmen should have all they required. since they spent much longer at the Depot than a recruit. the Coldstream Company would move into the nearest wooden huts and the lrish Guards and Welsh Guards Companies Other would fit in where ever a room could be found. than the problems created by the size of the Depot there were none of the disasters that normally attend the occupation of new buildings. The blocks themselves are first class and because many mature trees remain The new barracks even sit well in their surroundings. boasts the luxury of its own swimming pool. An official

Opening Ceremony took place on the 25th September when the barracks were Alexander of Tunis. D.B.E.

named

by

The

Countess

Amalgamation—

Alamein Day was celebrated on the 23rd of October. A magnificent lunch was served in the new Mess Room and was attended by both the Silver Stick and the In the afternoon the Mounted Band of Commandant.

Maior the Hon.

The Life Guards repeated the performance they had given

A. Broughton with the Squadron

at the Berlin Tattoo. This was a most impressive display which took place in brilliant sunshine. The Band are to

be congratulated on having made it such a success since

eight horses never arrived; a civilian box having been involved in an accident. The Riding Master did sterling work sorting out the ghastly problems this created. After the Mounted performance recruits were able to inspect a static display of armoured vehicles provided by The Life Guards and F.V.R.D.E.. Chobham.

Colonel

H.

S.

Hopkinson,

M.B.E.,

inspected

the

Squadron on the 10th of July. This must have been his last official engagement before handing over as Silver Stick. We have also had visits from Lieutenant Colonel M. Q. A. Darley. Lieutenant H, D. A. Langley.

M.B.E.. and Lieutenant Colonel R. M. H. Vickers. M.V.O., M.B.E. Unfortunately very few of our visitors have yet seen our new accommodation. The Squadron would like as many people as possible to come, parilcularly recruiters. The majority will be agreeably surprised at the splendid environment in which recruits now live and work. Despite our size we have continued to do well in the sporting field. We have not been able to repeat the splendid achievement of our cricket Xl in the summer

of 1968 who won the Trotter Shield and the Hancock Cup. However. we won the Crayshaw Cup for Rugby during 19681969 season and were runners up for the 1969 70 season. Several members of the Squadron are regular players for the Guards Depot XV. These include Lieutenant N. N. Wheeler. Lieutenant T. K. Brennan, Staff Corporal Ellis and Corporal of Horse Holt. in the military field Corporal of Horse Clayton won the House-

hold Cavalry Challenge Cup for S.M.G. shooting at the London District Rifle Association Meeting.

There have been numerous changes in the Staff during the last year. Arrivals include Captain R. A. Campbell. Lieutenant N. N. Wheeler, Squadron Quartermaster Corporal Matthew. Corporal of Horse Scriven. Lance—Corporal of Horse Anderson. Lance-Corporal of Horse MacLean. Troopers Kemp, Farrow. Proudtoot, Rixon. Eastwood. Graves and Bolton. We have said goodbye to Lieutenant T. K. Brennan and Corporal of Horse Clayton who have been posted to the Mounted Squadron and Squadron Quartermaster Corporal Martin who has gone to Sharjah,


THE CORPORALS MESt '

WO’s and CsoH MESS the

Gold

Stick

and

the

Deputy

the

excellent

amalgamation

activities,

we

was

a

great

success,

being

held

in

the

“German

Canteen", with Marquees for the buffet. The timely arrival of a spot of rain enabled the single lads to beat the "pads" in the annual Buffet race.

Since amalgamation the last year has been packed With entertainment. During the amalgamation week-end the Mess entertained many dignitaries and guests,

including

After

settled down to a steady routine, and the preparation for Hohne and the Waterloo Ball. The Waterloo Ball

Immediately after the Waterloo Ball, with hangovers

still present to prove its success, the Mess moved to

Colonel,

representatives of our affiliated regiments and many old friends from within Germany.

Hohne, where, informed by our “sleeping partners” Headquarters Squadron, we had a very good time.

Mid-week dinners were reintroduced shortly after amalgamation. These dinners, ably organised by Sergeant MacDonald, provide members and their ladies with excellent value for money.

which

in

. Mess life was disturbed by Battle Group training required our undivided

attention.

The year was rounded off with a Christmas Draw which was a great success with full attendance, in spite

The highlight of our summer festivities was the dance held on June 14th to celebrate Waterloo with

of many members being on leave. We would like to thank our Regimental Corporal Major for his assistance in selling our tickets.

the dance band from the King’s Own Scottish Borderers in the main dance room and a discotheque in the cellar;

running buffets and stationary bars—~or was it the other way around?

At thetime of going to press the Mess is in a state of flux, owmg to reconstruction and redecoration, which we hope will be finished in the near future.

Four days later the Regiment moved to Hohne for its annual firing. The Mess also moved to Hohne and was soon offering the same high standards one had

become accustomed to in barracks, thanks to the tireless efforts of the Caterer and staff. If criticism is to be levelled at all, it would be that the games rooms was found to be rather draughty! Towards the end of our stay at Hohne members were treated to an excellent dinner night which made our two weeks under canvas seem really worth while. In August we were delighted to have a visit to the Mess of Colonel H. S. Hopkinson, M.B.E., who was visiting the Regiment to say goodbye on relinquishing his appointment of Silver Stick.

The same month we "dressed down" for a Tramp‘s Ball.

Members and guests entered into the spirit of the

occasion

which

resulted

in

an

extremely

enjoyable

evening. The new Silver Stick, Colonel I. B. Baillie, visited us in September during his visit to the Regiment. During October and November, activities in the Mess

included a Wine and Cheese tasting party, being host

Members in the bar

Once again the Mess provided many members for the Regimental Teams in sport.

to their Mess for drinks and were given the opportunity A Ladies’ Dinner was held on December 12th where our wives were given the chance of hanging their aprons up and being waited on for a change. Our Christmas Draw took place on December 20th and, thanks to the draw committee, was a great success. 1969

was

seen

New Year’s Eve Ball.

out

by

a

capacity crowd

for

our

The merriment carried on into the

not too wee hours of the

morning

and the Ball

must

their month’s stay with the Regiment and we were pleased to accommodate the senior ranks for their second tour of Germany this year. The band entertained

the Mess on numerous occasions in between playing for squadron parties and concerts. December was by far the busiest month of the year as regard to our Mess entertainments. On December

5th We and our wives were kindly invited by the Officers

We wish Corporal Ford every success in his course

With the ”Paras", after his “Long” tour as P.M.C.

Serving Personality ROM 0. L. CASS

. Mr. Cass joined the Royal Horse Guards (The Blues) in November, 1944. From 1945 to 1952 he served in Germany.

When the Regiment returned to Windsor he

went with ”A" Squadron to Kirkcudbright. He was Regimental Signals Corporal of Horse with the inns of

have been a success judging by the number of dirty

Court

breakfast

went to Cyprus he was with “A" Squadron again when at this time two of his fellow Corporals of Horse in the

plates

the

next

morning!

On January 1st our Mess held its first New Year’s Dinner as Blues and Royals; carrying on the tradition from The Blues W.O.’s and CsoH. Mess. The Com— manding Officer, Adjutant and several other guests were invited to sample our ware—an excellent dinner.

to the Chris Barber‘s Jazz Band a Casino night. Towards

the end of November the Band arrived in Detmoid for

.

of taking our chance with luck on the roulette table.

We are now trying to catch up with our matches in the Detmoid Garrison in-door Games League. We are leading the fore at dominoes (and are putting in extra practise for the other events!) The comings and goings of Mess members are far too numerous to name here. To those who have gone we wish you the best of luck in your new station, and to those who have come, may your stay be a long and happy one.

Regiment from

1953 to

1956.

When the

Blues

Squadron were future Regimental Corporal Majors. Mr Cass then returned with the Regiment to England, where he remained with it during its service at Windsor and in Germany. in 1966 he went to Hong Kong as Garrison

Corporal Major. In 1968 he became R.C.M. of The Blues. .On

amalgamation

he

became

Major of The Blues and Royals.

Regimental

Corporal

He was thus the last

of the old and first of the new Regiment. The Warrant Officers and N.C.O.’s Mess is superb due to. Mr. Cass’s exceptionally high standards and organismg ability. The new Regiment owes a great debt

to his leadership and disciplinary powers; a very real terror to the evil doer, he has always helped those With a genuine problem. He has set an outstanding example to his successors.

UNION BRIGADE DINNER I969 On October 30th The Blues and Royals, Greys and

the Skins held a dinner to commemorate their brigadein g together at Waterloo and also, as the Heavy Brigade in the Crimea. The evening was a great success and

attended by the Commander-in-Chief as Deputy Colonel of The Blues and Royals, and the Greys and Skins Colonels. Despite The Blues and Royals being Household Cavalry it is hoped to maintain the old Royals alliance With the Greys and Skins by making the dinner an

annual event, it may also assist in preventing secession ist tendencies on the part of Scotland and lreland.

Silver Stick with Mess Members


Household Cavalry Museum By S.C.M. C. W. Frearson

VISITORS In the five months, April to August, 1969, over six

hundred people signed the visitor’s book.

Only about

Major Reginald Gunther which has been polychromed in egg tempera by Major J. N, P. Watson, and which commemorates the celebrated “Donkey Patrols" in Cyprus by “A” Squadron of The Blues. The collection of prints

half of our visitors sign the book and the many organised

and drawings—chiefly of the 1st Life Guards—but which include a number of prints of The Blues, gathered

parties we now entertain do not sign.

together

These parties

by

the

Baron

Fairhaven.

These

are

being

Brigadier D. J. St. M. Tabor M.C., noticed a grave in Arlington Cemetery, Washington, USA, which bore the name of Captain Angus Mackintosh of The Blues. This officer was wounded on 30th October, 1914, in the action at Zandvoorde. He was actually wounded when two Squadrons of The Blues went to reinforce the Royal

will also save storage expenses and enable the public

Dragoons near Hollebeke.

to see the pictures.

As a result of his wounds he

range from school groups of all ages to various local organisations. The strange thing is that only a handful

shown in a series of exhibitions of one month duration Of course, the largest accession

of our visitors are from Windsor. Foreigners easily outnumber British and of overseas visitors who came in the five months up to August, the following countries are

was evacuated to England and in 1917 was appoint ed Hon. Military Attache in Washington. He married during

was the collection of relics of the Royal Dragoons, which

his tour in America and two weeks after the birth of a

from September, 1969.

include 2nd Lieutenant John Spencer Dunville‘s Victoria

daughter to his wife, on 14th October, 1918, he died from

Cross, won on the 25th June 1917.

pneumonia in Washington.

Among other items

represented; Australia, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Holland, ltaly, New Zealand, Norway, Rhodesia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tasmania and the USA. Ben Goodacre's floor is as highly polished now as it was before they came. We are confident that it will

in the Royals’ collection is one of the earliest Rank and File shabracques yet seen, dated 1783 remarkably good condition, a very well preserved officer’s shabracque of late Victorian origin and a William IV sabretache More will be said of the

remain

collection under Future Development.

Britain’s

brightest

and

best

military

museum,

extant and in Royals’ superb Royals’

of the Household Cavalry is serving abroad, the pictures of the Officers’ Mess could be hung in this annexe, thus saving the wear and tear of transport to and from storage and the expense of renovation etc., when regiments

return from overseas to Windsor.

Needless to say it

APPEALS

Former Officers and soldiers of the Royal Dragoons

even after the National Army Museum moves to its new are

location.

FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS

Among important visitors have been the Colonel of The Life Guards, Admiral Earl Mountbatten, the Under

ENQUIRIES The addition of the collection of the Royal Dragoons

Secretary of State for the Army, the Allied Mediterranean

Forces Commander, the Lord Lieutenant of Buckingham— shire, Lieutenant General Sir John Mogg, the Marquess of Cambridge, Earl Spencer and the Countess of Longford,

who is writing a book on the Duke of Wellington and used some of our records.

These vary from the amusing to the amazing. We also deal with numerous verbal enquiries—cg. an elderly lady on a tricycle stops at the gate and enquires the way to the M4. The RP. asks the man on the desk, who is

heard to say, “Send her to the ..... museum.” A reputable West-end firm of antiquarian booksellers addressed a letter to ”The Horseback Cavalry Museum"

and much to the credit of the Post Office, it found us.

RECENT ACQUISITIONS Among the most recent acquisitions have been the statuette, “Blue on Bluesmoke" by the sculptor, the late

But the Post Office earned a “no-mark” when a lady in Lancashire, who enlisted our aid in answering a picture competition in a magazine, sent a pot of Morecambe Bay shrimps, in thanks and by post.

Visit of the Colonel of The Life Guards

has necessitated a new annexe. This will increase the total area of the museum from 2,840 feet to 3,790 square feet. Designs have already been submitted and it will be a new innovation in museum design. Entirely without windows, it is lit throughout by fluorescent lighting. This is not only for security reasons, but also to safeguard pictures and documents which will be on display. The showcases are rectangular glass "boxes” measuring four

feet by fifteen feet and some seven and a half feet high, without

divisions,

to enable

more flexibility

in

lay-out.

The showcases stand free of the annexe walls which are thus

left

collections.

clear

for

pictures,

requested

exhibits.

documents

and

medal

it is also possible that whichever Regiment

to

write

to

the

Curator

before sending

Periods such as Tangier and the Marlborough

campaigns are not at present well represented. We however, intend to approach various well tried sources such as Her Majesty's Tower Armouries (for old weapons

of the Royals), and to the National Army Museum for uniforms of the Royals which they may not be displaying. By this means and by the use of photocopying and models, the Royal Dragoons will be, we hope, commemorated in the most ”with it” museum in Britain. If any ex-Royal has already donated gifts to the Royals’ collection, it would be appreciated if they would inform the Curator of such gifts, including description, in order that they can be duly acknowledged when the annexe is completed. We have acquired a Daimler Armoured Car Mark l which, when it has the gun fitted, will co-partner the Mark III “Dingo” outside the museum.

Lieutenant General Sir John Mogg


HOHNE 0 SOLTAU For the benefit of Old Comrades it was thought worthwhile to include some

photographs

and

a

short

description

of where,

as

can

be

seen

by

perusal of the Squadron notes, the Regiment does the major part of its training. The exception to this are the Autumn manoeuvres which range widely over Germany.

Soltau is, in tact, part of the old Luneburg Heath, one of the great beauty spots of Germany, which can be seen north of the training area, quite unspoilt and in its natural state.

However, generations of German and British tanks

from the Reichswehr, Wermacht and British Army of the Rhine have turned parts of it into a wilderness; a desert in Summer and a morass of mud in

Winter.

It has a long history of use as a training ground for troops and it is

fairly certain that it was used by Hanoverians and Brunswickers up until 1866

and by Prussians after that. unlike tanks, left it unscarred.

Naturally of course their limbers and horses, It has the great advantage of light, sandy soil

which like that of Aldershot and Potsdam always goes with martial ardourl

Further to the south are the Hohne ranges where the annual tank firing is enjoyed by all. Belsen.

Nearby is the site of the notorious concentration camp,

Both these training

grounds figure

largely

in

the

Regimentâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s

and it is said that old hands require no maps when using them.

The Officers with the Commander in Chief

life


MAID]? GENERAI ’S INSPECTION THE BLUES & ROYALS

Major General The Hon. M. Fitzalan Howard, C.B., C.B.E., M.V.O., M.C., B.A,, Major General commanding The Household Division, visited the Regiment

at Detmold on 23rd and 24th October, 1969. He was accompanied by Lieutenant Colonel D. W. Hargreaves, Grenadier Guards,

Alp/Ire fit/Team

G.S.O., 1 HQ. London District, Lieutenant Colonel J. N. Ghika, lrish Guards, Brigade Major Household Division, Major J. W. T. A. Malcolm, Welsh Guards, D.A.M.S. London District, Major A. J. Hartigan, The Life Guards, D.A.A.G. London

District, and Captain P. F. Harvey Scots Guards, A.D.C. This was the visit that the Major General pays each year to every Regiment and Battalion in the Household Division and was the first time that he had met the new Regiment.

After inspecting the Regimental Police at the gate of Hobart Barracks the Major General presented Staff Sergeant St. John James R.A.P.C.

with the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal.

He then paid a short

visit to the Commander of 20th Armoured Brigade.

The party was later

entertained at the Divisional Party in the Officers‘ Mass. The next day the Major General inspected the Regiment and its tanks, toured the instructional wings, met the Corporals and later the Warrant Officers and Corporals of Horse in their Messes, and attended luncheon followed by a photograph at the Officers’ Mess. .' ..

g

,

.

Training began in earnest for our foray into the Alps in November, when we started to build up our fitness under the expert eye of 0.8M. Knight in the gymnasium. The team gradually assembled

from England and Detmold, equipment was bought and tested—and on December 7th we assembled in Chalet Tarpay in Verbier. The team consisted of Gavin Tweedie as captain, the most experienced

racer, backed up by Nick Roberts, who had learnt his ski-ing on the langlauf trail, Christopher Boone, an old habitué of Murren and Wengen, and Gordon Birdwood, whose windmill arm action disguised an effective technique. Mark Agar, the fifth member

was an unknown quantity. His previous experience had been confined to the Andes. We were also backed up by three valuable ”assistants" to cope with the domestic problems of cooking, which were beyond the scope of the Mess-pampered team. Soon, with Andre Guinnard as trainer, we were gingerly sliding out on the almost deserted slopes

in perfect sunshine.

