The Reigatian 2017

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T H E M AG A Z I N E F O R T H E R E I G AT I A N C O M M U N I T Y

THE REIGATIAN 2017

AVIATION INDUSTRY: FOUR RGS ALUMNI SHARE THEIR EXPERIENCES OF FLYING HIGH


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T H E M AG A Z I N E F O R T H E R E I G AT I A N C O M M U N I T Y

CONTENTS

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SOCIAL MOBILITY FOCUS

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52

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BY ISOBEL TILLEY (RGS 2009-2013) BURSARY RECIPIENT

HENRY SMITH CLUB

THE FOUNDATION CONTINUES TO IMPART HIS SPIRIT

UNIVERSITY HONOURS 2017 DEGREE INFORMATION FROM RECENT GRADUATES

FEATURES

WE HEAR FROM ORS ABOUT THEIR LIVES AND ADVENTURES

OR SPORT

REPORTS ON OR TEAMS

FOUNDATION NEWS UPDATES IN BRIEF

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56

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SCHOOL NEWS

WHAT’S BEEN GOING ON AT RGS

FOUNDATION ACTIVITIES 2017 WAS A SUCCESSFUL YEAR

THE REIGATIAN NETWORK

RGS LONDON PROFESSIONALS, OVERSEAS FRIENDS AND OVERSEAS AMBASSADORS

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REUNIONS

EVENTS DURING 2017

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DEATHS & OBITUARIES

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RECOLLECTIONS & MEMORIES REFLECTIONS ON LIFE AT SCHOOL

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FAREWELL TO OLD FRIENDS

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PUBLICATIONS

LATEST OR RELEASES

FROM THE ARCHIVES

PHOTOGRAPHIC MEMORIES OF THE SCHOOL

HONOURS

ORS RECEIVE AWARDS

Designed & produced by Haime & Butler Brand Design and Communication 020 7407 2141 haime-butler.com

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WELCOME FROM THE HEADMASTER

I am delighted to write for the Reigatian magazine after such a busy year. This is a chance to recognise the important Reigatian community and say thank you to all involved; to all who support our events, our Bursary schemes, our current and former students and most importantly, thank you to all who support the school’s values. RGS was shortlisted for the School of the Year award in the national TES Independent School Awards from more than 2,500 independent schools in the UK. This award is granted to schools who demonstrate innovation, imagination and efforts to develop children in ways that go beyond the league tables, which is completely in line with our philosophy here at RGS. It was a busy year for the school in 2017. Students took part in a range of activities including the drama department’s two major theatrical productions – The History Boys and The History Girls; RGS’s notable annual carol concert, which saw St. Mary’s Church looking splendid by candlelight; various trips to exciting destinations including Ancient Italy, Berlin, Washington and The Globe Theatre in London.

Sport was in full swing with some fantastic achievements; RGS was placed the top co-ed school in the Surrey Schools’ Swimming Relay, 12 medals were awarded in the South East Schools’ Biathlon and RGS was selected by the national magazine The Cricketer as one of the top 100 schools in the country for excellence in cricket. We were delighted to open up the brand new Harrison Centre in the Autumn Term. The Tatler Schools Guide called it ‘the knot in the bow tie’ which links the two sites and I agree! It is a fantastic addition to the school providing students with a new university-style library, Sixth Form Centre, a High Performance Learning and Innovation Room and much more. Thank you to all who have contributed to this edition. I hope you enjoy the glimpse that it gives you of life at and beyond Reigate Grammar School. Shaun Fenton Headmaster

“ I promise to continue to make the most of the opportunities available to me, because I am constantly reminded of the journey which has brought me here and realise that it began with the gift of a Reigate Grammar education.” K AROLINA CSATHY, BURSARY RECIPIENT (RGS 2008-15)


T H E M AG A Z I N E F O R T H E R E I G AT I A N C O M M U N I T Y

FROM THE HEAD OF FOUNDATION

RGS CHANGED MY LIFE! “I hope that one day I will be in a position to sponsor a child, so that they can benefit from the same quality of education, the same support and the same opportunities that I had. The education I received was an incredible gift, and I want to share the benefits I’ve reaped by giving the same opportunity to others.” Isobel Tilley (RGS 2009-2013) 1675 Scholar

2017 has been an exceptional year for Reigate Grammar School (RGS) and for the Foundation. I would like to start by saying a big “THANK YOU” to our fantastic Reigatian community, here in the U.K. and around the world, for your continued support and encouragement. Whilst the school continues to flourish and gain national recognition, the Foundation also has achieved significant success and momentum with its activities. Our most important philanthropic focus is the Changing Lives campaign, because it defines our moral purpose. Child poverty and social mobility continue to be two of the most serious issues facing U.K. society today. Recent figures indicate that in the Borough of Reigate and Banstead alone there are over 5,000 children under the age of 11 living in poverty. The RGS Foundation will continue to stress the importance of education as the primary engine for social mobility action and transformational change. By way of proof, I urge you to read Isobel Tilly’s (RGS 2009-2013) story on page 5, where she gives a personal account of the impact an RGS bursary has made to her life. Truly inspirational.

Within this edition you will see that we have had yet another busy year! The RGS professionals group continues to flourish and we are keen to ensure that this network benefits our community. We are so very grateful to former pupils and past and current parents for offering venues and opportunities to promote connectivity. Of course, our current students and young leavers benefit from mentoring, work experience and job opportunities. RGS is proud of the quality of talent and personal qualities of the young people it educates. The talent pipeline should be seen as a potential source and supply to our Reigatian network. We welcome the opportunity to discuss how engagement with the Foundation and its activities can benefit everyone. A new university standard sixth form and learning resource centre has just opened creating an amazing space at the heart of RGS. Reigate Grammar School is hugely grateful to Sir Peter Harrison and the Harrison Foundation for ensuring this building was realised. We will write more on this project and Sir Peter Harrison himself in the next edition and having officially opened the building.

The Foundation exists to engage and interact with anyone with an association, a link or a connection with Reigate Grammar School – a global family of over 14,000 people!

Sir Colin Chandler

I am thrilled to welcome Mark Elsey (RGS 1973-1978), as our new Chairman. As as a former pupil, the son of a former pupil, the father of former pupils…and married to a former pupil, you could say that he has made every effort to be part of the Reigatian community! Welcome Mark.

I hope you enjoy this edition and the stories and features within. We are most grateful to all those that have contributed. The piece by Dr Steve Fisher if fascinating and demonstrates the importance valuing your school years.

The Foundation is only as strong as the health of its community and we continue to look for ways in which we can engage more of our members and strengthen ties of association. For that very reason, we created a new Reigatian Community Officer role and in September welcomed Caroline Donald to the team. She is already making a significant impact, particularly with the variety and number of events on offer. Caroline has also been instrumental in the launch of the new Legacy campaign, with the support of Morrisons Solicitors. If you wish to discuss an idea that you have for an event or perhaps you wish to share a memory, return to the school for a visit or discuss leaving a gift in your will, then please contact the team: foundation@reigategrammar.org

Meanwhile, our Hong Kong Ambassador, Lawrence Webb, finds himself with old friends as they travel to explore the Death Railway in Thailand. There is much more, so please enjoy the read!

My final thanks go to Hazel Cornick in my team for all the effort and enthusiasm that goes into making a first-class publication. I trust that you will enjoy reading the 2017 Reigatian Magazine!

After many years of association with Reigate Grammar School, Sir Colin Chandler recently

Sean Davey

“I was one of the hundreds of thousands of children in the UK that received free school meals, and my family relied on benefits and the generosity of charities to keep us afloat, receiving food parcels from the Salvation Army when things got tough.” Isobel Tilley (2009-2013) Since launching four years ago, we have/are changing the life chances of 37 young people through an RGS education and the broader benefits and opportunities which that brings. For this, we are truly grateful to our fabulous Reigatian community who have emotionally and actively got engaged with our work. Receiving the ‘Campaign of the Year Award 2017’ from IDPE Europe recognises the important work of the RGS Foundation whilst highlighting the special bond we have with our community. Together we share.

retired from his role as a School Governor. As Chairman of the RGS Foundation, Sir Colin was instrumental in guiding and supporting its development and impact over recent years and remains a major advocate of its social mobility work. I’m thrilled that he will continue his support and involvement as an Honorary President.

The new Harrison Centre

WE REACH OUT. WE CONNECT. WE INFORM. WE ASK.

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THANK YOU! Up to the end of 2017 we already raised over £4 million for the campaign and there are currently thirty-seven 1675 Scholars. The ‘Gift of Education’, as provided by the 1675 Bursary Fund, aims to transform lives and raise aspirations but our vision can only be realised through the help of our friends and supporters.

Launched January 2014....

37

1675 Scholars And counting!

Please continue to support the Changing Lives campaign

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1675 BURSARY FUND


T H E M AG A Z I N E F O R T H E R E I G AT I A N C O M M U N I T Y

SOCIAL MOBILITY FOCUS BY ISOBEL TILLEY (RGS 2009-2013) BURSARY RECIPIENT

I

was a 1675 bursary recipient, no one in my family went to university, and my parents both left school at sixteen to get jobs to support themselves. University was not something that was even on their radar. My parents then divorced when I was six, and my dad stopped working, which left my mum as a single parent of three children, and despite her working full time, money was a constant struggle. At primary school, I was one of the hundreds of thousands of children in the UK that received free school meals, and my family relied on benefits and the generosity of charities to keep us afloat, receiving food parcels from the Salvation Army when things got tough. However, since I was little I have wanted a good education. I’ve always loved learning, particularly about languages and other cultures, an interest that really took hold when I was around ten. I wanted to get the best education possible, so I could get a good job, earn some money and not have to worry about my financial situation as I had seen my mum do. At RGS I received a full bursary and I can’t emphasise enough how crucial this bursary was, as there was no way my family could have afforded to pay even a fraction of the school fees. The education I received really allowed me to develop, both academically and personally. I had some wonderful teachers, who recognised my passion and potential for languages and encouraged me to stretch myself, to go beyond what we were doing in class, and to aim for the best results possible. This in turn helped build my confidence, something I had struggled with as a child, but the support and encouragement I received helped me to believe both in myself and in my abilities.

MY TEACHERS AT RGS HELPED ME WITH THE TERRIFYING PROCESS OF APPLYING TO CAMBRIDGE Alongside my education, I had access to some amazing opportunities. During my last year at RGS I took part in a History and Politics trip to the USA, which involved a visit to the White House, guided tours of the capitol building and Arlington cemetery, and a trip to New York and the Empire State Building. Having studied US history at GCSE, this was a really special experience for me, and again it was only available to me thanks to my full bursary. My teachers at RGS helped me with the terrifying process of applying to Cambridge, the university I had wanted to attend for years, and one I hoped would put me on the path to a successful future. I was given extra lessons, mock interviews, preparatory reading and so many tips and pieces of advice which were invaluable to me, as this was something none of my family members could have shed any light on. Thankfully, it paid off, and I was offered a place to study at Cambridge, where after four years, I graduated in June with a double first in Modern and Medieval Languages, specialising in French and Italian. On my graduation day, I really felt that I had fulfilled my potential, and that I had reached a point that I had wanted to reach for so long. I am currently working as a translator in Italy, and have recently been accepted onto the civil service fast stream. I ultimately hope to go on to have a career

in human rights and the charity sector, as I am really committed to making the world a better, and a fairer place. Benefiting from a high-quality education such as my own comes with responsibility. I and many others have been so lucky to have the education and opportunities that we have had, and it is only right that we contribute something back to society, to continue this cycle of advantage. We must recognise how lucky we have been and use these advantages to help others. Some ways that I have given back are by taking part in the RGS annual telephone campaign, which involved calling former pupils asking for support towards our Changing Lives campaign. I felt so proud to be able to use my story to raise money so that other bright children from poorer backgrounds can have the excellent opportunities I did. I then went on to spend the rest of the summer volunteering at Eleonas refugee camp in Greece. I wanted to help people who experienced suffering, and loss, and to give my time and my skills to help make their lives better (see page 36 for full feature). I hope that one day I will be in a position where I am able to sponsor a child, so that they can benefit from the same quality of education, the same support and the same opportunities that I had. The education I received was an incredible gift, and I want to share the benefits I reaped by giving the same opportunity to others. We are all part of a local and a global community, and it is our responsibility, to use our position of advantage to help others and to help change society so that it becomes more egalitarian. Over a quarter of all children in the UK today are living in poverty. Through education, we can help to change that. IZZY 05


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CHANGING LIVES

HENRY SMITH CLUB DINNER On Thursday 12 January at the splendid East India Club, President of the Henry Smith Club, Sir Peter Gershon CBE FREng (RGS 1958-1965), hosted the inaugural Henry Smith Club Dinner for current members and supporters of the RGS Foundation.

Established three years ago and aligned to the launch of the Changing Lives bursary campaign, the Henry Smith Club is named after its founder who was one of the great Elizabethan philanthropists. Today, the club has 52 members and currently sponsors five children at RGS as part of the social mobility initiative.

With over 60 attending the evening, Sir Peter Gershon took the opportunity to highlight the pivotal role RGS had played in changing his life and thanked the room for their wonderful support with the Changing Lives campaign and in particular the advocacy of Henry Smith Club members.

Former RGS pupil Sir Keir Starmer KCB QC MP (RGS 1974-1981), spoke of his fond memories of his time at school and of the first class education he received which laid the platform for his successful career.

If you would like to find our more information about becoming a member of the Henry Smith Club please contact the Foundation Office at

Sir Peter Gershon CBE FREng (RGS 1958-1965)

HENRY SMITH CLUB Membership benefits – You will have a significant impact on the life chances of a talented young child – Handmade bespoke membership pin – Invitation to Henry Smith Club Annual Dinner – Membership certificate – Exclusive annual HSC mailing update – Membership of an important professional network of like-minded individuals Sign up online at: rgs.foundation or for further information contact us at:

foundation@reigategrammar.org

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foundation@reigategrammar.org


Holland Club Did you know that TW Holland was RGS Headmaster in 1957? And did you also know that...

people donating the equivalent of a pint of beer a week (just £20 a month) to the Changing Lives campaign will be enough to provide a full bursary for one child?

eer then... b f o t in p a If not e extra shot a grand ino with marshmal ows mochacc ma ticket (with or a cine is just the same! popcorn)

Become a Holland Club member and collectively, we can change a deserving child’s life through the gift of education at RGS…all for the price of a pint of Oranjeboom! To learn more or to join the Holland Club, please email Jonny Hylton jdh@reigategrammar.org

Levens te veranderen sinds 1675

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FOUNDATION ACTIVITIES RGS FOUNDATION WINS IDPE FUNDRAISING CAMPAIGN OF THE YEAR AWARD We are very honoured, humbled and delighted to have been awarded the IDPE Fundraising Campaign of the Year Award at the prestigious Institute of Development Professionals in Education (IDPE) Awards for driving social mobility within the community. The award was in recognition for an office that had ‘raised the fundraising bar by demonstrating creativity and innovation within a fundraising campaign; meeting desired outcomes and making a positive difference to the educational experience of pupils; adding value to the profession and inspiring the IDPE community’. Legendary journalist and newsreader Michael Buerk was host for the evening and presented the award to the RGS Foundation for its work on the Changing Lives campaign and the effect that this bursary campaign has had on the issue of social mobility in the local area. “We are extremely pleased and honoured to have received such a prestigious award from the IDPE for the impact of our Changing Lives campaign. It recognises the commitment of Reigate Grammar School to the important issue of social mobility and the passion we have to provide as many life-changing bursaries as possible to talented children from disadvantaged backgrounds. Every child should be given the opportunity to fulfil its potential and this inspires us to work even harder and to build upon the tremendous support we receive from our amazing Reigatian community!” SEAN DAVEY – HEAD OF FOUNDATION

HENRY SMITH BEARD CHALLENGE Another year of bearded prowess from our ten ‘Bearded Brothers’ who took part in the Henry Smith Beard Challenge. From 1 January until 10 February razors were banished and the finest facial stubble was grown in aid of our Changing Lives campaign. Staff members did their best to recreate the one image we have of our founder, Henry Smith. Each year a vote is cast by all RGS staff to decide who should be crowned “King of the Beards” and the victor this year was teacher of DT Mr Alvarez.

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(L to R – Michael Buerk, Hazel Cornick Development Office Manager, Sean Davey Head of Foundation, Jonny Hylton Development Executive and Patrick Mulvihill IDPE Trustee)


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CURRY MASTERCLASS SATURDAY 25 FEBRUARY

We were very lucky to have the offer of a cookery masterclass by RGS Parent and celebrity chef, Hari Ghotra. Hari is an expert in Indian cuisine and former chef at Tamarind of Mayfair. Her motto is ‘make it, love it, share it’. All in aid of the Changing Lives campaign, participants donned aprons to learn to make vegetable samosas, mint chutney, thari wala chicken (chicken curry), red lentil dhal and cumin infused rice. Huge thanks go to Head of Food and Nutrition Mrs Bader and Mrs Day, without whom the day could not have happened. The masterclass raised £1,600 for the Changing Lives campaign.

