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JULY 2018


JUN 26

John Fogerty, ZZ Top & Willie Nelson Outdoor Event | 7PM Tickets start at $36 JUL 12

Disturbed & Three Days Grace Outdoor Event | 8PM Tickets start at $25 JUL 25

Godsmack & Shinedown Outdoor Event | 8PM Tickets start at $25 AUG 25

Deep Purple & Judas Priest Outdoor Event | 7PM Tickets start at $29

JUL 7

Little Big Town & Gavin Degraw

Outdoor Event | 8PM Tickets start at $30 JUL 20

Nickelback & Pop Evil Outdoor Event | 8PM Tickets start at $30 AUG 5

Jeff Dunham Outdoor Event | 8PM Tickets start at $20 SEPT 2

Lady Antebellum & Darius Rucker Outdoor Event | 7PM Tickets start at $36

Get your tickets at Soaring Eagle Casino or Saganing Eagles Landing Casino Box Offices, ETIX.COM or call 1.800.514.ETIX. Stay Connected with Soaring Eagle: Performances held at Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort in Mt. Pleasant, Michigan.

Mt. Pleasant, MI • 1.888.7.EAGLE.7 • SoaringEagleCasino.com

2 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018

Entertainment subject to cancellation. Management reserves all rights.


18+

18+

* JULY 1 KALEO

july 7 JANELLE MONÁE

w/ Dan Mangan

w/ St. Beauty

18+

*

JUly 20 FERG

july 25 ERASURE

july 21 SINGLES MINGLE

w/ IDK

w/ Reed & Caroline

july 18 BLACK LABEL SOCIETY w/ Corrosion of Conformity, Eyehategod

Guns N’ Roses Tribute

w/ Cleopatrick

w/ The Rails

18+

july 14 APPETITE FOR DESTRUCTION

JUly 13 OUR LADY PEACE

JUly 11 PRETENDERS

*

18+

18+

july 28 CARRIBEAN SUMMER JAM

AUGUST 4 PRISM

SEPTEMBER 9 CHUPONCITO

SEPTEMBER 10 GARY CLARK JR.

august 10 JONNY LANG

ft. Derrick Barry

*

* AUGUST 24 ROB BELL

AUGUST 14 DAUGHTRY

Holy Shift Tour w/ Peter Rollins

SEPTEMBER 5 THE MAGPIE SALUTE w/ Wayland

QUEEN EXTRAVAGANZA Performing Queen's Greatest Hits

SEPTEMBER 21 BEN RECTOR w/ The Band Camino

SEPTEMBER 22 MC50

w/ Dinosaur Jr., Netherlands

*

* SEPTEMBER 16

SEPTEMBER 15 MASTODON

SEPTEMBER 30 BULLET FOR MY VALENTINE

OCTOBER 5 BUDDY GUY w/ Quinn Sullivan

OCTOBER 6 LIL XAN

* OCTOBER 10 4U

A Symphonic Celebration of Prince

OCTOBER 13 SOCIAL DISTORTION w/ Will Hoge, Pony Bradshaw

OCTOBER 19 CLUTCH w/ Sevendust, Tyler Bryant & The Shakedown

OCTOBER 24 GOO GOO DOLLS

OCTOBER 25 YOUNG THE GIANT w/ Lights

NOVEMBER 16 AMANDA MIGUEL & DIEGO VERDAGUER

* SEATED SHOW

11 OTTAWA AVE NW • DOWNTOWN GRAND RAPIDS • 20MONROELIVE.COM REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

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TICKETS ARE STILL AVAILABLE FOR THESE SHOWS

Go online to Startickets.com or call 1-800-585-3737.

SUN

JUN 3

GLADYS KNIGHT

THE DECEMBERISTS ..........................MON, JUN 4 HERBIE HANCOCK ........................... WED, JUN 27 PATTI LABELLE......................................FRI, JUL 13 JOE JACKSON .......................................FRI, JUL 20 AIR SUPPLY ........................................ SUN, JUL 29 LYLE LOVETT AND HIS LARGE BAND .................. MON, AUG 27 +LIVE+ ................................................. MON, SEPT 3

WED

JUN 20

SEAL

IT’S HOW YOU KNOW IT’S SUMMER IN WEST MICHIGAN.

THURS

AUG 23

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Join us for a special fundraising concert in support of the Welcoming the World: Honoring a Legacy of Love capital campaign. Spend an evening with ALABAMA in the beautiful Meijer Gardens Amphitheater.

5/21/18 10:21 AM


P E R R I N

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*ENGLISH SUBTITLES / **SPANISH SUBTITLES ARE FREE. PRE-MOVIE ENTERTAINMENT AT 6:30 PM. FIRST FILM AT 7:30. 6 |FILMS REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 BRING YOUR CHAIRS, SNACKS, BEER AND WINE. LOCAL VENDORS ON-SITE.

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HARMONY HALL

(401 Stocking Ave. NW | Grand Rapids MI 49504)

SUMMER MUSIC CALENDAR Earthwork Music Summer Series Every Thursday from 6/21 to 7/26

All shows are 6/21

6/28

7/5

7/12

7/19

7/26

Dede and the Dream

Samantha Cooper + Steve Leaf (solo sets)

Seth Bernard

Jen Sygit + Sam Corbin Duo

Mark Lavengood

Gregory Stovetop

August 8/4

An Dro

8/23

Sandra Effert + Hannah Rose (solo sets)

8/9

Lipstick Jodi

free all ages

all ages

and are 8-10PM

8/16

Jordan Hamilton

8/30

Fast Hands Band

Live Jazz Sundays

Every sunday 2pm-4pm 1ST & 3RD SUNDAYS River Rogues Dixieland Jazz Band 2ND & 4TH SUNDAYS Robin Connell & Jim Cooper Duo

More information at harmonybeer.com

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

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REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

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WHAT’S INSIDE

July 2018 | Volume 30, Issue 7

SCENE 16

What’s Going On

SOUNDS 20 23

Local Music: eRoy On Tour: S Carey

SIGHTS: 36

Style Notes: I Do (Want These Fashions)

SUMMER FUN ISSUE 24 34

Summer Fun Guide Patio Guide

REVUE ARTS:

23

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24

36

1A Visual arts, classical and jazz music, theater, arts event previews and more. (See the center of this issue)

DINING & DRINKING: 38 40 42

Dining: Catch of the Day Beer: Shandy/Gose tasting Last Call: Duke's Bar

40


BEACH Party!

SAY “ALOHA” TO SUMMER! SATURDAY, JULY 21

LIVE MUSIC:

Enjoy our island-inspired buffet for just $25.99! From 11AM – 10PM, sample a range of Hawaiian cuisine including coconut shrimp, kabobs, a poke poi raw bar, and traditional roast pork on the carving board.

BAHAMA BREEZE 5PM – 8PM BEACH KATZ 9PM – 1:30AM

GUNLAKECASINO.COM Families welcome to dine. Minors must be accompanied by an adult 21 years or older at all times in dining areas. Must be 21+ to obtain a Passport card for discount. Price listed is with active play. Active play is defined as earning one point in the past 90 days. Must be 21 or older inside of Stage 131. See Rewards Center or www.gunlakecasino.com for complete details. ©2018 Gun Lake Tribal Gaming Authority. All rights reserved.

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

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Relax at Rosa MAY 3 - SEPTEMBER 13 Free Lunchtime Entertainment Every Thursday | All Summer | 12:00 PM-1:30 PM | Rosa Parks Circle

Uprizin Steel Band May 3

Jesse Ray & the Carolina Catfish May 10

Molly May 17

Matt Gabriel May 24

Asamu Johnson & the Associates of the Blues May 31

Kevin Michael Jones June 7

May Erlewine (ft. Max Lockwood and Michael Shimmin) June 14

Conrad Shock & the Noise June 21

The Crane Wives June 28

Phillip- Michael Scales July 5

Watching for Foxes July 12

Avalon Cutts-Jones July 19

Desmond Jones July 26

Turbo Pup August 2

Cabildo August 9

Melophobix August 16

Last Gasp Collective August 23

Afro Zuma August 30

The Appleseed Collective September 6

Flexadecibel September 13

More info at DOWNTOWNGR.ORG

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

13


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

W

hen summer arrives, time is compressed and options sprawl out like trails in a forest. Seemingly endless paths are available, but we have only so many days to take it all in. Like Esther Greenwood sitting under the fig tree, it’s easy to find oneself paralyzed with indecision, overwhelmed at the prospect of making any one choice over another. Often,

we fall into old routines, visiting the same beaches, parks, rivers and campgrounds as every summer before. But listen: We’re here to help. In this issue, we help you narrow down your options while also broadening your horizons. Let us guide you toward some carefully curated places and activities. Whatever sounds the most novel to you, we suggest taking that road. Everytime you buck routine and explore something new, the world seems that much larger. Of course, we also dig into some other summer favorites. Our patio guide will help you make a choice when all your friends are standing around asking, “What place has a good patio around here?” And let our shandy/gose taste-off point you toward the most “hydrating” beers West Michigan has to offer. Summer has just begun, and it’s not going anywhere … for now. That being said, if you don’t quite manage to take every path or eat every fig, just remember: There’s always next year.

W E S T M I C H I G A N ’ S E N T E RTA I N M E N T G U I D E

EDITORIAL Publisher Brian Edwards Associate Publisher Rich Tupica / rich@revueholding.com Editor Joe Boomgaard / joe@revuewm.com Managing Editor Josh Veal / josh@revuewm.com Copy Editor Claire Boomgaard DESIGN Kristi Kortman / kristi@revuewm.com Kaylee Van Tuinen / kaylee@revuewm.com Rachel Harper / rharper@revuewm.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Missy Black Eric Mitts Kelly Brown Jack Raymond Dana Casadei Kayla Sosa Nick Macksood Elma Talundzic Marla R. Miller CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Katy Batdorff ADVERTISING / 616.608.6170 / sales@revuewm.com Kelli Belanger / kelli@revuewm.com DIGITAL EDITOR Josh Veal

’Til next time,

MINIONS Hanna Price, Michaela Stock, Abigail Rzepka

FIND US ONLINE! Josh Veal, Managing Editor Website: revuewm.com Twitter: twitter.com/revuewm Facebook: facebook.com/revuewm Instagram: instagram.com/revuewm

UP COMING IS SUE S AUGUST:

SEPTEMBER:

Results from our third-annual reader poll to crown the best of West Michigan — music venues, restaurants, bars, shops, people and more.

A complete season preview of West Michigan's cultural arts, events and artist profiles.

Best of the West Winners

Annual West Michigan Arts Guide

TO ADVERTISE: Call (616) 608-6170 or email sales@revuewm.com. Space reservation is the 15th of the month before publication.

REVUE is published monthly by Revue Holding Company. P.O. Box 1629, Grand Rapids, MI 49501-1629 Office: 616.608.6170 / Fax: 616.608.6182 ©2018, Revue Holding Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part granted only by written permission of the publisher in accordance with our legal statement, fools.

ON THE COVER: Summer Fun Guide Illustration by Anthony Carpenter. See more on page 24.


TIME TO TURN

UP THE VOLUME CLIENT

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OF MÖTLEY CRÜE

PERFORMING ALL THE MÖTLEY CRÜE HITS SATURDAY, AUGUST 18

Tickets available now at the FireKeepers Box Office or FireKeepersCasino.com.

Must be 21 or older. Tickets based on availability. Schedule subject to change.

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REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 | AM 15 6/15/18 10:24


WHAT’S GOING ON THIS MONTH |  Compiled by Revue Staff

7/1 Kaleo

wsg. Dan Mangan

20 Monroe Live 11 Ottawa Ave. NW, Grand Rapids July 1, 2018, 8 p.m., $49.50 20monroelive.com Four-piece indie band Kaleo will hit the stage at 20 Monroe Live this month. For Kaleo, Iceland isn’t just an Instagram trend — it’s home. Originally from Reykjavik, the band moved to the United States in 2015 after singing with Elektra/Atlantic Records. Since relocating, Kaleo released its premier record, A/B, which features indie hits Way Down We Go and All the Pretty Girls. If you’re hungry before the show, local hotspot The B.O.B. is offering a variety of pre-show food and drink specials when you show your concert ticket.

World’s Largest Dog Wash

Fifth Third Ballpark 4500 W. River Rd. NE, Comstock Park July 1, 2018, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., $10 fifththirdballpark.com There’s nothing better than a field full of dogs — except for a field full of soaked and slobbery dogs, that is. The World’s Largest Dog Wash at the Fifth Third Ballpark is your opportunity to watch furballs of all shapes and sizes melt under the sun and suds. The event is partnered with the Dog Day! West Michigan Whitecaps Game and is sure to provide fun and entertainment for the whole family.

7/14 Flame Fest

White Flame Brewing Co. 5234 36th Ave., Hudsonville July 14, 12-10 p.m., $25 whiteflamebrewing.com

DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE

White Flame Brewing Co. is set to host RED as the headliner for its annual outdoor music festival, Flame Fest. The street will be blocked off for the event, allowing you and 2,000 others to rock out to live music while drinking your favorite brew. Grab a ticket and stay all night! Supporting acts include Slumlord Radio, Holy Warheads, Jesse Ray & the Carolina Catfish, Emma Loo and more.

7/17 Lost to Time: 20

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Detroit geniuses, heroes, merchants and drunks went from being local celebrities to buried in history over the course of the city’s 300-year lifespan. The featured stars were recognized locally, nationally and internationally throughout their lives. Come dig into Detroit’s underground during this free event.