Confidence came quickly and

speeds increased by leaps and bounds, and not

a few hard landings.

Andre proved to be the

perfect instructor to start us off, speaking English

like an Englishman (he had been born in Fulham and lived several years there).

All the time the girls were coping magnificently with a non stop stream of visitors—and even produced the most gargantuan Christmas Dinner for fifteen, including turkey, Christmas pudding and all the trappings.

We all felt we were

ski-ing brilliantly, until in a moment of gross over-

confidence Tweedie took a fast schuss in the most streamlined “egg if position and spreadeagled himself and skis, sticks and glasses over about fifty yards of piste. A visit to the bearded local doctor ended with him being told he would not be able to ski for at least three weeks, which was a bad blow to the team training.

Meanwhile Pierrot Michaud took over as trainer. He was a small round-faced man with an enormous grin permanently on his face, below the

Now training was becoming really hard. We met Pierrot every morning at 8.30, and went straight to the slalom slope for about an hour of concentrated effort to find that elusive path through impossibly close set poles. Improvement by all was obvious, and hopes were high for the first races at Lermoos. After a

long

and foggy drive

in

our fleet of ancient cars,

bought specially for the snow, we arrived at the Post Hotel, Lermoos, to find almost no snow. Still, full of faith, we brewed up the witches cauldron of waxes, repaired the damage done by the Verbier rocks and prepared ourselves for the first race of thethe season, the 4th Division Giant Slalom. This race in fact set

he invariably wore. Every morning the slopes would

the pattern for the season. Although we could beat the majority of the other teams, we just did not have enough racing expertise to be on terms with the top teams. We finished the day fourth,

resound to

knowing we could have gone faster.

extraordinary red mackintosh “pork pie” hat which

cries

of

“Mamma

Mia, the

condition

eet eez good this morning” as he shot off down

the hill—or sometimes it would be “Misere—too much wine last night"

but always he skied with

his usual elan.

were held, and in spite of Tweedie ski-ing well below par with an

He also renamed the vast Christopher Boone “Minou” (kitten) a name which stuck fast.

He was

a brilliant skier, and really worked the team. He taught by copying the faults of each member of the team, converting them into gross but accurate

caricatures.

From now on, Lermoos got more and more depressing. The ski—ing consisted of either slushing through brown muddy puddles, or skittering without control over sheet ice. However, three races only partially healed ankle, the team managed to pull up to second position overall, under the eye of Colonel Richard who had come

to make sure that our expensive training was worthwhile. An encouraging feature to emerge at Lermoos was the ski-ing of David Reed-Felstead, who had been langlaufing. He showed such obvious promise for a novice that it was thought worth taking him on with the Alpine team as a potential team member next year.

Illuminated Tanks 45


Gordon Birdwood, Pierrut Michaud, Gavin Nick Roberts and Christopher Boone

Tweedie,

Mark Agar,

THE WESER VALE HUNT FORMATION OF THE HUNT On the advent of German Sovereignty in 1955, the hunting of live game with hounds was forbidden, hunts

which had previously hunted fox or hare had to either disband or follow Today there are about eight a drag. German packs which usually hunt by English Clubs. Riding of invitation Military packs have gradually died out,

due to either lack of support, rioting or difficulty in obtaining country. To those of us spoilt by frequent hunting in England, the Regiment's tour in Germany would mean a considerable gap in one's Winter sport. Draghunting

seemed to be unsuccessful and the Unfortunately this meant abandoning Mark Agar, who, although he had improved immensely did not seem to be making a racer. With

some

relief

we

moved

on

the

Alpbach

for

the B.A.O.R. Championships, where the best teams from the

three

divisional

meetings

congregated.

Snow

conditions at the top were good, and we could immediately set to work to recover the skills which had been decaying at Lermoos. But the day was ruined by an accident to David Reed-Felstead who had the terrible luck to break his leg on his first morning skiing with

was to be made hard enough to race on the next day. All was well eventually, and Tweedie and Boone put respectable times followed by Roberts, who had met problems on the way, and lost a few seconds. As only

three members count towards the team result, it now all depended on whether Birdwood could better his time. He was seen to be ski-ing excellently on the first, steepest part of the course—and hopes were high. Then came a long pause while he entered a hidden part of the course.

The seconds stretched

on

but

no sign

of Birdwood

After the agonising preliminaries of blood

appeared, till eventually a snowy figure tumbled into sight. The team had to be content with sixth place.

wagon, ambulance, and heavy handed doctors, he was settled into hospital at Worgl. This was a double tragedy

The slalom was a nightmare, run in a blizzard, on a

the team.

for not

only

did

he

miss the

ski-ing,

but

also

his

opportunity of regaining the Army Rackets Championship.

shallow slope which broke up into enormous ruts. These were invisible from the start and engulfed many of the racers. We managed seventh place—but it was a most

The rest of the team now found themselves launched disappointing

race.

The

race

into a concentrated racing schedule of four races in five last

of

the

season,

the

Downhill

was

days, expertly organised by the Alpbach Ski Club, on postponed for a day to allow more time for training on perfect snow. it was now appearing that our best event was the Slalom. Pierrot's training was paying dividends. But

only other sport legally acceptable was hunting from the clean boot with

bloodhounds. short

However, apart from a in

description

speed and present immunity from distendsion; however, they are harder to train and lack the positive nose of the purebred. For us a threequarter cross

we walk over their land and discuss any points they may wish to raise. During the hunt there is a man checking for damage, which is either

is probably the best type to have and future breeding will be based on this. We have had our setbacks; one pure-

repaired on the spot or the day after by Corporal of Horse Burton Johnson and F/Corporal of Horse King (Life

bred died of distension; a bitch had to be put down; the foxhound was given to a German drag pack after an unsuccessful attempt at breeding. In nine months we have learnt a great deal, both in kennel management and out on exercise. Being in Germany we have to be

particularly strict with the hounds: this, however, has paid dividends for they have already crossed deer‘s spoor and put up hares without rioting, much to the pleasure of the farmers and our

Directory we knew very little about Fortunately we were able to them. visit the Savernake Forest where Lady

Rosemary Brudenell-Bruce has a pack and following a January morning with her hounds, we decided to form our own hunt to take with us in Germany.

THE HOUNDS By February we had three hounds kindly drafted to us by Mr. C. E.

Later in

the week Captain

farmers to give our thanks. This can mean as many as fourteen visits for one meet!

We are also particularly fortunate in being introduced to various estate owners. So far the Graf Von Asseberg Rothkirch, Baron Von Nagel and Dr. W. von und zur Muhlen have not only allowed us to meet at their castles

but

have

kindly

entertained

Our country is well spread out but heathland; locally it is arable and hilly,

THE COUNTRY Apart from obtaining hounds we were also faced with the task of finding some country. Captain Stringer has worked tremendously hard at this and with remarkable success: so far no farmer has refused us entry across his land. German landowners worry about the same things as their English counterparts: damage to crops and

futher south grassland. The fences in all areas are timber rails, but where wire prevails we have been allowed to

make jumping places. been

able to

The Hunt has

cater for all

selves down the mountain at racing speed, it is essential

March.

that they have maximum time to get used to the course.

hardly constituted a pack! l was, there-

insurmountable obstacles or wire.

THE CLEAN BOOT fences, disturbing livestock or game. meet

Hunting

from

the

Clean

But this time the postponement was a disaster, as the

fore,

day of the race broke cloudy and snowing our wax was wrong; visibility was nil, but the race went on. All was going well till Birdwood who had been ski-ing extremely

contact with De Heer Majoie, Master

One-and-a-half couple however

our hopes were dashed in the slalom here, as Boone, on a brand new pair of skis, lost one and had to be content with a good second run. Roberts and Birdwood were both steady, but Tweedie, going down first on the second run, lost his way, and missed a gate losing valuable time in climbing back to go through it.

The downhill race was last and here Boone excelled himself, coming in 17th and only failing to beat the Captain! The end result of this enjoyable meeting was fifth place for the team, out of eighteen starters who were all the best teams from the Divisional meeting.

The long run up to the climax was over. We arrived at the Army Championships in St. Moritz. Most of the teams were the same, but instead of the homely Austrian village

of

Alpbach,

we

were

in

the

Cosmopolitan

atmosphere of the most famous resort in the world.

But

well in training, found a. holiday skier stemming in front of him during the race. He had to change his line, and

particularly

fortunate

to

make

of the Ralleye ma Joie in Holland: the

only Master of Bloodhounds in this part

fell.

of Europe, he was particularly keen to help us. To date he has given us a couple of black and tan Dumfreisshire

Although he was allowed a re-run, that was even more perilous, as, with amazing speed, a snow cat had started up the course thinking the race was over. After

foxhound/bloodhound crossbreds. He has also driven over 600 miles in one day to ride with us behind his former

narrowly avoiding being crushed by that, surprising that his time was slow.

it

was

not

Now all that remained were the last parties and prizegiving before starting the weary journey back to Detmold. The results achieved had been as good as

hounds.

Later this summer we

B. Wright, Master of the North Warwick-

Bloodhounds

also

generously

gave us a bitch and three puppies.

where all ski races are regarded with a barely restrained disdain. Consequently, all course preparation was done by the competitors. No doubt the sight of sixty English

could be expected. The standard of the top four or five Army teams is so high that it is very hard to break their grip. Nevertheless, the team all showed great improvement on last year‘s performances, and Christopher Boone is now beginning to ski really well.

purebred

racers, floundering down the Open Run without skis was

obviously the Army races are small business to St. Moritz,

also

obtained a further couple of crossbred bitches from Mr. C. E. Furness. Mr. shire

Our pack now totals five couple, all being Dumfriesshire foxhound/ bloodhound crosses apart from two dogs.

The

crossbreds

are

often preferred for their better stamina, hilarious to onlookers. 46

But it was necessary if a course

Next year perhaps we could shake those at the top?

standards

of horses and riders and no one has failed to arrive at a ”kill" because of

Furness, Master of the Peak and Mrs. Elizabeth Seymour, well known for her success in Bloodhound trials. Together

with a foxhound bitch from the Wilton Hunt, these hounds left for Detmold in

all

gives us variety; in the north there is

On the Wednesday before each

the course. When fairly inexperienced skiers hurl them-

us

afterwards.

relief!

Hunting

Baily’s

Guards).

Stringer makes a point of visiting the

The Weser Vale meet at Schloss Merlshelm From lleit to right: Trooper Ikins (Kenna/man), Captain W. A. Stringer, Captain T. M. Hickman, Captain R. C. Wilkinson

boot

is


‘ Bedfords were up the blue! The End of a Hunt Left to Right: Captain Ft. C. Wilkinson, Captain T. M. Hickman, Captain W. A. Stringer. Major J. H. Pitman, Cornet C. Ft. Goodall. The two quarries Trooper B’ambel and Corporal Pitt

Hounds about to lay on to their quarry.

The grassland

and rails are typical of the country south of Detmold

Bedfords. Hitched lifts from Matruh

x“.g

The Former Blues Foxhounds at Wesendort

of the W.V.H. {3rd from right)

improve either in their hunting, marking or accuracy, it is presently not unusual

of course, is quite untrue. Bloodhounds

to hear at the end of each day the

artificial

man

by

his

drug

or scent

own is

smell,

no

Quartermaster stating,

ever used.

it's our best day yet!”

The quarry leaves a rag or handkerchief, which he has had on his body, at the start of his line. Hounds are laid on to this and hunt that particular person.

The

time

we

give

to

our

quarries is usually an hour, however, this varies according to scenting conditions or the speed at which we wish to hunt. Bloodhounds though not as fast as foxhounds can show quite a

turn of speed: they are very thorough, independant creatures, particularly when casting. Often they will refuse

“Well

i

reckon

SUPPORT Although hunting hounds for our own pleasure, we have received conofficers, but also the N.C.O.'s: brave words uttered in the W.O.'s and CsoH. Mess have resulted in some returning to the Hunting Field mounted, while others prefer the well-padded upholstery of a warm car.I

out over some distance. However, with

former Blues hounds, under the Master-

each day’s sport the hounds seem to

ship of Major, now Lieutenant Colonel

48

to

a

particular

hound,

each

other

Regiments,

individual

Germans

our sport; fields often total twenty or

more.

siderable support, not only from various

insisting on working the line out for himself; hence a pack can be stretched

mark

C. G. M. Gordon had met at the W.O.‘s and CsoH. Mess at Wesendorf in 1949. The Deputy Colonel, General Desmond Fitzpatrick, had a day with us and showed us the way. Members of and the Pony Club have also shared

The Regimental Corporal Major gave us an excellent Meet at his Mess on Boxing day. It was twenty years to the day since the last Meet of the

to

seldom a clapped-out Bedford. Occasionally, they were kept going with a combination of wire. chewing gum and affectionate exhortations to perform anatomically impossible actions. Like

M. Gordon, The Master (4th from right), Corporal, now Captain W. A. Stringer, present joint Master and Huntsman

often misunderstood, many think it is just a drag using bloodhounds. This, a

along the tracks and in the wad/s, but '

to Alex. in them — and maa/eesh’ ' the blokes, they had guts. the redcaps. You'll still see Bedfords wherever Bedfords went 'up the blue‘ to you see the British Army. And, of Benghazi — and back again in Wavell'ss course, you‘ll see a few hundred ‘push in '41. Came back like the thousand Bedfords any day of the week clappers in the flap in ’42. Bardl on Britain's roads. Still a/akeefak soya, in October 1942 they went up about going rough. Nowadays, though, again. and kept going. ' you can forget the chewing-gum and There were burnt-out Bedfords the wire.

Among those present are Lieutenant Colonel D, J. Daly (2nd from left}, Lieutenant, now Lieutenant Colonel C. G.

hunt

it you were in the Western Desert. anytime between 1940 and 1942, you lived with Bedfords. Brewed up beside them. Filled your lighter by dipping it in their petrol tanks. Kipped down in

left

Unfortunately Captain Campbell us in September on his posting

to the Training Squadron and Captain Hickman has taken his place as Field Master,

The German winter is never a kind one to the hunting fraternity, however, we look forward to next year with anticipation There is a Hunter Trial and Hunt Ball in April, breeding to initiate, summer hunting during annual firing and lastly those unceasing 5 am. reveilles prior to next season.

Redford-keep going where the going's rough Photograph by permission of the Imperial War Museum


Kaiser William II COLONEL-IN-CIIIEF. THE IromL DIt’.-1(}001\"'S,

1894-1914

In ‘memory at Waterlooz—The presentation of the Kaiser‘s wreath to the Royals at the Curragh This photograph was taken‘on Waterloo Day at the Curragh, on the occasion of the presentation of the wreath sent to the 1st Royal Dragoons by his Ma/esty the German Emperor, as Honorary Colonel of the Regiment, in memory of the distinction won by the Royals on the 18th of June, 1815. The wreath, which was received with all honour by Colonel McLaren and the Royals at a full dress (parade and a'tached to the regimental standard, was of three feet diameter, and comprised of laurel leaves interspersed With leaves of gold, and bound with a crimson sash impressed with the Imperial Monogram. Lett: Kaiser in Royals frock-coat with King George V as Colonel of 1st Dragoon Guards at Princess Victoria Louise of Prussia's wedding in 1913.

a.

km; 3am] :_ xi

. film‘fl

The Royals" first Colonel-in-Chief was born at Potsdam in 1859, the first born of Queen Victoria's eldest daughter, the Crown Princess of Prussia. He was educated at Kassel Gymnasium and the University of Bonn. His upbringing was rigorous, strict and conducted on military lines. He survived it despite a sensitive nature and a withered left arm. He became Emperor of Germany in 1888; one of the first acts of his reign being to place his mother, from whom he was estranged, under house arrest. The Kaiser possessed a mercurial and unstable temperament. He had a brittle brilliance, a great love for the arts, particularly music, and a comprehensive knowledge of archaeology. He developed a passion for military splendour, a deep conviction of the divine right of the Hohenzollerns and a burning desire to emulate Frederick the Great. Conflict between England and Germany was in the early “Nineties" very much a thing of the future, 50

and the Royals were felt to be receiving a notable compliment

when,

in

April,

1894,

the

German

Emperor was made their Colonel-in-Chief. He was the first foreigner advanced to such a position in the British Army. The Royals became affiliated to the 1st Guard Dragoons of Prussia of which Queen Victoria, King Edward VII and King George V were successively Colonel. The Kaiser was highly gratified at his appointment and immediately invited the Commanding Officer of the Royals, Lieutenant Colonel Tomkinson with his Adjutant and Lieutenant H.S.H_ Prince Francis of Teck to pay a State visit to Berlin, where

they were magnificently entertained by the Emperor and the German Guards Cavalry Regiments. Later that year the Emperor attended a review at Aldershot where the Royals provided him with an escort and Guard of Honour. Each Royals’ Commanding Officer went to Berlin on appointment accompanied by three or four

of his officers. German hospitality was lavish and profuse: champagne was apt to flow extremely freely, but it was occasionally possible to pour a little of it under the table. The Emperor was also in the habit of annually presenting the Regiment with a wreath every 18th June, in commemoration

of the battle of Waterloo. This was usually carried out by the Military Attache. In November. 1902, the Kaiser inspected the Royals on their return from the Boer War, It was very wet indeed and both Lord Roberts and the Colonel have their collars up. (See plate above). As usual at Prussian groom holds the Kaiser‘s charger due to his weak left arm, There were 32 officers and 1.102 other ranks on parade. The Kaiser was meticulous about his Royals‘ uniform but he did once make a mistake. In 1908

he was receiving his uncle, King Edward VII, at

Homberg station. As the King stepped off the train he was heard to observe, “Willi, you‘re wearing the wrong uniform". “But it's the one Grandmama gave me“, protested the Kaiser. “Perhaps". replied the imperturbable King, “but we‘ve altered the width of the stripe since then!" After the Great War the Kaiser continued to send Christmas Cards to his old Regiment. One taken at Doom in Holland, where he lived in exile,

is shown here. He died in 1942. His portrait will hang in new Hyde Park Barracks Ofiicer’s House. To the end he retained his admiration. and in his own way his love, for England as for his grandmother Queen Victoria: and always his very

real

affection

for

his

own

Regiment,

The

Royal Dragoons. 51


the LAST DRAGOON

HRNHEM I969

by 13fh/18th Hussar, ex-Royal, ex-Submariner

By Major The Lord Wrolfes/ey, M.C.—Formerly Royal Horse Guards (The Blues)

This year is the Twenty-Fifth Anniversary of the Battle

of Arnhem, and Arthur Young and myself had the great It would seem that the only way to get over the “Hum Drum” of an amalgamation is to lose oneself at sea—as a Trumpeter on a submarine.

l was very lucky to be able to do this. I received an unofficial movement order which read, “You will report to H.M.S. Repulse and accompany her to America for the D.A.S.O." (Naval jargon for firing trials). What this involved l had no idea. On arrival at Faslane in Scotland, the submarine base, l was given a warm welcome by a large dockyard policeman. “Repulse?” ”Yon won’t get aboard her now as she is closed down and ready to put to sea." After numerous telephone calls they managed to contact the Captain who was

impatiently waiting for his trumpeter and who asked for him to be sent along immediately. l jumped on a van and was taken about ten miles along the coast. The driver eventually stopped and said, “There she is.”