“People often tell me that cooking Indian food is a challenge: spices worry them, chillies worry them and everyone thinks Indian food is unhealthy. The masterclass was a fantastic opportunity to help with all of those questions and worries as well as cooking up a storm with so many wonderful people. Everyone left with boxes filled with fragrant Indian dishes, all cooked by them, to share with their families for a curry-fueled Saturday night in.” HARI GHOTRA

REIGATE CHARITY 7S 2017 SUNDAY 5 MARCH

Over 40 schools descended on Hartswood for the established annual Reigate Charity 7s, sponsored by John Laing. Despite some of the worst weather conditions you could possibly imagine for sevens, the overall standard of rugby was magnificent. In the Boys’ Cup Final, Epsom College faced previous winners Tonbridge in a tense and exciting game and it was the black and white of Tonbridge that showed their experience and class to come out on top with an attritional 12-7 victory. Meanwhile in the Plate, Caterham dispatched a combative Wallington side beating them 17-12. In the Girls’ tournament, Cup Final newcomers Wellington swept aside Wallington with a powerful 17-0 display and it was Christ’s Hospital who took home the Plate Trophy after a comprehensive 25-0 victory against King Henry VIII.

RGS had a mixed day with the boys losing to Sherborne in the Cup Quarter Finals 12-5 and the girls losing to eventual winners Wellington in the Cup Semi Final. Kukri Players of the Tournament were awarded to: Logan D (Epsom College) and Kathryn R (Wallington County Grammar School). We would like to thank John Laing, our principal sponsor for their support and all of our corporate partners who make this such an incredible event, helping us to raise thousands for our Changing Lives campaign.

SUMMARY OF RESULTS: BOYS TOURNAMENT Cup Winners

Tonbridge School

Plate Winners Caterham School Shield Winners The Portsmouth Grammar School Bowl Winners City of London Freeman’s School GIRLS TOURNAMENT Cup Winners

Wellington College

Plate Winners Christ’s Hospital Shield Winners Royal Hospital School

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FOUNDATION ACTIVITIES

LORDS RECEPTION THURSDAY 15 SEPTEMBER

Members from the Reigatian community were treated to a Lords Reception hosted by Brooks Macdonald, an award winning investment management firm. The purpose of the evening was to bring the Reigatian community together for a social occasion within the surroundings of an iconic sporting venue. It was a typically wet British evening but this did not hinder the warmth and enjoyment or value of the event. Our huge thanks go to RGS parent David Hyner and Brooks Macdonald director for his support with the event. Brooks Macdonald, our hosts for the evening have been closely connected with the RGS Foundation for a number of years. The connection runs even deeper as it was a former pupil and Senior Investment Director at Brooks Macdonald, Adam Temple (RGS 1996-2001) who was our main speaker for the evening. Adam provided an insightful snapshot of the current world markets and spoke of the main economic and political factors which have been the drivers to this current state of play.

After the talk, guests were treated to a whistle stop tour of the historic ground that included the futuristic Media Centre and MCC Museum (featuring the original Ashes urn) from the very passionate guides who both possessed an encyclopedic knowledge of Lords cricketing history. Finally, returning to the splendid Writing Room, guests were treated to some quintessentially English refreshments.

RGS FOUNDATION GOLF DAY THURSDAY 29 JUNE

Our huge thanks go to our principal sponsor on the day Devine Homes and former RGS pupil Barry Devine (RGS 1983-1990) for his fantastic support. Also we would like to thank Nearest to the Pin sponsor Dataquest and Longest Drive sponsor Beard Construction. It was current RGS parent Laurie Kerr who showed enough accuracy on the 9th hole to collect the Nearest to the Pin and RGS governor/parent/former pupil Marc Benton (RGS 1983-1990) who unleashed a monster of a drive on the 5th hole to pick up the Longest Drive.

Reigate Heath Golf Club hosted the 7th Annual RGS Foundation Golf Day sponsored by Devine Homes. With a full complement of players ranging from current RGS students to those who left RGS in the 1950s, there was a great blend of youth and experience in attendance from the Reigatian community.

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In the main event, there were some enormous scores posted. With the winning trophy awarded to David Diffey and Jack Coles, representing Beard Construction, scoring a very impressive 50 points. The evening finished with a delicious BBQ, raffle and auction, raising over £5,000 for the Changing Lives campaign. Thank you to all who supported this event. We look forward to seeing more of you next year, on Thursday 28 June 2018 – put the date in your diary now!


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ANNUAL TELEPHONE CAMPAIGN At the end of July and throughout the beginning of August, the RGS Foundation held its Annual Telephone Campaign in aid of Changing Lives. This year we had a combination of 10 current and former RGS students who enjoyed reconnecting and receiving updates from our Reigatian community. Over the course of the two-week campaign, our callers completed over 400 calls with a range of conversations which varied from recollections of RGS, school developments to the work of the RGS Foundation and in particular the progress of our Changing Lives campaign. Once again the support from the Reigatian community was fantastic and re-emphasised the tremendous support and belief that our Reigatians have in our important social mobility work. Thank you to all Reigatians who took the time to speak to our enthusiastic callers and support the campaign.

RGS FOUNDATION TEAM RAN REIGATE SUNDAY 17 SEPTEMBER

Our huge thanks and appreciation to all who sponsored our runners and helped smash the ÂŁ3,000 target in aid of the Changing Lives campaign with half of this raised by current parent David Wigfield! Team RGS had 18 runners taking part in this popular community event. Two individuals who stood out were Oscar S (current RGS pupil) who finished the 10km in overall second place with an astonishing time of 34:28 and George Roux (RGS 2005-2007) who flew round the half marathon in a breezy 1:20:41.

One of the best stories of the day came from one of our runners, Vanessa Ramsden (Assistant Head of Fifth form and Geography). Like most, Vanessa needed some motivation heading up the very last hill on the course and this came from none other than double Olympic champion Dame Kelly Holmes. For 2-3 minutes, Kelly accompanied Vanessa up the gruelling last

climb giving her tips on breathing and what to do next as the gradient became steeper. On reaching the summit, Dame Kelly passed on her congratulations, swiftly turned on her heels and went and did it all over again with the next group! Vanessa, with a spring in her step, from receiving this personal coaching session, glided the last kilometre and finished with a beaming smile. 11


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FOUNDATION ACTIVITIES

REMEMBRANCE SERVICE FRIDAY 10 NOVEMBER

On Friday 10 November at RGS we remembered and honoured those who paid the ultimate sacrifice to secure and protect our freedom. A two-minute silence was held and wreaths were laid at memorials. Our special thanks go to John Rowlands (RGS 1966-1973) for reading the Act of Remembrance in the Service. The Last Post was played and after the reflective silence, a poignant rendition of Abide With Me was sung by Polyphony. The Corps of Drums played whilst students were dismissed, and an invited group from the Reigatian community walked to the memorial garden for a special service and to lay a wreath.

RGS FOUNDATION STUDENT AMBASSADORS For the first time, we have created leadership roles for current sixth-form students as Student Ambassadors for the RGS Foundation. They have played a vital role in supporting events, helping with activities and spreading the message of our work to the school community. They even produced a Changing Lives Christmas – Thank You video! 12


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DREAM STEAM SOCIAL WEDNESDAY 15 NOVEMBER

An Evening with Andy Gomarsall MBE took place at Steam Wine Bar in the very heart of London. Our fabulous host for the evening, former RGS pupil, interviewer, auctioneer and owner, Stephen Chenery (RGS 1982-1985) laid on a tremendous event with over 75 members of the Reigatian community attending to show their support for the Changing Lives campaign. To rapturous applause the star of the show, former Wasps, Bedford, Gloucester, Worcester, Quins, Leeds Carnegie and England 2003 Rugby World Cup winning Andy Gomarsall MBE was introduced to the stage. Talking about the early stages of rugby career, his competitive nature and talent at a variety of sports, Gomars spoke with real passion about the core values of rugby and how it appealed to the same ethos that he shared growing up. He

admitted that it was listening to the ‘Voice of Rugby’ Bill McClaren as a young lad that inspired him to take up the game seriously. Steam Wine Bar owner Stephen then took to the floor to take charge of the auction, with some fabulous items available. The aim of the evening was to raise enough funds to support one year of a Changing Lives bursary recipient here at RGS and we are delighted that not only did we achieve this but surpassed our target, by raising over £20,000, an incredible achievement from just one night. Our thanks go to Stephen Chenery for hosting this fantastic evening and, of course, to Gomars who took time out from his busy schedule to join us and share his wonderful stories from his career. Most importantly thank you to everyone who attended and supported the evening, you made it a resounding success.

SIXTH FORM ECONOMISTS AT DELOITTE FRIDAY 3 NOVEMBER

We are hoping to have our second Dream Steam Social in November 2018 so please keep your eyes peeled for more information.

On Friday 3 November 24 enthusiastic RGS students arrived at the Deloitte offices on Little New Street, right in the heart of the city. We are extremely thankful to James Alexander (RGS 1985-1992) Partner, Risk Advisory, for organising and hosting the day. It was a unique opportunity for students to gain an insight into an International multi-faceted business. James kicked off the proceedings by talking about his role within the business, his journey after leaving RGS and some of the more interesting and diverse projects that he has worked on during his time at Deloitte. Students were also lucky to be given an insight into the Deloitte recruitment process and some key tips to help with the extensive and popular application process. With the hindsight and advice of a successful graduate that had recently joined via this route – the message was ‘preparation is key’. Finally, students were set an interactive business game, carrying out SWOT analysis of large multinational companies ranging from Netflix to M&S and the various economic factors that could affect their success. Our enormous thanks go to James Alexander for his help in arranging this great day for the current crop of future economic and business leaders! 13


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THE REIGATIAN NETWORK RGS PROFESSIONALS GROUP The Reigate Grammar School Professionals Group was formed in 2012. It encourages professional networking, connectivity and support and provides a platform to develop and nurture relationships within the Reigatian community in a professional environment. To date, we have hosted over twenty-five RGS Professional Events and in 2017 we celebrated the five-year anniversary of the group. In 2018 we are planning more diverse events with the addition of regional based get-togethers (Birmingham, Exeter and Cambridge) due to the demand from within the group.

Recent networking events with industry-specific guest speakers including Commerzbank, Royal Academy of Engineering and RELX. Plus social and fundraising events such as the RGS Professionals Charity Golf Day. With over 1,200 members, we invite you to join our RGS Professionals Group on LinkedIn. Simply search:  Reigate Grammar School Professionals Alternatively, if you are not on LinkedIn and would like to find out more and join the group then please email us and we will ensure that you receive all future invitations for these regular RGS Professionals events: foundation@reigategrammar.org

RGS PROFESSIONALS FIVE YEAR ANNIVERSARY @ RELX

RGS PROFESSIONALS CHARITY GOLF DAY 2017

RGS Professionals braved the storms of London to celebrate the five-year anniversary of the network at RELX HQ on The Strand early in the year. Our enormous thanks go to David Wigfield, Head of Talent Management at RELX Group and current RGS parent, for all his hard work in organising this successful celebratory event.

This year’s annual RGS Professionals Charity Golf Day took place at the illustrious Royal Ashdown Forest Golf Club. The course was in fantastic condition, the sun was shining and the 50 enthusiastic golfers were greeted by the smell of warm bacon sandwiches before heading out for their day on the course.

One of the highlights from the evening was our inspirational guest speaker, Kumsal Bayazit and her talk ‘How artificial intelligence is shaping new generation products’. Tech guru Kumsal explained how, in the not too distant future, A.I. could have an impact on a variety of industries from oncology to car insurance. Indeed, it led to some challenging questions from the floor with patent attorneys, general managers and RGS students keen to gain a glimpse into what the future holds for them.

It was the team from Dataquest (led by current RGS Parent Dan Jones) that posted the best score of the day to take home first place. Stevensdrake Solicitors, featuring former RGS parents Paul Dungate and Ed Wheeler, held their nerve to win the Thunderball Challenge and International Rugby Union referee, JP Doyle, had the Longest Drive on the monstrous 12th with Richard Risebro proving most accurate on the Nearest to the Pin at the tricky 6th hole.

THURSDAY 23 FEBRUARY

RGS Professionals Chairman, Governor and former pupil Mark Elsey (RGS 1974-1978) provided an overview of the RGS Professional Network, its remarkable growth from just 120 members to 1,200 in the last five years and the exciting plans to diversify with our first Medics event on the horizon. If you would like to learn more about the RGS Professionals Network or think that you may be able to host an event in the future please email: foundation@reigategrammar.org

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THURSDAY 12 OCTOBER

With all teams fed and watered the afternoon was capped off by an extremely successful auction by our very own Head of Foundation, Sean Davey, and the day raised over £9,000 for the Changing Lives campaign. As RGS Foundation Chairman, Mark Elsey (RGS 1974-1978) remarked, “Events like this Golf Day are integral to raising awareness and funds for the important social mobility work of the Changing Lives campaign.”Thank you to everyone who supported the event and made the whole day so successful.


T H E M AG A Z I N E F O R T H E R E I G AT I A N C O M M U N I T Y

OVERSEAS FRIENDS OF RGS

Standing L–R: Lee Mancini (’95), Sean Davey, Nicola Evans (’01), Paul Woodman (’83), Trevor Bundy (’81), Julian Frankum, Rob Willock (’91) Seated L-R: Immy Adshead (’12), Shaun Fenton, Rachel Armstrong (’04)

RGS DUBAI SOCIAL GATHERING

RGS FRIENDS OF HONG KONG GATHERING

Roberto’s in the Dubai International Financial Centre (DIFC), was the venue for a very enjoyable RGS Dubai Friends Gathering.

The established and growing ReigAsian group gathered at the top of the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Causeway Bay for some light bites and drinks looking across the stunning Hong Kong skyline. Amongst the newcomers were two Cathay Pacific pilots, Josh Tuppen (RGS 1998-2006) and Graeme Johnson (RGS 1993-2000) both now living in HK and both unaware they worked for the same employer! Earlier on in the week, we were delighted to meet with Roy Bouch (RGS 1969-1976) and his wife Viv.

WEDNESDAY 15 FEBRUARY

With over thirty Reigatians based in the UAE, it was good to see so many attend and to be joined by the touring RGS 1st XI cricket squad which was victorious earlier in the day. Headmaster, Shaun Fenton, spoke warmly of the importance of our overseas community and the opportunities that exist for networking. Indeed, Immy Adshead (RGS 2005-2012) moved to Dubai recently having been professionally connected with Kerry Patterson (RGS 1997-2004) who is based over there. Now, Immy has both a job and accommodation, all through the strength of the RGS network!

FRIDAY 7 APRIL

We welcomed Andrew Cooper (RGS 1975-1982) and his family, who were in town to watch the Hong Kong Rugby 7s. Andrew took the opportunity to reconnect with one of our Hong Kong Ambassadors, Grant Kennedy (RGS 1976-1980), whom he hadn’t seen for over 20 years. We were also lucky to have Tom Holland (RGS 1998-2006) and Stuart Mills (RGS 1995-2003) attend as both were visiting Hong Kong, taking in all the sights that the city has to offer. Our thanks go to our excellent ambassadorial hosts for the week, Lawrence Webb (RGS 1969-1977) and Grant Kennedy. If you are ever passing through or relocating to the area please do let us know so that we can connect you.

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T H E R E I G AT I A N 2 017

OVERSEAS AMBASSADORS The Reigatian community continues to spread further and wider around the globe. From New York to New Zealand, there are members of the community in most continents either working, with their families or enjoying a well-earned retirement.

We are delighted to have appointed RGS Overseas Ambassadors who are the points of contact for anyone wanting to join up with the existing established Reigatians in these far reaches. If you are living, travelling through or visiting any of these territories please email: foundation@reigategrammar.org so that we can put you in touch with your local ambassador.

AMERICA: New York City Michael Lloyd

AMERICA: Seattle David Mycroft

CANADA: Vancouver Matt Falkner

Left RGS: 1986 Interests: Golf, fishing and field sports Family: Married to Jill with one daughter, Julia Career: Head of Trading

Left RGS: 1976 Interests: Sailing, U19 County Rugby Coach Family: Married with two children Career: Now retired

Left RGS: 1981 Interests: Rugby, airlines Family: Married to Michelle with two children Career: Aviation Security

AUSTRALIA: Sydney Neil Brett

AUSTRALIA: Brisbane Chris Smedley

AUSTRALIA: Melbourne Raymond Buckett

Left RGS: 1980 Interests: Music, speedway and rugby Family: Married to Simone with four daughters Career: Mortgage and Independent Financial Advisor

Left RGS: 1985 Interests: Real English Public Houses Family: Married to Sarah with three children Career: General Manager

Left RGS: 1966 Interests: Travelling, AFL and cricket Family: Partner Lorraine, three sons and four grandchildren Career: Pharmaceutical Industry

HONG KONG Lawrie Webb

SINGAPORE Ryan Younger

THAILAND Mark Blashfield

Left RGS: 1977 Interests: Open water swimming, rugby and running Family: Married to Vivien and three (mostly) grown up sons Career: Finance

Left RGS: 1991 Interests: Cold beverages Family: Married to Aileen and one daughter Charlotte Career: Oil industry

Left RGS: 1991 Interests: Kayaking, surfing, sailing and most types of motorsport Family: Married with two sons Career: Investment Management & Trading

UAE: Dubai Campbell Steedman

NEW ZEALAND: Auckland Ed Kidd

Relationship: Parent of Alumni Interests: Golf, dining and fine wines Family: Married to Sally with two children Career: Partner at White & Case with vast Middle Eastern experience

Left RGS: 1998 Interests: Property, Rugby, Technology + Start ups Family: Married to Rochelle with 3 boys Career: Civil Engineering and Commercial Property plus runs software start-up business.

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T H E M AG A Z I N E F O R T H E R E I G AT I A N C O M M U N I T Y

REUNIONS GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY CLASS OF 1967

GRADUATION BRUNCH CLASS OF 2013

RGS welcomed back 16 Old Reigatians from the class of 1967 and their partners to celebrate their Golden Anniversary since leaving RGS. Some had made return visits since leaving but for many this was their first trip back to RGS in fifty years.