7/18 DIY Zen Garden

Detroiters You’ve Never Heard Of

Creston Brewery 1504 Plainfield Ave. NE, Grand Rapids July 18, 7-9 p.m., $40 crestonbrewery.com

Learn about 20 of Detroit’s forgotten movers and shakers with Joel Stone, the Detroit Historical Society’s senior curator. These

Grab a drink and decompress from the daily grind by making a zen garden at Creston Brewery. Included with your ticket is beer and all you need to create your very own tranquil tabletop garden Be sure to reserve your spot by July 13, as limited tickets are available.

Grand Rapids Public Library 111 Library St. NE, Grand Rapids July 17, 6:30 p.m., free grpl.org

Jerry Seinfeld. COURTESY PHOTO

Japanese Breakfast. PHOTO: JOYCE JUDE

7/19 Jerry Seinfeld

DeVos Performance Hall 303 Monroe Ave. NW, Grand Rapids July 19, 7 p.m., $85+ devosperformancehall.com

For some, merely seeing Jerry Seinfeld’s name can produce a chuckle — his work is that memorable. Seinfeld can make a joke out of anything — or nothing — which makes his humor personable and relatable to audiences everywhere. His latest project, Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, has been nominated for an Emmy. He also has a Netflix series titled Jerry Before Seinfeld. Don’t miss your chance to laugh all night with one of America’s top comedians.

Japanese Breakfast wsg. Mothers The Pyramid Scheme 68 Commerce Ave., Grand Rapids July 19, 7 p.m., $15 pyramidschemebar.com

Contrar y to what you might think, this event is not a brunch for mothers. Japanese Breakfast and Mothers are two rising indie bands that have been demanding attention with their innovative yet haunting and nostalgic music. Mothers, a kitschy rock folk group, will kick off the evening, and Japanese Breakfast, with her sweeping, shoegaze sound, is set to headline the night. Though no breakfast foods will be served at the event, all mothers are welcome (and encouraged) to attend.

Continued on page 18


SUMMER IN THE CITY

Enjoy our $6 weekday lunch specials or join us for Happy Hour on the patio from 4-7pm daily! D O G F R I E N D LY PAT I O

THE B.O.B. • 20 MONROE AVE GRAND RAPIDS • 616.356.2000 THEBOBSBREWERY.COM

MUSIC FESTIVAL

Wellston, MI • hoxeyville.com

HOLLAND / GRAND RAPIDS

C I T Y F L AT S H O T E L . C O M

Dawes Leftover Salmon

THe Infamous Stringdusters

One Night Stand Band

feat. phoffman + Dave Bruzza

Billy Strings x2

Steppin In It • Larry Keel • Luke Winslow-King Lindsay Lou • The Sweet Water Warblers Jon Stickley Trio • The Crane Wives Airborne or Aquatic • Richie & Rosie The Insiders: A Tribute to Tom Petty Artist at Large: Michael Arlen Bont

Granny Devito w/ Seth Bernard & Scott Pellegrom The Whistle stop Revue • Breathe Owl Breathe • Full Cord Jake Allen Band • BigFoot Buffalo • Jen Sygit • Soul Patch Brotha James • Watching for Foxes • Gifts or Creatures Cousin Curtiss • Herb & Hanson • Deep Fried Pickle Project REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

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Continued from page 16 two years since the release of her first EP. The 19-year-old recently released her first album, Lush, and has been featured in notable publications such as the Rolling Stone, The New York Times, NPR, and Pitchfork, to name a few. Special guests Long Beard and Jes Kramer will join.

Rayland Baxter

The Stache 133 Grandville Ave. SW, Grand Rapids July 27, 7 p.m., $12 sectionlive.com

Snail Mail. COURTESY PHOTO

Grand Rapids Balloon Festival

Grand Rapids/Hudsonville July 19-21, all day, $5 grandrapidsballoonfestival.com

DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE

Watch the sky turn into a kaleidoscope of hot air balloons at the Grand Rapids Balloon Festival. The festival begins with a picnic in Ah-Nab-Awen Park (220 Front Ave. NW, Grand Rapids) and continues all day Friday and Saturday at the Hudsonville Fair Grounds (5235 Park Ave., Hudsonville). This event serves a deeper purpose than just a fun weekend, though. After raising more than $24,000 for two charities in 2017, the festival plans to continue donating all of its funds from this year’s event as well. The 2018 recipient charities are the Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital and West Michigan Veterans Coalition.

7/24 Local Director Series: Ape

UICA Movie Theater 2 W. Fulton St., Grand Rapids July 24, 8 p.m., members $4, public $8 uica.org Indie films offer some of the greatest storytelling of our time, and the UICA’s Local Director Series exemplifies that. Presenting Joel Potrykus’ Ape for its July

18 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018

indie film showing, the series focuses on movies made in Grand Rapids and offers local directors the opportunity to share their work with a public audience. Grand Rapids is bursting with independent filmmaking and an impressive film industry, so come catch a great flick and see what the local scene is all about.

Scoopsgiving

Furniture City Creamery 958 Cherry St. SE, Grand Rapids July 24, 12-10 p.m. furniturecitycreamery.com

Though his sound encompasses the grit and wide-open feeling of the modern American landscape, Rayland Baxter’s music answers to a different call than the American Dream. Baxter’s music focuses on decision making, what it means to be human, and whether or not the chase to the corporate top is worth it. Rayland Baxter’s folky instrumentation and infectious melodies are perfect for a hot, summer night of music. n

FOURTH OF JULY Just a few of the many places to celebrate this Independence Day.

Grandville

July 3-4

Find more events in Revue Arts, and at revuewm.com!

Festivities begin July 3 with ball games alongside the Beer, Bands, and BBQ party in downtown Grandville. On the 4th, you can expect a pancake breakfast, parade, carnival, arts and crafts show, live music, fireworks, and more.

East Grand Rapids

July 4

Celebrate the day East Grand Rapids-style with festivities at Reeds Lake featuring food, kids games, live music, a water ski show, and, of course, fireworks. The shoreside party follows a noon parade, so show up early and stay late.

Eat ice cream and support the Hearts of Hope Dog Rescue at Furniture City Creamery’s second-annual Scoopsgiving event. Twenty percent of all sales from the day will be donated to Hearts of Hope, so go on and get a second scoop of that flavor you’ve been meaning to try all summer. Or a third scoop. Or a fourth. It’s for a good cause, afterall.

West Michigan Whitecaps

July 3

Enjoy an expanded fireworks show after a game with the Lansing Lugnuts.

Downtown Grand Rapids

7/27 Snail Mail

July 7

Grand Rapids is pulling out all the stops on Saturday with fireworks downtown. Head to Ah-Nab-Awen Park at 5 p.m. for family activities, games, food trucks, vendors and live music. Or, get a front row seat across the street at the Grand Rapids Public Museum, where admission includes all the usual stuff, special meal deals, a great view and more. And across the river, Kitchen by Wolfgang Puck and jdek are offering food, festivities and a sweet seat as well.

The Pyramid Scheme 68 Commerce Ave., Grand Rapids July 19, 7 p.m., $15 pyramidschemebar.com Snail Mail’s rise to indie stardom has been anything but snail-paced. Lindsey Jordan, the face and brains behind the solo-project Snail Mail, went from playing local shows to performing internationally all in the past

Grand Rapids Fireworks. COURTESY PHOTO

Rayland Baxter. COURTESY PHOTO


YOUR ENTERTAINMENT ESCAPE

MELISSA ETHERIDGE JULY 3

GET THE LED OUT JULY 6

UNCORK AND UNWIND JULY 8

FEMMES OF ROCK JULY 13

BOZ SCAGGS JULY 14

HAPPY TOGETHER AUGUST 10

KENNY WAYNE SHEPHERD BAND AUGUST 24

THERESA CAPUTO SEPTEMBER 1 & 2

SLASH ft. MYLES KENNEDY AND THE CONSPIRATORS SEPTEMBER 29

SMOKEY ROBINSON OCTOBER 5

REO SPEEDWAGON NOVEMBER 9

JOHNNY MATHIS JULY 20

A WEEKEND OF FUN AUG. 3-5!

CHA

CK O

THE BL LK

G

I

THE BL LK

JO

AN

S T. SE

StJoeToday.com

CK O

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P H, M I C H

I

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AN

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FRIDAY Friday Night Concert at 7:30pm SATURDAY Artists Begin Chalking Farmers Market 9am-2pm Movies in the Park - “Hugo” at dusk SUNDAY Antiques on the Bluff 10am-5pm

PLEASE VISIT TICKETMASTER.COM OR CALL 800-745-3000 FOR TICKET INFORMATION.

11111 WILSON ROAD • NEW BUFFALO, MI 49117 1-866-4WINDS1 • fourwindscasino.com Must be 21 years of age or older. The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians invites you to play responsibly. If you think you have a gambling problem, call 1-800-522-4700. ©2018 Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians. 3850-26.7.18

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

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/// LOCAL MUSIC

eRoy. PHOTO: BENJAMIN HOWELL

ONE MAN DANCE PARTY Grand Rapids livetronica artist eRoy explores musical boundaries on new EP |  by Eric Mitts

DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS | SCENE

W

HEN HE’S NOT SCHOOLING OTHER DJS IN

West Michigan’s expansive electronic music scene, rising artist eRoy — aka Evan Roy — schools students in his English classes at Union High School. A first-year teacher, Roy, 25, knows all about burning the candle at both ends. Between grading midterms and creating mixes, his double life has him exhausted. But rather than rest and relax during his summer vacation, he plans to rage on by dropping his latest EP, Sleep Without Dreams, at an exclusive show at The Mint. “Words cannot describe how excited I am,” Roy said. “The show has been a work in progress for several months now and I am elated that it’s all set in stone. It is literally a dream come true.” Last fall, Roy hit one of his first major career milestones when he performed in The Intersection’s main room as the opening act for pioneering livetronica duo

20 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018

EOTO. The gig put him in front of the largest crowd he’d ever performed for, and opened up new opportunities for him to play all over the Grand Rapids area. He officially launched his eRoy project in August 2016 with the release of his first EP, Progress. Now known for playing bass, guitar and other instruments onstage while cutting up mixes live, eRoy started slamming the keys on his older brother’s piano when he was just five years old. He hasn’t stopped learning since. “I picked up the saxophone in f ifth grade band, and played alto and tenor throughout all of my secondary education,” Roy said. “When I was 14, I took what I knew from learning piano and saxophone to teach myself to play guitar. Now, I have a never-ending drive to learn any instrument I can get my hands on.” Describing his sound as a collage of several different sub-genres of electronic music threaded together with live instrumentation, Roy takes influence from electronic artists like Griz, Sunsquabi, STS9, Flying Lotus, Bassnectar, Manic Focus, RJD2, Girl Talk, Opiuo and more. He also looks

to legends like Parliament Funkadelic, The String Cheese Incident, Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, Sublime and others for inspiration. “I’d say two things separate me (from) the majority of other electronic music artists,” Roy said. “One is that I incorporate as many live instruments into my recorded music and performances as I can. The other is that I do not stick to one genre or vibe throughout a set. I haven’t found very many artists that will play funk, trap, house, dubstep and future bass all in the same set. I like to keep the crowd guessing and hope to open the minds of people who claim to only like one specific sub-genre of electronic music. I’m not trying to hit a niche or fill a mold — I like what I like, and I’ll play what I like!”

eRoy Sleep Without Dreams EP Release

wsg. Pause., Super Future, sandose, Gyp$y, Saylin The Mint (inside The Intersection) 133 Grandville Ave. SW, Grand Rapids July 27, 8 p.m., $10 sectionlive.com (616) 451-8232

His latest EP encompasses his farreaching sound. The five-song set has been in the works for almost two years, with Roy recording everything on his own at home. The EP will feature guest appearances from GR artist El Brandino, as well as Roy’s brother, who adds live organ to the mix. “I taught a poetr y unit in my 11th grade English class,” Roy said about the origin of the EP’s title. “We read a poem by William Cullen Bryant titled Thanatopsis, which was about the inevitability of death. I had my students write their own version of the poem and wanted them to start their poems with a simile, ‘Death is like (blank).’ For the beginning of the example poem, I wrote, ‘Death is like sleep without dreams.’ I liked how it sounded and felt like it matched the atmosphere of the title track, so that’s what I named it!” For now, eRoy is amped and ready to take his summer next level. Look for his Sleep Without Dreams EP online, or catch him at the Sweetgrass and Sage Burn Transformational Festival on July 1-2, or the Future Dream Festival on Sept. 7-9. n


on the

IE VANJ

VIXEN

BLAIR

DUSTY M ONIQU E

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

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Allegan (269) 673-5411

Grand Haven (616) 846-8360

Holland (616) 396-5266

Hudsonville (616) 669-0040

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22 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018


JULY 2018

MAKING SENSE

Wharton Center strives for accessibility with special sensory-friendly performances SEE PAGE 16A. STORY BY DANA CASADEI.