All I could see was a chap standing there in Petty Officer's uniform, but on going nearer could see that the Petty Officer was at the head of a gangplank which led to a large barrel shaped object.

After the usual introductions I asked, ”Where is the Repulse?” l was taken aboard the Barrel and climbed down a hole (which I was soon to discover was called

an accomplished submariner and was thinking in terms

fortune to attend the Annual Pilgrimage made by survivors of the Battle, to Arnhem through the kindness

of a transfer to "The Boats". Having dressed I found my first mistake, namely that The Royal Dragoons Full

of “Scrubber" Stuart Richardson who was Commanding the 10th (Volunteer) Parachute Battalion.

on to the outer casing.

By this time, of course, i was

casing

I

thanked

the

four

On arrival on the outer men

who

had

pushed

and

heaved me out and then found that the boat was about to enter Cape Canaveral Submarine Base.

behalf of the

Skipper. Coming alongside l was the first to go ashore and was met by a host of newspaper reporters and television cameras. These gentlemen were told in great

More

On waking the next morning at 1100 hrs. l found that

l was asleep on a bunk with a torpedo staring at me from

across the

gangway.

“What

a

was lucky enough to spend a complete week in

Air Force on Saturday, 13th September and Arthur and

passengers I gather being extremely noisy and uncom-

perhaps it is an omen for the future that it was one of the most accurate shots that the Americans have ever witnessed. For the

next three

days the Starboard

crew

(the

Royal

Repulse.

l

Holland with them and Arthur very nobly came out for one day and then returned to the United Kingdom only to reappear for another day at the end of the pilgrimage. We flew out to Holland by courtesy of the Royal

Dragoon Trumpeter on loan to H.M.S. Repulse doing his duty to God and Country”. A week later, on the day of the amalgamation, the boat fired the Polaris missile and

and so ad infinitum.

H.M. Submarine

to send representatives out to stay with his Battalion which was training at Harskamp, and which would be playing a part in the pilgrimage.

detail about the amalgamation of The Blues and Royals but somehow the story was written about “A Royal

who welcomed me aboard and then immediately dragged me protesting to the C.P.O.'s Mess where l was given a beer, a tot of Navy rum, a beer, a tot of Navy rum

into

introductions were made to members of the crew and then I met the Captain, Lieutenant Commander Whetstone,

Airborne Forces, he very kindly asked if we would like

It was a proud moment to be able to stand “Forward”

and salute the United States Navy on

chaps on the right-hand side) had leave before returning by air to Scotland. These days were spent lounging on the beaches of Florida in temperatures of 80°F, soaking up the sun and watching the Port crew preparing for their shot. (Note—the port watch is not a bunch of gentlemen who sit looking at old wine. These are the chaps on the left-hand side). All too soon the Last

the Main Hatch)

Knowing the connection the Regiment had with the

Dress Uniform was never designed for climbing out of

the hatch of a submarine.

l were fortunate to travel on the flight deck of the Aircraft (3 Hercules) the actual seating space for fortable. We arrived at Deelen Airfield and were straightaway popped into motor coaches and taken to the Airborne Museum where we had an excellent cold lunch after

which we were taken out to the Gunkelse Heide where we

watched the

10th

Battalion

drop.

This was

more

interesting in that it was actual D.Z. used by the 10th Parachute Battalion at the time of the Battle. After the drop the Battalion formed up and a Memorial Service was held in memory of the 10th Battalion

in Detmold with no

dead at the memorial pillar by the side of the 0.2. There Arthur and I met the detachment from the

Band to return to and a lot of new faces in Camp. Surprisingly, everything seemed to be running smoothly.

Regiment who were giving a Demonstration of a Road Block, as part of a Tournament which had been arranged.

Dragoon found

himself back

peculiar dream,"

We were glad to see Bill Boucher and Nick Wheeler

I thought. “Good morning," said a hearty voice, "I am the

from The Blues and Royals who were running the demonstration and who made us both feel at home amongst all the Parachutists.

Cox’n, (now I knew I was dreaming) it is time to get up and we have been at sea since 0400 hrs. Come with me and I will get you fixed up." Back to the Mess we went where it was tot time once more. Having

managed to sink my half glass of rum on an empty stomach I felt much better. ”We will dive in about ten

minutes," said Max Wall

like to see how it is done?" one of the few things that I this trip.”

(the Cox’n),

“would you

“You should do as this is will

be teaching you

on

If the reader has ever been on the flight deck of a modern jet airliner he will know just how many gadgets

and

instruments there

are.

The

control

room

of

a

nuclear submarine is about six times bigger and six times as complicated. I was shown to a seat behind

the Cox'n and watched the whole operation of diving down to four hundred and fifty feet where we stayed for thirteen days. During this time I became quite proficient as forward planesman (Driver) before arriving in the

USA. A message arrived from the Skipper on the 13th day to ask if his trumpeter would get ready to go

After the drop we adjourned to a nearby field where

the tournament then took place.

It included a show by

Having arrived there we found it most difficult to recognise it as the same place we had been in twentyfive years earlier as quite a large amount of rebuilding

had been done. Arthur then went off back to England and left me holding the fort. The

main

had a formal Mess Dinner to which were invited a number of the Dutch Officers and Civil Officials who had made the visit by the 10th Battalion possible. On the Sunday there was a memorial service to the memory of those members of the 10th Battalion who had fallen in the Battle, after which Arthur and I together with Bill Boucher and the troops paid a visit to Driel.

not

due to

of the Pilgrimage and started off in the morning with a

After the service there was a Luncheon given by

the Queen for the senior officers of First Airborne D.W. and purely by chance I found myself in the City Hall having drinks before the luncheon and meeting Her Majesty and Prince Bernhardt which was a great and unexpected honour. When I met General Urquhart he enquired who I was and when I told him I was a Household Cavalryman he said, ”Ah, yes, we in first Airborne have a very soft

spot for the Household Cavalry, you did a lot for us" which was very warming and made me feel presence was not entirely unwarranted.

that

our

in the afternoon of the 17th there was another tournament this time in Arnhem similar to the one which had taken place on the previous Saturday and at which again the Regiment‘s turn brought down the house with

its most attractive “Girls" and not so attractive “hippys”. After the tournament there came for me one of the

most moving experiences of the whole week—the Silent

centre

After the Tournament we were taken back to Harskamp where we were staying and in the evening we

Pilgrims were

service at the Airborne Cemetery which was attended by Queen Juliana and Prince Bernhardt.

Procession.

1st

the

visit the Netherlands’ National War and Resistance Museum at Overloon. This we did and ended up having an excellent luncheon at the Hostellene “De Hamert“ which overlooks the Maas between Venlo and Goch, Wednesday the 17th of September was the main day

H.L.|. both of which Regiments had in one way or another assisted at the Battle, a Battalion of the H.L.l.

apart from ourselves, to make the link up with Airborne Division.

of

not being until the Wednesday morning, Nick Wheeler and I decided to take a trip down the Maas, visiting old friends such as Cuyh in Boxmeer where we spent a couple of cold months in the winter of 1944, and to

the Bands of the Devon and Dorset Regiment and the

being part of the Air Landing Brigade and a Battalion of the Dorsets being the first troops from 2nd Army,

body

arrive until the Tuesday and the first official ceremony

At about 5.45 the Police stopped all traffic in the of

Arnhem

and

the

Veterans

of

1st

Airborne

together with their hosts from Arnhem formed up about half a mile from the memorial at the bridge. One single bell from the Cathedral then tolled and

the whole procession then moved very slowly to the memorial where a service was held. The most extraordinary thing about this procession

was the fact that not a sound could be heard of the hundreds of feet moving in the procession and all one was conscious of was the tolling of the bell. I think this ceremony more than any other brought home to one how very strongly not only the ex—Airborne Soldiers but also the Dutch people themselves still feel about the Battle

53 52


On the Thursday morning the 10th Battalion was due to make another drop, but owing to bad weather this was cancelled much to everybody’s disappointment.

fine congregation. The Regiment very kindly sent two trumpeters who added colour to the ceremony.

Arthur Young very nobly came out under his own

the reception which we received and one of the highlights

steam via the Hague and joined us at the D.Z. after a

of the whole ceremony was the presentation of Medals to the Poles who had been present at the Battle and

l was tremendously impressed with the warmth of

hair-raising

drive

as

in the

afternoon

came—for

us—

the most important ceremony of the whole week.

also to Arthur and

This was the service in remembrance of the Polish Parachute Brigade at Driel and it was this Brigade that we first made contact with at first light on September

SPORT

myself.

A very moving speech was made by the Organiser

Football Notes

of the memorial service and l was again impressed here

at Driel as l had been in Arnhem how strongly the local

Up

22nd, 1944, and who we supported both with our own armament and also with fire from our artillery at

people

Nijmegen which we directed over our wireless net.

After the Ceremony we all went and had coffee and cakes in a local pub and were shown films. This marked

played in the fourth Division Northern League and had held a position in the first three places at the top. They also

A very attractive the centre of Arnhem

memorial in

had

been

memory of the

erected

Poles

and

in it

was round this that the service was held. About thirty Polish veterans had come for this service many of them driving in Holland, and these together with a large proportion of the inhabitants of Driel made a

still

feel.

finis to a week which I shall long remember not only because of the entertaining time which I had but also for the warmth of a reception which was based on an inter-

national friendship which has lasted for twenty-five years and which is as strong now as it was at the commencement.

till

amalgamation

the

team

had

played in the B.A.O.R./Army Cup and in the third round were knocked out by fourth Division Engineers 20. This Engineer team turned out to be the B.A.O.R. Cup winners and travelled to

the United Kingdom for the Army final. We were entered in the Cavalry Cup

as The Blues and Royals and were drawn in the first round against 17th/ 21st Lancers at Sennelager. The match

was due to be played on Saturday, March 15th. This presented a few problems as some members of the team were not due to arrive at Detmold

until March 13th.

The Regimental Football Team 1969

Having been told of

the standard of ex-Blues‘ players it was decided to select them for the team

and so, with the new Regimental strip

Reproduced by courtesy of the . "Soldier" magazine

of Black and Blue striped shirts, Black shorts, Black and Blue hooped socks, and a lot of pride and determination in our hearts we set off for Sennelager. The ground was in good condition and the excellent crowd in roaring support, a good game was underway. At full time the score stood at 2-2 so thirty minutes extra time was inevitable, much against our wishes because of fitness and teamsmanship, but we ran out winners 3-2, much credit being

given to all players for their very hard work. Our next opponents in the B.A.O.R. semi-final were the 5th lnniskilling Dragoon Guards who were stationed at Herford. This game was to be played at Little Wembley in Detmold.

Our training was taken seriously and the team's fitness becoming vastly improved. On a bright Saturday morning

The ad/utant on his Grand National horse "The Fossa" at Stratford, September, 1969

March 29th the two teams battled it out in front of a good crowd of supporters from both Regiments. The prospects of entertaining football were good and the match turned out to be just that. We ran out comfortable

winners 4-2. Now our eyes were set on winning the B.A.O.R. section and a trip to England. What a wonderful start for the new Regiment to win the Cavalry Cup. Training for the B.A.O.R. final got underway with everyone pulling out all the stops.

nents

in

the

final

were

Our oppo-

16th/5th

Lancers from neutral ground

Brigade

Headquarters

Arrangements

teams

Fallingbostel was selected

to

were

arrive

in

in

made

Minden

and a at 11th

Minden. for

on

both

the

morning of Saturday, April 15th, have lunch in the Cookhouse there, play

the game and a tea in the N.A.A.F.l. afterwards. On the Friday an inspection of the ground was made, the pitch being found a little heavy but reasonably firm. Alas, however. on the morning of the game the clouds opened

from first light and rain day. We travelled over the rain never ceasing. of the ground was made

set in for the on the coach, An inspection by both teams

with the final decision to be made by the referee and linesmen. Just about thirty minutes before kick off the rain

eased, although the pitch was sodden with water by now, the game was on. Among the spectators we were very pleased to have our Deputy Colonel

and Commander-in~Chief B.A.O.R., General Sir Desmond Fitzpatrick. We 55


started off in great form, within fifteen minutes we were two goals in the lead but nowhere near victory, the 16th/5th

after the first sledge blocked his path

on the way down! On the 27th, after a good fort-

Lancers drew level. We went ahead again after forty minutes only to see

night‘s skiing and in the middle of a

hard thaw we returned to Detmold. the

16th/5th

Lancers

draw

level

just on half time 3-3. After a quick break and a few sharp words around the team we settled down to attack the 16th/5th Lancers with determ'nation and vigour. By this time the mud was shin-deep in the middle but the spectators were in good form, the odd shower of hailstones doing nothing to

Langlaut Team Notes 1969-1970 The potential members of the langlaul teams left for Bavaria in early Decem-

ber and thanks to an early fall of snow

level

with

about twelve

minutes

left

and possible extra time in sight.

We

With only three minutes left to play we got what turned out to be the winning goal to give us victory 5-4; how well the team deserved the

Champagne which came rolling out of the Regimental Corporal Major's car. We had won the B.A.O.R. section of the Cavalry Cup in our first season as The Blues and Royals and the trip to England was on. A pleasant weekend was had by all and on Monday the team set about a strong build up programme until we left for the United Kingdom, the only

snag being that Troop Training was on before we left for England so the

Commanding Officer made his decision on who should be excused, in fact, no member

of

the

United Kingdom Troop Training.

party

going

completed

to

the

the

full

We flew over to London and were

accommodated by Household Cavalry Regiment at Wellington Barracks where

we met many friends old and new. Our opponents for the final were 3rd Dragoons whom we knew very well

from their days at Lothian Barracks, Detmold. They had always been a

ahead after about twenty-five m'nutes

January and arrived at Sonthofen, Bavaria, around 1130hrs. that night. Transport, by kind permission of LanceCorporal Reynolds, L.A.D., took us to

with a goal that completely foxed our

the Gasthaus Maribu.

keeper. Our opponents now had their tails up and really played attractive

the only thing that we saw on the way was the local brewery.

football and deservedly got a third goal about ten minutes from full time. We did not match up to our opponent’s good football and with a hard fast ground not to our liking we finished runners up. We had tried hard, the players had given of their best and

The first day was taken up by kitting out. Trooper Barden titted us up with skis, but nobody could solve the large foot problem. Lance-Corporals Hatherall and Maguire, Craftsman Tong and myself all needed size 11 boots.