Our school was delighted to welcome back the Class of 2013 for the popular Graduation Brunch. It was fantastic to see over 80 of this talented year group return back to RGS in the newly refurbished Old Library.

The morning began with refreshments in the Wright Gallery followed by tours of the school with the Head Boy and Head Girl alongside the RGS Foundation Student Ambassadors. Guests reminisced on their time at RGS, recalling classes and teachers as well as seeing how the campus and facilities have expanded and changed over the years. The tours ended in the garden of the Headmaster’s house, 1 Chart Lane, where lunch was enjoyed despite the (somewhat) wet weather!

With an array of embarrassing photos on display and past copies of the Pilgrim to flick through, friendships and memories were reignited – all accompanied by a delicious brunch. After a few words of welcome from Head of Foundation Sean Davey, RGS Headmaster, Shaun Fenton, made a toast to the Class of 2013 which was followed by a trip down memory lane with the highlights video from their final school year four years ago!

TUESDAY 27 JUNE

SATURDAY 16 SEPTEMBER

Photographs from the archives and those supplied by ORs were displayed for all to enjoy during the lunch reception. Much time was spent looking through all the photographs and trying to recall names and anecdotes from years gone by. The afternoon was rounded off with a living history session which involved Fourth Form History students talking with guests about life at RGS now and then. The students helped to serve tea in the garden and thoroughly enjoyed hearing stories about life at RGS fifty years ago.

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T H E R E I G AT I A N 2 017

HONOURS THE JOHN SNOW SILVER MEDAL AND THE FEATHERSTONE PROFESSORSHIP AWARDED TO

OR RICHARD GRIFFITHS RGS 1972-1979

RGS alumni, Richard Griffiths, has been awarded the John Snow Silver Medal and the Featherstone Professorship, in recognition of his enormous contribution to anaesthesia through his work in research. His colleague and life-long friend, William Harrop-Griffiths, Past President at The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland (AAGBI) writes his citation for this wonderful award. "Healthcare is a team game, a bit like rugby, and there are many involved in the care of patients. I have been very lucky to have met and worked with some inspirational figures. The NHS is a wonderful institution, often criticised, but doing remarkable work. I think that the work that I have done with older hip fracture patients has left a legacy and has inspired younger healthcare professionals to continue to promote the cause of the elderly patient. The AAGBI Featherstone Professorship, coming at the end of my career recognises not only me but everybody else who has been involved in promoting the cause of older folks." PROF. RICHARD GRIFFITHS, RGS 1972-1979

Richard Griffiths left being presented with the Featherstone Professorship

As a British Journal of Anaesthesia (BJA) Research Fellow and Lecturer in Leicester in the mid-1990s, his MD addressed the effects of ageing on acetylcholine metabolism. Completing his MD during a year working in San Francisco, he was faced with a stark choice between academic and clinical anaesthesia. Academic anaesthesia in the UK was in the doldrums at that time and, realising that he got more pleasure from working with humans in an operating theatre than from working with rats in a laboratory, he returned from the USA to take up a consultant post in Peterborough. However, he did not rest upon his laurels while there. His interest in the physiology of ageing drove him towards a passion for the care of the elderly and in particular the peri-operative management of patients with hip fractures. His academic output has focused on this area of practice, and he co-founded the NHS Hip Fracture Peri-operative Network. He soon appreciated that the outcome of these patients could be greatly improved if their care was prioritised and accelerated. Richard threw himself at the AAGBI Council membership with typical drive and enthusiasm, and was the motive force behind the publication of three key guidance documents. 18

While Education Lead, he oversaw the development of Learn@AAGBI, the UK’s largest online educational video platform for anaesthetists. His Council colleagues elected him to the post of Honorary Secretary for the period 2012-2014, a role he fulfilled with characteristic energy and efficiency. The last two years have seen him continue to offer his valuable services to the AAGBI in the role of Vice President. The award of the John Snow Silver Medal publicly acknowledges his immense service to the AAGBI, its members and their patients over the last 10 years. However, it is the award of the Featherstone Professorship that he will appreciate the most. It is a clear indication that you do not have to be in an academic post to have an enviable academic output, that you do not have to work in a major teaching hospital to have your voice listened to, and that you do not have to have your hand on the levers of NHS power to make real differences to patients. If you have the ability, intelligence, drive, persistence, work ethic and personality, you can rise from a small village near Pontypridd via Peterborough to the Featherstone Professorship. It is a clear indication of his peers’ appreciation of him and the work that he has conducted in the relentless and successful pursuit of better outcomes for patients. He richly deserves this honour, and it is with great pride that I will call him “Professor Griffiths”.


T H E M AG A Z I N E F O R T H E R E I G AT I A N C O M M U N I T Y

REIGATIAN BECOMES 71ST DEAN OF EXETER RGS 1972-1979

DAVID WALLIAMS OBE RGS 1981-1989

The Very Revd Jonathan Greener was installed as the 71st Dean of Exeter in a special service in November. Jonathan had previously been Dean of Wakefield, where he oversaw the biggest makeover of any English Cathedral in recent years. Part of the service saw the new Dean being quizzed by the Cathedral’s most junior chorister, who (as part of the liturgy of the service) asked him: “Why have you come to this holy place?” and admonishes him to remember Jesus’ words that “Whoever wants to be first must be made last and servant of all.” Jonathan was joined by his wife Pamela, his parents and friends and clergy from Wakefield for the service, as well as clergy from across Devon. In his first sermon, he told listeners that his priorities were to build a strong Christian community, work closely with the city, and serve the whole of Devon, in the hope that everyone in Devon would want to visit their cathedral. Reigatian David Walliams was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in the 2017 Birthday Honours for services to charity and the arts. We would like to congratulate David on this wonderful honour.

The Very Revd Jonathan Greener during the installation service

"I am delighted, daunted but thrilled to be appointed the 71st Dean of Exeter. This is a fantastic cathedral of immense history situated in a vibrant and expanding city and the opportunities to serve the community are significant. My wife Pamela (who is Cornish!) and I have been welcomed with great warmth, and we look forward to all that Ministry might have in store here. This is an exciting place and we hope everyone will want to come and see our marvellous cathedral, and to experience the many delights of Devon."

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UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION ACTIVITIES 2017 HONOURS Congratulations to all those that graduated in 2017 and we wish you all the very best of luck with your future chosen career paths. Don’t forget to join the RGS Professionals group for networking, connectivity and support in a professional environment.

 Reigate Grammar School Professionals

Lily Akerman University of Exeter Business & Management WIE Degree type: BA Class: 1st

Rory Gale University of Reading Real Estate Degree type: BSc Class: 2:1

Jessica Allen University of the West of England Criminology with Psychology Degree type: BSc Hons Class: 1st

Alex Glass University of St Andrews Philosophy and Economics Degree type: BA Class: 2:1

Nick Allen Durham University Philosophy Degree type: BA Hons Class: 1st

Joel Grant Canterbury Christ Church University Events Management Degree type: MSc

Will Bennett Swansea University Economics and Finance Degree type: BSc Class: 2:1 Ellen Bickley King's College London Biomedical Sciences Degree type: BSc Class: 2:1 George Brill University of Cambridge Biological Anthropology Degree type: BA Class: 1st Charlotte Catton University of Bath French & Italian with European Studies Degree type: BA Class: 2:1 David Chalkley University of Reading Real Estate Degree type: BSc Class: 2:1 Amber Charitos University of Bristol Chemistry with Study Abroad Degree type: MSci Class: 1st Ellis Clarke University of Cambridge English Literature Degree type: BA Class: 2:1 Ella Coleman King's College London English Language Degree type: BA Class: 2:1

We endeavour to obtain as many University Honours as possible but occasionally this is not possible. If you did not appear in this year’s University Honours List and would like to feature in a future edition, please let us know and we will add you to the supplement in next year’s list. 20

Oliver Curtis Oxford Brookes University Biomedical Science Degree type: BSc Class: 2:1 Emily Dixon University of Oxford English Language Degree type: BA Class: 1st Claire Forster Durham University Chemistry Degree type: BSc Hons Class: 2:1

Rosie Grant Bath Spa University Graphic Communication Degree type: BA Hons Class: 1st Jamie Hannigan University of Nottingham Mathematics Degree type: BSc Class: 1st Jack Herrington Imperial College London Chemistry Degree type: MSci Class: 1st Guy Holden BPP University Graduate Diploma in Law Degree type: Diploma Class: Distinction Georgina Hopkin Central Saint Martins Jewellery Design Degree type: BA Class: 1st Sophie Horne University of Chester Early Childhood Studies Degree type: BA Class: 1st Laura Houlding BPP University Graduate Diploma in Law Degree type: Diploma Class: Commendation Imogen Knibbs University of Oxford Cell and Systems Biology Degree type: BA Class: 2:1 Alex Marshall University of Bristol Physics Degree type: MSci Class: 1st Joseph Meakin Swansea University Human Geography Degree type: BA Hons Class: 2:1 Ruairidh Morgan Imperial College London Medical Sciences with Surgery & Anaesthesia Degree type: BSc Class: 2:1


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UNIVERSITY HONOURS SUPPLEMENTARY YEARS

Zoe Munday University of Roehampton Primary Education with Physical Education Degree type: BA Hons Class: 2:1

Kirstie Stewart Goldsmiths University of London Psychology with Cognitive Neuroscience Degree type: BSc Class: 2:1

Rhys Newcombe University of Portsmouth Pharmacy Degree type: MPharm Class: 2:1

Sean Stewart Manchester Metropolitan University Sociology Degree type: BSc Class: 2:1

Annie O'Brien University of Birmingham Drama and Theatre Arts Degree type: BA Class: 1st

Isobel Tilley University of Cambridge Modern & Medieval Languages Degree type: BA Hons Class: Double First

Chloe O'Connor Durham University Education Studies & Geography Degree type: BA Class: 1st

Alexander Upstone University of Cambridge Engineering Degree type: BA & MEng Hons Class: 1st & Distinction

Philip Pangalos University of Reading Management & Business Degree type: BA Class: 1st

Charlotte Ward Cardiff University Geography Degree type: BSc Class: 2:1

Meera Patel University of Leeds Dentistry Degree type: MChD BChD BSc

Emily Welch University of East Anglia Medicine Degree type: MBBS Class: Distinction

Hannah Pipe Newcastle University Biomedical Sciences Degree type: BSc Hons Class: 1st Jessica Pritchard University of Leicester Biochemistry Degree type: BSc Class: 2:1 Saskia Rees University of Warwick Systems Engineering Degree type: MEng Class: 1st Emily Ruiz University of Southampton Human Geography with Spanish Degree type: BA Class: 2:1 Matthew Shelley University of York Theoretical Physics Degree type: MPhys Class: 1st with Distinction Jordan Sloan University of Chichester Mathematics & Mathematical Learning Degree type: BSc Class: 1st

David Whitlock University of Oxford Biochemistry Degree type: MBiochem Class: 2:1 Elizabeth Williams University of the West of England Geography Degree type: BA Hons Class: 1st Lewis Wing Warwick University Manufacturing & Mechanical Engineering Degree type: MEng Class: 1st

Ben Adams University of York Economics and Finance Degree type: BSc Hons Class: 1st Graduation year: 2016 Natasha Ayling Arts University Bournemouth Interior Architecture and Design Degree type: BA Hons Class: 1st Graduation year: 2016 Laura Day University of Bristol Physiological Science Degree type: BSc Class: 2:1 Graduation year: 2016 Joel Grant Canterbury Christ Church University Events Management Degree type: BSc Class: 2:2 Graduation year: 2016 Emily Hocken University of Exeter English Degree type: BA Class: 2:1 Graduation year: 2016 Laura Houlding University of Exeter History and Politics CH Degree type: BA Class: 2:1 Graduation year: 2016 Anoushka Muir University of York Philosophy Degree type: BA Hons Class: 2:1 Graduation year: 2016

Emma Wishart Durham University Geography, Anthropology & Business Studies Degree type: BA Hons Class: 1st Katie Wood University of East Anglia Drama Degree type: BA Hons Class: 2:1

Matthew Sparrow University of Exeter Geography Degree type: BA Class: 2:1 Michael Stephen Loughborough University Sport Management Degree type: BSc Class: 2:1

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T H E R E I G AT I A N 2 017

FEATURES

RUN GERRY RUN GERRY BARNARD RGS 1945-1950

L

ife took a change for the better for me when I moved to Brunei in 1977. Socialising with other ex pats led to my joining the Hash House Harriers on their weekly jaunts in the rain forests. Not too much running was involved due to the very slippery and undulating terrain underfoot most of the time. Moving to Bahrain in 1980 exposed my lack of fitness when running in open countryside, so a work colleague suggested that we train on our own with the objective of running the marathon the next year, the only race in the Bahrain calendar at that time. As we trained together we gradually increased the length of our runs. Delighted at running nonstop through five and ten miles for the first time, and eventually ending in a fifteen mile run from the island’s old rugby club to the new one. At this stage the marathon distance still looked pretty daunting...

1982 BAHRAIN MARATHON

So this is it then. It’s approaching 7am and I’m among a group of runners on the start line for the 1982 Bahrain Marathon. Nine months of training are behind me and the real test is ahead. The gun goes and it’s like a cavalry charge at first but soon we settle into a more sedate pace, hopefully the right pace for us. Up ahead the front runners are still visible but will soon be out of sight. At the first kilometre marker

22

I glance at my watch and find that I am running a bit faster than planned so ease off and try to relax. There’s a long way to go. The marathon distance of 26 mile 385 yards is run over four laps on this course and as I am nearing the end of the second of these I become aware of fast approaching footsteps. A trio of runners seemingly glides past me and I am pleased to see that today’s guest of honour, three


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RD GERRY NBGARDNIAARY RUNNI resent 1977 - P m to 100km 0 0 2 : e g n a r e Distanc ces run: 682 Total ra Includes: 82 x 8km 82 x 10km 35 x 10 milesrathons 51 x half-ma hons 39 x marat NG MILEAGE= I C A R L A T O T

80,000km

times Olympian Ron Hill, is among them. I still feel okay at this stage but on the next lap start to feel the fatigue setting in. Now it’s just the will to get me to the finish. Starting the last lap I know that I’ll make it and am cheered to overtake other runners as I go. A great feeling as I cross the line and stop my watch at 3.33.59. Wow. That is truly better than was expected. My wife Marlis and I invite the runners to our bungalow for drinks and a snack that evening where we are able to relax and share memories of a great day. Although I also ran marathons in London, Bolton and Stone in 1982, shorter distance events were being organised and became well supported as runners realised that less training was required. I was still training six days a week and varying training as I went. It really had become a new way of life – and I felt all the better for it. What sort of mileage? In my first year 1,423 miles, in my second 2,471 miles and so on. Often I would have company on training runs but equally, if none of my regular pals were around, I’d happily run on my own.

Working for an airline made it possible to travel around the world to run. It could be the short hop down the Gulf to Abu Dhabi or Dubai or further afield as we found interesting events to aim for. Thus I’d travel to Hyde in Cheshire to run in The Tour of Tameside, where two to three hundred runners would run six races in seven days, or to Paris to run their marathon on a pleasant summer’s evening. Other races stand out in my memory, the World Airlines Road Race in London, Sydney, Atlanta, Fort Worth and San Fransisco, the River Kwai Half marathon and the annual Bruges 25k are just some. In all my running diaries, they show that I have competed in 682 races over distances from 200 metres to 100 kilometres. The latter was run over 250 laps on a track in Hong Kong and took 11.5 hours to complete. In between those extremes I have logged over 680 races. Total training and racing mileage is over 80,000 kilometres and my 93rd 5k run was completed in November when I ran my 25th Park Run in Coventry. ¢ 23


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FEATURES

JONATHAN NASH RGS 1975-1980

LET’S GET READY TO

RUMBLE “Why on earth are you doing that?” That was the most common reaction to my telling friends that I intended to take part in a White Collar boxing event.

The simple answer was that having spent a couple of years using boxing as my usual workout, during which time one of our group had done a couple of bouts (won 1; lost 1), the question naturally arose as to when I was going to step into the ring. When I thought about it seriously, I found I couldn’t drop the idea. Undoubtedly ‘mid-life crisis’ would be an available diagnosis but mostly I wanted to see how I would react where the only available options were fight or flight. I knew, as well, that if I could get through it without making a complete fool of myself it would be an important experience. So I signed up for the ‘veteran’ bout on a boxing show up at the Boston Arms in Tufnell Park, London. Reassuringly, my opponent was a solicitor who was a couple of years older than me and had done eight or nine bouts. I could see from his YouTube clips that he was slightly shorter than me and a bit heavier, so I reckoned we were quite evenly matched. I had intended to put in a solid ten weeks of preparation, but that was disrupted by illness and injury, so I ended up doing about four weeks intense fitness training. By the end of that I was reasonably confident I could go the distance of three two-minute rounds. Fight Night was a Thursday. When I got to the venue it was still quite empty so I had a walk around in the ring just to feel it under my feet and look out from under the lights at the 24

empty chairs. That was probably the moment when I realised this was actually going to happen. There was space for about 150 people seated and standing, and the room quickly filled up after 7pm with a loud boxing crowd. Downstairs I changed, did a quick medical check (basically a blood pressure test and a question about headaches) and then stood with the other fighters to get final instructions from the referee. From what I can remember, the only important rule was that if you got knocked down twice in a round the fight would be stopped, which seemed fair enough to me. I was the second fight on that evening. That caused a bit of consternation amongst my supporters (including Jonny Hylton from RGS and two of my ex-RGS brothers Callum and Rowan) because they had been told I would be first on. As it happened the first fight involved two enormous heavyweights, so when the first of these stepped into the ring there was a feeling I might have bitten off more than I could chew. Anyway, the moment arrived soon enough and I was called up. This was the interesting part for me: how would I feel now when there was no way out of this beyond refusing to fight, which of course would be unthinkable? In fact, I was pleased to find that what I had suspected might be the case turned out to be true. In my day job as a barrister I have learned to control nerves and adrenaline before going to court. I suspected this might be a


T H E M AG A Z I N E F O R T H E R E I G AT I A N C O M M U N I T Y

transferable skill, and so it turned out. I was quite relaxed walking to the ring and waved to my supporters as I went past. I was even relaxed during the face off in the centre of the ring where my previously friendly opponent – a highly respectable solicitor – transformed himself into a grimacing animal apparently determined to do me a lot of harm. Formalities out of the way, gum shield in, and then the bell goes. I walk out to the centre of the ring and throw out a first jab. It connects with his gloves and he throws back. We spend a few seconds getting our ranges like this and then he throws a jab which gets through the guard and connects with my face. This is the most important moment in the fight, when I suddenly know that this is a fight and someone is trying to hurt me. It’s quite unlike sparring with friends when every shot is pulled to some extent: this is the real deal. After the first shock I found my particular answer to fight or flight: I started going forward and trying to throw as much as possible to try to knock him out, in part because attack seemed the best form of defence and in part just instinctively. That set the pattern for three rounds with me walking onto a lot of jabs and landing a few shots myself.