PAGE

4A

GOING BLUE Blue Lake’s many, many concerts

PAGE

10A

MAKING HISTORY KIA’s pictures of the past

PAGE

17A

DRAMATIC ENTRANCE Exit Left Theatre’s novel approach


COMING SOON 2A

| REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018


[BEST BETS] Beethoven v. Coldplay Would Beethoven have enjoyed the soothing sounds of Coldplay? Steven Hackman doesn’t believe the idea is too far-fetched, as the two artists’ music has more than a little in common — universal, humanist themes of self-doubt, depression and finding love. As a tribute, Hackman has woven the two sounds together, creating a beautiful blend of Beethoven’s 3rd Symphony (Eroica) and Coldplay’s hit songs, including Paradise, The Scientist, Clocks, Fix You and Viva la Vida. The British rock band’s poetic lyrics just seem to make sense with a full symphony performing the 19th century composer’s emotional, swelling music. It’s an ambitious undertaking unlike any other, a passion project from Hackman who will conduct the Grand Rapids Symphony and singers in this outdoor, hillside concert. Arrive early for pre-concert entertainment from Kathy LaMar and Bob VanStee. - Josh Veal

BEETHOVEN V. COLDPLAY Grand Rapids Symphony Cannonsburg Ski Area 6800 Cannonsburg Rd., Belmont July 26-27 grsymphony.org

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Wright Night For one night only, enjoy an evening of stories from a collection by local playwright Stephen Douglas Wright. He’s from Grand Rapids and has written a collection of plays, including The Moon Will Rise and Grow and The Ghost of Jimmy Dean. The 27-year-old graduated from Aquinas College and is currently a playwright, theater director and actor for Curious Arrow. Join the community and hear something new from one of Grand Rapids’ very own. - Kayla Sosa

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WRIGHT NIGHT Dog Story Theater 7 Jefferson Ave. SE, Grand Rapids July 12, 8 p.m., $12 general admission, $7 students/seniors dogstorytheater.com

Publisher Brian Edwards Associate Publisher Rich Tupica Editor Joe Boomgaard / joe@revuewm.com Managing Editor Josh Veal / josh@revuewm.com Vice President Production/Audience Development   Kristi Kortman / kristi@revuewm.com Design Kaylee Van Tuinen / kaylee@revuewm.com Rachel Harper

Contributing Writers: Jane Simons Kayla Sosa Dana Casadei Marla Miller  

FIND US ONLINE:

Website: revuewm.com/arts Twitter: twitter.com/revuewm  Facebook: facebook.com/revuewm Instagram: instagram.com/revuewm

For advertising inquiries, e-mail: Rich Tupica sales@revuewm.com REVUE is published monthly by Revue Holding Company. P.O. Box 1629, Grand Rapids, MI 49501-1629 Office: 616.608.6170 / Fax: 616.608.6182 ©2018 Revue Holding Company. All rights reserved.

July 26-27 Cannonsburg Ski Area Benefactor Sponsors TerryTown RV GR Outdoor

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Media Partner

Patron Sponsor Inclusive Performance Strategies

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Making Sense: Wharton Center strives for accessibility with special sensory-friendly performances

See more on page 16A

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

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[Music]

Swimming in Shows

Blue Lake hosts more than 100 free performances all summer BY MARLA R. MILLER

Home to nearly 5,500 campers and 700 faculty members studying music, art, theater and dance every summer, Blue Lake Fine Arts Camp also hosts an annual Summer Arts Festival that offers evening entertainment in July and August. Cost is no barrier, as nearly every event is free.

SUMMER ARTS FESTIVAL Blue Lake Fine Arts Camp 300 E. Crystal Lake Road, Twin Lake June 29-Aug. 18, various evening concerts, free bluelake.org, (231) 894-1966

If you’re looking for a unique summer date night, such as an open-air show featuring symphonic sounds and big-band style music or an intimate evening of music in a replica Elizabethan theater, look no further. Professional musicians and college faculty members perform and conduct as part of the Festival Orchestra and Festival Band, along with special guests and solo performances by internationally acclaimed musicians. The schedule includes opera, dance, orchestra, band, student musical performances and art exhibits.

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Nestled on 1,600 secluded acres in the Manistee National Forest, it’s a unique experience to visit the camp for a live concert. The campus has several performance venues, including Stewart Shell, Miller Theater, Blodgett Recital Hall and The Rose, resembling Shakespeare’s Globe Theater and one of the few structures of its kind in the country. “These performances are top-notch,” said Dave Myers, vice president for broadcasting and development at Blue Lake Fine Arts Camp. “Our faculty comes from all over the United States and we have international faculty as well. They perform as ensembles and soloists; it’s a hidden gem.” Jazz fans should mark their calendars for July 12, when James Carter, a jazz saxophonist and former Blue Lake camper, returns for a concert in Stewart Shell. Carter came to Blue Lake on a scholarship in the mid-1980s and participated in the international exchange program. He has performed with Dee Dee Bridgewater, the Mingus Big Band and Christian McBride, among others. “He’s incredible,” Myers said. “He travels all over the world — he’s internationally acclaimed. He came from Detroit on a scholarship from the Kellogg Foundation and he has just grown to be an extraordinary jazz performer.” Other highlights: On July 1, 3 and 15, a performance from violinist Walter Verdehr, distinguished professor of violin at Michigan State University, with guest artists and the Rose Chamber Orchestra. A native of Yugoslavia, Verdehr studied with Ivan Galamian at the Juilliard School and was a Fulbright Scholar. He has many solo recordings and toured internationally as a soloist and with ensembles and orchestras, including his own Verdehr Trio. On July 30, Verdehr conducts the Blue Lake Festival Orchestra in a show featur-

Blue Lake. COURTESY PHOTOS ing Corelli’s Concerto Grosso in D Major, Op. 6, No. 1, David Diamond’s Rounds for String Orchestra, and Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5 “Emperor” with Ralph Votapek on piano at Stewart Shell. Votapek is professor emeritus of piano at Michigan State University College of Music and also internationally recognized as a fine pianist, Myers said. On June 29, July 13 and 27 and Aug. 10, The Blue Lake Opera Department presents James Niblock’s Ruth and Naomi in Miller Theater. Admission is free, but seating is limited and must be reserved in advance. The late Dr. Niblock composed the opera with his wife, Helen. Grand Rapids Symphony also visits the camp July 14 for a special show benefiting Blue Lake Public Radio. The 8 p.m. performance, conducted by Marcelo Lehninger in Blodgett Recital Hall, requires advance tickets by calling 800-889-9258. In August, Blue Lake annually hosts the Leonard Falcone International Tuba and Euphonium Festival and Competi-

tion, which combines master classes led by internationally known euphonium/ tuba artists with student and artist level competitions. Special performances are planned Aug. 10-13 as part of the festival, allowing the public to enjoy recitals featuring some of the best euphonium and tuba artists around. For more information, visit falconefestival.org. Closing out the series, Blue Lake Festival Orchestra returns to the Stewart Shell stage Aug. 18 for a show featuring Salvador Brotons’ Prelude, Interlude, and Finale from Reverend Everyman; Franz Liszt’s Les preludes; and Maurice Ravel’s Daphnis et Chloé, Suite No. 2. Conductor Dr. Salvador Brotons also serves as music director and conductor of the Barcelona (Spain) Symphonic Band and the Vancouver (Washington) Symphony Orchestra. The Aug. 18 show is one of several performances broadcast live on Blue Lake Public Radio WBLV 90.3 in Muskegon and WBLU 88.9 in Grand Rapids as well as online at bluelake.org. ■


35 years as your local, independent bookstore!

Join us for our July events! Every Monday @ 11am

Pre-school Story Time

A member of the Schuler Books Children’s bookselling staff will read a variety of new, favorite and best picture books.

Every Saturday @ 11am

Pre-school Story Time

Miss Margaret will read great books for great kids and guide your preschooler in a small art project or related make-and-take activity.

Saturday, July 21 @ 11am

Special Story Time with Norwegian authors Kristin Roskifte and Svein Størksen

Kristin Roskifte and Svein Størksen are Norwegian picture book authors and illustrators, and the founders of the publishing house Magikon. They’ll be joining us for special story time presentation of the book Animal Beauty, a hilarious story with an important message. This zany, satirical picture book addresses body image issues and reminds readers to appreciate themselves for who they are.

Monday, July 23 @ 11am

Special Story time with bestselling author Carol McCloud

Twelve years ago, Carol McCloud wrote her first children’s book, Have You Filled a Bucket Today? A Guide to Daily Happiness for Kids. Carol never would have dreamed this now best-selling, award-winning book would introduce millions of people around the world to the concept of bucket filling. In her newest book, Buckets, Dippers and Lids: Secrets to Your Happiness, bucket filling is taken a step further by introducing the idea that, in addition to an invisible bucket and dipper, everyone also has an invisible lid. In this fun, family-friendly event, author Carol McCloud will read and discuss her newest book using fun songs and role plays. Immediately following, Carol will be answering all your bucketfilling questions!

Thursday, July 26 @ 7pm

Readers Theatre Performance

Actors del Arte Ensemble of West Michigan Present a Readers Theatre for all the Sci Fi fans. Blade Runner / “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? “ By Phillip K. Dick. A story that was made into 2 major films. Join us as we take a look into a futuristic society of technology and the fate of mankind.

Schuler Gift Cards!

AVAILABLE NOW, IN-STORE OR ONLINE. Use Schuler Books gift cards in our store, café, or at www.schulerbooks.com

Visit www.SchulerBooks.com for a complete list of events. All events are subject to change.

2660 28th Street SE | 616.942.2561 REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

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[Music]

Beyond Reggae Zion Lion explores music from all over the Caribbean BY JANE SIMONS

Zion Lion Reggae Band is not your typical reggae group. True, reggae is part of the musical repertoire, but the band also plays African zouk, mucosa, zoukous and Afro-Latin influenced songs, all without the need to imitate Bob Marley. “There’s a stereotype that people who play reggae are a bunch of dreadlocked Rastafarians smoking weed. We definitely don’t do that,” said Myra Atkinson, Zion Lion’s lead singer and steel drum player. According to an early definition in the Dictionary of Jamaican English, reggae is based on ska, an earlier form of Jamaican

popular music, and employs a heavy fourbeat rhythm driven by drums, bass guitar, electric guitar, and the “scraper,” a corrugated stick that is rubbed by a plain stick. The musical group, which bills itself as the “baddest band” to hit the Kalamazoo music scene, is performing on July 8 at Flesher Field in Oshtemo Township. The band’s six members are a combination of several bands from the Kalamazoo area that happened to cross paths and now perform the right mix of reggae and lesser-known music. Atkinson said their shows include a mix of original music and cover tunes. She and Preston Moore, the group’s founder and drummer, write the lyrics and compose the music for their original tunes, along with Moore’s son.

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Zion Lion. COURTESY PHOTO Moore has been performing for more than 20 years on drums, bass, lead guitar and keyboard. He relocated in 1996 from Chicago to Kalamazoo and two years later joined the Jah Kings, a Kalamazoo-based reggae band. He has a home studio and production label and is dedicating himself to preserving and honoring great artists. “ Eve r y b o d y k n ows B o b M a r ley, but for me, I have been influenced by a combination of African artists like Hugh Masekela and Angelique Kidjo,” Atkinson said. “We’ve all had different influences of different artists.” The Zouk music they play is based on popular dance music associated mainly with the Caribbean islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique, as well as Saint Lucia  and  Dominica, all in the  French Antilles (French West Indies). The music blends a variety of Caribbean, African and North American music styles. It is characterized by frequent use of French Antillean Creole language, the prominence of electronically synthesized sounds, and sophisticated recording technology. While their name may not be easily re co gn iza b le wit h in Mi ch i g a n’s mainstream music scene, Zion Lion has been together for at least 15 years with various members. The group has played in venues including area breweries and at festivals throughout the state and Rock Island, Ill. and Louisville, Ky. During their performances, the members take time to give the audience

insight into what they’re playing. “When we’re doing concerts in the park, we do a lot of things that we gear towards children,” Atkinson said. “Some of the songs we include are Harry Belafonte’s Banana Boat Song and Bob Marley’s Three Little Birds.” Zion Lion’s current members come from Senegal, St. Lucia, Chicago, Virginia and Kalamazoo. In addition to Atkinson and Moore, the band includes John Foster, who plays rhythm guitar; Webster John-Baptiste, bass guitar; Assane Dia-Djembe, percussion; and Joel Finley-Pink, who plays keyboard and bass guitar. Atkinson, a retired school administrator, played piano and clarinet in middle school and high school and later learned bass and rhythm guitar, all the while becoming a more avid fan of reggae music, which led her to teach herself how to play the steel drum. When asked if the band is a full-time job for any of its members, Atkinson laugeds and said, “We’d be broke if we didn’t have other jobs.” ■

ZION LION Flesher Field 3664 S. 9th St., Kalamazoo July 8, 6 p.m. oshtemofriends.org


Hastings LIVE is a free concert series brought to you by:

Baum Family Foundation

June 29 May Erlewine Trio

July 6 The Blue Leaf's

July 27 Alan Turner

August 3 The Outer Vibe

AUGUST 3

July 13 Olivia Mainville

August 10 Luke Winslow King

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JULY 12 - 29, 2018 • POTTER CENTER • JACKSON AUGUST 3 - 19, 2018 • VILLAGE THEATER • CANTON

MichiganShakespeareFestival.com

Everyone’s a Member Day Friday August 3 Welcoming the community for all-day benefits 8 am-8 pm

$20 off a fall class or workshop

(with on-site registration)

10 am-8 pm 10% off in the Gallery Shop 11 am-8 pm Free gallery admission

Featured exhibitions: Global Glass: A Survey of Form & Function, West Michigan Area Show, Moving Forward: New Acquisitions at the KIA, Vibrant Bounty: Folk Art from the Shaanxi Region

6-8 pm Nashon Holloway performs (beer & wine available for purchase)

KALAMAZOO INSTITUTE OF ARTS

Open six days / Thursday & Friday until 8 pm / 435 W. South Street Free parking & entrances on South & Lovell streets REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

7A


[MUSIC]

PREVIEW This month, we have weekly jazz in the park and loads of stuff happening at the Grand Rapids Symphony, all outdoors. Go put your beach stuff down and check out some live music. Maybe grab a towel though if you’re going to one of the outdoor venues. BY DANA CASADEI

GRAND RAPIDS SYMPHONY 300 Ottawa NW Ste. 100, Grand Rapids grsymphony.org, (616) 454-9451 ext. 4

CLASSICAL FIREWORKS, July 12-13, $5+ This annually beloved concert will not only feature the GR Pops but three (yup, all three) of its maestros: Music Director Marcelo Lehninger, Principal Pops Conductor Bob Bernhardt, and Associate Conductor John Varineau. During the concert, the trio will lead the orchestra in an evening of classics like The Armed Forces Salute, Overture to Candide, God Bless America and fan-favorite Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture. Prior to the show will be pre-concert entertainment featuring Michael Schaeffer, the Grand Rapids-based professional accordion player. Schaeffer specializes in playing Italian, French and Tango music, as well as his own original compositions. He also has a pretty impressive mustache.