Lance-Corporal Charleton 70 km. at Oberioch

in

4

x

at full stretch and 3rd Dragoons went

well done to them for their efforts. During last season the team wss ably

skippered

by

Squadron

Quarter-

master Corporal Wood. this is a task he took seriously and did very well, but now he has decided to retire having given good service since 1956. The following players represented the team

during last season. master Corporal

Squadron QuarterWood. Squadron

Quartermaster Corporal Hearn, Staff Sergeant Instructor Bryan, Corporal of Horse Livingstone, Corporals Birt, Sibley, McKenna, Startford, LanceCorporal Gibbs. Troopers Dean, Allen, Ford, Craftsmen Babb, Hazeldine, Lance-Corporal Butler. At the time of going to press we

are about half way up the Northern very good Football Regiment and had

won the Cavalry Cup more times than

League, have been knocked out of the

B.A.O.R./Army any

other

Regiment.

We

trained

hard,

Burton Court on Thursday prior to the match. This enabled the team to see how

the

ground

was.

in

fact,

pletely the opposite to B.A.O.R. bone dry, hard and very fast. The

score

was

1-0

in

com-

It was

level

after

Dragoons goal. 56

pressure

but

are

training

setting

once

again

our

main

attack on the Cavalry Cup in which we are at home to 15th/19th Hussars in the preliminary round to be played by 21st February, 1970.

our oppo-

nent's favour at half time with honours about even. Just after half time we drew

Cup

at

in

the

3rd

Both sides were now

Ski-ing at Wertach 14th January—27th January, 1970 We departed by bus on the 14th of

As it was dark,

Two pairs we were able to find—the rest

was

left

to

injury

to

sort

out,

which it did within three days. After two days of practising ski

Lance-Corporal Charleton, was Lieute-

brought over from England by Cornet Gill and Sergeant Mannock, Ft.T.R. Sergeant Mannock proved to be a most useful visitor being a very experienced Ianglaufer and in his time had raced for England against Norway.

nant Hayward, Corporal Harman, LanceCorporal Markwick, and Lance-Corporal Charleton. The reserves were Corporal Simpson, Lance-Corporal Peasgood and Trooper Haine, all very ably supported by the mini—bus driver Trooper Scarrot.

P W L D F A 16 16 0 0 60 9 These Impressive results show our

small

gasthot

with

On January 61h those chosen to form the team south to Lermoos and

the

fourth

Division

championships,

while the unsuccessful returned to Detmold. At Lermoos most of the team caught flu and much of the benefits from previous fitness training was wasted. The first race was the 4 x 10 km. relay and the team came ninth out of thirty-one. Lance-Corporal

Markwick had the ninth fastest indivi» dual time of the day. The 4 x 10 km. was followed by the 15km. cross country in which the team again came ninth.

Mounted Sports Mounted sports in Germany have been

limited this year by lack of both horses and riders. However, what we lacked in quantity, we made up for in quality! The Rhine Army Horse Show in June,

was the first we entered.

This is the

major British show of the year and involves Hunter Trials, gymkhana events, polo pony and dressage classes, as well as show jumping.

Captain Wilkinson

The meeting finished with the

had a fast if

20km. patrol being raced in a fresh fall of snow that was rapidly turning

they had done it before, we went to

to slush.

We came fourteenth, making

to be placed second in the open Hunter Trials on the first day. We

the slopes.

our overall position in the champion— ships eighth which qualified the team to go on to compete in the British

entered a somewhat unrehearsed team of Captain Parker Bowles on Outlaw, Captain Wilkinson on Nymphet, Captain

National

Campbell

end and

of the fortnight Russell, Farrell Lance-Corporal Shawcross had

improved greatly while the rest of us were capable of going down the slopes with reasonable safety. Trooper O’Toole

was lucky to escape when he passed through Lance-Corporal Shawcross's legs, at stick.

speed,

Working

only

breaking

hours were from

a

ski

about

and

Army

championships

at

Oberjoch. Cornet Reed-Felstead who had shown great promise as a novice langlaufer was claimed by the Alpine team with whom he went to Alpbach. The remaining Ianglaufers all left Lermoos for Oberjoch. There were thirty teams competing

at

Oberjoch,

the

top

ten

of

each

slightly uncontrolled

on

ride

on

Kenbane

Nymphet

Castle

and

Captain Davies on Lady Elenor II, for the Nato team jumping: though unplaced the team did by no means disgrace itself. Captain Davies was placed in the Novice jumping; Lieutenants Goodall and Whetherly swept the board in many of the Gymkhana events; Major Pitman and Captain Parker Bowles both had success in the Polo pony classes.

10 am, when the lifts opened, to 3 or 4 pm. depending. Evenings were passed, often enough, at the Buronhutte owned by

Division. in the first race, the 4 x 10km. relay run in good, fast conditions the Regiment came twenty-first, we also

Lugi and some 2km. up the mountain.

country, in which Lance-Corporal Markwick again distinguished himself by coming seventieth out of two hundred

Castle won both the class L and M jumping competitions at the Bielefeld Horse Show in July. Captain Wilkinson on Sefton was placed second and third in Novice Hunter Trials held by

and eighteen despite having broken a

the

ski 3km. from the finish.

Lancers respectively. Mrs. Hickman‘s Bootsie ridden by Captain Hickman (Life Guards) has also been well placed in both British and German shows this summer.

This was the nearest waterhcle and part of the evening‘s entertainment was to come back down the track by sledge. Seen in daylight it was madness. Even more so at night but nobody noticed it. Lance-Corporal Hatherall was lucky enough to escape with his life and a very sore head

The Regimental team is having one of

the

our

movements, which only Troopers Barden and Russell could do because

The results were at first hilarious though undamaging. However at the

Hockey Notes

J.L.R., R.A.C.’s langlauf team who were

shared

Corporal Harman handing over to did not want it because of the very heavy conditions: our team had their tails up and set about getting ahead.

of thirty teams. It was one of those rare and so satisfying occasions on which everything seemed to go to order, and the only time during the month of races that the unanimous feeling was we had put on the correct wax. Our overall position in the championships was eightienth out of

its most successful seasons and requires only a modest amount of luck to bring honours to the Regiment. Our results to date are:

We stayed in the Allgauer Alps and

The Patrol Race at Oberioch, waitirg for General Cordingley, the inspecting officer. Lieutenant Hayward, Corporal Harman, Lance—Corporal Challefon and Lance»Corporal Markwick

Cordingley we came home twelfth out

All the horses in the stable are now being regularly hunted and it is hoped that after this season more horses and riders will take part in competitions next summer, if training permits.

thirty. The team for all of the races, except the 15km. at Lermoos when Cornet Reed-Felstead raced instead of

were able to begin training immediately.

damp their spirits. In a breakaway down the left and a hard cross our opponents got a goal to put them in the lead for the first time. However, we were not beaten yet. We got going again and put on the pressure to draw

tage and after collecting a very good result from the inspection by General

came twenty-first in the 15km. cross-

The last race

of the season, the 20km, Patrol, was undoubtedly our best performance of the year. We started second last in the running order, usually a disadvan-

Captain

14th/20th

Campbell‘s

Hussars

and

Kenbane

16th/5th

strength and makes us winners of the Detmold League and still battling it out in the B.A.O.R. Divisional Semi-

final.

The R.E.M.E. L.A.D. team, which

fields up to seven of the Regimental team, have reached the quarter finals of the Craftsman's Cup and are in good form. Establishing a good team is not done by drawing names out of a hat. Starting with inter»squadron competitions, winners "B” Squadron, we selected possibles and got down to serious training. Under, the much appreciated, “personal” guidance of C.S.M.l. Knight A.P.T.C. early morning training has produced new players and

the

over

forties

have

proved

that

“there is life in the old dog yet!" (Well done Colonel). A special mention to A.Q.M.S. Hitchcock, Corporal of Horse Melbourne B.A.O.R. and 4th Division players, A.Q.M.S. Hitchock and Corporal Musgrove R.E.M.E. Corps players, Corporal of Horse Melbourne and Corporal Birt Corps players. These representative players do much to keep up the good name of the Regiment. Some of the highlights of the season so far have been—Beating R.A.F. Gutersloh 4-1 away on grass; 3rd Royal Horse Artillery 1-0 in the

B.A.O.R. Cup; Headquarters 4th Division 40, 3-1; 7th Signal Regiment 5-0; 52.

Next

month

we

enter

the

final

games of the season and hope to maintain our record, which will give me a good opening for the next edition.

The Blues and Royals Climbing Club In

May this year 2nd

Lieutenant J.

Snodgrass R.E.M.E. was asked to organise an adventure training exer-

57


cise, in the Austrian Tirol, to be named Infantry Regiments in the Brigade one exercise

“Top

Rope".

Knowing

that

I was a climber and after testing my

of the joint winners, Trooper Brady “C" Squadron, both the runners up,

climbing ability, Mr. Snodgrass invited me to assist him with the training and

Corporal Harman, Command Squadron and Trooper Mountford, “C" Squadron,

preparation for this exercise. The training consisted of trips to the quarry at Leopoldstal on Wednesday afternoons

and

to

a

larger

outcrop

and the team winners were all Blues and

of

Limestone at the lth Hils at the weekends. The training was necessary for the fitness of those who could climb and

the teaching

of those that couldn't.

The

party

and

experience,

was

very Mr.

mixed

in

instructed at Windsor. The next event on the Orienteering Calendar is the Divisional Meeting on

talent

Snodgrass being

very good but modest, myself of long experience up to the grade of Very

26th November for which a team of six and three individuals have been

Difficult, Lance-Corporal March A.C.C. who was a proved leader up to the grade of Severe, but no Alpine experience,

wise,

Craftsman

Trooper

Salmon

Palmer

with

entered.

like-

Basketball

Outward

Bound School training but nothing since

At the time

The Mountaineers and Trooper Scarrott who was at first only intended to drive the Mini-Bus but decided that if he was going to Austria he

may

as

well

climb,

a

by the rigorous Regimental Exercise Programme. Despite this progress was made and all the party reached the

required, technically, to do reasonable climbs

be in

Austria. Neglected, | feel, was personal

fitness for the long steep uphill walks, necessary to reach the foot of most Alpine and Tirolian climbs. We were aware of this and everyone worked hard on the early Austrian walks to get as fit as possible. Myself suffering

more

than

most.

We

for our members.

We have in the club at the time

complete

novice. Training for the trip was hampered

standard able to

climbed

the

of

writing

sixteen

members.

Four

belong to the Austrian Alpine Club, one to the Army Mountaineering Association,

two

with

Alpine

snow

and

ice

training in Italy, five have climbed with Junior Leaders, four have completed courses

at

Outward

Bound

Centres,

one of whom was recommended for Mountain Leadership Certificate and

the first equitation course in October. So far one officer and ten men have been taught basic essentials prior to posting to Household Cavalry Regiment. A five-week preliminary course, which included six grooms from other Regiments has been held. An intermediate course, for those with some riding experience, was passed out by Colonel E. M. Turnbull The Life

which made it impossible to get on the rock. We had good weather

except for this but it seemed a shame that after ‘all; the hard work and planning by Mr. Snodgrass a third of our stay in Austria should have weather that kept us in the hut. Shortly after returning from Austria Snodgrass

left

us; to

go

to

the

Royal Military College of Science at

two novices. We have a club meeting every Friday night, and meet at local climbing areas every other Sunday. We invite anyone interested in the moun-

present there is another intermediate course being run with strong represen-

tains, potholing, climbing, or even just

tation from the LAB. Two further courses, one preliminary and one polo are planned for the spring. By the

walking to contact us.

end of March over sixty personnel will

received

equitation

Regiment

so

far

this

season

are:—

C.S.M.l. Knight, Corporal of Horse Martain, Corporals Birt, Sibley, Rumber-

in

Inter<

1910

and

polo being played between the wars it was to be exactly fifty years before The Blues team again achieved victory in this tournament, having been English runners up in both 1959 and 1961. In 1962, in England, they won the triple crown of Inter-Regimental, Captains and Subalterns and the Champion Cup. In 1963 The Blues were also runners up in Germany. The Royals also have had a long and distinguished career in the world

of

polo.

Captain

Tomkinson

was

Nine Regiments entered for this: The Blues and Royals, Queen‘s Dragoon Guards, 4th/7th Dragoon Guards, 51h Innis Dragoon Guards, Scots Greys,

9th/12th Lancers, 10th Hussars, 13th/ 18th Hussars and 14th/20th Hussars. The draw could not be said to favour

the Regiment, as in the first round they had to play the Skins, a young, fast and well-mounted team, also recently arrived in Germany, who were beaten after a close exciting game by 3-2. The next round against the 14th/ 20th Hussars, who had beaten the 4th/7th Dragoon Guards, resulted in a win for the Regiment 4-1. So the day of the final, Sunday, 8th June was upon us and the two finalists, both from Detmold, The Blues

Lamb.

the Household Cavalry Regiment, the remainder being Remounts from Melton Mowbray. The primary purpose of the

Orienteering

Polo Both The Blues and The Royals have

between

in

of: No. 1 Lieutenant M. R. Sorby, No, 2

had a strong tradition as polo-playing

officers and men due to be posted to

Orienteering is a relatively new sport which the Regiment has seized upon with some enthusiasm and a degree of

the Mounted Regiment.

success.

Regiments in the past. The Blues had the distinction of

1951—54, they were the Champion Regiment out of almost 100,000 troops In Germany, for three years running. The Royals were runners up in the lnter-Regimentals of 1957 and 1959. It is not surprising with this back-

Captain A. H. Parker-Bowles, No. 3 Major J. H. Pitman, Back Major W. S.

stables is to teach horsemastership to The horses are

regiments

stationed

in

It involves a high standard

also used for recreational riding, the Weser Vale Hunt, and courses eligible

of map-reading and crosscountry running. Ten—day courses were run on

to other regiments.

it

The

stable

Troop

block

hangar

is the

and

many

soldiers

summer

the

May,

Despite some stiff opposition from the

arrive

Queen's

Windsor

the total being complete in time for

to

the

at

became quite proficient. During the late

these were followed by a couple of Regimental practices in preparation for Wednesday, 15th October when The Blues and Royals had been asked to organise the Brigade meeting.

existing walls. Horses started

of

former

designed eighteen excellent loose boxes together with a forge, tack, changing and wash rooms within the

and

has joined the Regiment) we hope to finish in the top three of the League. Players who have represented the

it won the

helped other Germany.

enthusiasm. Lieutenant Cooper has taken:,his place and with no climbing experience is doing a good job in helping arrange further trips to the areas

again in 1912. This really took some doing at that time. In spite of much

India,

Tournament

The Regiment has fifteen Government horses stabled in Lothian Barracks. Eleven of these are Tr00p horses from

Squadrons ran their own meetings and

local

were drawn against 7th Signals Regiment, with a weakened team due to players away on courses and leave, the Regiment put up a very good show but just lost by two points. Height is the main thing missing in the team at the moment, but with

in

during the winter. This has been of great value to the Regiment and also

Equitation

Major Boucher has

new

Regimental

selected to play for England against America in 1914, when the team won both matches. In India the Regiment enjoyed great success, winning over twenty tournaments when there between 1930-36. Egypt has been the place where The Royals perhaps particularly excelled. Many tournaments were won when the Regiment was there

Dragoon Guards.

recce.

stationed

In the first round of the Army Cup we

low, Lance-Corporals Hamilton, Mitcheil, Lloyd, Gibbs, Troopers Barden, McGinley, Ward, Laycock, Craftsman

leadership and skill but even more his

to

The Regimental Polo Team

instruction

Recce

Alps,

press the

At

Shrivenham, we miss very much his

get as many mountaineering courses

to

off courses and Craftsman Lamb (who

have of 2178m. or 7000ft., enough to justify the hard work applied. We stayed in Austrian Alpine Club huts and were very comfortable whilst sitting out three days of foul weather

of going

Regimental team have played seven matches on the Detmold Lemgo League, of which they have won four.

Corporal Sibley, Trooper Barden back Guards, on the 12th of December.

Fleishbank on the north face, a height

Mr.

Royals.

The winning team was “A" Squadron for which Cornet ReedFelstead, Lance-Corporals Chapple and Caple, and Trooper Binch ran. LanceCorporal Chapple, Troopers Brady, Mountfort and Binch had all been

in

playing the 1st Life Guards in the earliest recorded game of polo in England when the game was brought

from India in 1869. They also won the very first Champion Cup in 1876. Polo was played on the Household Cavalry ground at Datchet, only sold after the

last

war,

and

a

strong

Regimental

team was always in evidence over many years. Although the Regiment never

succeeded in achieving the standard of those Cavalry Regiments which were

ground

1927-29 and much

that

The

Blues

later,

and

and

Royals

and

1st

The

Queen's

Dragoon Guards played before a large crowd of British and German civilian specators. A good, fast game followed with the Regiment running out the winners by four goals to two.

The

Regimental

team

consisted

Royals

H. Boucher. During the summer the Regiment played, either as a team or represented by individual players, at Munster, Dusseldorf, Hohne. Hamburg, Berlin,

be

Windsor, Tidworth, Morocco and Rome.

reckoned with in B.A.O.R. poloz None the less it was most gratifying that, only

In the course of a long and varied season, with much travel and extensive

a bare two months after amalgamation, the Regiment won the coveted Intermost the Tournament, Regimental important trophy in B.A.O.R.

periods when their owners were on exercise, the regimental ponies were

were

expected

to

be

a

force

to

kept exceedingly fit and well. Our warmest thanks must go to the grooms, 59

58


whose long hours and intelligent work

(DUB AFFILIA TEII REGIMENTS

enabled us to enjoy such a satisfactory season's polo.