IN MY DAY JOB AS A BARRISTER I HAVE LEARNED TO CONTROL NERVES AND ADRENALINE BEFORE GOING TO COURT

When the final bell went, I felt a huge wave of relief and satisfaction. I had done what I had set out to do and got through the event. My opponent’s arm was raised as the winner and I don’t quarrel with that. The great thing was that I hadn’t made a complete fool of myself and I could now say that I had been in a real fight. The rest of the evening was, quite simply, fantastic. For a few hours I was a hero for actually having been in the ring. Complete strangers were coming up to shake my hand and tell me I was ‘game’. Of course, this was all a few months ago and I have kept up the training with our group in the gym but I don’t think I’ll fight again. There is a part of me that recognises there is something slightly ridiculous about a middle-aged barrister taking part in competitive boxing at any level. So my record will stay at 0-1 (no wins; 1 loss). Pity it’s not 1-0, but regrets? No, none at all – it really was amazing. ¢ 25


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FEATURES

FROM

REIGATE TO DUBLIN, THE LONG WAY ROUND!

DOUGLAS PROCTOR RGS 1981-1989

H

aving grown up in Reigate and spent eight years at RGS in the 1980s (from Lower First through to Upper Sixth), it’s interesting to reflect on the importance of my time at RGS in shaping the course of my life and career so far. Since my A Levels, I’ve spent almost all of the intervening period outside the UK – and indeed outside Europe – only recently moving to Ireland to take up a position at University College Dublin. So, where did this all start and why is RGS important in that? In many ways, I can trace my career path directly back to the eight years I spent studying French at RGS and the influence of teachers such as Sandra Paxton née Benson and the late Jeanette Kitteringham (RGS Staff 1973-1995) in framing my aspirations to speak other languages. Kerry Girdwood (RGS Staff 1988-1989), a history teacher on exchange from New Zealand, also played a key role here. After A Levels in French, German and Maths and a gap year, I studied French and

26

Linguistics at the University of York and had my first experience of living and studying in France (in Rennes, Brittany) for a year. Prior to that, RGS school trips to Dieppe and Paris, and family holidays, had been the sum total of my exposure to the French-speaking world! However, that soon changed after I graduated, as I headed back to France to teach English in a university in Reims, and then fairly quickly received an opportunity to do the same thing at the French University of the Pacific in Noumea, New Caledonia (a French overseas territory in the South Pacific). It was Kerry Girdwood who planted the South Pacific seed in my mind – otherwise, I might never have known that there were French-speaking countries in that part of the world! I was fortunate enough to spend two years teaching at the university in Noumea and – New Caledonia being a small place – even ended up being a guest interpreter for the local TV and radio stations. What’s more, I met Kirsten, an Australian, “sous les cocotiers” (under the palm trees, as the locals would say) and this truly changed the course of my life. After New Caledonia,


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POLITICAL TURMOIL IN THE USA AND UK MAKE THIS A PARTICULARLY INTERESTING TIME FOR MY WORK IN INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION...

The Proctor family in Mont St Michel, France

Kirsten and I spent a couple of years living and working in Strasbourg, France (her teaching and me working as a translator at the European Court of Human Rights) before deciding to marry and settle in her home town of Melbourne. It’s hard to believe that was 17 years ago already, but anyone who has spoken to me in recent times will not have failed to miss the distinctly Australian twang in my accent today! So, Melbourne is now definitely home for me – we have three kids (13, 11 and 8) and I’ve spent the last 15 years working in the field of international education for various universities in Melbourne. This work has focused on international student recruitment, exchange and outbound mobility, partnership facilitation and support, and international relations, and it has enabled me to continue travelling the world – a definite bonus! Having spent the last three years studying for a PhD, I was chosen to head up the international office at University College Dublin (UCD) from January 2017. UCD is Ireland’s largest university and its most international on a wide range of measures, so this was an opportunity not to be

missed. As such, we’ve packed up the house in Melbourne and have relocated to Dublin, where we’re establishing a new life back in Europe. Political turmoil in the USA and UK make this a particularly interesting time for my work in international education, let alone for Ireland and its ongoing relationship with the UK and the EU. As such, it’s a fascinating point in history to be back in the ‘old world’. Had anyone said to me during my time at RGS that I would end up living and working in France, New Caledonia, Australia and Ireland, I think I would have scoffed at the idea. However, in following the path that has unfolded before me, this has been the journey so far – and one which I would never have started without the inspiration from my teachers at RGS! Further information about me and my academic work is available at douglasproctor.com If you’d like to know more about UCD, Ireland’s Global University, you can find out at atucd.ie/ucdglobal/ ¢

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AVIATION PILOT EMMA PERRIN RGS 1999-2004

Since a young age I had followed my father around the world and discovered a passion for culture, diversity, and travel. It gave me the aviation dream to become a commercial airline pilot. I left RGS in 2004 for university to study a very different subject. Whilst at university, I realised my real desire was for flying. I have no regrets about going to university, it gave me the chance to mature and gave me life experience. I undertook an integrated course at CTC Aviation in 2010 to obtain my commercial pilot’s licence. In 2012 I started my job as a First Officer for Monarch Airlines. Flight training was probably the hardest part, it has been a very steep learning curve with continuous testing and progression and a limited amount of support provided. In my opinion, the most successful way to become a pilot is through one of these types of training courses. However, there is a huge cost involved and a potential risk of no job at the end. I was one of the fortunate people to end up with a great job straight from training, working for a superb company. It is a well-known fact that there is a very small number of female commercial airline pilots; recent figures show that it is still only 3%. This can have its ups and downs. Throughout my flying career I have always been the only girl on my course and after five years haven’t flown with another female. It wasn’t until I started working for Monarch that I realised how many people stereotype the industry. I would say almost every day I go to work someone makes a comment or asks questions, both negative and positive. Sadly, I feel there is still not enough awareness regarding options for girls, and the understanding that gender should be irrelevant when picking a career. I have always just seen myself as a pilot and never differentiated myself from the boys. As a girl in a male dominated industry, I feel I have had to prove myself and work

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harder to progress with my career and certainly identify that we still have a fair distance to go. Despite this, I will never regret my choice of becoming a pilot and aspire to progress from a First Officer to Captain over the next few years. I fly short haul, which means every working day I will do a take-off and landing and only ever fly with one other pilot. It is not all cracking views of the Alps and wonderful sunrise and sunsets. Throughout a pilot’s career it is continuous testing through bi-annual simulator checks, medicals, line checks and safety training to ensure the highest level of safety is applied to all operations. Recently I have been faced with a major turn of circumstances. I was working for Monarch Airlines until the day they went into administration. I had been there for five years, made some fantastic friends, learnt all I knew about commercial aviation and enjoyed every second. It has been the past eight weeks that I realised just how much I loved my job; the feeling of landing a jet, the view from the flight deck, the people you get to work with and the variety I imagine are very hard to replicate in other careers. I am incredibly lucky because, as I write this, I have been fortunate enough to start a new job working for British Airways, sitting in the right hand seat of a jet once again.


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PILOT KATE WINTER RGS 1996-1998

My name is Kate, I’m 36 and I’m an airline pilot. I work for easyJet and I’m based at Gatwick, flying Airbus 319 and 320 aircraft all over Europe. I’m a Senior First Officer so I sit in the right hand seat and I’m second in command after the Captain. At school, Art and Maths were my strongest subjects but Art was by far my favourite. Along with excellent academic standards, the biggest advantage RGS gave me was the opportunity and encouragement to take part in the Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme and the CCF. Fortunately, I really enjoyed doing those extra curricular activities so it never felt like a chore and it’s great to have that experience on my CV. When I interviewed for pilot training school they were really interested in any experience I had that demonstrated an ability to work in a team, problem solve, cooperate and make decisions. After school I completed a Foundation Course in Art and Design at Central Saint Martins College of Art in London and then a degree in Graphic Design at the University of Leeds. My interest in aviation started very young because my dad was a pilot. However I didn’t consider it as a career option until after graduating. That doesn’t matter at all and I’ve met hundreds of pilots who had completely different careers before they got into aviation. My dad encouraged me to get a Private Pilot’s Licence in my spare time and I quickly realised that I loved flying. I was under confident, I can remember thinking “Me, a pilot?! That’s crazy!” However, with encouragement from one particular female flight instructor I began to pursue a career as a pilot. I started training with CTC Aviation (now L3) in New Zealand in 2007. Less than two years later I was sitting in the right hand seat of an easyJet airbus! Training to be a pilot was a fantastic experience; hard work but worth it. It was a privilege to spend hours flying around the beautiful countryside in New Zealand.

One of the greatest advantages of working for easyJet is their huge European base network. After two years at Gatwick I applied to transfer to Paris Charles de Gaulle where I lived and worked for three years. I recently returned to work after maternity leave. My partner is also a pilot, he flies long haul for British Airways. We have spent the last six months adjusting to working life with a small child at home. It’s been a steep learning curve but I’m pleased to report that it is possible! And even better than that – it’s going ok! Life as a pilot and a mum is far better than I expected. Commercial Aviation is a 24/7 industry, operating 365 days a year. As a pilot you can expect to work a very varied shift pattern. Sometimes that means missing out on weekends, getting up very early or getting home very late but it also allows huge flexibility. I never have less than three days off at one time so although my working days are quite long I also get a lot of quality time with my family. My next step will be to become a Captain. It will involve more testing and training but I’m looking forward to the challenge. The big difference between the Captain and the First Officer is responsibility for making some of the more crucial decisions. The First Officer supports the Captain but ultimately the Captain has to make the final decisions in any abnormal or emergency situations. I really do love my job and I’d encourage anyone with an interest in flying to go for it. I can honestly say that at no point in my training or career so far has the fact that I’m a woman mattered. It’s still a male dominated industry but it’s changing fast. My advice to current students is to take every opportunity, join the clubs and do the extra curricular activities.

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TRAINEE PILOT MARCUS GALE RGS 2004-2011

On 14 November 2017 I started training to be a pilot for British Airways (BA). So far, it has been intense! I have lessons from 9am-5pm Monday to Friday and then usually revise for three hours every evening and on weekends. When I left RGS, I went to University of Bristol and studied Aerospace Engineering and did a masters there too. I always knew I wanted to be a pilot but I think my parents were hoping that I might change my mind! It can be a volatile career and my degree is a great backup. I enjoyed being at university and am really glad I got that experience. The course was really interesting – but very hard.

After my Masters, I was one of just 12 out of 2,000 to get a place on BA’s Graduate Engineering Scheme. Over 18 months I rotated around departments. I also thoroughly enjoyed the SCU (Shorthaul Casualty Unplanned Damage) because it was a dynamic working environment. There would be really busy days and we would never know what aircraft might need fixing. The graduate scheme lead me into a job with BA in line maintenance. I still really wanted to be a pilot. I have always had a massive interest in aircraft. I was drawn to it; the travel, the variety and not being stuck in an office! Again, I got through 4,000 applicants, rigorous aptitude tests and interviews for the training course with BA City Flyer where I get a guaranteed job at the end, which takes the pressure off during the course. I don’t have to worry about being top of the class or the risk of being without a job – especially as the course costs between £90-120,000. My knowledge of the industry from my time working for BA has been a big benefit; it is definitely easier for me to see the bigger picture. On the course you have to be really highly motivated; there is so much to learn. It’s not so much the difficulty, it’s mostly the volume and you have to be like a sponge to take it all in. What really helped me from RGS was getting involved in CCF, Music and Sports teams. I was able to use this experience in my interviews. In the future I am hoping to move up to Boeing 787 from Heathrow in the next five years and longer term perhaps a training captain or fleet technical manager.

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DEVELOPMENT ENGINEER (AVIATION/AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY) ASHA PURKISS-KUMAR RGS 2003-2011

When asked to write a short article about my experience as a woman in engineering/the aviation industry I was fairly apprehensive, having not written an article since my GCSE years! However the past few years have given me some insight and experience, which hopefully will be interesting to any young women considering a career in engineering. I studied Mechanical Engineering at the University of Birmingham and after graduating, I joined a world-renowned aerospace company as a pyrotechnic engineer. Recently, I have taken up a new role as a development engineer in the automotive industry. I didn’t necessarily know I wanted to be an engineer when I was studying at RGS and it was having an interest in maths and science applications that eventually led me to mechanical engineering. So my first piece of advice for anyone thinking about becoming an engineer would be to get as much information as possible: go to open days, read journals, speak to engineering students, teachers etc. Often fast-paced and demanding, working in engineering has proved to be a constantly rewarding challenge – there is always a new problem to solve and a new skill to learn. My advice would be to get as much hands-on experience as you can, join engineering clubs, take any opportunities to lead teams and manage projects as the skills are invaluable. Any extra languages too are a bonus as most companies operate in a global market and you can’t always rely on Google Translate!

My advice, in particularly for girls, would be to not be put off by the lack of women engineers and to be ambitious. At many points so far in my career I have been the only woman in a meeting, in a team or even in an office. However, of the small number of women who I studied with during my engineering degree, all of them are now successful engineers and more women are taking up jobs in engineering and the industry is much richer for it. Finally for anyone seeking some better worded advice, there are organisations such as Women in Science and Engineering (WISE), the Women’s Engineering Society (WES) and others that can help connect you with mentors and other women engineers, which is a great way of getting advice if there isn’t already a scheme at your university or company.

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CRISTIAN ZACCARINI (RGS 2009-2016), an aspiring actor meets and welcomes professional actor and Reigatian Alex Price (RGS 1997-2002) back to Reigate Grammar School to discuss his time at school through to his success in the West End, film, TV and now Broadway!

INTERVIEW WITH

ALEX PRICE

RGS 1997-2002

Q: What are your fondest RGS memories?

A: My fondest memories are set in (RGS Head of Drama) Sarah Branston’s classes or at Hartswood. Also, Sixth Form entertainment, which was the final assembly in Sixth Form where students would get awards and where somebody would play some music. So me and my best mate, John Greatwood (RGS 1997-2002), decided that we would do a lip sync dance routine to Slam Dunk (Da Funk) by the band Five, and we spent nearly all our spare time pausing and rewinding their videos. It took hours to choreograph. Then we roped in three other mates and we were like, “Would you like to commit social suicide with us and do this choreographed dance routine lip sync to this song?” So we decided to do it and had I never been more scared in my life but it absolutely brought the house down.

Q: From your time at RGS, is there a particular play that still holds a special place in your heart?

A: Being back here at RGS is jogging my memory about some of the stuff that we did that I had completely forgotten about. I forgot that we did The Rivals, I forgot that we did Outside Edge, I forgot we did Romeo and Juliet, I mean I played Mercutio, I can’t believe I forgot that! But the one play that is seared into my memory is Oliver, where I played Fagin. It was so lifelike that some of the audience were crying at the end because I got hung on stage. Thank you Sarah! It was obviously one of Sarah’s things, just hanging students! So we had kids that were balling their eyes out. I had to come out at the end and reassure them it wasn’t really real. 32

Q: Who was your biggest influence at RGS?

A: (Laughs) I don’t know if I’ve already mentioned this person called Sarah Branston? Sarah was the biggest influence for me at RGS. I think the tough times that I had at school (which were few and far between) shaped me just as much as the amazing Sarah Branston or the amazing hockey coach or any of the other amazing teachers. RGS is one of about twelve schools that I went to, so I was forever the new kid.

Q: How did you go from an A Level Theatre Studies student to a successful professional actor?

A: I went straight into Webber Douglas Drama School. Sarah played a large part in this by taking me to The Pendley Shakespeare Festival to get some experience outside the classroom. That was hugely beneficial in terms of getting into drama school.

Q: How did your parents feel about you going to drama school?

A: My mum flipped out, I mean she properly flipped out which surprised me because I thought it would have been my Dad, but he didn’t.

Q: What was your first professional acting job?

A: It was Colourings at The Old Red Lion Theatre in Islington. I spent years unemployed, seriously contemplating giving up and moving on and studying Chemistry (laughs). But at the time it felt like the part was written for me. It was about a kid who had been to many schools and I thought “Crikey, if I don’t get this one I might


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FEATURES

as well give up!” and I was very open and honest in the audition about it. At drama school you’re taught to be very professional and I just went in there and said, “I get it, I get this, I can do this”. I was almost a bit desperate and I wouldn’t ever do that again but I guess this time honesty worked and I got lucky with the director and the writer taking the audition.