LOVE IS IN THE AIR - A BENEFIT FOR BLUE LAKE PUBLIC RADIO, July 14, $30+ The 13th annual Grand Rapids Symphony performance at Blue Lake Fine Arts Camp takes place this month. The symphony will perform pieces like Mozart’s Overture to Marriage of Figaro, Tchaikovsky’s Serenade for Strings and Romeo and Juliet Overture, and Sousa’s Washington Post. (Yes, it is connected to the newspaper. In 1889, the owners of said newspaper requested Sousa compose a march for the newspaper's essay contest awards ceremony.) The concert will be followed by a dessert reception. Yum.

80S REWIND!, July 19-20, $5+ Get your parachute pants out and tease your hair high, the ’80s are back for two nights. As your stack of bangles make noise on your arm, relive the days when MTV actually played music videos. Rock out to like, totally righteous songs like Scorpions’ Rock You Like a Hurricane, Billy Joel’s Uptown Girl, U2’s Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For, and like much more. Pre-concert entertainment will feature the Acoustic Quartet. It promises to be totally tubular.

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CONCERT AT JOHN BALL PARK, July 21, Free This family-friendly, free community concert will feature conductor John Varineau and vocalist Edye Evans Hyde. Kids and adults will be able to enjoy pre-concert music and activities before the group takes the stage and performs music from The Pink Panther and Jurassic Park, the finale from Dvorák's Symphony No. 9, and so much more.

GRS Picnic Pops Classical Fireworks.

TERRY JOHNSTON FOR THE GRAND RAPIDS SYMPHONY.

BEETHOVEN V. COLDPLAY, July 26-27, $5+ With Beethoven v. Coldplay, conductor and composer Steven Hackman has paired together two artists you wouldn’t expect, but the resulting mash-up is moving, melodic and personal. Beethoven’s 3rd Symphony (Eroica) acts as a brilliant backdrop for Coldplay’s hit songs, such as Paradise, The Scientist, Clocks, Fix You and Viva la Vida. Arrive early for pre-concert entertainment from Kathy LaMar and Bob VanStee.

WEST MICHIGAN JAZZ SOCIETY PO Box 150307 Grand Rapids wmichjazz.org, (616) 490-9506

PAUL KELLER'S AT SUNDOWN QUINTET, July 9, Free Kicking off their 2018 Scully Tour, the quintet will also kick off Monday Jazz in the Park for the month of July. The group features vocalist/clarinetist Sarah D'Angelo, saxophonist Steve Wood, pianist Duncan McMillan, and drummer Stephen Boegehold, and their leader/namesake over on string bass, Paul Keller. Not often heard in jazz, the group is well-known for its unique tonal blending of clarinet and saxophone in harmony.

IVAN AKANSIIMA, July 16, Free Originally hailing from Uganda, this jazz musician and scholar graduated from Hope College last year and is currently pursuing his master’s degree at Western Michigan University. Akansiima has performed in more than 40 countries and will be joined by saxophone player Jordan VanHemert, bassist Ian Thompson and drummer Zach Snoek.

Paul Keller's at Sundown Quintet.

COURTESY PHOTO

MICHAEL DOYLE & EVIDENCE,

THE JOHN PROULX TRIO, July 30, Free

July 23, Free If you’re a fan of Latin jazz and swing, this show will be right up your alley. Evidence has been a "hard bop haven" for some of the state's best jazz players over the last 24 years, and consists of Michael Doyle on saxophone and flute, Brad Fritcher on horns, Steve Talaga on piano, and Tom Lockwood on bass. The group is joined by guest artists on percussion, congas and timbales.

Singer, pianist, composer and recording artist John Proulx makes his way to Jazz in the Park this month. The Grand Rapids native recently released his latest album, Say It, which features Chuck Berghofer, Joe LaBarbera, Larry Koonse, Bob Sheppard, and a duet with Melissa Manchester. There are also three string quartet arrangements by Alan Broadbent. Proulx has three previous albums, which earned him national and international attention, and he’s a Grammy-winning composer.


JUNE 22 - July 15

Live at the Saugatuck Center for the Arts Tickets at sc4a.org 269-857-2399

MSW Actors: Amanda Ryan Paige Heather Patterson King Gina Milo REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

9A


[VISUAL ARTS]

Picturing the Past Kalamazoo Institute of Arts journeys through time with photography

BY JANE SIMONS

The idea to document the Work Progress Administration and the Farm Security Administration during the late 1930s through photography was an idea well ahead of its time, according to Michelle Stempien, curator of education for the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. Those efforts produced such timeless photographs as Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother. An in-depth look into photography of this time will be explored by Dave Curl, a professional photographer and instructor at the KIA. His presentations are part of the KIA’s free ARTbreak programs. “Dorothea Lange and her timeless Migrant Mother first come to mind, but during this difficult decade extending into World War II, other photographers also were creating iconic images,” Curl said. While discussing photography from a certain period, Curl will be coming at it from a photojournalist’s CURL point of view, Stempien said. She said his talks will contain examples of social documentation of a specific time period and demonstrate how forward-thinking some government agencies were. “They thought at that time that it was important to send people out into the country to document that time in the United States history,” Stempien said. “Now, to have these

ARTBREAK: AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE 1930S Kalamazoo Institute of Arts July 17 & 24, 12-1 p.m. kiarts.org

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primary sources documents, to have that forethought, they recognized that in this particular time something important is happening.” The July 17 presentation will incorporate vintage clips to highlight early photojournalism, the social-documentary work of Lange, Walker Evans, Arthur Rothstein and their U.S. Government colleagues, the “glass-ceiling-breaking” magazine stories by Margaret Bourke-White for Fortune and LIFE, and James Van Der Zee’s upbeat studies of his African-American neighbors in New York City’s Harlem. Vintage video clips also will be used during Curl’s July 24 presentation to cover the cutting-edge advertising photography of Edward Steichen culminating with the Family of Man exhibition, and some early work by Edward Weston and Ansel Adams. “I grew up in the ’30s and ’40s, seeing these great photographs published and aspiring to be a photojournalist for LIFE magazine,” said Curl, a Western Michigan University professor emeritus, former adjunct professor of Art at Kalamazoo College, and KIA docent. “I knew most of these photographers. I lived through this history. These are the people who developed the technology and medium.” The photographers Curl will focus on contributed through photojournalism, documentary or fine art photography and were working on the cusp of World War II. Curl’s first job, while still in high school, was as summer staff replacement photographer for The Columbus Dispatch. After graduating from Ohio University, he went to work for the Milwaukee Journal, which had sent more photographers to LIFE and National Geographic than any other paper. But during military service, he had enjoyed instructing college ROTC courses, so his career path led him to graduate from Indiana University. He then embarked on a teaching career with a “night job” as a contract industrial photographer and collaborator with his wife, Ardyce, on many feature articles for magazines and for the Kalamazoo Gazette. Seeing the work of the photographers he will be highlighting in his presentations inspired Curl to learn the craft early on. He set up his first darkroom while still in elementary school and by the time he was in high school, he was shooting as a professional. When deciding what to focus on for the ARTbreak pre-

Top: James Van Der Zee, Couple, Harlem, 1932, gelatin silver print. Left: Walker Evans, Bourbon Street, New Orleans, 1936, gelatin silver print. COLLECTION OF THE KALAMAZOO INSTITUTE OF ARTS

sentations, Stempien said consideration is often given to something that will augment current exhibits or artists. She said the goal is to add layers that help people to better understand what they’re seeing. The KIA has a large photography collection and Stempien said Curl’s presentations about the history of photography relate to that collection and will give people a better understanding when these photos are displayed. She said she hopes those who attend the ARTbreaks will look at the photos from more of a technical standpoint "One of Dave’s goals is to kind of demystify some of the old processes,” Stempien said. “We are hoping that they will learn something from looking at people who are technologically trained. A lot of what brought people in was the storytelling aspect. Photography is one of those art forms that’s more accessible to people. “Everyone feels that they can step into it because it's recognizable. It’s a storytelling narrative. People feel that they can jump into the images and make a connection. Now, it’s such a common medium. Everyone has access and feels connected to it.” ■


August 13-18, 2018 Art Competition, Exhibit & Art Sale

Photo by Mark Gregg Photography

Monument Park, Dexter, Michigan

Presented by

www.paintdexter.org Sponsored by Dexter Arts, Culture & Heritage Committee, Washtenaw Convention & Visitor’s Bureau, Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales Dexter, DAPCO, Chelsea State Bank, OHM Advisors, Mark Gregg Photography

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

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[VISUAL ARTS]

PREVIEW

This month, we’ve got one exhibit dedicated to attention to detail, another one-day show focused on daylilies, a new photography exhibit, and a two-day event all about honey bees. Warning: There are a lot of puns ahead. BY DANA CASADEI

LOWELLARTS! 223 W. Main St., Lowell lowellartsmi.org, (616) 897-8545

LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION, Through July 14

CAPTURED: A PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION AT LOWELLARTS, July 21-Sept. 1 With a name like Captured, it seems pretty obvious what this exhibit is about … sculpture. Just kidding, it’s a photography exhibition. More than 150 photographs — all by Michigan photographers — will be on display, highlighting the different approaches and techniques they used to create their images. Photos were taken by three artist groups, and two individual artists.

MUSKEGON MUSEUM OF ART 296 W. Webster Ave., Muskegon muskegonartmuseum.org, (231) 720-2570

UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL: THE ULTRA-REALISTIC SCULPTURE OF MARC SIJAN, Through Aug. 12 AMERICAN ICON & WHISKEY RIDGE, Through Aug. 12

THE 150TH ANNIVERSARY OF EDWARD CURTIS: 150 MASTERPIECES FROM THE NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN, Through Sept. 9

While tasting several different honey samples, learn about the bees that work so hard to make it, and how they communicate with each other through dance. Yes, dance — bee impressed.

PERCHANCE TO DREAM: THE ART OF MICHAEL PEOPLES, Through Sept. 16 PICTURES OF THE BEST KIND: TREASURES FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION, Through Aug. 12

DAYLILY SHOW, July 14

For the past century, the museum has been able to build a reputation as being home to one of the most renowned collections of art among small museums throughout the country. This exhibit will show off the collection with works by artists commonly found in big-city art museums. Think Degas, Whistler, Curry, Turner and Bonnard, among others. The museum is also well-known for showcasing major works in studio glass and hosting pieces by some of the most important African American artists of the past century, such as Hughie Lee-Smith and Henry Ossawa Tanner.

This show will present the flowering Hemerocallis in all its glory. Daylilies less than one inch across to almost 10 inches will be presented in a variety of colors, shapes and forms, including

spider, ruffled and “eyed” forms. Throughout the show, guests can take a look at creative arrangements, hear tips from Daylily Society members, and vote on their favorites. A fun flower fact for you: Each daylily flower lasts for just one day, just like this show. Smart planning.

William Louis Sonntag, Mountain Landscape, 1854. COURTESY PHOTO

FREDERIK MEIJER GARDENS & SCULPTURE PARK 1000 East Beltline Ave. NE, Grand Rapids Meijergardens.org, (888) 957-1580

MASAYUKI KOORIDA: BEYOND EXISTENCE, Through Aug. 19 AMAZING HONEY BEES, July 14-15 See what all the buzz is about by discovering different aspects of bees and beekeeping through an observation hive, chatting with local experts, and making a beeswax candle.

KENDALL COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN OF FERRIS STATE UNIVERSITY

2018 FALL YOUTH CONTINUING STUDIES AND ADULT CONTINUING STUDIES Adult and Professional Courses Start September 10

Youth Courses Start September 15

Sign up at kcad.edu/cs

Revue Arts 2018.07.22 FINAL.indd 12A 17164 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 20181

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CLASSICAL FIREWORKS AND THE 3 MAESTROS July 12-13

80s REWIND! July 19-20

BEETHOVEN v. COLDPLAY July 26-27

Anila Quayyum Agha: Intersections. COURTESY PHOTO

SAUGATUCK CENTER FOR THE ARTS 400 Culver St., Saugatuck sc4a.org, (269) 857-2399

INDUSTRIAL NATURE, Through Sept. 7 FIBER NATION, Through Sept. 22

KALAMAZOO INSTITUTE OF ARTS

of meticulously crafted sculptures, paintings, etchings, drawings and vessels that capture the artist's commitment to their vision through an unusually high level of detail.