J.H.P.

Adventure Training Throughout the year since amalgamation, we have managed to send various adventure training parties away.

Cornet G. T. R.rBirdwocd has been in

charge of the canoeing which has

had a successful year. A small band of sailors, under the recently departed Cornet Steel made their presence known throughout most of the Southern Baltic. Corporal Pitt has been threat—

ening to

down

scissors

recent visit to the

climb. Approximately

Tirol)

one

(since so

The Regimental Training Staff. Left to Right: Corporal Sherwin, Trooper Wildgoose, Corporal of Horse Burton-Johnson, Trooper Nisket. Captain R. C. Wilkinson, Trooper Butcher, Corporal of Horse King (The Life Guards), Trooper lkins and Lance-Corporal Partridge

his

he

can

hundred

sol-

A troop from the Governor Genera/’5 Horse Guards Mounted Squadron on their way to escort His Excellency the Governor General at the 1969 Queen’s Plate

diers went to Bavaria for an escape and evasion exercise. Although heavily handicapped to begin with by three days of torrential rain pour, it turned

GOVERNOR GENERAL’S HORSE GUARDS At this writing we, in the Governor General's Horse

Guards of Canada are awaiting with bated breath the

out to be a tremendous success.

edict of our government.

Due to the stabilization of military expenditures at 1969 levels the militia is to experience its second cut-back in five years. As you are all aware the

Rugby So

“Goldie"

has finally appeared

at

Detmold.

First

experimented

stabilization

on

the front of B.A.O.R. Newspapers. The great war-cry of “Come on the Eagles" echoes relentlessly round the hangars

Corooral ‘Harman. 2nd individual in Orienteering

Trooper Hardy receiving the winner's plaque from Lieutenant Colonel R. M. H. Vickers, M.V.O., M.B.E.

season by Sergeant Arnott being chosen to represent B.A.O.R. Although missing his experience at centre, we managed to win our first three matches with a total of 114 for and 6 against. Our front row is well led by

Corporal

Louis

sounding

remarkably

Although

Freeman,

with

out for 40.

Each

Saturday

the

winning

Regimental

Cross-Country team will be competing

in the Westphalia League for units in B.A.O,R. and in early February the Brigade and Division meetings.

Cricket Notes

on crusades to Soltau.

poral Cox—7 overs, 1 maiden 1 for 7

only two matches, both Cup Games. The first against the Queen's Dragoon

Saturday, 1st November.

Guards who we beat. A good innings of 29 not out by Corporal of Horse

first sixteen to count.

twenty,

the

The course was

five miles long, starting and finishing on the airfield, mainly uphill and the

going heavy.

26th Engineers’ Regi-

we seem to spend more time each year

The Regimental Cross-Country run was held on the austerely cold morning of

Each Squad-

out for 47. Only Corporal of Horse Emery (14) and Corporal Harris (11)

minutes for 3.

During the last season, we played

of

subjects);

The second game was against the 26th Engineer Regiment on their ground. We batted first and were all

ment were in trouble at the beginning of their innings when Corporal of Horse Melbourne—7 overs, 1 maiden, 4 for 7, and Squadron Quartermaster Cor-

the Cricket notes, not because we can not write or play cricket but because

team

Squadron Quartermaster 3 for 11, at one stage of Squadron Quartermaster had 2 for 0 in four overs. Dragoon Guards were all

seemed to be able to master the bowling, although Squadron Quartermaster Corporal Cox stayed for 45

behind the scrum half.

a

of

Squadron was third.

the

Each year, it becames harder to write

produced

reduction

which Colonel Redgrave will attest). Our current organizational set-up is based upon three Squadrons plus a Headquarters Squadron. “A" Squadron under Major J. Burns is responsible for General Military Training (recruit and basic corps

were

we unfortunately are still slightly weak

ron

a

Corporal of Horse Melbourne taking 5

Squadron

by forwards,

Cross-Country

in

for 20, and Corporal Cox the game, Corporal Cox The Queen's

"C"

cry‘s

like the Beatles.

inundated

resulted

team with Lance-Corporal Markwick, Command Squadron, the individual winner of the Mayor of Windsor's Cup, Corporal Bright, “C” Squadron was second and Lieutenant Hayward “C”

at the Cavalry Cup match against 2nd

Our lines of communication were broken at the beginning of the 69-70

already

will function as a viable military entity. To this end we are pursuing our annual training, cavalry and light armoured, with our usual vigour and exuberance (to

with

Royal Tank Regiment. Although with feathers pruned and talcns sharpened the visitors unfortunately won a good close run match 8-5.

has

Canada's N.A.T.O. commitment, etc. However, the Commanding Officer is confident, as are we all that the Governor General’s Horse Guards

Melbourne, helped the Regiment to score 70. Once again we hoped that the

us.

bowlers would

This

they

win the game

did,

in

fine

for

style.

Major

R.

Robertson’s

”B"

Squadron

The Spring usually heralds our second qualification firing. From the point of view of public duties we are not as busy or as committed as you. our Allied Regiment. However, we do have some commitment. We provided a Mounted Vice Regal Escort at the annual running of the Queen's Plate last June for His Excellency the Governor General of Canada, and have just recently

provided another mounted escort at the official opening of the

Royal Winter

Fair.

is

responsible for corps subjects to bring the graduate of “A” Squadron up to the Militia Crewman Reconnaissance group 1 level; ”C" Squadron under Major J. McCrimmon who is also Training Officer responsible for further Corps training to give our men practical application of their Major D. Freisen of Headquarters training in the field. Squadron is responsible for all the other bits and pieces Captain E. Constantinides, as recruiting. including Cavalry Officer is responsible for ensuring that mounted

Squadron is up to any and all types of escorts. Last, but by no means least, we have the Regiment Headquarters Group, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel M. B. W. Davis, C.D., A.D.C., with Major H. Forbes,

2ic and Captain K. Marshman as Adjutant. had

bowled

really

well,

but

had

So far this training year, we have accomplished a

to

come off because of Cup rules which

All Squadrons have gone

good deal of field training. away to C.F.B.

(a

new way

in

our

intergrated set-up

allowed each bowler only 7 overs, 26th Engineers Regiment then scored the remaining runs without further loss with four overs left to play.

of saying “Camp". "Base", or “Station") Borden, on a few occasions to get field work. The culmination was a combined Squadron familiarization on the 3.5 rocket launcher, and the M 7.2 Anti~tank weapons, All ranks

We hope in the coming season to do much better and play far more games.

had the opportunity of firing at least eight each of the

above two weapons. to

the

rifle

ranges

Naturally, the Regiment has gone on

at

least

one

occasion

so

far.

The winners of the Lorne Scot's Trophy at the Ontario Rifle Association Competition

61 60


When the Provincial Parliament opens in January we shall probably provide the Lieutenant Governor with a Mounted Escort, as is our custom for every Parliament

opening. of

The Regiment paraded in force on Sunday, the 9th November, 1969. for our annual Remembrance Day

parade through the streets of downtown Toronto.

problem, especially to we part-time soldiers in the Canadian Militia. This past October, the Regimental Rifle Team attended the annual Ontario Rifle Association competition at C.F.B., Borden. Lieutenant B. Palanik, one of our recently appointed subalterns came away with a high

We

score in the Junior Ontario Militia Service Sniper match,

had a good turn-out of not only the Regiment, but also

and a sub—team under Captain B. Conway, our paymaster,

of the Governor General‘s

came away with the highest score in the Lorne Scot Trophy competition.

Horse

Guards Association

and of our affiliated Cadet Corps.

KCL Y

(Sharpshaoters)

Notes from the affiliated Yeomanry Regiment have not appeared in “The Eagle” for some years and readers may be forgiven for thinking

8th KURRIASIER REGIMENT Two visits have been made to the

that, like much of the Territorial Army, the Kent and County of London Yeomanry have sunk without trace. This is fortunately far from the case, and we are very pleased to appear in this first number of ”The

8th Kurriasiers at Cologne. In May S.C.M. Vargar and S.Q.M.C. Poulter attended a reception at which the

Blue and Royal", to renew acquaintance with old Royals' friends and

Last May we had the honour of having Field Marshal

If any Blues and Royals find themselves in Torcnto,

Sir Gerald Templer with us for our annual Mess Dinner.

we expect that you will contact us and allow us to reciprocate the hospitality shown to our Commanding Officer and Regimental Sergeant Major (they finally recuperated) during their visit to you upon your

affiliation of the two Regiments was renewed. This liaison started when

to establish contact with the Blues and Royals. The Field Marshal entertained us all with several anecdotes relating to the recent formation of Blues and Royals. As a result of his talk we look forward to not

being amalgamated with any other unit. ironing out traditions, customs, dress, etc., seems to be an insolvable

THE ROYAL CANADIAN DRAGOONS 1883. On that date a regular force School of Cavalry was authorized by the Canadian Government and started with training Cavalrymen for the Militia Regiments. The school was reorganized in 1892 on a Regimental basis and renamed the Canadian Dragoons, the Royal being

added the following year. Upon the outbreak of war in South Africa in 1899 the unit was recruited up to a strength of two Squadrons of three hundred and seventyvone all ranks and two

hundred and seventy-five horses. It was redesignated the 1st Battalion Canadian Mounted Rifles and landed at Cape Town on the 21st of March, 1900, under that name. However, representation was made to Army Headquarters and their name reverted to Royal Canadian Dragoons several months later and has remained so

ever since. By 21st April, 1900, the Regiment had joined the British Corp of Mounted infantry at Bloemfontein and joined in the general advance to Pretoria and Johannes-

burg.

By November of that year the war had evolved

in a guerrilla type conflict and the Royal Canadian Dragoons were being employed as covering force for Major-General Smith-Dorrien's flying column of two

badge, the Royal Cipher, was never rescinded so the Regiment still retains the right to the two Badges.

The

was withdrawing

Lilfontein to

numbers of Boers.

The Regiment although outnumbered

Royal

Yeomanry

without Royal Proclamation in times of national emergency and the Regiment

is

expected

to

achieve

a

standard

of

training

which

will

with Ferrets.

213th PANZER BATTALION 213th

Panzer

Battalion

is

our

neighbouring German Regiment, being stationed at Augustdorf just outside Detmold. Friendship with this battaIian was started in 1964 between the W.O.'s and CsoH. Mess and their Sergeants’ Mess, when the Blues were

stationed at Herford.

The Liaison has

rapidly disappearing, it was decided at the beginning of this year that the moment in the throes of converting to an Armoured Car Squadron.

in 1970.

German

advance

short

of

Amiens

and

prevented the splitting of the British and French Armies. The action was savage indeed and the Canadian Cavalry

This has meant an increase in establishment from eighty to one hundred and thirty and we have had to go out and recruit these extra fifty. We

Brigade lost three hundred men and eight hundred horses

in ninety minutes.

The Royal Canadian Dragoons was

back in Canada by May, 1919, and took over their old

are happy to report that even with wastage we are now only about ten We are particularly short of our target with recruits still coming in. pleased to have a support troop again as this provides an excellent

barracks, where they remained until September, 1940, when they were placed on active service and became an

training ground for recruits without previous military experience as well

Armoured

as being a troop with quite remarkable spirit and zest.

Regiment.

The Royal Canadian Dragoons landed in Italy on the

regroup

before proceeding to

France.

By the

2nd

of

April the unit was part of the 2nd Canadian Corps in Holland and were involved in the final battles of the war in that country. On the 15th of April the unit liberated the town of Leeuwarden in Northern Holland and the anniversary is celebrated annually both and at the Regiment.

in

Leeuwarden

over only

discontinued in 1940 when the Regiment was Mechanized and since then the Ride has been performed by the

Now the Royal Canadian Dragoons have been posted to Europe once again and will be stationed in Lhar by late summer of 1970 when they will be able to renew

Mounties). During this time also the Springbok was adopted as the Regimental Badge although the previous

acquaintances with their new affiliated Regiment, The Blues and Royals.

was

grudgingly provided

the

the air portable role was no longer relevant and the Squadron is at

the

Ride with

fact,

Army

equipment,

museum and a luncheon party.

stopped

of the Regiment still had plenty of overseas duty.

in

obsolete

in

took part in the Cavalry Charge at Morieul Wood which

supplied recce Squadrons for UN. duty, three Squadrons to the Middle East and four to Cyprus so the members

Ride,

former Territorial

ceremony

This was followed by an visit to their “Armoury”

now grown, and apart from entertainments, the two regiments will be sharing training days with each other

It was during this period up to the first World War that the Royal Canadian Dragoons started the Musical (the

of

mounted again on the 30th of March, 1918, when they

present time.

America

ration

With the world-wide commitments of the British Army

Quebec, and “B” Squadron and Regiment Headquarters

which they entertained audiences all

sparse

of the Canadian Cavalry Brigade in France. They spent the bulk of the war as infantry in the trenches but were

in Toronto.

and

contrast with the

enable it to go straight into action. The Kent and County of London Yeomanry (Sharpshooters) Squadron started in 1967 as an air-portable squadron equipped only

Dragoons found themselves overseas once again as part

After a tour of duty with B.A.O.R. from 1957 to 1959 at Iseriohn the Regiment was based at Camp Gagetown on Canada's east coast where it has remained to the

Canada

a

wreath-laying

November. interesting

Regiment is equipped as a regular Armoured Car Regiment. With this goes an obligation on the part of its members for immediate call-out

1945, when they were pulled out of the line to rest and

five to one successfully beat off the Boer attacks and enabled the column to withdraw safely. Three members of the Royal Canadian Dragoons received the Victoria Cross for their actions during this running fight and a fourth man was awarded the DOM. This was almost the last action for the unit and it was back to Canada in January, 1901, with “A" Squadron stationed in St. Jean.

annual

of these animals had alerted a sentry to the presence of Boers attempting to creep up on the bivouac and the men had been stood to in time to beat off the attack. On the 4th of May, 1915, the Royal Canadian

Belfast

after an unsuccessful attempt to destroy a Boer Commando, when it came under sever harrassment from large

Later in the year, a party led by the Secondin-Command attended their

with

On the 7th of November from

In

Kaiser Wilhelm II was honorary Colonel of the Royals and King George V reciprocated this by becoming Hono— rary Colonel of the 8th Kurriasier.

Yeomanry

little antelope as on one occasion the antics of a group

within the 8th Army until the Senio river battle in January, the column

This is made

Headquarters Squadron Berkshire and Westminster Dragoons. All still retain their Regimental identity in such matters as uniform. We have five honorary colonels and five guidons.

Springbok was adopted in grateful appreciation of the

9th of November, 1943, as a Recce unit and remained Regiments of British infantry.

were reduced to one, the Royal Yeomanry Regiment. up of the following: ”A" Squadron Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry. "B" Squadron Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry. “C" Squadron Kent and County of London (Sharpshooters). “D" Squadron North Irish Horse

formation.

A SHORT HISTORY OF

The Regiment began its existence on 21st December,

A word of explanation for our absence would seem to be required. As a result of the 1967 reorganisation the twenty Yeomanry Regiments

During this period, however, the Regiment

We are also

busily training Saiadin drivers and gunners—only a very few members of the Squadron have had any experience on this vehicle before. The bulk of our new vehicles arrive in the new year and we shall be expected to have completed conversion by camp in Norfolk next May. The high point of our first two years in the new role was undoubtedly

the 1968 camp in B.A.O.R. For this we drove all our own vehicles out of Croydon down to Southampton, loaded on an L.S.L., landed at Bremerhaven thirty-six hours later and drove dOWn the autobahn to

READING BLUE COAT SCHOOL The

Bluecoat‘s Army C.C.F.

sec-

tion wear the cap badge and titles of the Regiment; a custom, which has been continued from the Blues. Due to our training commitments in 1969,

their C.C.F. was unable to visit us, however they will be spending their annual camp with the Regiment in July this year.