Q: You’ve been lucky enough to work in theatre, TV and film. What is your preference, and which do you find the most rewarding?

A: I’ve not done much film but actors frequently get asked this question and the honest answer is that there is none. A lot of people say that theatre is an actor’s medium and TV and film are a director’s medium because you know your performance is in the hands of somebody else when it’s on the big screen, in the editing room between the editor and the director. But in theatre you are totally in control, it’s a live thing. The director leads you to a certain point and then you’re in charge. But I don’t have a preference, I’ll do anything that pays!

Q: You played the role of Draco Malfoy in the inaugural West End production of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. How did being in the show differ from other projects you’ve worked on? Was there any pressure to live up to devoted fans’ expectations?

A: The difference between this and other projects was its scale, the scale of how many ingredients that went into it, whether it was the special effects, the magic, the new writing, colossal amount of cast or the physical movement of Steven Hoggett. All of those different ingredients coming together was huge. Even just rehearsing there were three banks of creatives and people who were at the top of their field doing these insane things. You had Set Designer Christine Jones, a Tony award-winning scenographer, with her graphic designer in one corner, then you had Original Story and Playwright Jack Thorne, at the back on his laptop, and John Tiffany the Original Story and Director at the front. It was just colossal in size, to the point where there were very few places we could actually rehearse. We had to go to a film studio outside of London to stage it and rehearse it; that’s the big thing. In terms of the expectations, it was really well marshalled by Sonia Friedman and Colin Callender who were the two Producers. They were very good at keeping the outside world and expectations separate from what we were doing. We felt that we were just doing a play that was called Harry Potter. But you could never get away from it truly. The play starts where the books finish, 19 years later, but there’s nothing between from when Draco finishes school to him dropping off his kid to school. So there was my job…to try and fill in those 19 years with what happened. It was strange having this character where you have this crazy back knowledge of him growing up but then you don’t have anything in between. So that was the way I felt I could push him into different, exciting territory alongside an amazing script to work from.

Q: You’ll be joining the Broadway cast for the opening of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child in Spring 2018. Has Broadway been something you have always dreamed of doing?

A: I never really thought about it, but it’s exciting because when it becomes a reality you’re like, “Oh wow, this is going to be amazing”. But it isn’t something that I aspired to do; I just aspired to do this job for a living. Whatever happens, happens. You’re in control of your personal life but everyone else controls your career. It’s not really in your hands. Unless you get to a point where you can pick and choose. But I’m a one trick pony, all I can do is this (laughs). I wish I could play the guitar or sing or do something else but I can’t. I’m a failed boy band member is what I am!

Q: Do you have any roles on your acting bucket list?

A: Not really, but I want to work with Juan Antonio Bayona, a director I worked with on Penny Dreadful, who was an unbelievable director. If I had my time again, I think now that it exists I think that Scorpius in Harry Potter and the Cursed Child (Draco’s son) is possibly one of the most incredible pieces of writing for a young character I’ve ever seen. Jack Thorne writes teenage angst like nobody else and I would have killed to play Scorpius when I came out of drama school. ¢

Alex Price playing Fagin in Oliver, 2001

When Alex came back to RGS (Front row L to R – Alex Price, Sarah Branston and Cris Zaccarini)

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INTERVIEW WITH

CHARLOTTE MICHEL RGS 2001-2008

After leaving RGS in 2008, I went to The University of Portsmouth to do Business Studies. While I was taking my finals I got my first job as a runner on a BBC Drama called ‘Mayday’. After that I did a few running jobs for the rest of the year then moved up the ranks to be a Production Co-ordinator, which is where I am now.

Q: What was your most memorable moment from RGS?

A: The school trips were amazing. I also have fond memories of being in the school plays and rehearsing late at night and on weekends as we always used to seem to get up to trouble.

Q: Who was your favourite teacher and why?

A: It’s so hard to have one favourite teacher as I had one favourite teacher from every year, but I have (the late) Mr Paul Flanagan to thank for pushing me in Upper Sixth Form in Business Studies. He pushed me and pushed me and made me sit with him every lunch time to revise for the A Level exams as I struggled with some of the modules and at the time I hated every minute of it, but it worked as he helped me get that ‘A’ for my A Level.

Q: When did you know that you wanted to get into the TV and film industry?

A: I always thought I wanted to work in TV and film. I was lucky enough to have family members in the industry, so from a young age I was on film sets during the school holidays but always with the Art department. There are so many different aspects and areas of film/TV production but after doing work experience at BBC Drama, I realised the Production department was the area of the industry I wanted to pursue. 34

Q: What was the hardest thing about starting in this industry?

A: It is not knowing when your next job will be. Being freelance isn’t for everybody as you can go for weeks without work and you think the phone will never ring again, and then all of sudden you will get a call saying “Can you start next week on a five month project...”. Luckily the UK Film & TV industry is booming at the moment so it’s very busy out there; it hasn’t always been like that though.

Q: The best bits?

A: The amazing locations we get to go to. On The Crown we were lucky and spent most of our days filming in the most stunning castles or stately homes around the UK. It isn’t always like that, some days you are sat under the M4 flyover in a dusty car park. I worked in South Africa for a month in November 2016 for the second season of The Crown. We filmed all around Cape Town and beaches along The Garden Route. I had to pinch myself sometimes and remember this was work. A month after I got back from South Africa, I was on a plane to Budapest to shoot out there for two weeks.


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Q: The worst bits?

A: The hours. Typically I will leave the house at 6am and get home again at 9pm. If I want to book a holiday I have to do it the week before I go and it’s always touch and go whether I can make that friend’s wedding...

Q: What is your biggest achievement?

A: I can’t think of one specific achievement, but it’s rewarding when you have a huge travel day and you get to the end of the day and think, “Wow, I personally just got 60 cast and crew and camera equipment through an airport and onto a beach in Cape Town with everyone and everything in one piece”.

Goukamma Na ture Reserve Beach, Sou th Africa – filming on the beach which fea tures in Episode 2 Season 2 of The Crown

Q: Describe your job role

A: No one knows really what a Production Co-ordinator does until something doesn’t turn up or when something goes wrong (which we obviously try and avoid). The Production department are there to facilitate every department on the project. You have to have a lot of patience for everyone and you have to be able to multi-task and do everything with a smile. Oh, and we laugh a lot, you have to. d at the Clapper Boar 1 end of Season

Filming in the Scottish Highlands on The Crown Season 1

Q: What is a typical (or not so typical) day in the life of Charlotte Michel?

A: Every day is so different. For a prep day we will be based in the offices at the studio and I will be organising meetings, sending out paperwork to cast & crew, organising location recces, booking transport and ordering equipment. On a shooting day we will be based on location and we deal with the day-to-day running and problem solving when things don’t always go to plan. We have a Production team of 15 people on The Crown so it’s mainly keeping an eye on what everyone else is doing as well as prepping call sheet information for the following day.

Q: If you could give 18 year old Charlotte, one piece of advice what would it be?

A: Do what you want, follow your heart in what you want to do instead of doing what you think you should be doing.

What advice would you give someone who wanted to get in to the industry?

1 The Crown Season Premiere at Odeon are Leicester Squ

A: Email and post your CV to everyone. Unfortunately everybody gets their jobs through recommendations so jobs are never advertised. It’s about being in the right place at the right time, so if you get your CV out there someone will give you work experience and if you are keen and polite and are good at making tea you will be asked to come back on the next one, paid. ¢

Filming at St Panc ra s St at ion The Cr ow on n Season 2

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FEATURES RGS FOUNDATION YOUNG AMBASSADOR AWARD

REFUGEES, KARATE & ME... IZZY TILLEY PROJECT ELEA, ATHENS Signing residents up for karate lessons at the opening event of Elea House

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ver the summer I spent six weeks volunteering with Project Elea at Eleonas refugee camp in Athens. Project Elea is a relatively small organisation of around 30 volunteers and the main objectives of the project are to improve the living conditions within the camp by providing a range of fun, creative and educational activities, as well as distributing essential items such as food and clothing. The camp has over 2,000 residents, the majority of which are from Syria, Afghanistan and Iran, although there are large minorities from other countries such as Mali, Cameroon and Pakistan.

I MET MANY AMAZING PEOPLE, MADE FRIENDS WITH BOTH VOLUNTEERS AND RESIDENTS, AND GAINED AN INSIGHT INTO THE REALITY OF THE REFUGEE CRISIS

When choosing which organisation to volunteer with I was wary of falling into the voluntourism trap and, as such, wanted to make sure that my contribution would be part of a sustainable and sensitively thought-out plan. I was pleased to find that Project Elea actively encourages residents of the camp to not only participate in but also to devise and run activities, workshops and other events taking place at the camp. During my time at Eleonas, I carried out a huge range of tasks including going door-to-door distributing baby milk, running sports and games sessions for children and teenagers, and helping to set up art classes for adults. As I was going to be at the camp for a fairly long period of time, I also decided to put forward some of my own ideas and undertake longerterm projects. The first of these was setting up, organising and leading, alongside a small sub-team of volunteers, long-awaited English lessons within the camp. Many of the residents hoped to eventually settle in countries

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such as the UK, Germany and Holland and wanted to improve their English but had no way to do so. Our small team began giving lessons from 10am-2pm in the newly-opened Elea House, a container that had been fully renovated so it could be used as a space for indoor sports activities as well as for teaching. It was a lot of work but it was immensely rewarding. The teaching itself was far more challenging than my previous experiences of tutoring in the UK, mainly due to the language barrier, as some students spoke no English and could not read or write using the Roman alphabet at the beginning of the course. However, I was able to use my French and limited Arabic to explain to those who spoke those languages, and had to think of creative ways to get the message across to speakers of other languages such as miming actions, using drawings and contrasting opposite words. I taught five days a week for five of the six weeks I was at the camp and by the end I not only felt I had grown in confidence and had learnt how to deliver lessons effectively,


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but I had also built a good rapport and friendships with my students.

ISOBEL TILLEY RGS 2009-2013

As a black belt in karate, another thing I was keen to do was to start karate lessons for the residents. I arranged to teach three hour-long classes a week: one for all adults, one for women only and one for children. The response to this was extremely positive and at a sign-up event for activities in the camp I was approached by over 50 residents who were interested in the lessons! I taught the basics of the style of karate I practise, Wado-Ryu, and tailored each lesson to the people who came. The children’s lessons were particularly well-attended with around 25 attendees every week. I was really pleased to be able to teach something that is important to me and that I have been practising for years, and I was glad that it extended the range of activities on offer for the residents of the camp. Project Elea encourages all volunteers who have a particular skill or interest to introduce new activities at the

camp, or to expand on those that are already running. It was this flexibility that allowed me to begin teaching karate. In the last week that I was at Eleonas the whole camp celebrated Eid and a group of (mostly teenage) residents put on a theatre production about their experiences of having to leave their home countries, which was extremely moving. We also organised a community meal, which was followed by music and dancing. It was wonderful to see all the different communities, volunteers included, participating in the festivities together! During my time at Eleonas I met many amazing people, made friends with both volunteers and residents, and gained an insight into the reality of the refugee crisis that I would never have been able to otherwise. As I hope to work with refugees and NGOs that support them in the future, this experience was invaluable. ¢

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DEATH RAILWAY DUNCAN PLAYFORD RGS 1966-1974

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“THIS WAS AN EXPERIENCE NONE OF US WILL EVER FORGET.”

John Dancer, Duncan Playford, Lawrie Webb and David Playford at Hellfire Pass

Lawrie Webb, John Dancer and David Playford at the Kanchanaburri War Cemetery

Four Old Reigatians, David Playford (’69), John Dancer (’64), Lawrie Webb (’77) and myself recently made the trip of a lifetime to the Burma Railway, also known as the Death Railway, at Kanchanaburri in Thailand. The Empire of Japan built 258 miles of railway between September 1942 and October 1943 completing the rail link between Bangkok, Thailand and Rangoon, Burma. The Japanese used 60,000 allied prisoners of war (POW) with 12,000 dying during its construction. In addition c.90,000 Burmese and 75,000 Malayans worked on the railroad with reports that 60,000 of these workers perished. The 1957 film Bridge over the River Kwai immortalised these events, although the iconic bridge was not built during the war nor was there a River ‘Kwai’! The film is loosely based on one of the bridges built over the Mae Klong, three miles away. The three days we spent there were an incredibly moving experience including the train journey itself from Kanchanaburri to Nam Tok. The original line was closed in 1947 but this section was reopened in 1957. Fortunately, the three hour trip did not reflect the railway’s horrendous

history as it was incredibly scenic through the stunning Thai countryside.

LIVING IMAGE OF HELL ITSELF

Close to the Nam Tok terminus is the Hellfire Pass, so called as it was a living image of hell itself. Carved out of the rock face with only the most basic of materials, this was the longest (75m) and deepest (25m) mountain pass across the railway line. Sixty nine men were beaten to death by Japanese guards in the six weeks it took to build the cutting, one of the highest for a specific section. They worked 18 hours nonstop each day for six weeks and many people died from cholera, dysentery, starvation and exhaustion. Walking through Hellfire Pass it is impossible to appreciate the suffering and inhumanity that occurred. However, the Museums there and at Kanchanaburri plus the cemeteries at Kanchanaburri and Chungkai are sobering reminders. ¢

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JAMES WOODALL RGS 1986-1994

GEORGE AND THE GIANT PLEDGE

FUNDRAISING TO BEAT CHILDHOOD CANCER

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s an Old Reigatian and father to two boys at Reigate St Mary's we've been struck by the generosity and amazing nature of our community so wanted to take this opportunity to say thank you as well as share our story with those of you who may not be aware of it.

complex surgery and received proton therapy in the USA thanks to the NHS. George bravely battled back to learn to use a wheelchair going on to eventually walk and run again. We're happy to report he currently has no evidence of disease and is starting on a few short sessions a week easing him into his Reception year at Reigate St Mary's.

In November 2016 we found a lump on our then fouryear-old son's back. Having been launched into the world of childhood cancer, whilst going through multiple tests and awaiting George's diagnosis, on New Year's Eve we set up a fundraiser called George and the Giant Pledge for the fantastic paediatric team at The Royal Marsden.

Throughout we've kept a daily blog of everything that's been happening to George. Not least including being caught up in the largest hurricane on record during our time whilst he was having treatment in America! Through this we've been able to raise awareness of childhood cancer as well as inspire others to get involved in fundraising. (See Facebook.com/georgeandthegiantpledge)

I have a stark memory of our first trip to the Marsden which was both a heart-breaking and heart-warming experience. Seeing all those young children with no hair and tubes coming out of them was truly overwhelming. Yet the thing that struck us the most was how many of those kids had a smile on their face. We were shocked to learn that last year just 1.3% of all Cancer Research UK donations went to childhood cancer research, and with 1 in 500 children under the age of 14 in the UK diagnosed with cancer, this compelled us to set a bold target of raising £100,000 in 2017. Sadly on the 3 January 2017 it was confirmed our son George had a rare soft tissue PNET Ewing's Sarcoma. By this point we were already well on the way to hitting our £100,000 target. Amazingly, thanks to the generosity of many of you connected to the school and our local community, we hit our target within two weeks so it wasn't long before we gained the courage to add another nought to it! Since then George has endured 14 rounds of chemo, had part of his spine removed during 10 hours of 40

George and the Giant Pledge has gone on to receive support from 26 countries around the world, had celebrities from Dame Judi Dench to Jack Whitehall and Andy Murray get behind it. We're still fundraising so other families don't have to endure a scenario like ours and are determined to hit our £1,000,000 target. We're very proud to have funded a full-time paediatric psychologist helping children re-learn having had surgery for brain tumours, two play specialists to help the children get through their awful experiences, a Sarcoma fellow to help develop international research in this area as well as the refurbishment of a paediatric oncology isolation room at East Surrey Hospital. The next part of our project is to fund ground-breaking work into paediatric and adolescent drug development at The Royal Marsden. You never know on leaving school where your path in life will take you, we certainly never expected this to happen to us but we're happy to at least try to get something positive out of our shockingly bad situation. ¢


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BY THE END OF 2017 OUR TEAM TOTAL SAT AT

ÂŁ630,000!