GRAND RAPIDS ART MUSEUM

WEST MICHIGAN AREA SHOW, Through Sept. 2

GLOBAL GLASS: A SURVEY OF FORM AND FUNCTION, Through Oct. 14

LAFONTSEE GALLERIES 833 Lake Drive SE, Grand Rapids lafontsee.us, (616) 451-9820

SLIGHTLY OBSESSIVE, July 6-29 If you think you pay a lot of attention to detail, these artists might just have you beat. The gallery’s summer show will have a collection

Special Event!

BEN FOLDS August 3

COLOR OF THE YEAR, Through July 29

PASSION ON PAPER: MASTERLY PRINTS FROM THE KIA COLLECTION,

Through Aug. 12

Excludes special events.

2 W. Fulton St., Grand Rapids uica.org, (616) 454-7000

TRANSITIONS: NEW PHOTOGRAPHY FROM BANGLADESH, Through Aug. 26

VIBRANT BOUNTY: CHINESE FOLK ART FROM THE SHAANXI REGION,

CHILD PACKAGE (2-18) $15

URBAN INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY ARTS

314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo kiarts.org, (269) 349-7775

Through July 15

3____________________________________________________ CONCERT PACKAGE $42

101 Monroe Center, Grand Rapids artmuseumgr.org, (616) 831-1000

AMERICAN SPECTACLE: PAINTINGS FROM THE MANOOGIAN COLLECTION,

TICKETS CHILD AS LOW AS

$40 $5

Special Event!

TITO PUENTE JR. August 2

Through Aug. 5

TICKETS AS LOW AS

SHOW AND TELL: GRAM STAFF SELECTIONS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION, Through Aug. 26 OSWALDO VIGAS: TRANSFORMATIONS,

CHILD TICKETS

$20 $5

ANILA QUAYYUM AGHA: INTERSECTIONS, Through Aug. 26 MIRROR VARIATIONS: THE ART OF MONIR SHAHROUDY FARMANFARMAIAN, Through Aug. 26

TICKETS

Media Partner

ORDER YOUR PACKAGE TODAY! PicnicPops.org | 616.454.9451 x 4

Through Sept. 2

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

13A


[THEATER]

Shakespeare Reconstructed Pigeon Creek and Rose Theater bring the bard’s work fully to life BY MARLA R. MILLER

If “Shakespeare” brings to mind recollections of high school English, all “thee, thou, thine,” The Pigeon Creek Shakespeare Company entices you to give a live performance a try. Thou just might like it more than ye think. You don’t have to plan a trip to London’s Globe Theater to see Shakespeare performed as it was in his day — on an open-air thrust stage with natural lighting, minimal sets, balcony seating and standing-room space for “groundlings,” plus plenty of audience interaction.

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And there’s no time to stare at your phone or sleep because you might be brought into the action. “We are actually in direct contact with the audience,” said Executive Director Katherine Mayberry, who also acts in many plays. “It’s not stiff and formal. These plays tell great stories. The language, when people are saying it out loud, is pretty easy to understand.” West Michigan is home to one of a handful of Elizabethan theater replicas around the world, and The Pigeon Creek Shakespeare Company performs benefit shows there every summer for Blue Lake Public Radio. But beyond the company’s Rose Theater productions, Pigeon Creek takes its show on the road, bringing Shakespeare’s 400-year-old plays to life in nontraditional venues throughout the region and exposing schoolchildren to the infamous English playwright. Pigeon Creek performs regularly at Dog Story Theater in Grand Rapids, where

it draws a college crowd and faithful Shakespeare fans, as well as Seven Steps Up in Spring Lake and Jenison Center for the Arts. “If you think you don’t like Shakespeare, come out and give it a try, because you might see something different than you have before,” Mayberry said. “I think everyone’s first experience with Shakespeare should be seeing it onstage.” The company is Michigan’s only professional touring Shakespeare company, and its performance philosophy is rooted in the original staging practices of acting companies in Shakespeare’s time: using nontraditional theatrical spaces, universal lighting, minimal sets, cross-gendered casting and actors who play multiple roles and perform musical instruments. These techniques create a sense of playfulness and intimacy that makes Shakespeare’s storylines accessible and engaging, especially since the actors and audience members can see each other. “Going back to the way they staged at

that time makes it seem more modern and unique to people in our time period,” Mayberry said. “There are lines that are written to share with the audience that make it really lively and interactive in a way that people are not expecting.” Based in Grand Haven, Pigeon Creek has been around since 1998 and started out as a summer theater troupe. Founded by Chicago area actor and director Frank Farrell, he gathered a group of West Michigan actors, and from 1998-2007, the group produced plays outdoors in various Ottawa County Parks. Now, Pigeon Creek produces five mainstage plays per season and performs year-round at a variety of venues, offering numerous staged readings, performances of Shakespearean scenes, and educational programs in schools. Housed on the campus of Blue Lake Fine Arts Camp, officials built The Rose Theater in 2010 primarily for campers in its summer theater program. The theater’s


10 Books & 28 Events JULY EVENTS GR Reads: The Movies – Minority Report Tuesday, July 10, 2018, 8:00 pm Wealthy Theatre – 1130 Wealthy St SE

Lost to Time: 20 Detroiters You’ve Never Heard Of Pigeon Creek Shakespeare Company performing at The Rose Theater. COURTESY PHOTOS

design, approximately half the size of Shakespeare’s Globe Theater in London, is based on a synthesis of popular 16th century English theaters and surviving sketches and documents from that era. “It’s one of the few Shakespeare programs for young people in the country and one of the very few structures like this in the United States,” said Dave Myers, Blue Lake’s vice president for broadcasting and development. “It’s truly an authentic Shakespearean theater. It’s an amazing space.” There are only a few concerts and performances open to the public, including those produced by Pigeon Creek, so it’s a unique opportunity for audiences to experience Shakespeare’s plays as they were meant to be staged. The Rose includes a Juliet balcony, seating for nearly 600 people on three sides of the stage in two galleries, plus “the yard” area in front of the stage for groundlings. There’s no indoor plumbing or electricity and the center is exposed to the elements, putting the acting front and center and creating a sense of community. Pigeon Creek started performing at The Rose in 2012, and it’s such a unique venue that actors and directors travel from across the country to perform there. Mayberry said the closest place to experience a similar Elizabethan replica is Virginia, where she attended graduate school at the American Shakespeare Center. That’s also where she met Aili Huber, who still lives in Virginia but has worked with Pigeon Creek since 2009. She visited West Michigan in early June to direct Much Ado About Nothing at The Rose, in large part because she wanted to direct in the unique space. There is a different kind of empathy and engagement when actors and audience are not in the dark, she said, and plays are very different when they are performed in the spaces they were designed for.

“One thing I would love for more people to know is what an incredible space they have at The Rose,” Huber said. “I feel like the plays are so much more connected to the audience in these spaces.” Huber praised Mayberry for building a strong company and the quality of acting happening here. “There’s a lot about Shakespeare that’s fun and relevant, and this company is amazing at sharing that,” she said. “They have a tremendous amount of training in the kind of theater we do. I know I am going to have a really talented, really committed group of actors to work with.” Huber also returns in August to direct Antony and Cleopatra. A tragic romance, the play isn’t performed very often, but it includes great fights, great music and “it’s a pretty sexy show as far as Shakespeare goes,” Huber said. ■

Tuesday, July 17, 2018, 6:30 pm Main Library – 111 Library St NE

Sound Proof and the Music of Michael Jackson Thursday, July 19, 2018, 7:00 – 9:00 pm Billy’s Lounge – 1437 Wealthy St SE

Robotics Petting Zoo Saturday, July 21, 2018, 2:00 – 4:00 pm Main Library – 111 Library St NE

Michigan Native Plants in Your Home Landscape Tuesday, July 24, 2018, 7:00 pm Main Library – 111 Library St NE

Supermercado Tour Wednesday, July 25, 2018, 7:00 pm Rodriguez Supermarket – 1428 Grandville Ave

Surviving College Culture Shock Thursday, July 26, 2018, 7:30 pm Main Library – 111 Library St NE

PIGEON CREEK SHAKESPEARE COMPANY’S UPCOMING SHOWS: Henry VI: June 30, Jenison Center for the Arts; July 1, Seven Steps Up Antony and Cleopatra: Aug. 10-19, Dog Story Theater; Sept. 7, Seven Steps Up; Sept. 15, Jenison Center for the Arts Henry V: Aug. 25, Shakespeare at The Rose, a benefit for Blue Lake Public Radio. pcshakespeare.com (616) 850-0916

To see the ten book selections, more events, and details, visit www.grpl.org/GRReads.

WWW.GRPL.ORG/GRREADS 616.988.5400 SPONSOR:

MEDIA SPONSORS:

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

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[THEATER]

Making Sense

Lionesses Dance, The Lion King. COURTESY PHOTO

Local theaters strive for accessibility with sensory-friendly performances BY DANA CASADEI

On July 21, some of the Wharton Center’s typical theater house rules will be a bit relaxed. Patrons will be allowed to eat snacks, look at phones and move around the theater during this production of Disney’s The Lion King. Welcome to a sensory-friendly performance, the third of Wharton’s 2017-2018 season. These performances were created in collaboration with Michigan State University community partners like Residential Options, Inc. to make live theater accessible to those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), developmental disabilities, sensory processing disorder, and other sensory-sensitive people and their families.  “We had been wanting to do it for years,” said Diane Willcox, Wharton Center’s director of marketing & communications who is leading the SFP program. “This was really prompted by the fact that Disney is supportive of the program … and willing to allow us to put on a sensory-friendly performance of The Lion King while they are here.” So while the show onstage will be the same Broadway performance seen by

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millions around the world, there will be noticeable differences off the stage to accommodate the needs of their audience. For example, the lights onstage and in the theater will never go fully black. Some of the sound cues have been removed or dampened. Guests can print off helpful documents before the performance, such as a “social story,” which explains what they can expect during the theater experience via pictures and text, or a character guide, which has photos identifying each character. The Wharton Center also will provide quiet spaces and calming rooms, a very large number of volunteers (some of whom are professionals in the ASD field), and staff that has been trained for this specific event. “It’s really just a time for us to welcome an audience that sometimes isn’t welcome in public spaces and to be very accepting of whatever behaviors they need to have in order to be comfortable,” Willcox said. One other major way these performances differ: an extremely flexible refund policy. The Wharton Center allows refunds for their sensory-friendly performances, as long as they are contacted within 10 days of the performance the patrons were scheduled to or attempted to attend. They just have to explain what happened and return the tickets. “It is a situation that is unheard of and it’s only for this audience, because they are really hesitant to make a commitment

like this,” she said. “We recognize the fact that it’s a unique situation, and sometimes there’s nothing you can do.” But on the days families do attend these performances, it can be life-changing, like it was for Michele Tucker’s family. Tucker’s 8-year-old daughter, Josalin, is non-verbal. This July, the family will mark The Lion King as their third sensory-friendly performance at the Wharton Center. They also attended Cat in the Hat and Clementine as an entire family—a rare experience. “Our first performance was Cat in the Hat, and I’ll be honest, we were really nervous because we had never been able to go anywhere like that with our daughter. She usually is just like, ‘No, I’m not feeling that,’” Tucker said. “Then, when we went, we were just blown away.” She described it as a perfect theater experience because they were treated like any other theater patron. They got to escape in an environment that was planned for families like theirs to feel safe and enjoy

THE LION KING

Sensory-friendly performance: Sat. July 21, 2 p.m. July 11-29 whartoncenter.com

their time, judgment-free. Tucker also said it can be harder to hone in on what Josalin enjoys compared to her son, who is involved in athletics. But at these performances, she clearly lit up and Tucker was able to see her enthusiasm and pure joy. “I’m just like, ‘How much can I pay?’” Tucker said, laughing. “Where do I sign up? I’m drinking the Kool Aid — you have me. I hope that this is the forefront to bring other sensory-friendly programs to our community.” The Wharton Center hopes so as well. The 2018-2019 season will have four sensory-friendly performances, two public performances and two where schools will be selected to attend. Other West Michigan organizations are ramping up inclusivity efforts as well. Celebration! Cinema and West Michigan University Theatre have offered sensory friendly events, and Miller Auditorium is planning to do so as well. As a marketing director, Willcox realizes the number of people with ASD is ever-increasing, so the Wharton Center wants to add more disciplines to the sensory-friendly program, such as dance performances. There also are talks about broadening their scope to not just family productions, but multi-week Broadway shows as well. “It’s something that there’s such a great need for. It’s been a beautiful experience,” Willcox said. “Honestly, I think it’s probably the most important thing I’ve ever done.” ■


[THEATER]

Hedwig and The Angry Inch. LILLIAN COLE PHOTOGRAPHY

At the Table BENJAMIN DOUMA

Dramatic Entrance Exit Left Theatre brings conversation to the community BY KAYLA SOSA

Exit Left Theatre Company is working to change the boundaries of art in Holland. Started by University of Michigan senior Jamie Colburn in April 2017, the company has already seen success in just over a year. “After the (presidential) election in 2016, that really took a toll on me and it got me thinking about my own community where I come from … which happens to be pretty conservative,” Colburn said. “Along with that, I started thinking about how I could give back to the community in a way that will benefit everybody.” Colburn’s reputation in Holland is with the theater, so he thought he’d start there. While the city has a good theater community already, Colburn wanted to do something different while also opening the doors of communication. “There are going to be differing opinions no matter where you go, but it’s how you approach those ideologies and how you talk about them with each other,” Colburn said. “I wanted to create a theater whose mission was to spark a conversation that opens people up to new life experiences and allows them the opportunity to talk about it.”