1st REGIMENT DE GUIDES

Wolfenbuttel where we were looked after by 5th Royal Tank Regiment. After ten days of troop, squadron, regimental and inter-regimental

The 1st Guides, the senior Belgian Cavalry Regiment has been stationed

(with 5th Royal Tank Regiment) training not to mention a weekend in

at Duren since 1956. It is presently an armoured Regiment equipped with American M47 Tanks, forming part of the fst Belgian Army Corps in Germany. The Regiment is well known

Hamburg, we drove back again and reached Croydon without leaving It was an one vehicle behind or even having to fill in one F.M.T. 3. next invaluable experience and we all look forward very much to our

B.A.O.R. camp in 1971. A word about the permanent staff without whom we could not survive. Because of the greatly increased administrative load we are, by former standards, well provided for. We have a Squadron Adjutant, 'three Squadron Corporal Major, Squadron Quartermaster Corporal,

for its historic charge at Burkel in 1918. whose 50th anniversary was recently

celebrated in Brussels. In 1969 the Ier Guides won the national

stage of the

Canadian

Army

parent regiment, Corporals of Horse, 3 Corporal and two Troopers. As these posmons, the Blues and Royals are given first opportunity to fill

Trophy for Gunnery: the Regiment beat

then the but if they cannot provide anyone with the right qualifications

their eight rival Tank Regiments in not

At present just under half positions are offered to R.A.C. regiments. the Permanent Staff are from the Blues and Royals.

only the competition Cup but also for the Best Individual Troop Trophy, 63

62


NOMINAL ROLLS

At Home and Overseas

enjoy “A” SQUADRON ORBAT Squadron Headquarters Troop

DOUBLE DIAMOND

Maior H. 0. Hugh Smith Captain N. M. B. Roberts S.C.M. Lane, 3. CoH. Aueutt, G. L/Cpl. O’Connor L/Cpl. Villers L/Cpl. Chessher Cpl. Worthy

and

3 Troop Ct. R. M. Reed Felstcad L/Cpl. Robinson L/Cpl. Smith 86 Tpr. Greer Tpr. Haley Tpr. McGreary

CoH. Stephenson Cpl. Lisney L/Cpl. Chapple Tpr. Williamson L/Cpl. Caple Tpr. Douglas 74

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Mead Chillingwortb Maskell McKenzie MacLeod

Administration Troop S.Q.M.C. Hayes Cpl. Meldrum Tpr. Ford

V

0]. 8K International

1 Troop

poms. DIAMOND ~

In bottle and on draught

Tpr. Hutchinson Tpr. Binch

57 .5)

Ct. The Hon. M. S. A. Agar CoH. Midwinter Cpl. Boon L/Cpl. Mullen L/Cpl. Harris L/Cpl. Cousins

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Russell Henchion Mazurkiewitz Allen 87 Nelson

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Shaw Page Shillabeer Gillett Shields

2 Troop

4 Troop CoH. Hayward CoH. Hill Cpl. Cain Tpr. Grimes Cpl. Morris Tpr. Parker

Tpr. Gillingham L/Cpl. Cooksey Tpr. Cooper L/Cpl. Tompkins Tpr. Allen 68 Tpr. Bates

L.A.D.

Ct. H. T. de Messel CoH. Stacey Cpl. Tucker Tpr. Chamberlain L/Cpl. Triggs Tpr. Webb Tpr. Smith

S/Sgt. Chaszczewski Sgt. Ward Sgt. Jasper Cpl. Murray L/Cpl. Nuesink

L/Cpl. Shawcross Cl'n. Farley Cin. Shore Cin. Booth Cin. Saul

L/Cpl. Doyle

”B” SQUADRON Officers Maior J. H. Pitmnn Captain G. H. Tweedie Lt. R. N. 0. Couper Ct. G. T. R. Birdwood

Troopers Ct. A. J. T. Carter Ct. P. R. L. WalkerOkeover

Senior N.C.O.'s S.C.M. Mackay, J. S.Q.M.C. Cox, W. G.

CoH. Cook, K. W.

CoH. Grinyer, R. B. C. CoH. Livingstone, J. A. CoH. Melbourne, D. W.

CoH. Davis, J.

THE Junior N.C.0.’s

PARKER GALLERY 2 ALBEMARLE STREET PICCADILLY LONDON, WIX 3HF Telephone: 01-499 5906/7

Specialists in Military Prints

Gibbs, D. A. G.

Adams, K. G. . O’Halloran, D. A. G. . Parkes, M . . Rumbelow, H. W. p . Scammell, J. A. G. L/Cpl. Back, R. L/Cpl. Bennett, R. L/Cpl. Cox, B. R. L/Cpl. Donnelly, A. J. W. L/Cpl. Fox, G. A.

. Gregory, D. Hamilton, M. i'. J. . Longhurst, D. G. . Maskell, W. L Mitchell, 1’. Robinson, D. . Rose, C. W. . Stacey, M. B. Trist-Collins, R. G.

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Blomquist, I. R. Brown, J. H. Byrne, D. R. Callaghan, N. M. P. Clews, J. Collett, G. A. Cooke, L. Copsey, R. J. French, C. J. Fry, I. E. C. Gambrell, D. C. Gardiner, T. E. Garrett, J. W. Harkness, I’. J. Hennessy, W. Howard, J. McAnulty, R. E. McGowan, G. M. Mellor, D.

. . . . .

Nixon, R. J. O’Toole, C. Ratclifie, H. Roberts, A. K. Scott, C. A. Smart, W.

. Smith, I. E. . Standen, D. C. Staples, H. F. . Thornburrow, F. H.

. Ward, L. J. \Vaters, G. D.

. Welsh, M. . \Vest, J. T.

. Williams, R. 1., 92 Wood, M. J. . Wyatt, A. R. Young, D. P., 62

L.A.D. S/Sgt. Vokes, M. B. Sgt. Kesby, R. B. Cpl. Dufi, I.

Cpl. Watt, A. R. L/Cpl. Butler, G. L/Cpl. Mills, P. w.

L/Cpl. Mitchell, 1’. C. Cfn. Davies . Mansbridge, F. J. . Massey, R. T. . Tong, P. L. . Tyson, I’. G.

“C” SQUADRON Squadron Headquarters Troop

2 Troop

Captain R. 5. Bell (R.C.D.)

Lieutenant M. R. Sorby CoH. Chapman Cpl. Bellas L/Cpl. Chaloner L/Cpl. Reid Tpr. Savage Tpr. Wischhusen

Captain R. C. Wilkinson S.C.M. Clark CoH. Lawson Cpl. Pinks

Water Colours, Paintings, etc.

Cpl. Bright

Also in Sporting, Marine and

L/Cpl. Collett L/Cpl. Putland L/Cpl. Langton

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Thompson 82 Thomson 21 Cofi‘cy McMahon Stevenson Ollin Rawsthorne

. Phillips Davis . Seddon . Borden . Ricketts

Topographical Pictures and Cleaning and Restoration of All Types ROYAL HORSE GUARDS WHITEHALL Oil Painting on canvas by Ph. Baratt, 1884

1 Troop

3 Troop

Lieutenant H. T. Hayward CoH. Emery Cpl. Jones L/Cpl. Shaw

Ct. C. T. Goodall CoH. Fortt Cpl. Sibley L/Cpl. Benn Tpr. Dodsworth Tpr. Jones 84

L/Cpl. Smith 04 Tpr. Blackley

Founded 1750

. Cooper . McIntyre . Buckle Quinn

Brady . Guy

. Williams 95 Sowerby


{ Troop

Squadron L.A.D.

(.1. G. A_. Corry Reid

Tpr. Bramble

CoH. Olltngton

Tpr. Steel

S/Sgt. Thomas

L/Cpl. Smith 09

Cpl. Garvey L/Cpl. Mufl Tpr. Evans

Tpr. Stiekles Tpr. Perry Tpr. Goodman

SEL Walker Cpl. Stone L/Cpl- Ca"

Cln. Holman Cfn. Avards Cin. Wright

Admlnlstratlon Troop

S.Q.M.C.. Hearn

L/Cpl. Kennedy

CoH. Stntnth Cpl. Thurston

Tpr. Mountfort Tpr. King

L.A.D. R.E.M.E.

Ft.A.P.c.

L/Cpl. Elliott

at . St I

L/Cpl. Love

or: Lair:s

Captain. I. C. Clarke S/Sgt. St. John James Sgt. Farnworth Cpl. Ashley

C _ Cgl £3553 Cpl. Sims

' 2mm.' Brnoét ' szrctt

1g.

Sig. Tracey

Reglmental Headquarters Troop

Recce Troop

Lieutenant Colonel RMM- H. Vickers, .V.0. M.B.E. Maior. G. F. Lane-Fox 3

Ct. C. H. Boone

{4;gpi. gltg'ris p.

a

Tpr. Haine

Edwards 36

L/Cpl. Charleton

Tpr. Howson

S'Q M.C‘ €133]:

£13335 81

L/Cpl. Forester

Tpr. Jones 19

Cpl. Embree

Patrick

L/Cpl' Markw'ck

.CVarga

Cpl. Ford Cpl. Horan Cpl. Mullins L/Cpl. Carroll L/Cpl. Mee

Pritchard . Proost Salisbury Sanderson

R,O_R. Troop S.Q.M.C. D. J. \Vennell CoH. Desborough Cpl. Docherty Cpl. Freeman Cpl. Sturrock Cpl. Weston

L/Cpl. Provost Tpr. Baldwin Tpr. Douglas Mus. Platt Mus. Parsons

HEADQUARTERS

. . L/Cpl. T1mrms Tpr. Oliver Tpr. Mchlay

. I’ritchett

Stalwart Troop Buckman . Godding . Kendon

Hughes

Sedgewiek

Stevenson L/Cpl. Heatheote L/Cpl. Moloney

Slater Wilkinson Young 68

GymnaSIum A.I.I’.T. Cpl. Birt A.I.P.T. L/Cpl. Lloyd

A.I.P.T. Tpr. Dean

Storeman Tpr. Hardtng Storeman Tpr. Priestley D.R.0. Tpr. Hewitt Barber Cpl. Pitt

S.Q.M.C. S.Q.M.C. Peck

Quartermas‘er Q.M. Captain W. A. Stringer R.Q. M. C. R.Q.M.C. Crabb 0p Union S.Q. M.C. Preece

Signs Cpl. Hildred Tailor L/Cpl. Coles

Acen. Cpl. McKenna M955 N-C-O- L/CPI- Emmett ACC‘S- L/CPI- ShEEWOOd Steward L/CPI- H1“

Clothing CoH. Howick “'orks CoH. Millett Clerk Cpl. Greene Families Cpl. Clay Accn. Cpl. Craig Rations Cpl. Dickman

Carpenter L/Cpl. Kay Saddler L/Cpl. Hatherall Clerk Tpr. Laycock Butcher Tpr. Smaldon Clothing Tpr. Watson Farm Cpl. Jones 502

S.Q.M.C. Heath Clerk Cpl. Jones 323 Stores Cpl. O’Dwyer Dvr/Ord. L/Cpl. Notridge

Steward Steward Stewart Orderly Orderly Orderly

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Gibson Parkinson Shell Hall Lake Lloyd 388

P.0.L. Cpl. Elmslie P.0.L. Tpr. Stainsby Storeman Cpl. Anslow

Storeman Storernan Storeman Storeman Storeman Storeman Dvr/Ord.

L/Cpl. Crowley L/Cpl. Haighton Tpr. Corarn Tpr. Hardgrave Tpr. Marshall Tpr. White Tpr. Weller

Caterer Col-I. Williams

Steward Tpr. Davidson

Accn/Ord. Cpl. Mannering

Tpr. Johnsoit, L. S. L/Cpl. Jones, I’. CoH. Kelsall, C. G.

S/Cpl. Doxcy, A. Tpr. Drogomireckl, J.

L/Cpl. Kettley, B. L/Cpl. Lane, E. L.

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. T . Tgi. Cpl. Tpr. Tpr.

Lawson, I’. Lees, M. J. MaeFarlane, I. McGregor, P. MacKenzie, I. Maddarns, R. J. Malia, A. 1'. k' R. E. M l' M25323: ID. Mapley, L. G. Marsh, T. P. Marshall, J. McWilliarns, J. McBryan, A. Moore S. N. Cpl. Neatsey, T. R. Tpr. 0’ German, I. W. P. . Owen R. A.

Perrin:BJ. G. Price,B J. Purcell, MB G. Reynolds,B .J. . Ricketts, H. P.

Tpr. Roberts, P. J. Tpr. Rougvie, M. L. Tpr. Salisbury, K. W. CoH. Sellars, J.

L/Cpl. Share, J. C. L/Cpl. Smith, B. Tpr. Spurs, D. t B. W. t T Tgi. SSetr’evens, B. Cpl. Stubley, I. Tpr. Swan, R. G Tpr. Thompson, P. L/Cpl. Thornton, A. P. Tpr. Urquhart, M. . T r. Waldron R. V. C31. Warren, 3W. J Tpr. Wasp, G. T . W t on C. E.

C51. Weastswood, A. J M. Tpr. Williams, M. Cpl. Wills-Smithi,’ J. J. Tpr. Winstone,P .C.

H.Q. SQUADRON HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT

Tpr. Amey, P. G. Tpr. Bates, D. E. L/Cpl. Bennett, T. ' Tpr. Blumenthal, P. Tpr. Bond, Tpr. Boardman, J.

Tpr. Finnie, J. F. Cpl. Fisher, J. Tpr. Fletcher, S. Tpr. Flude, A. T. L/Cpl. Fry, M. G. W.0.I Giles, R Tpr. Gratton, A.

L/Cpl. Law, K. Tpr. Lazenby, R. Tpr. Lees, G. A Tpr. Lewis, W. Tpr. Manetta, M. Cpl. Mansfield, R. Cpl. Marchington, L.

L/Cpl. Reed, N. Cpl. Roberts, P. Tpr. Sammons, T. S.Q. M. C. Smith, P. L/Cpl. Staveley, T. Tpr. Stokes, M Cpl. Thompson, T.

Cpl. Bradley, A.

CoH. Hawley, H.

L/Cpl. Tomlinson, J.

Groom Blacks Tpr. Ikins

L/Cpl. McGregor, D.

Farrier Col-I. King Polo L/Cpl. Catlin L/Cpl. Patridge Groom Blacks Tpr. Butcher

Groom Blacks Tpr. Nisbct Groom Blacks Tpr. Wildgoose

Tpr. Chillingworth, G. Cpl. Cross, C. J. CoH. Clayton, J. S.Q.M.C. Cooper, J.

L/Cpl. Henderson, C. L/Cpl. Jones, R. Tpr. Jones, R. Tpr. Kilpatrick, C

Tpr. Payne, L. R. Tpr. Paul, C. Tpr. Pyne, l’. L/Cpl. Rankin, A.

Tpr. Twinn, Tpr. Waterman, D. L/Cpl \Vhite. A. W.0.II \Voodman, N. J.

L/Cpl. Kissoek, D. C. M. CoH. Lee, I’. A.

Tpr. Bolton, M. P. Tpr. Eastwood, P. Staff/Cpl. Ellis, D. Tpr. Graves, T. J. CoH. Holt, M. L. Cpl. Hunter, T. Tpr. Kemp, I. G.

Miscellaneous Bde.

Ofirs.

Driver Tpr. Fuller Driver Tpr. Grant

A.C.C.

Driver Tpr. Harding

W.0.II Newbigging

Driver Tpr. Hart Driver Tpr. Johnson Driver Tpr. Northover Driver Tpr. O’Connell Driver Tpr. Robinson Driver Tpr. Toney Driver Tpr. Walters I’.R.I. Bus Tpr. Scarrott Staff Car L/Cpl. Hester

Sgt. MacDonald Cpl. Barnett Cpl. Garth Cpl. Wright L/Cpl. Conway Lee L/Cpl. Edmond

L/Cpl. McLaughlin L/Cpl. Maguire L/Cpl. March

A.P.T.C.

66

Tpr. Davies: K. E. Tprr. Dearden, J. I’. CoH. Donnelly, J. M.

T1"- 3" 1 '

Medical Centre Med. 0rd. L/Cpl. Feldwick

Tpr. Aindow, R. J. Tpr. Edwards, T. J. D. L/Cpl. Arnold, E. G. L/Cpl. Frampton, D. L/Cpl. Ayres, C. E. Tpr. Garnett, I. R. Cpl. Baldwin, K. D. Tpr. Gasson, J. N. Cpl. Barr, M. H. Tpr. Griffiths, J. R. Tpr. Grimes, G. W. Tpr. Beecham, K.D Tpr. Grogan, I. G L/Cpl. Brown, M. R. T 1-. Ha ue S. R. T pr. B runton A . J . Tpr. Butler, 12.1%.. Heigtesy, M. J. Tpr. Higgins, G. F. Tpr. Chambers, S. Tpr. Hill, G. R. Tpr. Church, M. T. Tpr. Cooper, J. Tpr. Holt, A. J. Tpr. Corker, T. Tpr. Houzam, J. B. Tpr. 803;, P. NVIV 'If/Cle Howe]ll,vD. G. pr. r1 ge . pr. ows . Tpr. Hyatt: S. P. Tpr. Cross, ,P. G. Tpr. gui-rrtli, €4.13. TOH-JJhmiesthE S. pr. az1e . . pr. e ries . .