Follow George and the Giant Pledge Giant Pledge @GiantPledge giantpledge

If you wish to contribute or get involved in 2018 see

Giantpledge.com/ team

Thank you from the Woodall family

The Woodall's incredible dedication to supporting The Royal Marsden earned them the Outstanding Commitment to Fundraising award at the JustGiving Awards in November 2017 as well as recognition from the Prime Minister with a Points of Light award in December. We wish the family all the best with George's continued journey as well as continue to support them on their ÂŁ1,000,000 fundraising mission. 41


T H E R E I G AT I A N 2 017

RECOLLECTIONS & MEMORIES FINDING MY NICHE THE LONG AND WINDING ROAD

STEPHEN K FISHER RGS 1960-1967

The two years that I spent at Reigate St. Mary’s Preparatory School, with its structured and disciplined environment, allowed a smooth transition to life at RGS. I enjoyed many of the classes, in particular the foreign language and chemistry classes. One of the most beneficial features of my early education was an emphasis on developing writing skills. The requirement to write many essays really helped me in later years when preparing scientific manuscripts. Beyond academics, cricket and rugby were enjoyable activities as were school trips abroad to Europe. I remember a number of excellent teachers but the one who really stands out was Mr Paxton (RGS Staff 1962-2000), a wonderfully engaging English teacher. My early ‘halcyon’ phase at RGS lasted until about the Fifth Form when a combination of social distractions along with poor study 42

habits resulted in a rather mediocre record of O Level accomplishments! Things didn’t improve in the Sixth Form. Even though I had every intention of eventually pursuing a career in Chemistry or Biology, nothing ‘sparked’ my interest sufficiently. At the time, I remember that both Mrs Knight (Chemistry) and Mr Griffiths (Biology) were justifiably sceptical of my purported plans for a career in the sciences! My ‘epiphany’ came about late in the Upper Sixth Form when I finally realised that I needed to apply myself more seriously. But because of less than stellar


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A Level grades, I initially pursued a twoyear Higher National Diploma in Applied Biology at the Borough Polytechnic in London (now London South Bank University). It was there that I hit my stride having been introduced to Biochemistry, in which I found my passion. Those two years were invaluable in allowing me to both identify my real interests and to correct academic deficiencies. Following completion of the HND in 1969, I was admitted directly into the third year of a four-year BSc degree course in Biochemistry at Leeds University and graduated in 1971. Thereafter, it was smooth sailing and I subsequently obtained MSc and PhD degrees in Neurochemistry from the University of London in 1972 and Birmingham University in 1976, respectively. After my PhD degree, I pursued two post-doctoral fellowships, the first at Birmingham University where I had the unsettling experience of being completely unable to replicate any of the previous graduate student’s results! The explanation was simple, the student had fabricated all of the ‘data’ even though the studies had appeared in prestigious peer-reviewed journals. The stern warning that Mr Walter,

 12 year old Stephen Fisher

my English teacher, had issued regarding the ‘fallibility of printed word’ certainly resonated with me. In 1978 I emigrated to the USA for a second post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Ann Arbor is a college town of about 150,000 people and the University of Michigan is one of the largest and highly-ranked public Universities in the country. My move to the USA turned out exceptionally well both scientifically and personally. Not only did I receive great mentoring there, but the research was exciting and the experiments actually worked! Moreover, it was there that I met my wife of 37 years, Anne, who is a PhD neuroscientist. Following this postdoctoral fellowship, I spent three years in the Pharmaceutical Industry in New York, but really missed academia and in 1985 I accepted a position as Assistant Professor of Pharmacology back at the University of Michigan, subsequently rising to the rank of full Professor in 1996. In the 32 years that I have been on the faculty I have thoroughly enjoyed my career, which has focused on the fields of Cell Signalling and Neuropharmacology. Both my colleagues and the research environment have been outstanding and I have derived much satisfaction from the teaching of

“I seriously doubt whether my career would have been possible without the broad and excellent education that I received at RGS. At the time, I didn’t take full advantage of it but the seeds were planted there, only to flourish later.”

graduate students and mentoring of my own PhD students. I closed my laboratory in 2012 but still am active in teaching, administration and directing the MSc programme in Pharmacology. When I look back on my career, it was certainly a ‘long and winding road’ to find my ultimate niche. The path was not always smooth and I benefitted from some strong advocacy along the way. However, I seriously doubt whether my career would have been possible without the broad and excellent education that I received at RGS. At the time I didn’t take full advantage of it but the seeds were planted there, only to flourish later. ¢

 1965 School trip to Germany (photo provided by Dave Reardon) L to R: Stephen Fisher, Andrew Lloyd-Thomas, David Woodward and the late Chris Scott

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RECOLLECTIONS & MEMORIES

LETTER TO THE EDITOR MARTIN SMITH RGS 1966-1969

 Martin Smith School Admission Card

 1969 Third Form School Cricket Team

It was with equal measure of pleasure, nostalgia, interest and total agreement that I read Duncan Playford’s (’73) article in the ‘Recollections and Memories’ section of the 2016 Reigatian Magazine.

hard work, plus probably most importantly, the value of strong bonds of friendship that had been developed and reinforced by my RGS experience fortunately stood me in good stead.

I entered RGS in 1966, two years ahead of my brother Tony (’68) and immediately relished and responded to the ethos of the school. Whilst I recall that discipline and respect were firmly embedded expectations, it seemed that expanding pupil horizons and developing potential were always at the forefront of the school’s aim. Sport and associated healthy competition was fundamental to this approach but with for example the lunch-time record club, house activities, the Pilgrim Magazine, and the engaging humour and dedication deployed by so many of the staff team, this was by no means the only vehicle. From the age of 11 I played alongside Duncan and the other lads in rugby and cricket teams, week in week out, often travelling fair distances to away matches in the school's iconic blue and white striped double decker bus. These were developmental years that I’ll never forget and at the time, when after only three years in the school, my father informed me that due to a career move we’d have to go to school elsewhere, I felt the break massively. I moved from Reigate to a mixed grammar school in another county and, my word, how very different things immediately felt! However, the understandings of teamwork and the benefits of 44

Rugby and sport in general, although sadly never at any illustrious standard, have always since remained a guiding passion, not just through the senses of camaraderie and shared mission but also the resultant health and social benefits. My schooling has influenced my subsequent family life and a career of almost 40 years of involvement in the Probation Service has left me with no regrets and a real sense of achievement and pride. It’s been and still remains a wonderful journey giving me plenty of reasons to count my blessings. Certainly it has often had me returning to the values and attitudes we learned at school and at home. As such I can only reiterate the sentiments expressed by Dunca as he commented on the firm foundations that good schooling can and should afford. We were so lucky to have this opportunity. I’m not sure if any of my peers at school between 1966 and 1969 will recall the back-row forward who also liked to spin a ball a bit for the school, who along with others managed to con our headmaster that travel to school during the Derby week was inconceivable, and who had a complete ineptitude when it came to Latin; but I fondly remember many of them and will always feel indebted to RGS for the formidable and indestructible life building blocks that I picked up during my time there. ¢


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FAREWELL ALAN REID RGS STAFF 1971-2016

A very special farewell lunch for Alan Reid took place on Saturday 28 October at the Old Reigatian Rugby Football Club. It was a wonderful afternoon with over 70 people attending to wish Alan a happy retirement. A wide variety of Reigatians spanning across Alan’s 46 years of coaching and teaching at RGS attended to say thank you and give Alan their best wishes. Along with Reigatians catching up with Alan and with one another, Shaun Fenton, Headmaster spoke about Alan’s contribution, key achievements and the impact he has had on the students, staff and history at RGS. Stuart Nicholson (current RGS staff) took the opportunity to delve into Reidy’s past with a few jovial anecdotes and, on behalf of the PE department, presented Alan with a fabulous bespoke picture which included both RGS Rosslyn Park winning teams from 1976 and 2015. Former 1st XV captain Brian Woodford (’90) spoke on behalf of all former RGS rugby players when he told three short stories that encapsulated Alan as a man, coach and respected member of the Reigatian community. Finally, Alan spoke about his time at RGS and Head of Foundation, Sean Davey, ran a Q&A giving Reigatians the chance to ask questions they had always wanted to! This was followed by a delicious hog roast before there was much catching up and celebrating to be done. ¢

60-SECONDS WITH ALAN REID If you had the chance, what advice would you have given to yourself on your first day at RGS? Come very well prepared, be confident, and give 100% to everything you are asked to do. What are you most proud of? The development of the playing fields at Hartswood. What will you miss most about RGS? Coaching committed talented pupils and the camaraderie among the staff. What will you miss least at RGS? Unnecessary paperwork! What was your best sporting tour and why? The first tour to British Columbia in 1975 because it was ground-breaking, and we were so well looked after by our hosting schools and clubs. How would you like to be remembered? As someone who hopefully made a real difference to the lives of the pupils I taught.

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FROM THE ARCHIVES ALEC HARVEY REEVES CBE ‘FATHER OF THE DIGITAL AGE’ RGS 1915-1918 (1902-1971) q Alec Harvey Reeves CBE

I was recently made aware of a former Reigatian of some note who, as far as I am aware, has never been recognised in the school’s ‘Hall of Fame’. I hope this article will go some way to redress this.

Alec Harvey Reeves attended the school from September 1915 to July 1918 and achieved some impressive academic results. His father Edward Ayearst Reeves was a man of some note, being Map Curator for the Royal Geographical Society from 1900 to 1933, and lived at the house “Hillside” on Reigate Road, which still exists, backing onto Millway and having a different name these days. Alec had previously attended the local Radnor Preparatory School in Redhill. In 1916, at the Grammar School, Alec achieved distinctions in the London University Junior School Examinations (what one might loosely compare with the modern GCSE) – in English, arithmetic, Latin, oral French, mathematics and chemistry. In the following year he sat for the London University Matriculation (Hons) and gained distinctions in mathematics, mechanical physics, Latin, French (written and oral) and electricity and magnetism.

telephone networks of Spain and South America, the world's first single-sideband radio telephone system, and for developing a multi-channel carrier system for UHF radio telephones. He was also responsible for innovations in the design of automatic frequency control circuits, digital delay lines and condenser microphones. He also regularly experimented with the paranormal, conducting studies to measure the power of thought and attempting to communicate with the dead. He reportedly performed paranormal investigations on the roof of ITT’s Paris laboratory and said he was guided by the late Michael Faraday (a 19th Century English scientist). This was an interest he most likely inherited from his father, who in 1916 published The Recollections of a Geographer, one chapter of which was dedicated to ‘psychic experiences’ of which he claimed to have had many including meeting the ghost of Knightsbridge Tube Station.

As a result of this impressive set of results, he was granted £40 entrance scholarship for three years from 1918 at the Imperial College of Science, South Kensington and followed this with a further period of study for his PhD in 1921.

But there were two inventions for which Alec Reeves is most well-known, in the field of communications and radio technology.

Reeves joined the International Western Electric Company in 1923 and was part of a team of engineers responsible for the first commercial transatlantic telephone link. In 1925 Western Electric's European operations were acquired by ITT and in 1927 Reeves was transferred to ITT's research laboratories in Paris. Whilst in Paris, he was responsible for a number of projects including: a short-wave radio link between the

INVENTIONS Reeves recognised the potential that ‘pulse-code modulation’ (PCM) had for reducing noise when speech is transmitted over long distances. With an analogue signal, every time the signal is amplified, the noise contained in the signal is also amplified and new, additional noise is added. With pulse code modulation, all that is required is to regenerate the pulses,

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T H E M AG A Z I N E F O R T H E R E I G AT I A N C O M M U N I T Y

q This is a stamp issued by the Post Office in 1969, one of a set to commemorate important telecommunications

developments. It shows stylistically the principle of pulse code modulation.

THE ‘OBOE’ WAS ONE OF THE MAIN DECISIVE DEVELOPMENTS THAT HELPED OVERCOME THE ENEMY

hence the noise content of the signal is not increased. Reeves patented the invention in 1938. Unfortunately his idea required quite complex circuitry (by 1930s standards) that was not costeffective, using valves. PCM was not used commercially until the 1950s when the invention of the transistor made it viable, although it was used by Bell Telephone Laboratories during the Second World War for secure communications links such as the SIGSALY system used for encrypted voice communications between Roosevelt and Churchill. It was PCM technology that allowed the development of the compact disc (CD) and its introduction to the public in 1982. And, of course there has been a host of other digital-based technological developments dependant on the principles he worked on. His second important invention came during the Second World War, the ‘Oboe’ radio-based guidance system for aircraft. Following the invasion of France by Germany in 1940, Reeves escaped from Paris over the Spanish border and then made his way back to England aboard a cargo ship. Reeves was a committed pacifist but accepted the need to defeat Hitler’s Nazis. He joined the Royal Aircraft Establishment at Farnborough and took part in the development of countermeasures against the German radio navigation systems, the so-called 'battle of the beams'. Reeves was later transferred to the Telecommunications Research Establishment as part of a team of scientists and engineers developing Britain's own radio navigation aids. The first system they developed was

called 'GEE', a system that performed well but was susceptible to jamming and was not accurate enough for blind bombing of targets at night or through thick cloud. Together with Frank Jones of the Telecommunications Research Establishment, Reeves developed a new system called 'Oboe', which offered pin-point accuracy to within 50 yards (45m) and was resistant to jamming. 'Oboe' was to prove invaluable to the Royal Air Force during Bomber Command's offensive against Germany and was one of the main decisive developments that helped overcome the enemy. POST WAR After the war, Alec Reeves managed a team led by Charles K. Kao and George Hockham at Standard Telecommunication Laboratories, (initially at Enfield, North London and later at Harlow Essex), which invented optical fibres as a means of communicating large quantities of information. Kao was awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize in physics for his part in this achievement. Reeves worked at STL until retirement. He was awarded the Stuart Ballantine Medal in 1965 and also the CBE in 1969. It was mainly his work in pulse code modulation that ultimately made the digital revolution possible, and it is with some justification that we can consider Alec Reeves to be the ‘Father of the Digital Age’. ¢

PETER BURGESS RGS 1967-1974 47


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FROM THE ARCHIVES

The RGS Foundation is frequently asked to help find information, pictures and Pilgrim articles from yesteryear for personal intrigue or by a family trying to research a loved one for whom they have little information about their educational past. It is always a pleasure to help with requests like this and often those whom are seeking this information are trying to piece together the life of a relative who passed away some time ago, in particular those who fell during the First or Second World War. In 2015, John Rowlands (RGS 1966-1973) wrote 'They Were More Than Just Names' The Reigate Grammar School First World War Memorial book. This book looked at each young man who attended RGS and whose life was cut short during WWI. A detailed summary gives the reader a true picture of each of these respected young men and the part they played in the local community (available from Foundation shop).

GONE BUT NEVER FORGOTTEN The RGS Foundation was contacted by Penelope Morrison Boettiger, the great niece of Brian Hartford Morrison (RGS 1911-1913) one of the aforementioned young men who attended RGS and who went on to fight in the First World War only to fall in 1919. Penelope decided to research more into her great uncle Brian’s life and learn more about where he lies today. With thanks to John Rowlands and the RGS Foundation, Penelope has been able to deepen her research for personal and family closure.

WHO WAS MY GREAT UNCLE BRIAN? BY PENELOPE MORRISON BOETTIGER When I came across it (They Were More than Just Names) and found his page, I was immediately struck that he (Brian) looked exactly like my father had at that age. I sent the photo to my father, now 87, and he was amazed and agreed it was like looking in a mirror! That single experience really personalised Brian for me and I decided I needed to know more. I had grown up hearing about ‘Uncle Brian’ from my grandfather, but I didn't listen. I was young and thought it all sounded very boring. My grandfather passed away in the 1980s before I had the slightest interest in anyone over the age of 30. My father knows some of the stories but he too wishes he had asked more questions. I am devastated to learn his medals, but particularly his diary and drawings and photos were auctioned off just five years ago. Had I started this search five years ago, after almost 100 years I could have bought them back. I don't know how

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they got out of family hands but one day I hope to figure out where they are and get them back. I decided to see if there was a way to learn whether his headstone still stands in Quetta, Pakistan. No one from our family has ever visited it given the location. Sadly, the cemetery was abandoned by the military in the 1930s due to security concerns but because of this his name was added to the Delhi Memorial (India Gate), a memorial to 82,000 soldiers including some soldiers and officers from the UK. In my research I learnt of a family in Quetta who had continued to maintain the graveyard, generation after generation of the same family, for no money once the British left. They had been employed by the British and felt it was their duty and honour to continue maintaining the site. Unfortunately in the 1990s the family was attacked for maintaining a Christian cemetery, a son was nearly beaten to death, the father was hurt badly and a daughter was kidnapped. That was the last reference I could find to the military section of the cemetery. I knew too that the earthquake had destroyed many headstones.


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Through all this, I had very much started to feel it was my duty to learn as much as I could about him and the place where he lies. With no family of his own, it was up to us to keep him alive. I stumbled on a book about the Quetta Cemetery. In that book are the inscriptions and locations of every gravestone as of the 1980s. His was there. It read as follows:

later, he sent a photo with flowers laid at Uncle Brian’s headstone. A restoration in the kindness of humanity!

Lieutenant Brian Harford MORRISON. 22nd Punjabis. Died 9 Jun 1919, aged 20 years, of wounds received at Spin Balak. E'en as he trod that day to God so walked he from his birth, in simpleness and gentleness, in honour and in mirth.

The day Brian was wounded, his men began carrying him. They carried him from Spin Balak all the way to Quetta, on foot for 50 miles... we have always taken comfort in that solidarity.

Seeing there was a map laying out the cemetery, I then set out to see what else I could find. I reached out to a complete stranger in Quetta. I asked if he was ever at the cemetery and would he be willing to take a few photos of the gravesite and headstone, if it was still there? I had no idea if anything would come of it. A couple of weeks later, I received the photos. He and a friend of his went to the cemetery and followed the map to his headstone. We started a conversation and I said that one day I hoped to visit and lay flowers as his grave had surely never had flowers laid before. An hour

I considered repatriation but now I feel far more comfortable with where he is. He is not in some unknown place, he is in a place I have seen with an inscription showing love from those who buried him.