Because Colburn is studying theater at U of M, he has a connection to professional theater as well as the community theater in his hometown. The goal with Exit Left was to have both. Colburn has been part of theater in Holland since the age of 8, so by now he has a reputation with the community — so much so that he was able to raise $6,500 in one month to kickstart the theater company. After the first season — paying actors, buying sets and costumes, venue space, etc. — Colburn’s company broke even. “Which is almost unheard of in the theater world,” Colburn said. “Let alone bringing something so radical into such a traditional community.” Exit Left has staged a variety of shows, including Hedwig and the Angry Inch, a play focusing on a trans woman with a botched surgery, and Sweeney Todd, a classic but with Exit Left’s twist. The music was performed by a pianist and cellist, and the cast had nine people singing in a round, all performed at the Holland Armory. Colburn said the goal is to stage six shows a year by season four. Currently, Exit Left is in its second season, preparing for the third and final show. Next year, Colburn has five shows ready to go. This passion for theater didn’t just come from anywhere. “According to my mother, I was singing since I was a baby,” Colburn said. “My dad

is a musician and did theater when he was younger, and both my sisters did theater growing up, so it runs in the family.” Colburn started at eight years old, playing Winnie the Pooh in a community theater program. He continued acting at Holland High School and even directed some shows. In 2014, Colburn traveled to New York City to compete in the Jimmy Awards, a.k.a. the National High School Musical Theatre Awards. That opportunity gave Colburn the chance to perform as the Phantom in Phantom of the Opera on Broadway. After graduating high school in 2015, Colburn was accepted into the University of Michigan musical theater program. After finishing up the June show, At the Table, Colburn is now preparing for Parade. Set to open July 26, this musical is about a Jewish man accused of murder while living in the 1930s South. Focusing on themes of race and anti-semitism, the story reminds us of our morals and the consequences of being prejudiced and ignorant. Colburn definitely doesn’t do all this alone. Education Director Taryn Timmer Roels works with summer interns. Colburn’s sister, Kelsey Colburn, is the associate marketing director, Jen Kouw is the public relations director and Justin Dryer is the tech director. Rich Perez is the co-artistic director. Colburn has big dreams for himself and his theater company. After college,

he hopes to move to New York to pursue acting and wants to build up Exit Left to be a sustainable company, with or without his physical presence. More than anything, he wants to make a difference. Everything Colburn does with Exit Left is in pursuit of a specific goal: starting a conversation. He believes theater is a unique and sometimes easier way to reach people when trying to address political or social issues. “Theater is a collaborative experience from beginning to end, with the cast, the crew and the audience,” he said. “It’s one of the only art forms that tells a story and brings a community together and transports an entire room to a different place. You can tell so many stories and experience so many different things within two hours.” ■

PARADE

Exit Left Theatre Company Hope Church 77 W. 11th St., Holland July 26-August 5 exitlefttheatre.com

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

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Playing the Part

[THEATER]

Fun Home explores one woman’s sexuality and family relationships BY KAYLA SOSA

The story of one can relate to many. That’s the binding truth at the heart of Circle Theatre’s Fun Home.

Fun Home's poster. COURTESY IMAGE.

FUN HOME

Circle Theatre 1703 Robinson Rd. SE,Grand Rapids July 12-28 circletheatre.org

It’s based on the true story of Alison Bechdel, a lesbian graphic novelist whose father dies unexpectedly, and the many ups and downs of growing up, getting along with family and discovering who you really are. Directing this unique musical is Jolene Frankey, who’s excited to bring a show that really touches on heavy topics, but can relate to every single person in the audience. “It’s so important to the LGBT community because you see Allison’s coming out process from the time she’s little,” Frankey said. “It’s the first time that the leading lady is a lesbian (in a Broadway musical), and there’s no question about that. It’s important, because we’ve never seen that before. “We’re watching the empowering story of Alison coming out, but you also have to watch this heartbreaking story of Bruce (Alison’s father), who is gay and chooses to live his whole life in the closet.” The story consists mainly of flashbacks, moving from present day 43-year-old Alison to younger versions of her during various big moments of her life. “Maybe not everybody has been affected by suicide, or doesn’t have a family member that is LGBTQ, but you understand those familial relationships,” Frankey said. “Some parts of it are really hard to watch and you feel that pain, and can relate that to parts of your life. And some parts are so beautiful, to see the way that they learn to cope and depend on each other to the best of their ability.” The show’s lead is local actress and comedian Eirann Betka, who not only relates to the story in many ways, but also has taken a backseat from theatrical acting for a few years. Jason Morrison plays the part of Bruce, Alison’s father. “Jason and I are both part of the LGBTQ community … and there’s so many parallels that we’ve already seen and talked about that it’s painful sometimes to think about it or to see other people go through it,” Betka said. “It’s separating those two while still giving that

July 19-20 Cannonsburg Ski Area

honor to Alison’s feelings, too, because that’s what she went through as well.” Two years ago, Betka saw a performance of Fun Home in New York City and was so moved that it rekindled her love for theater. After being off the theater stage for six years, she’s making time in her busy schedule of comedy gigs to take the lead in Grand Rapids’ first production of Fun Home. “It’s done in a full circle, so the audience sees every angle and everything,” Betka said. “So even when you’re seeing the back of someone’s head, you can still see how much emotion they’re putting in their body. And it’s such a cool reminder as an actor that your acting needs to be 360 (degrees).” Not only is the acting shown full-circle, but the story is told that way as well. “Which I think is part of the beauty of the storytelling as well, because you get to see each person’s perspective,” Frankey said. “While it may look like (Bruce) is failing as a parent and not giving his daughter the support and love that she needs, you see enough that you understand he’s unfortunately doing the best that he can. “Everybody’s just doing the best they can and sometimes that just isn’t enough.” Frankey and Betka agreed that this truth is hard to bear for most people, and they hope that by seeing this story told onstage, people and families will understand one another better, and just be more patient and truthful in general. Through it all, they said, theater is the vessel by which stories are told and much can be celebrated. “It can be a celebration of humanity, or love, or freedom, or revolution — in this case, hopefully they see that theater is simply a story just like theirs,” Betka said. Frankey agreed. “There are so many heterosexual stories that are told, and that is just one slice of humanity,” she said. “It’s the same way that we need to see more ethnic diversity on the stage. We need to see that same diversity in all of our storytelling.” By having this show in a relatively conservative area like West Michigan, Circle Theater appears to be making a push to encourage diversity. “I feel like it’s a turning point not just for Circle, but for the theater community and Grand Rapids in general that we’re able to highlight and celebrate our stories,” Frankey said. ■

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[theater]

preview If you’ve been wanting to take your kid to the theater for the first time but just haven’t found the right show, June has plenty of options. There are Disney classics like Beauty & the Beast and The Lion King, adorable mouse Stuart Little going on adventures, and Andrew Lloyd Webber’s take on a Jack Black film. Don’t worry — we have shows geared toward adults too. Check it out! BY DANA CASADEI

THE BARN THEATRE 13351 M-96, Augusta barntheatreschool.org, (269) 731-4121

HAIRSPRAY, Through July 1, $39+ BONNIE & CLYDE, July 3-15, $39+ RUN FOR YOUR WIFE, July 17-29, $39+ This outrageous comedy written by Ray Cooney follows a taxi driver juggling two wives — who don’t know about each other, obviously — with his irregular work schedule. It’s a classic slamming-doors farce, full of hilarity, lies and misunderstandings.

DISNEY’S BEAUTY & THE BEAST, July 31-Aug. 12, $39+

CIRCLE THEATRE 1703 Robinson Road SE, Grand Rapids circletheatre.org, (616) 456-6656

FUN HOME, July 12-28, $26+

GRAND RAPIDS CIVIC THEATRE 30 N. Division Ave., Grand Rapids grct.org, (616) 222-6650

SCHOOL OF ROCK, July 27-Aug. 4, $10+ It's time to stick it to the man in this hit musical, created by Broadway legend (and we do mean LEGEND) Andrew Lloyd Webber. Yes, the guy who composed Broadway sensations like The Phantom of the Opera, Cats and Evita also wrote the music for a musical based on that 2003 Jack Black movie. Dewey Finn, a failed wannabe rock star, is looking to make some extra cash. He poses as a substitute teacher for a fifth grade class at a prestigious school. After he finds out his classroom is full of fantastic musicians, he decides to compete in the upcoming Battle of the Bands competition. It’s an adorable story about self-discovery and finding the child within.

LITTLE WOMEN, July 28-Aug. 5, $10+

FARMERS ALLEY THEATRE KALAMAZOO 221 Farmers Alley, Kalamazoo farmersalleytheatre.com, (269) 343-2727

THE PRODUCERS, July 20-Aug. 5, $32+ With a name like Springtime for Hitler, producers Max Bialystock and Leo Bloom are destined for a sure-fire flop, right? That’s what they are hoping for — so they can then run off with the money they've raised — in the Mel Brooks musical, which he adapted from his own 1967 film of the same name. The original 2001 musical ran for more than 2,500 performances on the Great White Way and won a record-breaking 12 Tony Awards. The Producers will close out the theater’s 10th season.

HOLLAND CIVIC THEATER 50 W. 9th St., Holland hollandcivictheatre.org, (616) 396-2021

STUART LITTLE, July 12-21, $10 Adapted by Joseph Robinette and based on the famous book by E.B. White, Stuart Little follows everyone’s favorite pint-sized pal. Stuart may be a mouse, but he was born into an ordinary New York family, which leads to some pretty grand adventures, both big and small. Fun fact: Robinette also dramatized the highly acclaimed stage version of Charlotte's Web.

HOPE SUMMER REPERTORY THEATRE 141 E. 12th St., Holland hope.edu, (616) 395-7600

THE WIZ, July 2-28; Aug. 3-10; $35+ THE ODD COUPLE, July 3-18; $26+ DRAGON PACK SNACK ATTACK – THE MUSICAL, July 2-30; Aug. 3-8; $15 AN ILIAD, July 13-31; Aug 2-7; $30

Dixie's Never Wear a Tube Top. PHOTO GODSPELL, July 20-30; Aug. 1-8; $35+ This timeless tale “based on the Gospel according to St. Matthew” will have guests singing along to just-as-timeless music, including the show’s international hits, Day by Day, Learn Your Lessons Well and All for the Best, among many others. Created by three-time Grammy and Academy Award winner Stephen Schwartz (Wicked, Pippin and Children of Eden) Godspell is presented in a series of skits and songs, with Jesus and his disciples presented as loving clowns.

WHARTON CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS 750 E. Shaw Ln., East Lansing whartoncenter.com, (517) 353-1982

DISNEY'S THE LION KING, July 11-29, $35+ The curtains come up and audiences are taken to Pride Rock, where lion cub prince Simba is growing up in the African heartland. If you’ve seen the 1994 Disney film of the same name, then you know what comes next: Simba leaves his home after tragedy strikes. Eventually, after making some new friends and singing a lot of songs, he finds his way back to the animal kingdom where he truly belongs. The musical features actors in animal costumes as well as giant, hollow puppets, along with music by Elton John.

BY JOHN MOORE

MASON STREET WAREHOUSE 400 Culver St., Saugatuck sc4a.org, (269) 857-2399

MAMMA MIA, Through July 15, $44+ DIXIE’S NEVER WEAR A TUBE TOP, July 25-Aug. 5, $44+ Known for her wildly popular Dixie’s Tupperware Party, Dixie Longate is back with her new show (which may have the longest title ever) Dixie's Never Wear a Tube Top While Riding a Mechanical Bull and 16 Other Things I Learned While I Was Drinking Last Thursday. Bringing her well-known humor from her tupperware party, Longate shares her lessons and swaps out her tupperware for a mechanical bull.

NEW VIC THEATRE 134 E. Vine St., Kalamazoo thenewvictheatre.org, (269) 381-3328

YOUNG AT HEART, THE NEW VIC THEATRE YOUTH TALENT SHOWCASE, Through July 21

TAKE MY WIFE...PLEASE! Through July 28, $25

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

19A


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Sleeping Beauty Jan. 20 @ 3 p.m.