Groom Polo Tpr. Hannant Groom Polo Tpr. Hayward

20 Armd.

R. M. 0. Surg. Major J. P. A. Page Dvr/Ord. Tpr. Seager

Squadron Leader Maior The Hon. A. H. G. B o ht Squadron 2/i.c. Captain J. F. Mackie r 11g on 1 Troop Leader Lieutenant R. C. P. Wetherley 2 Troop Leader Lieutenant J. W. B. Robertson 3 Troop Leader Lieutenant The Earl of Normanton Lieutenant T. K. L. Brennan

R.I. CoH. Burton Johnson R.I. Cpl. Sherwin

Mess L/Cpl. Elvy

Heaquarters Squadron Att. Pers. Col-I. CoH. Greenwood Svg. Cpl. Howell Clerk Tpr. Hulett C.pl Cpl. Woollard Cpl. I/Cpl. Butler Cpl. L/Cpl. Moore Cpl. L/Cpl. Morris Driver Tpr. Blake Driver Tpr. Broadhurst Driver Tpr. Curtis Driver Tpr. Ford

5

Lieutenant Colonel D. J. Daly Captain J. D. Smith-Blngham

Motor Transport M.T.0. W.0.II Tucker

Stoddard

eyno

w.o. and CoH. Mess

Stables Q..M (T) Captain T. J. Williams R.Q. M.C. (T) R. Q. M. C. Handley S.Q.M.C. S.Q.M. C. Hunt CoH. CoH. MacDougall Clerk Cpl. Brandon Clerk Tpr. I’yke

. Sheldrick

Ofilcers‘ Mess Cook CoH. Barrett

Quartermaster (T)

“:5...

1351K . fieadows MOUNTED SQUADRON

Cartwright . Fairey Farell . Hutton Lyons . MeHale

SQUADRON

squadron Headquarters _ Sqn. Ldr. M810! T- W- P- Connell SKOI'Eman Tpr- Birth. S-C~M. Heath

fiisgilmd -

L C 1 Rusgrloive / p.

Squadron Headquarters Troop Maior J.D.S Cri nps S.C J. W. Remfrey S. QM. C. J. L. Harty Cpl. Black Cpl. Hayes Cpl. Strattord 78 Cpl. Stratiord 49 L/Cpl. Calvert L/Cpl. Stephenson

Captain W R. Marsh S..N1Q ..C D. \Vhittington Cpl. Dixon Howells

PI'OVOSI TI'OOP . 20:1.HMartm . Cpl. S111 p . weeney

' 3:131

”W- w...

:1": 13:31:53),

L/Cpl. Caple

.

. Henderson . Higson Kerslake . Lam

gett

Eli Maya“), C31: ma“

S.

mm...

2.2232 . Saul Varley Cpl Ward 241 Davies

(C);¥.Fl;:l:ece

L/Cpl. Peasegood

odfrey Cass

. Harris Newton Watkins

y es

COMMAND SQUADRON—ORBAT

2-5.-1. w..fi-JEWW 82:23 Matthews ES‘YJ‘?

L/Cpl. Shawcross Simpson . Sydall

Wall

S/Sgn Morson

R- Slgs, (SEPI- Eli“!

S.C-MI

gargain R. M. Lipsett . .1 Beer S/Sgt. Buckingham A.Q.M.S. Hitchcock

C.S.M.I. Knight

L/Cpl. Mulgrovc L/Cpl. Norton Pte. Bailey Pte. Hill Pte. Reed I’te. Stevenson Pte. Suffolk I’te. Tucker I’te . Quinney

E.R.E. Guards Depot

RHHQ. Cpl. Barnes, D. CoH. Baylay, D. N. Tpr. France, A. G. Tpr. Gibson, D. A.

L/Cpl. Oakes, W. CoH. Vaudin, S. H.

H.C.T.S. L/Cpl. Anderson, P. Tpr. Burton, K. L/Cpl. Fairs, M. F. J. Tpr. Farrow, A. F. L/Cpl. McLean, S. C. CoH. Patterson, M. A.

Tpr. Tpr. Cpl. Cpl. Tpr.

Palmer, 1. F. Rixon, C. A. Shatwell, R. A. White, A. A. Worthy, B. F.

Staff/Cpl. Matthew, J. A.

CoH. Pomroy. H. S. J. Tpr. Pritchard R. CoH. Sayer, J. Cpl. Smith, T. A. Tpr. Williams, B. J.

CoH. Wright, J. G. M.

L/Cpl. Liddell, J. A.

H.Q. Rheindahlen Garrlson Cpl. Chamberlain, D. E. Tpr. Harvey, N. R.

Cpl. Jordan, H. A. Cpl. Procter, B. E.


A.

W.0.l B

L/Cpl. Freeman

I. C l. Cange. M. '1‘.

L/Cpl. 8333231, D. M.

Lécgi. P’erry, L. .A.

Staff/Cpl. Hales: N. J.

Tpr. Rockford, A. R.

CoH. La Roche, M. J.

F.V.R.D.E. (Aldershot)

On}! . Sampson, W. H. J. Co“. Whitworth, B.

Darren,

born

at

Upton

Tpr. Laycock—Daughter, Erica, born at Devizes Maternity Hospital, Wilts, 20-6-69. Tpr.

Tpr.

Harkness—Married

Miss

Dorothy

Anne

Young

Hennessy—Daughter,

Bernadette,

born

at

B.M.H.

at

Rinteln, 20-6—69. Burnfoot Parish Church, Hawick, Scotland, 24-4-69.

Royal Yeomanry Regiment

’ 1. C.

CoH. Robson

I’.

Hong Kong Regiment w.o.11 Simpson, F. A.

'Ipr. Thomson’s, A.

1%.. Notfid’ge, P. W.0.I Paul. J- A-

Major Pitman—Son, Thomas Edward, born at 27 Welbeck L/Cpl. Robinson 26—Married Miss Veronica Anne Ricketts at All Saints' Church, Frindsbury, Strood, 10-5-69.

CDH- Bell, P- (h

Tpr. Pennings, R. C.

L/Cpl. Keams, B. J.

W.O.II Lloyd, (3. K.

Col-I. Acton. G.‘ R.

F-V~R-D-E- (Kirkcudbright) C l. Munro

Tpr. Notrldge 54—Married Miss Janet Ann Steer at the Parish Church St. Paul’s, Penge, Bromley, 29-3-69.

3. T. ‘ CoH. Coleman. CoH. quuDI'ISh, H. 1’.

J. \V. ‘ Cpl. Cooper Tpr. Dior-Icy: G. M.

Sanderson—Son, Ricky Hospital, Slough, 9-6-69.

Staff/Cpl. Story, J. 1:.

Special Recruiters

‘ e K. L C I. Aidnd C(JHI.’ Buckingga’m, l’. A. T r. Batchelor M.

p

Stan/Cpl. Yates, R. I}.

K. R.

Cpl. Dawson, D. C.

Tpr.

MARRIAGES

Junior Leaders Regiment R. A. C.

HQ. 1 (B.R.) Corps

Street, London, 5-7-69. L/Cpl.

Gunnery School—R.A.C. Centre

Joint Services Staff College

SKafi/Cpl. Melia, P.B.

Cpl. Barrett, ]. A.

H.G. R.A.C. Centre

Army Air Corps

Tpr. Salisbury—Married Miss Janet Shakespeare at St. Michael's Church, Bieleteld, Germany, 24-5-69.

Benn—Son,

Rinteln,

Martin

Anthony,

born

at

B.M.H.

17-7-69.

Tpr. O'Toole—Daughter, Tara Dierdre, born at St. Kevin's Captain Hewson—Married Miss Anne Jennifer Greenaway

Hospital, Dublin, Eire, 20-7-69. at Holy Trinity Church, Brompton, London, 16-6-69.

Tpfv Boreham. S. A.

L/Cpl. Ming, K. 0.

Tpr. Carringtonr R E-

Cor-r. Bali, EN. M.

Tpr. Mltcheli, D. I.

L/Cpl. Dunn, J. \V.

Tpr. Murphy, R. J.

Mons 0-C-S.

Evenden, R. D. L/Cpl. ‘

Eng.‘St_;uderckkJ-A

W.O.I Ladds, J. C.

L/Cpl. Calcrait, B.

CoH- Brown. D. J.

L/Cpi1 PreecehRi-B.

Tpr. Gregory, I’. J. Vi.

Tpr. Shears,

/ p .s

“-011 Martin. K- E-

or

.

~

Cpl. Elmsile—Married Miss Pamela Dorothy Cozens at All

217-69.

Saints’ Church, Friern Barnett, London, N20, 2—8-69. .

L/Cpl. Provost—Son, Bjorn Vivian, born at B.M.H. Rinteln,

L/Cpl. Trist-Coiiins—Married Miss iris Frances Shaw at

R.A.C.

Parachute Squadron

.

ay

CoH. Cooke—Son, John Anthony, born at B.M.H. Rinteln

25-7439.

The Parish Church, Staveley, Derbyshire, 2-8—69.

'

h

of Music

L

1. D vies A.

L/Cpl. Reid. 1’.

Royal Mun?” SC 00' Staff/Cpl. Ramger, P. D.

CgfipMai: M: J. Tpr. O’Donohoc, 1,. J‘ M.

R.A.C. Training Regiment

Mercian Brigade Depot

Cpl. Val‘ins

o

A. J.

.

.

earce

Ii'

.

Davis—Married Miss Janet Taylor at the Parish Church, East Grinstead, Sussex, 30-8-69,

Tpr. Fisher—Married Miss Catherine Margaret Lennon at HOS ital

Household Cava y

CoH. wrikir’rsurr, v.

Tpr. McGlnlay—Son, Ian Dennis, born at B.M.H. Rinteln,

Cpl.

H_ D cac 0 n, E_ s. Co

CoH. Straw, N. s. gag. }”i'ill(ins,l)G.A

CPL Potter, R. L. Col-I. \Vight, E. W.

Coll. Forrester, R. L.

the

p

Parish

Church

of

St.

Martin,

Bradford,

Yorks,

L/Cpl.

30»8~69.

Stafi/Cpl. Fielding, D.R.R.

Norris—Daughter,

Karen

Ann,

born

at B.M.H.

Rinteln, 23-9—69.

A.A. College—Arboriield R.M. College of Science CoH. Edwards, J. A.

Smith

15—Married

Miss

Maureen

Bernadette

CoH. Owen, \V. Tpr. Goody, B. J.

Robinson at St. John’s RC. Church, Bradford, Yorks,

1 Div. H.Q. and Signals Regiment

Junior Mustcians Wing—Guards Depot (35)

13-9-69.

CoH. Farrar, T. E.

S. D. A. ’ Tpr. kennard,

British C. in C. Mission to Soviet Forces in Germany

Cpl. Murtagh, M. J.

Col-l. Hum, C. W. NI.

Army Recruiter

' F. “1.0.1! Norris,

CoH. Norman, E. M.

Kuwait Liaison Team

Ratciitfe—Married

(1011. Rouney, A.

.

Miss

Pamela

Eileen

Coley

at

_

_ . S E

castle General Hospital, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 3-10-69

Miss Eileen

Phelan

at

Church

of

District

L/Cpl. Allsop A. I. Tpr. Doubtfiré. B. R.

Tpr. Scannell, T. J. L/Cpl. “/3“, B. G.

“'0

Tpr. O‘Callaghan, A. J.

Tpr. \Vhyte, “K A.

CoH. \Veeks, N.

BIRTHS

Established 1878

COLES LTD. AND

Hayes—Married

PKIAMA

Tpr.

Stevenson

OBITUARIES 43—Daughter,

Natalie

Evelyn,

born

at

B.M.H. Rinteln, 8-4-69.

.IIAKERS

L/Cpl.

REGIMENTAL SHIRTMAKERS TO THE BLUES & ROYALS

Cousins—Son,

Michael,

born

at Yeovil

General

Hon. T. E. Jessel, 1288/5631 Tpr. F. Knott, 304874 Tpr. F. Davis, H. J. Harrington, M.M., 504118 CoH. T. Harris, T. Woodroffe, W. Robson, J. T. Rutland, M,M., Sir John Buchanan-Jardine, Bt. M.F.H., Cpl. W. Caley.

Hospital, 24-4-69. L/Cpl. Crowley—Son, Frank Peter, born at B.M.H. Rinteln,

ROYAL HORSE GUARDS

7-5-69. Cpl.

Dressing Gowns

Cpl. McKenna—Son, Lee Derick Thomas, born at New-

Clodiagh, lnistioge, Kilkenny, Eire, 20-9-69.

P. and E. Establishment Tpr. Pearce, D. J.

w'o'" Hague’ M' Bahrein Garrison

Cpl. Stevenson—Daughter, Andrea Moyra, born at King's Mill Hospital, Mansfield, Notts, 25-9-69.

A.

Staff/Cpl. Woods, P. C.

Manchester Registry Office, 15-9-69.

SHIRT

24-8—69. L/Cpl. Villers——Daughter, Amanda Marjorie, born at B.M.H. Rinteln, 7-9439.

Gloves Neckwear

Hosiery Pullovers

Sibley—Daughter,

Cheryl,

born

at

B.M.H.

Rinteln,

11'5-69. Cpl. Clay—Daughter, Tina Phyllis, born at B.M.H. Rinteln,

5-6-69.

147

KNIGHTSBRIDGE,

LONDON,

S.W.1

CoH.

Robson—Son,

Timothy,

born

at

B.M.H.

Rinteln,

20-6—69.

SLOANE

Lieut. Colonel (Strutt) Irwin

T. Westacott.

Tpr. Burrows.

W. Pollard. M.M.

O.R.Q.M.C. (Sonny) Davids

S. W. G. Cole.

S.Q.M.S. (Reg) Doucherty.

W. Barker.

S.G.T. (Percy) Precious.

J. Colthart.

Tpr. B. Proctor.

D. J. Lean.

Tpr. H. Smith.

G. A. Stubbs.

Bdsm. S. Wood.

Rinteln, 5-6-69.

AND

131

Captain S. I. Fairbairn.

Tpr. Fairey—Daughter, Ann Maria Tracey, born at B.M.H.

Telephone: 730 7564

STREET,

LONDON,

F. King.

S.W.l Tpr.

Telephone: 589 4798

ROYAL DRAGOONS

McGowan—Daughter,

589 8552

B.M.H. Rinteln, 15-6-69.

Jacqueline

Anne,

born

at

J. lbbitson.

C. S. Hoddinott.


THE BLUES and ROYALS ASSOCIATION on parade, city and country...

CONSTITUTION AND RULES NAME

.Fine tailoring counts, wherever you are. We can meet all your needs, suits for city and country, sporting and riding clothes 3 and we’re abreast of all developments in lightweight and tropical materials too. If you wish, personal credit facilities can be arranged.

ROGERS, JOHN JONES LTD

.

AIMS AND OBJECTS 2. The aims and objects of the Association shall be the promotion of the efficiency of the Regiment (hereinafter called “the Regiment") known as The Blues and

Royals (Royal Horse Guards and lst Dragoons) by all or any of the following means:~ (a)

16 Clifford Street, Savile Row, London, WIX 2H5 Tel: 01-734 2248

By maintaining contact and connections between past members of the Regiment and the two previous Regiments (now amalgamated to form

the Regiment) known as the Royal Horse Guards (The Blues) and The Royal Dragoons (lst

Also at: 4021 London Road, Camberley, Surrey. Tel: 24071. (Afternoons Tues, Wed. & Fri. during R.M.A. Terms.)

Dragoons) (hereinafter called “the previous Regiments") and serving members of the Regiment.

REGIMENTAL TAILORS TO

The Blues and Royals

By undertaking or entering into any other activities for the furtherance of the above aims and objects.

MEMBERSHIP AND SUBSCRIPTIONS

payable

on

the

lst

subscription to the end of the then current year and

for the ensuing year.

All Officers and ex-Ofiicers

subscriptions shall be paid on the lst January annually by banker‘s order. All other subscriptions shall be paid direct to the Hon. Secretary or by banker’s order.

If any member should fail to pay his annual sub— scription on or before the Blst March next after it has become due. notice shall be sent to him calling his attention thereto. If any subscription be not paid on or before lst July following. he shall cease to be

If at any time he

. A person may become a life member (subject nevertheless to the provisios of clause 10 hereof) on payment of the following sums (which may from time to time

be varied by the Association in general meeting) in lieu of further annual subscriptions:—

Officers and ex—Officers £15 0. 0. Other Members £2 12. 6. . The Committee may with the authority of a resolution of the Association in general meeting invite as honorary members (either for life or such shorter period as may be decided) any persons who have given outstanding service to the Regiment. the previous

Regiments. or either of them. or the Association. Members may send to the Honorary Secretary names suggested for invitation. Honorary members shall not be required to pay any subscription and shall be entitled to all the benefits and privileges of membership.

attached or formerly attached to the Regiment or previous Regiments are entitled (subject to these Rules) to become members of the Association. The Committee

Any member may resign his membership by giving the Honorary Secretary notice in writing to this efiect. Every such notice shall. unless otherwise expressed. be deemed to take effect as from lst January next following the receipt thereof. Any serving soldier who shall have been discharged

shall

for

from the Regiment for disciplinary reasons shall cease

membership. . Subject as herein provided all members shall pay an

forthwith to be a member of the Association. In addition the Committee shall have the power to expel any member who shall offend against these Rules or

3, All Oflicers. Warrant Officers. Non-Commissioned Oflicers and Men presently or formerly serving with the

Regiment or

have

the

previous

right

annual subscription to

to

Regiments.

refuse

any

and

all

applicant

these

the Association as follows:~

Officers and ex-Ofl‘icers Other Members

.

be

a member of the Association.

By providing financial support for the production and distribution of the Regimental Magazine.

£2. 0. 0. for the 1st Year. £1. 0. 0. thereafter. 7. 6.