I don't believe the journey is over. I had better live a long time because I am so fascinated and touched by all of this and have much more to research! I am so appreciative of your work as, for our family, it has truly made a difference. I am also so grateful it has happened while my father, Brian’s nephew, is still with us as he is extremely interested and touched by all of it. ¢

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FROM THE ARCHIVES

FRANK ELLIS REGIMENT 51ST BATTALION AUSTRALIAN IMPERIAL FORCE RGS 1895-1898 (1882-1918)

THE MISSING HERO Following the publication of the book They Were More Than Just Names, I was contacted by Richard Bugler. Richard had noticed that the publication did not reference a gentleman named Frank Ellis. Frank attended RGS between 1895 and 1898 but sadly fell during the First World War and for some reason was not honoured on the memorial plaque that stands at RGS today and, therefore, was not included in the publication. Richard as a young boy had met Frank’s sister Gertrude who had been a family friend of his parents until her old age. Through this family link, in 2002 he came into possession of a box containing a number of letters sent between Frank and his sister Gertrude, medals and other information regarding Frank. Hidden amidst this material was the evidence that Frank had attended RGS. On further research from the school archives it was verified that he was an OR and I established he had moved to Australia in 1910. His sister Gertrude moved to Bristol where she was in service. It appears that all contact with the school was lost and RGS were unaware that he died. In 1901 Frank had been living in Earlswood and working for the postal service. It was revealed that sometime early in the century Frank and Gertrude had lost both their parents. The natural strengthening of their bond during this difficult time became evident in his correspondence from the trenches.

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On 12 November 1910 Frank left the UK bound for Freemantle, Australia. There he joined the Australian Forces on 5 June 1917 and at the time was known as a ‘well-sinker’, someone who built wells to bring water up from below the surface of the land, which was fairly essential in the dry areas of Australia. Frank went straight into Machine Gun School and became an acting corporal until February 1918 when he voluntarily reverted to Private. On 13 March 1918 he left Australia on the steam ship Ormonde, taking two months and reaching Southampton on 15 May. After a period of training in UK he left for France on 15 August 1918 and was sadly killed just four weeks later and two months before the end of the war. It is during this period that many of his letters to his beloved sister Gertrude were sent. The last letter from the trenches was dated just six days before he fell during the 100 day surge which brought about the final allied victory. Gertrude lived with her memories until she passed away in the 1980s. Frank is buried at the commonwealth cemetery at Jeancourt his body having been recovered from the fields around the assault on the Hindenburg line. ¢

JOHN ROWLANDS RGS 1966-1973


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PHOTOS FROM THE ARCHIVES

NOTABLE ALUMNI SIR THOMAS HENRY COTTON MBE RGS 1918 (1907-1987) The name Henry Cotton is famously associated with the history of British golf since the early 1900s. Born on 28 January 1907 in Cheshire, Thomas (latterly known as Henry) and his family moved to London and he later attended Reigate Grammar School. Henry left school in the summer of 1923 and soon started his career as a professional golfer, joining his younger brother Leslie as assistant teaching professional at Fulwell Golf Club, Middlesex. In 1925 Henry travelled to Scotland to try and qualify for the Open Championship but sadly his scores left him well outside the qualifying mark. This did not stop Henry, his perseverance prevailed. It was in the 1930s and 40s when Henry achieved fame following three victories in The Open Championship (1934, 1937 and 1948). During a record (at the time) perfect round of 65 during the 1934 Open Championship, the Dunlop golf company launched the famous 'Dunlop 65' ball in Henry’s honour, which is still in production to this day.

Resort and Pestana Alto Golf in the Algarve, Portugal. In 1952 Henry set up the Golf Foundation, a charity that today thrives in encouraging young people from all backgrounds and circumstances to enjoy the playing and personal benefits of golf. Henry was knighted in the New Year's Day Honours of 1988, named a Knight Bachelor. Sadly Henry passed away on 22 December 1987, just days before it was publicly announced and before he could accept the honour in person. ¢

Henry was awarded an MBE following his charity work during Second World War whilst he served with the Royal Air Force, raising money for the Red Cross by playing exhibition matches and shows. Towards the end of Henry’s competitive career he was a member of four British Ryder Cup teams and served as captain of the team in 1947 and 1953. In the early 1950s, when he stopped playing competitive golf, Henry became a successful architect of golf courses including designing the Penina Golf and

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REIGATIAN SPORT OR HOCKEY 2016-17

OR RUGBY 2016-17

The Club, now entering its 58th year in December 2017, continues to run three teams and to attract good players. This is the report for the 2016-17 season.

those playing continues to rise and what a few years ago would have been a 1st XI standard on grass is now the general level of the lower divisions.

The 1st XI in Surrey Division 2 finished 9th out of 12 in 2016-17, two places down from the previous year. The 2nd XI in Surrey Open league Division 2 finished 4th out of 11 and the 3rd XI finished 8th out of 10. Although the number of clubs and teams within Surrey is declining, the standard of

The Club, with the help of the staff, has strengthened its links with the School, and entered the 2017-18 season with an improved prospect of attracting youthful players.

Training is free and all are welcome (see orhc.info for latest dates and times). If you are interested in joining or would like more information, please contact Rob Evans on 01737 823114.

Ian Whiteman (RGS 1953-1961)

After the tribulations of recent years it is pleasing to report that we had the full use of our Clubhouse and surrounds last year. Our thanks are once again extended to our President, Sir Peter Harrison, for his continuing support and the commitment to the additional work. On the pitch we enjoyed a successful and enjoyable season. Our 1st XV , under George Wheeler, had an improved season rising up to 4th in the league largely based on a stellar performance before Christmas of 10 wins out of 12.The A XV had a great season winning their Surrey Reserve League Championship, and ending the season winning the Surrey Plate Competition. Congratulations to Hamish Elsey and his team. Our Extra XV had 14 games and our Veterans managed to get out for a couple of matches. Our objective for next season remains the regular fielding of four senior sides. Another great season for our Mini section, as well as many achievements on the field we also had some great days out, 240 going to the Quins vs Exeter game including a half time lap of honour. The 2016-17 season was the second full season of our Colts Academy, bringing a dedicated U17s group of players together with a stellar U18s who have shone throughout their time at ORRFC. A number of our older Colts Academy players have again experienced senior rugby on Saturdays for the Extra A XV, aiding that transition to senior club rugby. This has also been another great season for our girls and ladies section and we continue to grow our numbers and make great strides with the standard of the rugby that the girls are playing. Our sincere thanks to all the many managers and coaches that do such a great job in welcoming our youngsters to the game of rugby. We are very proud that we run 30 active teams from Under 6 all the way up to Veterans.

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This year has seen some dramatic improvements to our grounds and pitches. Work in the 12-acre field has been completed and the pitches have been available for use as from September 2016.


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Work has now been completed on the installation of floodlights for the A XV pitch and this has significantly improved our evening training sessions. Finally, the Club celebrated its 90th Anniversary with a well-attended dinner. The Club is well placed to enjoy the next 90 years. Peter Tharp (RGS 1954-1962) ORRFC Hon Secretary

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FOUNDATION NEWS TO BE A PILGRIM – IT’S A SMALL WORLD! A very special feature of the Reigatian community is that we are global. Through the work of the Foundation Office, particularly over recent years, it has been great to see the emergence of international hubs and communities. I say that as the honorary Ambassador for Canada (West coast)! RGS has for many years had a strong affinity with British Columbia linked to several rugby tours and exchanges that have taken place since the 1970s. My love of rugby, fostered at Reigate Grammar continues today. Although the body does let me know that I’m no spring chicken!

Sean Davey once told me that you will find a Reigatian in every corner of the world. Well, on 23 September, two Old Reigatians unknowingly met on the pitch at an old boys rugby game in Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada! It wasn’t until after the game and over a social beer that I discovered another English accent in the room (Stephen Borer RGS 1986-1993). Whilst he was English and was my opposite number on the pitch, it transpired that he also attended a school in Surrey! We couldn’t believe it and just laughed out loud. The joy and camaraderie of rugby and the power of the Reigatian network. It seemed apt to acknowledge that the school song was To be a Pilgrim – once a Reigatian, always a Reigatian! Matt Falkner

Stephen Borer (RGS 1986-1993) and Matt Falkner (RGS 1976-1981) were banging heads in the centres, although at a more leisurely pace!

REIGATIAN LAUNCHES HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH

QUEEN ELIZABETH CARRIER FACTS

On 16 August Sir Peter Gershon (RGS 1958-1965) met with Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May and Commodore Jerry Kyd, Captain of the 65,000-tonne British aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth, after it arrived at its new home port, Portsmouth Naval Base. Greeted by thousands of people who lined Portsmouth seafront, the 280m vessel entered the harbour on England’s southern coast at 0610 GMT. HMS Queen Elizabeth is the largest warship ever built for the Royal Navy, according to the Ministry of Defence. Sir Peter Gershon Chairman of the Aircraft Carrier Alliance said “I am incredibly proud to witness HMS Queen Elizabeth arrive at her home port of Portsmouth Naval Base having successfully completed the first phase of her sea trials programme. “Over 10,000 people have come together to bring HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales to life, from early design to the magnificent ships they are today. It is thanks to their industrious endeavours and pride that we have achieved this historic moment in the programme to bring HMS Queen Elizabeth into service. “We’re excited to complete the remainder of her test and commissioning programme before delivering her to the Royal Navy by the end of the year.”

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280m The Queen Elizabeth Carrier is the biggest and most powerful ship ever made in Britain and built for the Navy The ship will generate enough energy to power 300,000 kettles or 5,500 family homes, or a town the size of Swindon

40,000

tonnes of steel will go into the ship, 150% more than was used in Wembley Stadium

The ship’s two propellers weigh 33 tonnes each – nearly two and a half times a double decker bus and one and a half times as high

Two huge aircraft lifts can move two combat jets from the hangar to the flight deck in

60 seconds

500

tonnes of fresh water will be produced daily on the ship


LEGACY GIVING LEAVE A GIFT IN YOUR WILL AND CHANGE A LIFE FOREVER Support the 1675 Bursary Fund DO YOU REMEMBER YOUR FIRST DAY AT SCHOOL? THE CRISP AUTUMN AIR, NEW SHOES, NEW TIE. A NEW BEGINNING. So much to look forward to and the first steps into a whole new world of opportunity. Today, just as it was then, young people, no matter what their background, need a chance to fulfil their potential and to be their best. Supporting the 1675 Bursary Fund by leaving a gift in your will can help them and change a life forever.

For more information, please contact us: foundation@reigategrammar.org

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SCHOOL NEWS RGS SHORTLISTED FOR SCHOOL OF THE YEAR AWARD From more than 2,500 independent schools in the UK, Reigate Grammar School has been shortlisted for the School of the Year award in the national TES Independent School Awards. RGS is one of eight schools and the only co-educational school in Surrey to have been selected for the prestigious ‘Senior School of the Year’ award which is granted to schools who demonstrate innovation, imagination and efforts to develop children in ways that go beyond the league tables.

ANOTHER SUPERB SET OF GCSE & A LEVEL RESULTS FOR RGS The overall results for RGS are once again outstanding but what is most remarkable is that they have been achieved by students who have not only been focused on their academics but are active on the sports fields, top class musicians and performers and active contributors to all things extra-curricular at RGS. A Level results have once again been fantastic with the average Reigatian securing three As. There were more A*-A grades than all other grades put together and A* grades saw a big jump compared to last year’s record results! These grades will open doors of opportunity for Reigatians, securing them places at top universities so they can go on to achieve their life aspirations and fulfilling careers.

Headmaster Shaun Fenton said, “I am delighted that Reigate Grammar School is a finalist for School of the Year. The award, which is granted to schools who develop children in ways that go beyond the league tables, could not be more in line with our philosophy here at RGS. Our core purpose is to deliver education that is great fun, develops qualities of personal character and prepares children for a happy and successful adult life.”

FORMER RGS STUDENT IN WINNING VARSITY HOCKEY MATCH TEAM Lucy Donovan (RGS 2008-2015) was selected for the Oxford University Blues Hockey team to play in the 117th Varsity Match against Cambridge, which they won! This is not only a huge achievement for Lucy as a hockey player, it is also an achievement for RGS to have produced a player of Blues standard. Lucy said, “Having never played hockey before joining RGS, I owe a lot of my success as a hockey player to the excellent coaching I received as a student at the school.”

The celebrating did not stop with exceptional A Level results; GCSE students have also done it again with the typical Reigatian securing 5A*s and 5As. More than 80% of the grades were A*-As and there were more A* grades than all other grades put together. As always, the majority of students have stayed on to pursue their subjects of choice at A Level, benefitting from the brand new Harrison Centre which houses a new Sixth Form Centre with cafe, study area, innovation room, terrace, gardens and other social facilities in addition to a state-of-the-art university style library and learning centre.

NATWEST RUGBY CHAMPIONS For the first time in its history RGS reached the semi-final of a national 15-a-side rugby competition and faced Crossley Heath Grammar School in what was to be an incredibly physical encounter and a superb display of schoolboy rugby. It was a day for records to be set, with Lucas O once again leading out the side, winning his 50th cap for RGS – an amazing achievement. It was a fantastic day for the entire squad who worked incredibly hard. Each and every player has contributed fully to the cause and the final at Worcester Warriors is a justified reward to the superb commitment they have shown.

Lucy Donovan second from left 56


T H E M AG A Z I N E F O R T H E R E I G AT I A N C O M M U N I T Y

A CENTRE OF EXCELLENCE The £8 million new Harrison Centre at Reigate Grammar School is a state-ofthe-art learning and resource centre at the heart of the school’s campus. Opened in September for the start of the new academic year, the new development has added to the already superb facilities here at RGS that, combined with a talented common room of dedicated teachers, enables us to provide a first class education to the children in our care. The new building will unite the school’s campus, offering improved indoor and outdoor space for RGS students and a new home for the Sixth Form. Located on newly acquired land at the heart of the school, the new centre hosts a university quality learning resource centre and a large, flagship library with learning zones and e-readers. The new Sixth Form Centre with café, study area and social facilities allows students to study, learn and relax. The new facilities will enable increased technology-rich learning for students of all ages. The Harrison Centre was created by award-winning architect Cindy Walters, from firm Walters and Cohen, who has focused on creating a beautiful, innovative and environmentally sustainable design.

This major capital development has been transformational for RGS and will enhance our already outstanding facilities located at the main site and sports ground, Hartswood. We are honoured that Sir Peter Harrison KGCN CBE and The Peter Harrison Foundation are supporting this project. Their generous support has enabled our biggest ever capital building programme and will provide a lasting legacy for generations of Reigatians. The official opening will take place on 24 April 2018. If you would like to visit and take a tour, please contact the Foundation office.

ST JOHN’S SMITH SQUARE SUMMER CONCERT The music department’s Choral and Orchestral Concert wowed a packed St John’s Smith Square audience in the heart of Westminster in what was a huge undertaking and great spectacle. The performance of 250 musicians included members of RGS’s First to Upper Sixth Forms. The audience was thoroughly entertained during a programme of contrasts featuring the Senior Brass Ensemble, Concert Bands, Spring Orchestra, Junior Voices, Sixth Form Ensemble, Symphony Orchestra and RGS Singers. The galleries of the church provided for some exquisite antiphonal brass playing and the organ played a key part, particularly in the Fauré Requiem. Choirs of all ages and string players in large and small groups also enjoyed the acoustics and produced a fantastic sound. 57


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SCHOOL NEWS

ART & DESIGN TECHNOLOGY EXHIBITION The annual Art and Design Technology exhibition was outstanding yet again, showing just how talented students at RGS are. The work of A Level Fine Artists and Photography students was displayed in the Wright Gallery and it is clear from this space alone that there is immense diversity in the work produced by students, from installations, large abstracts and more realistic paintings, stitching and embroidery work. This area, along with the Concert Hall provided a vast and varied spectacle and an opportunity for the Art Department to showcase the works and projects students have produced throughout the year.

RGS AWARDED BEST PLAY AT DRAMA FESTIVAL Following the final performances of the heats, RGS Drama’s entry The Darwin Awards was named Best Play at the 2017 Leatherhead Drama Festival. The Drama event included eighteen entries from colleges, drama groups and theatre schools across Surrey. The play, devised and written by Fifth Form Drama students Sam A, Dan G, Alex M and Louis V, examines the fatal nature of male machismo through real life stories from The Darwin Awards.

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Hari’s private dining Availiable upon request


T H E R E I G AT I A N 2 017

DEATHS & OBITUARIES

JAMES THOMAS MARTIN 1927-2017 (RGS 1938-1944) Born in Reigate in 1927, Jim had a happy childhood growing up with his older sister Margaret and their parents, James and Florence. He attended the local village infant and primary schools, then went to Reigate Grammar School from 1938 to 1944. During this time he joined the Army Cadet Force when he was 12 and became the bass drummer with rank of Staff Sergeant. After a war office selection course he joined the army in September 1944 and at 17 years old was sent on a course to Exeter University – a two year course that was compressed into six months! His training continued at the Officer Cadet Training Unit at Wrotham in the Royal Signals Regiment and he was then chosen to go to Mhow in India – what an incredible experience for a young man starting out in life! At the age of 19, Jim found himself serving as Motor Transport Officer at the Deccan Area HQ as part of the Indian Signals Regiment. After Partitian he was posted to Singapore at GHQ Far East Asia Command. Eventually, in June 1948 he was discharged from the army aged 21. Jim’s father was unwell at this time, so Jim came to Seasalter to help him run the Blue Anchor Public House. It was from here that

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RAYMOND GEORGE HUMPHREY BMUS FRCO LRAM ARCM 1916-2017 (RGS 1928-1934) he noticed a gap in the market and formed Coast and Country Caravans with his business partner, beginning with a plot of land on the Isle of Sheppey and leading to the development of several other caravan sites. Jim also started to follow in his father’s footsteps in being initiated into Reigate Priory Lodge in 1951 at the age of 23. This was the start of a long and very distinguished Masonic career, in which he received several promotions and appointments. Happily, Jim and Dorothy were blessed with two healthy children, Roger and Alison, and Jim was delighted to become a grandfather to Oliver, Jolie, Max and Thomas. He was very proud of his family and looked forward to their visits towards the end when his health began to fail.