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6/15/18 11:30 AM


/// ON TOUR

DOUBLE TIME S. Carey. PHOTO: CAMERON WITTIG

Bon Iver drummer and solo artist Sean Carey excited to play with two bands at Mo Pop Festival

W

ITH ALL THE LOGISTICAL CHALLENGES AND geographic distances to grapple with when touring, many musicians find themselves spending much of their time on the road doing just about anything but playing music. So when it comes time to finally get up in front of a crowd and share the songs that everyone came together for, artists like Bon Iver drummer/vocalist Sean Carey gladly admits that once they start playing they don’t really want to stop. Thankfully, he gets the occasional opportunity to really stretch out musically — like he will at this year’s Mo Pop Festival in Detroit — where he will play an early afternoon set with his solo project S. Carey on July 28, before joining his good friend Justin Vernon and company for Bon Iver’s beatific headlining set later that same night. “I’ve always loved doing both things, playing both roles,” Carey said. “Being a frontman with S. Carey is definitely some more pressure, but it’s definitely more rewarding at the same time. It’s a different animal. You get to express yourself differently.”

member of one of the most beloved indepenYet it’s not the hype, but how grounded A Wisconsin native, Carey grew up he and his music remain, that makes studying jazz. He has a degree in clas- dent bands of the past decade. “It’s surreal to look back on it,” Carey said. Hundred Acres so therapeutically appealing sical percussion from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, where he vividly “At the time, it was super exciting. But we in these fast-paced times. Casting off the bustle of everyday life — remembers listening to Bon Iver’s massively started small. The first tour was a grind. It was influential indie-folk masterpiece For Emma, eight weeks long, and we were playing tiny no pun intended for those who follow Carey’s love for fly-fishing — the album acts as an rock clubs and we were the opening band. But Forever Ago back in 2007. Transf ixed by Vernon’s songwriting, yeah, that whole year and a half, two years, open invitation for listeners to immerse themCarey quickly learned all of the songs on the that momentum just kept snowballing, and selves in the peaceful simplicity of nature. pretty soon we were playalbum in his dorm room, and after sharing “It’s hard to explain,” an early gig with Vernon, joined up with him Carey said of the unining bigger venues. … I’m as both percussionist and supporting vocalist. sure I will look back on it tended philosophical bent MO POP FESTIVAL “It’s funny how that really did change as one of the most exciting of his latest work. “I don’t Feat. Bon Iver, The National, Portugal. my life in a lot of ways,” Carey said of his times in my life for sure.” really go to church, but The Man, St. Vincent, Brockhampton, early obsession with Bon Iver’s landmark Inspired by his experi- S. Carey and more (nature) is my church. I West Riverfront Park, Detroit debut LP. “I mean I was just so into the ences in Bon Iver, Carey can’t explain it. All I can July 28-29, $85-$520 music and I saw an opening and it worked think about it is, ‘Why found the confidence to mopopfestival.com from the start. Our voices really worked explore his own voice with doesn’t everyone have this same feeling?’ Because it’s well together. My sensibility as a percussion- his own project: S. Carey. such a strong thing. When ist and where I came from matched Justin’s. He has since released three We both have kind of a jazz background, but albums and two EPs over the past decade, I’m out there, I don’t know, you can’t argue it. I get frustrated when — not to get into we’re also super into all other types of music including his latest, Hundred Acres. politics or whatever — but I don’t get why Now counting pop superstar Taylor Swift as well, including indie rock and folk stuff.” Before hearing Bon Iver, Carey wasn’t as one of his fans, Carey has taken his music everyone doesn’t have that connection. I sure what he would’ve done after graduation. to new heights. He’s worked with artists as dif- guess we’re all different. “It just seems like it’s part of being huHe speculates he might have gone to grad ferent as Sufjan Stevens and Dierks Bentley as school and later taught lessons and played collaborators, and most recently contributed man, because that’s where we came from.” n gigs. He certainly never thought he’d get to two songs for the Netflix original series Flaked. tour the world over, let alone become a key

SCENE | SOUNDS | SIGHTS | DINING

|  by Eric Mitts

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

23


SUMMER

FUN

DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE

ISSUE

SUMMER FUN GUIDE Revue's map to a season of change

We all have our summer mainstays — our favorite beaches, campgrounds and festivals — but there’s nothing like trying something new to create lasting memories. And until you make new friends, it can be difficult to find that “something

24 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018

new.” Well don’t worry, because we’re your friends now. Our writers have hand-picked some of our favorite hidden gems and perennial favorites for you to enjoy. Make it your goal to give even one (or two, or five) a try before summer disappears.


TA S T E T H E C I T Y A U G U S T 8 - 19 SABORES DE LA CIUDAD

Budgies at the John Ball Zoo & TreeRunner Adventure Park. Courtesy Photos.

HAVE A HOT AIR BALLOON RIDE In a hot air balloon, no one can hear you scream, but you still will — things like, “I can see my house from here!” and “Wheeeeee!” Join Doug and Karen Mills in the sky as you dangle from a balloon the size of a humpback whale. Seasoned sky people, Doug and Karen have actively run Sky High Hot Air Balloons since 1973, chartering expeditions everywhere from Hollywood to Tanzania. Although somewhat less illustrious than East Africa, floating over Middleville does have its charms. There is a peace to the rollicking countryside, like counting sheep to fall asleep. Trees, streams, a hill or two, it’s a gentle breeze into the sunset known to change those who ride. Consider bringing a ring to propose to your sweetheart. What could be more romantic than getting on one knee, 1,000 feet in the air? - Jack Raymond Sky High Hot Air Balloons 9251 Garbow Rd., Middleville skyhighballoon.com

SWINGING THROUGH THE TREES The woods hold many secrets. We know not what mysteries lie within the leaves and betwixt the roots, creeping through the branches at night. One less arcane secret, however, is TreeRunner Adventure Park, nestled in the trees behind Celebration! Cinema North’s parking lot. TreeRunner welcomes you into the forest, then gives you the tools you need to traverse its many obstacles. This isn’t simply walking along a plank in the sky — it’s climbing, swinging and pulling yourself along with balance and dexterity. It’s honestly some of the best exercise I’ve ever got, forcing me to use muscles I never even knew I had (or rather, muscles I didn’t have, but

discovered I should’ve). Walking along the highest branches of the tallest trees is somehow both soothing and exhilarating, confirming my long-held belief that we would all be happier if we were squirrels. Bonus: Head to the park after dark on weekends for Glow Night, a neon-lit trip through the boughs. - Josh Veal TreeRunner Adventure Park 2121 Celebration Dr. NE, Grand Rapids treerunnergrandrapids.com

FEEDING BUDGIES AT THE JOHN BALL ZOO If you haven’t the gall to cage dive with Great Whites but crave the raw intensity of direct animal interaction, John Ball Zoo has the exhibit for you. Meet the Budgie. For a dollar, you can hang out with a bunch of them. This pint-sized Australian parrot is a neon puff of feathers and squawks. Given a couple hundred thousand years longer to evolve, it could probably learn to say your name, but for now, it is a simple bird that enjoys simple pleasures like tickles on the back of its neck and balls of granola off a feed stick. Maybe one will land in your hair. Maybe you’ll spot two of them kissing with their strange wormy tongues. A stroll in the birdcage is an experience no one can quite predict. However, do not try to feed one a Skittle like I did last summer. The aviary bodyguards will toss you out faster than you can say, “Taste the rainbow, my little birdie.” - Jack Raymond

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John Ball Zoo 1300 W. Fulton St., Grand Rapids jbzoo.org Continued on page 26

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ISSUE

Outside Coffee. Courtesy Photo.

EXPLORING THE STARS

SUMMER LUGING

COFFEE, OUTSIDE

Ever since I was a kid, I’ve had this fascination with outer space. I thought the night sky was the absolute coolest thing, and I spent plenty of time reading about the moon, stars and planets. Then, it finally happened — on my 15th birthday, I got the best gift ever: a Galileo Telescope. I immediately pulled the scope from its box and began exploring what I could of the night sky (mostly the moon). On occasion, I’ll still dig up my dinky little telescope, but for a more stellar view, I suggest a visit to the James C. Veen Observatory. The Grand Rapids Amateur Astronomical Association opens the observatory to the public on select Saturdays of the month. You get the chance to explore beyond the moon with the observatory’s two large telescopes, but GRAAA members also set up their own telescopes to give visitors more ways to admire the stars. Public night events are listed on the website. - Elma Talundzic

Admit it — when it’s blazing well over 90 degrees for more than a week, the cold winter months actually sound kind of fun. What’s even more fun? Careening down the only wheel-luge track in all of North America like a bonafide Olympian. Without that sub-zero wind chill freezing your face off, it’s even better. Located at the Muskegon Winter Sports Complex, the wheel-luge track gives those interested in the high-velocity sport a chance to experience all the thrills, while also learning some basic skills. Think roller derby meets roller coaster. And better than those malfunctioning rides at Cedar Point, the 300-foot track shoots racers from top to bottom in about 10 seconds. So hang on tight, compete for a spot on the podium against your friends and have the time of your life! - Eric Mitts

This summer, it’s all about being outside, enjoying your coffee and your community. The new place to do this and completely Zen-out is Outside Coffee — a curated green space with a 1956 camper that’s been converted into a coffee shop. From coffee to tea and small nibbles and noshes, the space is like entering a book on nature, your best outdoor field trip in school or a favorite spot in your backyard. Summer means gorging on fresh air and only coming indoors sporadically. Stay out as long as you can and do it in this green-friendly, community hub where you can bring a dog, sip on a specialty drink and let the outside soak in one sunbeam at a time from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., every damn day. This gem is located right next to sister store Woosah Outfitters. If there were summer rules, this would be one: get there. - Missy Black

Muskegon Winter Sports Complex 462 N. Scenic Dr., Muskegon mssports.org

James C. Veen Observatory 3308 Kissing Rock Ave. SE, Lowell graaa.org

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DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE

Packages Start at $250

26 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018

Outside Coffee 734 Wealthy St. SE, Grand Rapids outsidecoffeeco.com

Continued on page 28


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@gilmoreeats REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

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ISSUE

Ada Township Park & Virtue Cider Patio. Courtesy Photos.

BEACH & DRINKS

HANGING IN THE PARK

Sometimes, all it takes is being a tourist in your own state to find your favorite places. That’s how I stumbled upon West Side County Park … on Trip Advisor. I was over the large crowds at Holland and Grand Haven State Park and wanted a place where I could go read a book without sand being kicked in my face from a herd of screaming children (sorry not sorry). I cringe to think telling you, dear reader, about my park will result in its imminent popularity, but at the same time, sharing IS caring. West Side County Park is accessible by wheelchair which makes it very popular for older folks. My favorite summer trips include a few hours at West Side Park followed by a tasting at Virtue Cider, located right down the road. Vastly different from the style produced by Vander Mill, Virtue is known for their European-style cider which features strong farmy flavors that I personally can’t get enough of. - Kelly Brown

I’ve grown up going to Ada Township Park. The park holds countless memories of cookouts, family gatherings and long nature walks. Ada Park has a little bit of everything for everyone: there’s a large playground for kids, numerous grills throughout and plenty of greenery to take in. I’m partial to the nature trails and old trees. If you’re looking to relax, this is the place for peaceful walks. The trails are shrouded in shade by the enormous trees, to the point where you might not feel a single drop on a rainy spring day. Another small detail I enjoy is the placement of subtle plaques in front of the trees that list the date it was planted. - Elma Talundzic Ada Township Park 1116 Buttrick Ave. SE, Ada ada.mi.us

West Side County Park 2152 Lakeshore Dr., Fennville

DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE

Virtue Cider 2170 62nd St., Fennville virtuecider.com

DINNER AT THE DINER

28 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018

Continued on page 30


current mood.

STREET PERFORMER SERIES

Thursdays through August 30 • 6:30pm - 8:30pm June 14 - August 30

Enjoy the sights and sounds of over 20 performing artists and groups all along 8th Street every Thursday night while you’re shopping and dining in Downtown Holland.

SIDEWALK SALES Friday, August 10 • 9:00am - 9:00pm Saturday, August 11 • 9:00am - 5:00pm Head to Downtown Holland for the biggest sale of the year for great deals, live music and lots of fun!

HOLLAND FARMERS MARKET Wednesdays and Saturdays • 8:00am - 3:00pm Located at the Eighth Street Market Place, the Holland Farmers Market brings together over 75 local farmers and vendors, food trucks, street performers, special events and more throughout the season! Be sure to shop early for the best product assortment.

MARKET CHEF SERIES Saturdays through September 8 • 10:00am Local chefs, caterers and vendors demonstrate how to prepare simple, healthy and delicious recipes using fresh ingredients from the Holland Farmers Market.

MARKET KIDS ACTIVITIES Wednesdays through August 29 • 9:30am - 11:30am Children can enjoy free, fun and educational activities at the Holland Farmers Market. Each week begins with Story Time provided by the Herrick District Library.

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ISSUE

SLAP A BAG OF WINE DOWN THE ROGUE RIVER

Trufant Flea Market. Courtesy Photos.

You can find great pleasure in doing absolutely nothing. Just take one look at a sloth. As it loafs from vine to vine, it always wears a smile. The closest I’ve come to such bliss was on my back, Rockford-bound, gliding along a lazy river. Cloudless, 80 degrees. Very nice indeed. Like Dionysus reclined on his slab chaise, bushel of grapes draped above and all, so too can you feel like a god while floating down the Rogue River, suckling from the nozzle of a boxed chardonnay. For an extra dose of luxury, spring for the Cadillac of tubes: a 52” flotilla with back rest, cup holder, and mesh seat. No one has formally named the tube yet, but I’ve taken to calling it the S.S. Franzia. All aboard! Don’t forget to apply sunscreen liberally lest you risk the accidental wine nap. The trip can last between two to four hours, so if you’re not careful, the sun will cook your outsides until you look like a lizard raised on planet Mercury. - Jack Raymond AAA Canoe Rental 525 Northland Dr., Rockford aaacanoerental.com

SHOPPING FLEA MARKETS There’s nothing like the smell of treasure in the morning. Take a road trip to Trufant and spend a beautiful summer day out in the fresh air at this flea market where most vendors are ready to sell around 7 a.m. and close shop around noon. With vintage jewelry, books, collectibles and plenty of plants and garden fare, these are wandering grounds for sure. If you get hungry, there are food vendors and homemade Amish treats. It’s a hodgepodge of yesteryear with plenty of people-watching and dog meeting, and if you leave empty handed, there’s surely something wrong with you. Of note: the market is only open on Thursdays. - Missy Black Trufant Flea Market 299 N. C St., Trufant petersenauctionservice.com

Continued on page 32

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30 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018

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Music Club at Frederik Meijer Gardens. Right: Courtesy Photo. Left: Photo by Tony Norkus.