Provided Always:— (a) The amount of the subscription

whose conduct shall in the opinion of the Committee render him unfit for membership of the Association. Before any such member is expelled. the Honorary

Secretary shall give him not less than seven days may be varied

/

In association with W

shall

shall give to the Committee a satisfactory explanation he may in the discretion of the Committee be re-admitted to membership.

Regiment and previous Regiments may meet. By the care of the graves of members of the Regiment and previous Regiments. who have fallen on active service.

SACCONE & SPEED LTD

subscriptions

and the advantages of service therein and encouraging desirable candidates to enlist in the Regiment. By assisting members, when requested, in obtaining employment.

By arranging social meetings including an Annual Dinner at which past and present members of the

At the double!

Annual

January in each year provided that any member joining after the lst October shall pay an annual subscription forthwith. Such payment shall cover his

By circulating information concerning the Regiment

By granting financial assistance (subject to these Rules) for the relief of members or their dependants, in necessitous circumstances.

We have been serving Her Majesty's armed forces with fine wines, spirits and cigars since the beginning of Queen Victoria’s reign. So we know how to take an ‘ order. And how to carry it out at the double. We keep an excellent cellar with a very wide range of burgundles, clarets and hooks. We take so much trouble in selecting even our Vln ordina/re that It IS qurte . extraordinaire. Our Masters of Wine see to that. But only our trade price list can show what we have to offer. Please send for It.

(b) The Committee shall have power, in exceptional cases of hardship, to reduce or forego the annual subscription.

. The Name of the Association shall be “THE BLUES AND ROYALS ASSOCIATION”.

from time to time by the Association in general meeting.

written notice to attend a meeting of the Committee and shall inform him of the complaint made against him. No member shall be expelled without first having

Kinloch House, Cumberland Avenue, London. N.W.o13() 71


the opportunity of appearing before the Committee and answering complaints against him, nor unless at least two-thirds of those present vote in favour of the expulsion. An expelled member shall have no right to refund of any subscription. or payment made under these Rules nor any claim upon the Association. its property

or funds.

necessary to manage and arrange the affairs of the Association. Eight members of the Committee (inclusive of ex-ot’ricio members) shall form a quorum.

The

Honorary

Secretary

will

circulate

an

11. The Commanding Officer for the time being of the Regiment shall be the President of the Association.

agenda.

of the Committee not less than seven days before each meeting of the Committee. Minutes shall be taken of all proceedings of the Committee and copies

aims and objects stated in paragraph 2 of these Rules

and shall have control of the funds of the Association

the

President.

When

the

Regiment

is

overseas the Vice~President shall normally be the Squadron Leader of The Blues and Royals Mounted Squadron. (a) The management of the Association (except as otherwise provided by these Rules) shall be deputed to a Committee of not more than eighteen members. excluding ex-officio members. The

President. Vice-President, Deputy President (when one has been appointed). Honorary Treasurer, and

Honorary Secretary (or joint Honorary Secretaries) shall be ex-officio members of the Committee. The Deputy President. Honorary Treasurer and Honorary Secretary (or joint Honorary Secretaries) shall be appointed by the Committee subject to approval by the President and they shall respectively hold office for a period of three years

unless previously removed by a resolution of the Committee. The R.C.M. of the Regiment and W.O.s and S.Q.M.C.’s of the Regiment for the time being serving at home shall be ex-ofificio members of the Committee. At the First Annual General Meeting of the Association eighteen members shall be elected to serve on the At each subsequent Annual General Committee.

Meeting two members of the Committee (not ex-ofiicio members

appointed

under Rule

14) shall

retire and

shall not be eligible for re—election for a period of one year.

The

members

of

the

Committee

shall

retire

in order of seniority and in case of equal seniority the order of retirement shall be determined by lot. The Committee may nominate a sufificient number of

members of the Association to fill vacancies on the Committee and any two members of the Association

and the

investment and expenditure thereof.

The Committee

shall

have power

to

pay

or

Committee

or

(as

binding

on

the

Association

and

its

of vacancies on the Committee and shall set out the names of the retiring members including (if there shall

of the Association.

two retiring members) any additional

members nominated to fill the vacancies. Election to the Committee shall be by show of hands at the

these

Rules) as

they shall

to fill any casual vacancy on the Committee until the next Annual General Meeting. Any member so appointed shall retire at the next Annual General Meeting. but shall be eligible for re-clection as a member of the Committee at such Meeting. The Committee shall meet as often as it may consider

of the Association and of the Committee.

In his

absence the Vice—President or failing him the DeputyPresident (when one has been appointed) shall act

as Chairman. the Committee to preside.

When none of the foregoing are present shall

appoint

one

of their

members

In case

present and voting thereon.

If

at

any

General

Meeting

a

resolution

the same

by a short Codicil.

Failure to do so could result in legal costs and possible failure of gift. A form of legacy or bequest will gladly be supplied, on request, by the Honorary Secretary.

(National Association for Employment Regular Sailors, Soldiers and Airmen)

of

for

the

This Association is part of the Regular Forces Resettlement Service and its object is to find suitable civil employment for men and women when they leave the Services, and in the years thereafter. All who have not taken commissioned rank in the Regular Forces and who leave them with characters of “Good” or better after three years service are eligible for the Association's Services.

The Association gives all its services free. in 1968 the number of men and women leaving the Services increased as a result of the reduction in the strength of the Armed Forces and, although there was a slight reduction in unemployment during the year, the competition for employment became all the more keen. it was in these conditions that the Association placed 11,140 men and women from the Services in employment, nearly all of which was of a permanent nature. This was done through the Association's 44

Branches which cover the whole of the United Kingdom and are run by Employment Officers, all of whom have

been in the Services themselves and are in close touch with employers and with the Department of Employment and Productivity. Of those found jobs by the Association 4,476 were

from the Army of whom 20 were from the Royal Horse Guards and 23 from the Royal Dragoons. The Association is at your service and the addresses and telephone numbers of its Branches can be obtained from your Corps or Regimental Association; from the

nearest

Post

Office;

or from

your

local

Employment

dissolution of the Association shall be passed by a majority of the members present and such resolution

Exchange.

shall at a Special Meeting held not less than one month thereafter be confirmed by a resolution passed by a majority of two—thirds of the members then

Portsmouth Cathedral D Day Memorial Appeal

present and voting thereon. the Committee shall thereupon or at such future date as shall be specified in resolution, proceed to realise the property of the Association and after the discharge of all liabilities shall

All by-laws and regulations made

The President shall act as Chairman at all meetings

be transacted

be deemed to have been passed unless carried also by a majority of at least two-thirds of the numbers

by the Committee under this Rule shall be binding upon the members until repealed by the Committee,

Annual General Meeting.

business to

addition shall be of such a nature as to render these Rules inconsistent with the charitable status of the Association and provided that no such resolution shall

expedient for the internal management and well-being

The Committee shall have power to appoint a member

of the

soon as practicable after the end of each financial year by a chartered accountant. The financial year of the Association shall (unless otherwise determined by the Committee) end on the 3lst December. These Rules may be altered. repealed or added to by a resolution passed at any Annual or Special General Meeting. provided that such alteration repeal or

think

or set aside by a resolution of a General Meeting of the Association.

and

The accounts of the Association shall be audited as

The Committee may from time to time appoint from among their members such sub-committee as they may deem necessary or expedient, and may depute or refer to them such of the powers and duties of the Committee as the Committee may determine. Such sub-committees shall periodically report their proceedings to the Committee and shall conduct their business in accordance with the directions of the Committee. A sub-committee may be removed or disbanded or the constitutions thereof changed by a resolution of the Committee.

with

meeting

amend

in favour Regiment

General

of the meeting shall have a second or casting vote.

members.

inconsistent

Annual

The quorum at General Meetings shall be twenty-five members personally present.

the

the Annual General Meeting shall specify the number

the

of equality of votes upon any resolution. the Chairman

case may be) the President, or his nominee, as to the making or with—holding of any payment, award or application of funds under this Rule shall be final and

before

by a majority of those present and voting.

this Rule shall be recorded and entered in the Minute the

least

Only life members and those members who have paid their subscriptions for the current year will be entitled to vote at a General Meeting. All resolutions shall (save as otherwise provided in these Rules) be decided

immediate awards up to a sum of £25 in urgent cases. All payments, awards or application of funds under of

at

thereat shall be sent to every member and no business other than that of which notice has been given shall be brought forward at such meeting.

Funds may be so paid

The Committee may from time to time make, repeal and amend all such by-laws and regulations (not

more than

such

dants are in financial need and that the funds of the Association should properly be paid or applied for his or their assistance. The President or his nominee may, without prior approval of the Committee, make

decision

days

Meeting or any Special General Meeting a notice of

apply

may propose a candidate or candidates in writing to the Honorary Secretary not later than six weeks before the Annual General Meeting. The notice convening

be

Fourteen

please

Montagu Dragoons

The Regular Forces Employment Association

six weeks before the date of such meeting.

. The Committee may at any time for any purpose call a Special General Meeting.

or applied in cases where the Committee is satisfied

Any

should

To fill the vacancies on the Committee.

Annual General Meeting shall give notice thereof in writing to the Honorary Secretary not later than

after reasonable enquiry that a member or his depen-

Book.

(b)

Any member wishing to move any resolution at the

funds of the Association to or for the benefit in necessitous circumstances of any member of the Association or his dependants.

(a) To receive from the Committee a report, balance sheet and Statement of Accounts for the preceding financial year.

(c) To decide on any resolutions which may be duly submitted to the Meeting as hereinafter provided.

Funds

of the Association may be invested in such security or securities of any nature as the Committee or any sub-committee appointed by the Committee may. upon the advice of a firm or Stockbrokers or a bank. think fit and need not be invested in securities authorised for the investment of trust funds.

or (as the case may be)

THE BLUES AND ROYALS OLIVER MONTAGU FUND (This is the amalgamation of The Oliver Trust of The Blues and the old Royal Aid Society). Members whose current wills contain bequests of the Associations or Charities of the former

the following purposes:—

to the Honorary Secretary therefor. The Committee shall be entrusted to carry out the

and shall hold office until his appointment is deterby

evening of the Annual Dinner or on such other date as may be decided by the Committee in each year and at a time and place fixed by the Committee, for

setting out the business to be dealt with, to all members

The Vice-President shall be appointed by the President

THE BLUES AND ROYALS ASSOCIATION

21. The Annual General Meeting will be held on the

shall be despatched to the members of the Committee after each meeting. The Minutes shall be open to inspection of any member of the Association applying

OFFICE BEARERS AND MANAGEMENT

mined

GENERAL MEETINGS

pay and transfer the same to any other charitable institution or object as may be specified in such

The D Day and Battle of Normandy Fellowship, formed in connection with the Portsmouth Cathedral Completion Appeal, continues to build up steadily. Membership, now several hundred strong, includes people

from the U.S.A., Canada and other overseas countries. An application leaflet can be obtained from the Honorary Secretary, D Day Fellowship, Flat 2, Cathedral House, St. Thomas's Street, Old Portsmouth.

resolution and upon the completion of such payment

and transfer the Association shall be dissolved. Committee The following retire from the Committee in 1970 at the

Annual

General

Meeting

in

accordance

with

Rule 132—Mr. J. Christie, Mr. J. S. Clark. With the amalgamation of the various Funds all legacies and

bequests should

in

future

be

payable to:—

Change of Address Mr. and Mrs. E. N. R. Cox.

From 14th October, 1959——

34 Belle Vue Gardens, Southbourne, Bournemouth, Hants. R. L. Crouch. From 15th February, 1969—

4 Chance Fields, Radiord Semele, Leamington Spa. W. A. Markham. 1 Abbey Hill Road. Winchester, Hants. 73


THE BLUES and ROYALS ASSOCIATION ANNUAL

REPORT

ASSOCIATION VISIT TO

ZAND VO0RDE

1969 was

Membership Annual Reunion The Membership of the Association is now:— Officers 388 Life Members 1,332 Annual Members 299

Due to the Musical Ride and the proposed move back to Knightsbridge it is improbable that an Annual Reunion can be held. However, if it is at all feasible ,

Once again a most successful visit to Belgium organised by Mr. A. C. Millin and attended by

members and wives of both the Association and The Life Guards Association. The tour included visits to Ypres, the Household Cavalry Memorial Zandvoorde, Zillebeke and Mons. The Associations were welcomed

Members will be notified under separate cover.

in the

historic

Cloth Hall in Ypres at a reception held in their honour.

2,019

In his speech the Alderman said, “I am particularly pleased to welcome a party from your Associations, more than 50 years after the end of the Great War, and

Subscriptions (Annual Members only)

Queen’s Birthday Parade

The annual subscription is now due. Please complete the enclosed proforma.

An extremely limited number of free tickets for this Parade on Saturday, 13th June, 1970, and for the Final

Rehearsal on Saturday, 6th June, 1970, are normally available to the Association. The majority of tickets are

Addresses

for the Inner Line of Sentries (standing). postage, applications are not acknowledged.

To

save

All Members are reminded that it is their responsibility

to keep the Hon. Secretary informed of any change of address.

visiting once again the old places. Each of you have your own memories, places you wish to see again,

memories of a fallen comrade, good and bad recollections, but above all you all left a part of your youth here in most tragic circumstances. You may rest assured that you will always find good and grateful friends here in Ypres. We all hope that strength and health will enable you to pay many more visits in the years ahead. Ypres will always remain the heart of the famous ‘salient'

where the memory of the fallen will never be forgotten. We

Field of Remembrance Annual General Meeting This will be held in the WC. and N.C.O.’s Mess, Combermere Barracks, Windsor, at 6 pm. on Saturday, 2nd May, 1970. All members are entitled and encoura ged to attend.

appreciate

your

friendship

to

Ypres

and

your

faithfulness to our City."

The Field of Remembrance will be opened at 12 noon on Thursday, 5th November, 1970. Assemble in St. Margaret’s Churchyard at 11.30 am. The Badge Cross will be planted by the Colonel at 11.45 am. Dress: Lounge Suits. Decorations will be worn.

The Household Cavalry Memorial at Zandvoorde was reported to be in excellent condition and well cared for by the War Graves Commission. The party were photographed at the memorial, Mr. Millin laid a wreath in memory of fallen comrades and Trumpeter White, The

Life Guards, who accompanied the party, sounded Last Post and Reveille.

Annual Dinner Christmas Cards The Annual Dinner will be held at Combermere Barracks, Windsor, at 7 pm. on Saturday, 2nd May, 1970. Dress: Lounge Suit. No decorations. Bars will be open

Household Cavalry Regiment Cards should order from

at

the joint Hon. Secretaries.

6

pm.

Applications

for

tickets

on

the

Members requiring either The Blues and Royals or

enclosed

Everyone

proforma to the Hon. Secretary by Saturday, 18th April 1970. Coaches will Wellington—Windsor

be

organised

and

return.

A civic reception was given to the Associations .in Zillebeke, and Mons was visited where Trumpeter White sounded at a ceremony at the Mons Memorial. in the

party expressed their pleasure at

being able to make the trip again and visiting scenes

on

repayment from Depart Wellington

of 55 years ago. In particular they were grateful for the generous donation of the Association towards their

Notices

Barracks—1630 hrs.

expenses.

1.

ZANVOORDE.

ASSOCIATION

Walk

the

Association

Members are requested to ensure a large After the parade, Members will be welcome in

Secretaries,

Association

Banner

will

head

contingent. turnout.

the

W.O.‘s

and

N.C.O.’s

Mess,

Household

Cavalry

Regiment at Wellington Barracks, Birdcage Walk. Officers

requiring Buffet Luncheon tickets for the Officers' Mess at Wellington, kindly complete the enclosed proforma . 74

visit

to

Zandvoorde,

Mr. A. C. Millin at 92 South Coast Road, Peacehaven, Newhaven, Sussex (Tel.: Peacehaven 4140) as soon

The Combined Cavalry Old Comrades‘ Service will be held in Hyde Park on Sunday, 3rd May, 1970. Dress: Lounge Suits (Overcoats). Decorations will be worn. Assemble at 10.50 am. on Regimental Marker in Broad

The

annual

Zillebeke and Ypres it is hoped will be run again. Members wishing to go should contact the organiser

Cavalry Memorial Service

East.

The

as

possible.

THE

BLUES

BADGE.

are

Lapel

available

from

badges

the

for

ROYALS

CLUB.

The

of comrades able to attend is decreasing year by year. Needless to say these visits are most poignant for those who fought in the Great War, but it is hoped that younger members in due course might well W.|Sh‘ to

the

visit the places where their forerunners gave their lives

Hon.

in the fiercest fighting in 1914 and 1915. The success of these yearly visits are due to the hard workand

second

organisation carried out by Mr. Millin. The Assomations thanks are due to him for his help in the past, and to

joint

price 2/6d.

AND

It is realistic to say in conclusion however that old age and health are taking their toll and the number

Annual Dinner will take place on Monday, ist June, 1970, at Hyde Park Hotel. Dress: Black Tie. The

Chairman will be Major E. F. Gosling, formerly The Royals.

the hope that he will continue for many more years to

come.


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The blue and royal the blue and royal 1970