Raymond Humphrey who has died aged 100, was a member of Common room for 42 years. He was born in Surrey and attended Reigate Grammar School where he was a successful pupil, often at the top of the class. During this time, mainly taught by relatives and self-taught, he learned to play the piano. He took the post of organist to his parish church at just 12 or 13 years old and indeed gave recitals that were reported in the local press. Raymond interrupted a career in banking to serve in Land Forces during the Second World War where he worked on the radar systems in London during the Blitz, keeping them working and making any repairs following enemy action. He had many stories from this time, in particular remembering seeing the East End burn early one morning as he crossed the river after a particularly heavy night’s bombing during the blitz, which he had spent in an underpass at Clapham Junction. A short time after demobilising, he became organist at Saint Michael and All Angels in Brighton and, at the same time, taught at Ardingly College where he met his wife Joan Greenfield whom he married in 1950.


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PHILIP PLUMB 1942-2017 (RGS 1953-1959) In 1953 Raymond joined Winchester College music staff where he became Director of Chapel Music. He had a great affinity with the boys and worked hard within the College to promote music as a main subject rather than an extracurricular interest. During this time he continued to play concerts and recitals in his own right, growing in influence within the musical world and was appointed a Senior Examiner for Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music. A popular character, he was often seen in Winchester musical circles and the wider community. He was often seen in the Cathedral, becoming one of six deputy organists and Chairman of Winchester County Music Festival, which was held annually in the Cathedral. In 1978 Raymond retired as Director of Chapel Music and took up the role of organist at Holy Trinity Parish Church, a role for which he refused to be paid. In 1979 this popular Don returned as Honorary Member of Common Room, continuing to teach music in private lessons until 1995 when he retired at the age of 79. He retired from the Holy Trinity in 2008 at the age of 92.

Phil grew up in Merstham and lived in the Reigate area all his life. He attended Reigate Grammar School where his love of sporting activities found many outlets. These were continued after school and he played with both the Old Reigatian Football and Rugby Football Clubs. Phil always showed great pride in his family; although he supported the view of parenthood that when the children became wild and unruly you should find a nice safe playpen, and when they had finished you should climb out. His son James followed in Phil’s footsteps in attending the school, as did his daughters Alex and Hannah. He pursued a career in the printing industry and worked for local suppliers F. Smith & Co. before embracing his entrepreneurial talents, first forming his own business BML in 1970, a computer hardware and software solutions company that he managed for 20 years, before spreading out into farming (linseed and snails!) and real estate. He eventually sold these and pursued other property interests. With his wife Viv they also ran a successful bed and breakfast accommodation in Norwood Hill.

Rugby was a permanent love and particularly his time with the ORRFC Veterans XV, the Nondescripts, which he captained for several years. There was an element of truth in the observation that once this team had succeeded in getting their boots on the right feet, the mental challenge of the game for them was largely over. There were tours to Wales, Dublin and Amsterdam. The ‘65 tour was to Swansea where the Club magazine records that, “In the second half Phil Plumb made two dashing runs down the wing – on the second occasion, he even had the ball with him”. Outside Reigatian rugby, Phil also enjoyed his trips to Twickenham for International matches which gave him much pleasure, especially when England prevailed over certain Celtic Nations. Phil passed away on 8 July 2017 after a short battle with cancer. He will be very much missed and will be remembered with love and affection by his family and friends. A common theme to the tributes received by the family was that he was loved and appreciated as a true English gentleman. Peter Tharp (RGS 1954-1962)

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DEATHS & OBITUARIES

DR ROGER JAMES FREDERICK PULLEN 1949-2017 (RGS 1960-1967) The only child of Fred and Celina Pullen of Merstham, Roger joined Reigate Grammar School in 1960 having passed the 11+ at Radnor House School. He excelled both academically and athletically, soon playing rugby for the school and ultimately developing a formidable 2nd row partnership with Michael Spink in the 1st XV. Roger left RGS in 1967, progressing to Leeds University to study Chemical Engineering, where he graduated in 1970 and went on to complete his PhD in 1973. After a brief period at the National Coal Board Research Centre he joined Exxon, spending some time working overseas in Texas before returning to the UK. Roger continued to work for Exxon, finally retiring early due to ill-health from his role as Safety Manager at the Esso refinery, Fawley. Roger developed multiple sclerosis nearly 30 years ago and finally succumbed to this dreadful disease on 23 August. He passed away peacefully surrounded by his family. Roger is survived by his wife Jenni, two children Zoe and William, and three grandchildren. Alan Mills (RGS 1960-1967)

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JOHN L HAYBITTLE 1922-2017 (RGS 1932-1940) John attended Reigate Grammar School through winning a scholarship place. A later headmaster (Mr Allison) negotiated a county scholarship enabling John to attend St Catharine’s College, Cambridge in 1940. He finally completed his degree in Natural Sciences (Physics) in 1946 after service as a radar officer with the RAF during the Second World War. John excelled in his career within the Radiotherapy Department at Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge. His work with Diana Brinkley on early breast cancer screening and his analysis of the Kings/Cambridge Trial for the treatment of early breast cancer is a model to this day. John was an active member, and then Chairman, of the British Breast Group. His co-invention of The Haybittle-Peto boundary is referred to when clinicians decide to stop a successful clinical trial early. Working with Professor J S Mitchell, he helped develop several new types of radiation treatment. John worked on adapting one of the first high-energy linear accelerators from the Atomic Energy Research Establishment in Harwell for patient treatment at Addenbrooke’s. He also designed and calibrated a machine for using beta particles from strontium-90 to treat skin tumours. This pre-dated by some 30-40 years, the now routine use of high energy electrons from linear accelerators to treat several types of tumour.

In the 1960s John recognised how the power of data analysis provided by a computer could enhance radiotherapy treatment planning. His numerous contributions in this area are recognised in a volume entitled Radiotherapy Treatment Planning, part of a series on cancer management published in 1983 and still extensively cited. John went on to teach physics and statistics for Fellowship examinations of the Royal College of Radiologists, as well as statistics for anaesthetists. He also supervised Ph.D. students and became an examiner for medical and surgical degrees examining for Part I of the Fellowship of the Royal College of Radiologists. After retiring from medical physics in 1982, he continued to work in the Medical Research Council Cancer Trials Office in Cambridge. In 1967, John was one of the first Cambridge Alumni to be awarded a doctorate for published research. During his career, John had over 25 papers published in the British Institute of Radiology's Journal of Radiology. In 1972 John was awarded the Roentgen Prize for 'outstanding contributions to the Journal'. In the 1980s he served as Honorary Scientific Editor of the Journal for five years. In 1987, John was awarded the Barclay Medal from the British Institute of Radiology, one given to those who had ‘contributed materially to the advancement of the science and practice of radiology’. After 74 years of marriage, John is survived by his wife Mary and daughter Rebecca and family.


T H E M AG A Z I N E F O R T H E R E I G AT I A N C O M M U N I T Y

NOTICE OF DEATHS 2017

Richard Havers (RGS 1964-1970) died on 31 December 2017

Michael Snelling (RGS 1942-1948) died on 13 July 2017

Jeremy (Jez) Stevens (RGS 1978-1985) died on 28 December 2017

Philip Plumb (RGS 1953-1959) died on 8 July 2017

Michael Langran (RGS 1943-1952) died on 22 December 2017

Kenneth Longley (RGS 1936-1943) died 28 May 2017

John L Haybittle (RGS 1932-1940) died on 19 November 2017

Raymond Humphrey (RGS 1928-1934) died on 22 April 2017

Paul Vickers (RGS 1974-1981) died in November* 2017

Roger Dawe (RGS 1946-1953) died 29 March 2017

Jeremy Richards (RGS 1954-1961) died on 19 September 2017

Jocelyn Ian Rickard (RGS 1989-1997) died on 24 February 2017

Alan Phillips (RGS 1938-1946) died in August 2017

Wilfred Small (RGS 1944-1952) died on 10 February 2017

Matthew Muggeridge (RGS 2001-2008) died in August 2017

Howard Flack (RGS 1954-1962) died on 2 February 2017

Bruce B J Farrington (RGS 1942-1949) died on 29 August 2017

Roy Hobbs (RGS 1946-1950) died on 26 January 2017

Roger J F Pullen (RGS 1960-1967) died on 23 August 2017

Clive Phelps (RGS 1941-1948) died on 11 January 2017

Bernard Wyld (RGS 1957-1965) died on 17 August 2017

James (Jim) Martin (RGS 1938-1944) died on 7 January 2017

*Indicates approximate month

NOTICE OF DEATHS SUPPLEMENT Franklin Brunger (RGS 1964-1971) died on 25 July 2016

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Supporting the next generation We passionately believe that a young person’s success in life should be determined by how hard they work and the skills and talents they have, not by their background or family income. At Ashurst we are committed to being a sustainable global law firm which delivers positive impacts for our employees, clients, profession, environment and the communities in which we are based. Through our Corporate Responsibility programme, we aim to support those who are marginalised and disadvantaged.

www.ashurst.com

64 © Ashurst LLP 2016 Ref D/6090

We are proud supporters of Reigate Grammar School’s Changing Lives Campaign.


T H E M AG A Z I N E F O R T H E R E I G AT I A N C O M M U N I T Y

PUBLICATIONS ANDREW COLLEY (RGS 1970-1977)

ANDREW GORDON (RGS 1966-1974)

Andrew Colley is senior lecturer in special education at the University of East London, Cass School of Education and Communities and a part-time PhD student at Wolfson College Cambridge. He has a particular interest in improving outcomes for young people with severe or profound and multiple learning difficulties, and has had two books published in recent years. More information can be found at Andrew Colley’s website: andrewcolley.com

A SHORT LIFE: ALEC ONLY SON OF ELIZABETH AND STANHOPE FORBES (2017) This masterly biography reveals the intimate and loving relationship that exists between Alec and his parents Elizabeth and Stanhope Forbes and thus a new insight into their lives. Born into a dynamic community of acclaimed artists, Alec Forbes observed the lively social and professional lives of talented young men and women. This community, along with examples set by his parents the renowned artists Elizabeth and Stanhope Forbes and the enlightened education he received at Bedales enabled him to become aware of the inequalities of social deprivation and moulded his attitude towards work and gender equality.

INCLUSION IS DEAD, LONG LIVE INCLUSION (Routledge, 2017) is a provocative polemic against the widely held notion that inclusion for all children and young people with SEN is both possible and desirable. For those with severe learning difficulties (SLD) and profound and multiple learning difficulties (PMLD), the authors argue, it is neither (co-author with Peter Imray).

DAVID WALLIAMS (RGS 1981-1989) BOOGIE BEAR (for 3+ year olds) A hilarious picture book brilliantly illustrated by the artistic genius, Tony Ross. Outrageously funny with an incredibly heartwarming message about celebrating difference – in all its forms. BAD DAD (for 9-12 year olds) It’s his biggest and best book yet! Bad Dad is all about a father and son who take on the villainous Mr Big. It’s a riches to rags story that will have you on the edge of your seat and roaring with laughter.

PERSONALISED LEARNING FOR YOUNG PEOPLE WITH PROFOUND AND MULTIPLE LEARNING DIFFICULTIES (Jessica Kingsley Limited, June 2013). Challenging the notion that young people with profound and multiple learning difficulties (PMLD) should be taught in a linear, target-driven way, this book presents an innovative model for creating learning opportunities to suit the needs and abilities of each student within the constraints for formal curricula and even in large class settings.

THE WORLD’S WORST CHILDREN 2 (for 7-12 year olds) The brilliant follow-up to David Walliams’ bestseller The World’s Worst Children! Ten more stories about a brand new gang of hilariously horrible kids. ROGER TYLER (RGS 1944-1952)

TIM JACKSON (RGS 1968-1976)

WITCHES’ WEB – AN ONLINE CYBER ADVENTURE This children’s book was written in 2014 by Reigatian, Roger Tyler. Rogers fictional novel sees two children acquire a magic mouse, which they name Minimum, allowing them to transform their computer into a time machine. Helped by two friendly witches, they are bedevilled by a villain, a junk dealer names Eustace Trimp and so the adventure begins.

PROSPERITY WITHOUT GROWTH, ECONOMICS FOR A FINITE PLANET Is more economic growth the solution? Will it deliver prosperity and well-being for a global population projected to reach nine billion? In this explosive book, Tim Jackson – a top sustainability adviser to the UK government – makes a compelling case against continued economic growth in developed nations. 65


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MERCHANDISE

RGS MERCHANDISE We have a small but excellent selection of merchandise that would make the perfect gift for a loved one or could be a well-deserved treat for yourself. RGS ‘Old School’ Rugby Shirts Authentic thick cotton ‘old school’ rugby shirts, in traditional RGS colours, featuring the old embroidered school crest emblazoned on the chest with the Roman Numerals ‘XV’ featured on the back with ‘1675’ (the year RGS was founded) emblem detail on the collar. Available in sizes (chest size): XS (36”), S (38”), M (40”), L (42”) & XL (44”) £50.00

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RGS Foundation Baseball Cap In a navy and royal blue colourway, this unisex RGS ‘one size fits all’ baseball cap, features the embroidered RGS Castle logo on the front, along with ‘1675’ emblem on the back. £10.00

RGS Foundation Cufflinks & Ties Available individually or as a set. £20 each or £30 for both

All orders receive free UK P&P via Royal Mail. For more information or to place an order, simply email the item, size and quantity to: foundation@reigategrammar.org.


T H E M AG A Z I N E F O R T H E R E I G AT I A N C O M M U N I T Y

SCHOOL VISITS

Andrew Waller RGS 1957-1963 with wife Cynthia visiting from Vancouver – RGS visit June 2017

Ben Collins RGS 1991-1994 – RGS Visit November 2017

David Thomas former RGS Headmaster 2001-2012 with wife Andrea – RGS visit March 2017

James Knox RGS 1973-1980 – RGS visit December 2017

Jenny Barkell (née Ashurst) RGS 1997-2002 with father Robert Ashurst RGS 1962-1969 – RGS visit July 2017

Richard Strick RGS 1952-1959 – RGS visit March 2017

Ross Letten RGS 1956-1963 with wife Shez – RGS visit May 2017

If you would like to visit the school, we would be delighted to welcome you back for a tour, please email foundation@reigategrammar.org

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FOUNDATION OFFICE HOW WE USE YOUR DATA THE GENERAL DATA PROTECTION REGULATION (GDPR) In May 2018 The General Data Protection Regulation will come into force, extending the data rights of individuals. It requires us as an organisation and a charity to update our data processing policies and take appropriate and extensive measures to protect your data.

SEAN DAVEY Head of Foundation & Business Development spd@reigategrammar.org

JONNY HYLTON Development Executive jdh@reigategrammar.org

Currently, we hold information on you as a member of the Reigatian community on our database. This includes your name, address, email and phone number. Depending on the extent to which you have been involved with the school, we may also hold information on donations you have given, Gift Aid declarations and possible correspondence we may have had. It is important for you to know that we do not share your data with other organisations or individuals with the exception of those carefully selected to provide us with an essential service such as a mailing house (to send the Reigatian Magazine) or data cleansing (to ensure records we hold are accurate). We are committed to respecting your privacy and the GDPR will enhance our data policies.

HAZEL CORNICK Development Office Manager & Reigatian Magazine Editor hkc@reigategrammar.org

CAROLINE DONALD Reigatian Community Officer cld@reigategrammar.org

Currently, we contact individuals on our database with school and Foundation news, reunion and event invitations and fundraising campaigns. We always give you an opportunity to opt out of these mailings, however, under the new regulations coming into force, we may need you to opt in to specific mailings and how you receive them – giving us affirmative consent to use your data. We will continue to keep you informed about the incoming regulations and will be back in touch if action to opt in is required. We hope you enjoy hearing from us and being part of the Reigatian community.

Foundation Office Reigate Grammar School Reigate Road Reigate RH2 0QS 01737 222231 rgs.foundation rgschanginglives.org

 @foundationRGS Foundation & Alumni at Reigate  Grammar School  Reigate Grammar School Professionals 68

If you have any questions about how we handle your data, please do not hesitate to get in touch at foundation@reigategrammar.org


01737 245947 www.briangalesurveyors.com

25 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE Brian Gale Surveyors are a long, well established firm of Chartered Surveyors who will provide a comprehensive Survey and Valuation service on all types of property. With our base in Reigate from which we have operated for 25 years, we cover London, Surrey and Sussex predominantly, but will be happy to assist Private and Corporate Clients further afield.

SERVICES OFFERED Full Building Surveys RICS HomeBuyers / ISVA HomeSurveys RICS Redbook Valuations (for all purposes) Party Wall Awards Historic Buildings / Expert Witness Reports

For a more comprehensive list of the services we offer please visit our website. Marcus House, 8 West Street, Reigate, Surrey, RH2 9BS | sue@briangalesurveyors.com As parents and members of the Reigatian Community, we are pleased to support the Reigate Grammar School Foundation.


The Foundation Office exists to support the development of Reigate Grammar School and to foster the friendship and support of all Reigatians. The Reigatian community includes current and former pupils, parents, staff, governors and friends of the school – all, in fact, for whom the school is, or has been, an important part of their lives. Our future success depends upon the benevolence of the whole Reigatian community and we invite you to contribute with them and help to shape the future of our great School and its pupils.

Foundation Office Reigate Grammar School Reigate Road Reigate RH2 0QS 01737 222231 rgs.foundation rgschanginglives.org

 @foundationRGS & Alumni at Reigate  Foundation Grammar School  Reigate Grammar School Professionals Registered Charity number 1081898.