Continued from page 30

DRINKING AT RED DOCK I am a sucker for anything someone older than 50 would love. I enjoy wine tasting and napping at three in the afternoon. I love a solid pair of high-waisted pants, antiques, talking about the weather and yes, birding. But what I love the most about being an old soul in a 25-yearold body is going to established, townie places. Red Dock is my kind of place and I wait all winter for my first annual visit. Located on Kalamazoo Lake, Red Dock is one of West Michigan’s best-kept

secrets, an outdoor pub right on the water. You can find unknown bands unloading equipment for their evening concerts, a bartender chatting up a group of regulars, and boats docking alongside the bar for a refresher before heading home. Drinking at Red Dock feels like the best days of Spring Break, but not the cool spring break you took to Panama City … more like the year you were too broke and stayed at a friend’s grandparents in some Podunk town (which ended up being the best spring break trip yet). Red Dock is its own seasonal rite, a lakeside Cheers — a place where everyone knows your name. - Kelly Brown Red Dock Cafe 219 N. Union St., Douglas

MUSIC IN THE GARDENS There’s absolutely no live music experience quite like the Tuesday Evening Music Club at Frederik Meijer Gardens. Nowhere else in West Michigan can local up-and-coming bands play on the very same stage as nationally touring headliners for a crowd of up to 1,900 music fans of all ages, eager to hear someone

DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE

TM

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for the very first time. The unparalleled beauty of the gardens blends perfectly with the sheer wellspring of creative talent flourishing right here in our community, giving concertgoers a one-of-akind experience — on a weeknight! Plus, it’s free for Meijer Gardens members, and only the cost of regular admission for everyone else. The nine-night series features a diverse mix of local bands paired up and performing for two hours every Tuesday. - Eric Mitts Here’s the full run-down: July 3: Hannah Rose & the GravesTones and Rachel Curtis July 10: The Kathy Lamar & Robin Connell Band and Soul Syndicate July 17: The Eric Engblade Quartet and Wire in the Wood July 24: Valley Girl and The Hacky Turtles July 31: Lipstick Jodi & Hollywood Makeout Aug. 7: Nessa and The Moxie Strings Aug. 14: Franklin Park and 6 Pak Aug. 21: Winnow and Desmond Jones Aug. 28: Ralston & Friends Frederik Meijer Gardens 1000 E. Beltline Ave. NE, Grand Rapids meijergardens.org

Old school burger joint located in downtown Rockford. Great for dining in or taking to go!

(616) 884-3166

51 E. Bridge Street, Rockford, MI 49341 Mon & Wed: 11am - 8pm Tues, Fri & Sat: 11am - 9pm Sun: 11am - 7pm


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616-957-1111 | 28th Street SE at Patterson Ave. | facebook.com/GandersGR

German Tradition. Crafted in Michigan.

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413 3rd Street Fennville, MI 49408-8671 PALAZZOLOSDAIRY.COM

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SUMMER

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From Left to Right: Citizen. Courtesy Photo. Sovengard Biergarten. Photo: Wes Kitten. Arcadia Ales. Courtesy Photo.

PARADE OF PATIOS

Our guide to outdoor drinking and eating this summer | by Kelly Brown

I

DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE

n Michigan, “patio” is its own season. At the first sign of 65-degree weather, we open the back door, sweep off the remaining dead leaves (and sometimes snow) and break out the camp chairs. Really, does anything beat drinking a cold beer on the back porch with a cool breeze cutting the humidity, listening to your favorite summer jams? Probably not. With grueling winters, it’s no surprise that we celebrate the beautiful release into spring and summer with craft beers, seasonal cocktails and snacks at our favorite restaurants. Whether you’re traveling and looking for the best outdoor drinking spot or you’re a local wanting to change up your normal routine, these are the patios and beer gardens where you’ll find us enjoying the sunshine this season.

SOVENGARD BIERGARTEN, GRAND RAPIDS

This beautifully eclectic space meshes together Midwest vibes with traditional Scandinavian culture. The tucked-away backyard space features access to the main restaurant and a bright red shipping container bar. Picnic tables and yard games complete this summer atmosphere — perfect for trying out a new sour beer or a dish from the constantly changing, seasonal menu.

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ROSE’S RESTAURANT, EAST GRAND RAPIDS

If you’re searching for a place to take a date, look no further than Rose’s on Reeds Lake. This stunning patio juts out into the lake where you can view swans diving in, ducks paddling around and kayakers making their way through the water. People-watch from your chair as you enjoy the mix of Mediterranean and Italian cuisine.

ARCADIA ALES, KALAMAZOO

Well-behaved pups are welcome! Arcadia Ales welcomes Fido in the Beer Garden that sits in Downtown Kalamazoo with a waterfront view. The historic bandshell features live music throughout the year and the brewery has access to the Kalamazoo river for kayaks, canoes and paved bike and pedestrian pathways. Hang out over a game of shuffleboard and cornhole or take it easy around the gas-lit council fire.

SANDY POINT BEACH HOUSE, GRAND HAVEN

The Grand Haven area has too many outdoor dining options to mention, including patios, decks, tiki bars and much more. But Sandy Point Beach House is top of the list. A quiet and secluded location, Sandy Point is the city life getaway you crave. The restaurant offers live music every Saturday and American cuisine

ranging from seafood to steak, salads and more. Try your hand at a round in the bocce ball court!

BOSTWICK LAKE INN, ROCKFORD

It wouldn’t be a patio article without mentioning the king: Bostwick Lake Inn. The comfortable, large deck snuggles up to the short of Bostwick Lake, right outside of Rockford and Belmont. The Inn has a Midwest lodge feel with antique décor and regulars who post up at the bar on weekends. The interior plays homage to the history of the building and the deck is a great place to relax and enjoy the view and your meal.

BELL’S ECCENTRIC CAFÉ, KALAMAZOO

With more than 20 draft options, a fullservice restaurant and a luscious beer garden, Bell’s Eccentric Café is a premiere craft beer destination in West Michigan. The massive beer garden has a stage for music, a large lawn to lie on, plenty of picnic tables, unusual seats and more. Whereas most patios have some greenery here and there, Bell’s is a proper biergarten.

HARMONY BREWING COMPANY, GRAND RAPIDS

The long-awaited expansion to Harmony Brewing in Eastown opened this summer, and we’re all eager to check out its expanded patio with more seating

options and the indoor expansion with large garage doors to give an outdoor covered patio vibe. And if you’re looking to enjoy some pizza and beer on your own patio, Harmony now offers delivery of both food and drinks.

THE WINCHESTER, GRAND RAPIDS

It’s hard to pick a favorite outdoor eatery on Wealthy Street, but for a varied food selection and excellent cocktails, The Winchester might just take the prize. The menu is constantly updated with seasonal dishes and the full bar, cocktail, wine and beer list is one of the best in the area. Meanwhile, the patio itself features plenty of wood, nice shading to keep you cool under the sun and ample space for larger parties.

CITIZEN, GRAND RAPIDS

Creston’s newest restaurant is certainly doing it right. The authentic tiki bar features modern, cheerful interiors and an outdoor patio complete with tiki umbrellas and a sandy, stoney floor. It’s perfect for mid-day drinking Instagram-worthy cocktails that will make all your followers jealous. Drinks include both Tiki Cocktails and Tiki Bowls — like the South Paw Punch, which includes spiced rum, white rum, Wray and Nephew rum, pineapple and lime juices, orgeat, grenadine, and ginger beer. Are you thirsty yet? n


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Summer is better in the Beer Garden Visit Bellsbeer.com/events for a full concert lineup and to purchase your tickets. REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

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by Missy Black

STYLE NOTES

I DO

(Want These Fashions) With wedding season upon us, we’ve found styles you can commit to.

DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE

“THIS SUMMER, IT’S ALL ABOUT THE JUMPSUIT, AND PEOPLE LOVE THEM,” said Lisa Miller, owner of LA Miller Boutique in Rockford. Wedding guests can enjoy dressing up in the trendy (and easy) one-piece jumpsuits for something a little different and less traditional. It’s a simplistic fashion formula that allows you to get creative with your earrings, purse and shoes. “If you have a neutral color or simple pattern for clothing or in a jumpsuit, you can add a beaded clutch or big, tassel earrings that are huge right now — throw in pops of color. Use your accessories as the statement.” The shop features hand-beaded clutch purses with chain straps for crossbody wearing as well (keep those hands free for cocktails). Luxury, handmade 14-karat coated jewelry from Kenda Kist includes pieces that are sure to get you noticed. If you need help with shoes, check out neutral or snakeskin varieties and for outdoor weddings, wedges (so you don’t

36 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018

sink in the grass). The boutique has beaded flat sandals that elevate any ensemble. Even pairing a bralette (another popular lingerie accessory) to peek out from under skinny straps adds lacy, visual interest. “Layer a bralette over your normal bra to get support but add a feminine touch.” When the night cools down, kimonos are the new item to reach for. Whether a sleeveless look or sheer and romantic, this style is an effortless slip-on piece that can give cover to dresses and jumpsuits. Attending an informal wedding? LA Miller has flirty, separate top and bottom styles with high-rise, gaucho-style pants and matching crop tank tops. The two-piece set is popular for casual brunch type settings, beach weddings or impromptu, carefree nuptials. “Floppy hats with sayings on them are different and fun — add an accessory that you wouldn’t necessarily think of.” n


LESS HYPEROPTIK CASCADE OPTICAL 1134 WEALTHY STREET 6 1 6 . 3 0 1 . 1 9 1 1 w w w. h y p e r - o p t i k . c o m

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OF THE

SAME

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by Nick Macksood

DINING At The B.O.B. Grand Rapids, MI 616.356.2000 thebob.com

CATCH, COOK, CONSUME

Kirby House is serving up your fresh-caught fish, right from Lake Michigan

PAUL STlyRIC5K-7LAND Ju

STEWART

July 12- HUFF 14

LACHLAN PATTERSON

DINING SIGHTS | SOUNDS | SCENE

July 19-21

NATE CRAIG July 26-28 #drgrins

38 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018

S

ERVING UP GREAT LAKES FISH is something Trevor Bethke had always wanted to do as a chef. But because of some rather Byzantine laws regarding wild-caught f ish, food safety and distribution, it has long been difficult to do what seems so simple: see fish, catch fish, serve fish. Now, that time has come. “Growing up on the piers of Grand Haven, I never imagined I’d have this opportunity. What an honor for a Michigan sportsman,” said Bethke, chef at Kirby House. Launched in 2012, Michigan Catch & Cook is an effort to promote and encourage creative, safe marketing of Michigan Great Lakes sports fish through a partnership with the charter fishing industry and local restaurants. The program allows clients who catch fish from Michigan’s Great Lakes an opportunity to take their fresh catch to a participating Michigan restaurant to be cooked and served. The Kirby House (2 Washington Ave.) is one of the most recent restaurants to join the program, and as of this printing is Grand Haven’s only participant. If you’ve had a good day on the water and you’re on a

Fresh fish from The Kirby House. COURTESY PHOTOS registered charter boat, you can call the Kirby in advance of your arrival and choose from a variety of preparations and accompaniments, depending on the day’s catch. The Kirby will prepare dishes based on the f ish starting at the beginning of the sport fishing season in April through the end of the season in October. Served family style, Chef Bethke and the Kirby House have concocted classic preparations such as grilled, Cajun-cooked, barbecued, seared, buttermilk-fried, or steamed with Old Bay and lemon-butter, depending on what you’ve hauled to shore. According to Bethke, what the day’s catch may look like will depend on the season, but so far his crew has seen the likes of walleye, lake trout and fresh Michigan salmons from Coho to Chinook. “It’s really one of the only ways to consume wild, line-caught fish in a restaurant setting,” Bethke said. And you can be sure that your fish is up to snuff. The Catch & Cook program is one promoted and regulated by state entities such as the Department of Agriculture & Rural Development and the Department of Natural

Resources. Charter boat captains are licensed and trained to determine whether your fish is safe and ready for service and consumption by restaurants, which are also approved to handle and prepare your day’s catch. “Fresh, local ingredients are vital to the Kirby menu,” Bethke said. Really, what better way to celebrate the waters — whether it be with an old Michigander or a new out-of-towner — than to showcase the bounties that the Great Lakes have to offer? Regional cuisines, if nothing else, have become a popular way to tap into fresher ingredients and healthier, more sustainable lifestyles. We see Michigan’s agricultural variety on display at the Fulton St. Farmers Market and in the dizzying amount of restaurants opened in the last few years — many of which make a point to stock up from local distributors like Farmlink. But if Michigan is to carve its own culinary identity in the way that California or the American South has, the Great Lakes ought to play an important role in the way we eat. n


summer at

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39


by Joe Boomgaard, Editor

DRINKING

SHANDY: A SUMMER DANDY Also: Gose — not so, gross-uh (unless it is)

I

n the beer business, some brands seem like almost a guaranteed hit. Make a solid New England IPA, put it in a 16-ounce can and package it in a four-pack, then crank up the hype machine and prepare for liftoff. But when it comes to a beer-lemonade hybrid, there are no guarantees. That’s why the success of Soft Parade Shandy even caught Short’s Brewing Co. partner Scott Newman-Bale by surprise. “It is the most successful release we’ve ever done — by far,” Newman-Bale said. The Bellaire- and Elk Rapids-based brewery first debuted Soft Parade Shandy last summer as a variation of its mainstay fruit beer, Soft Parade. The beer gained traction briefly and then just exploded when it hit the market in cans earlier this year, most notably in the 12-pack format. “We sold more in five weeks than we intended to sell for the whole summer, or about four months,” Newman-Bale said. “We can’t even keep up. … These sales are insane.”

SHANDY RECOMMENDED Soft Parade Shandy Short’s Brewing Co., Bellaire 4.2% ABV

DINING SIGHTS | SOUNDS | SCENE

Beautiful berry-like color with sweet red fruity aromas. It’s definitely on the sweet side, yet manages to taste super-refreshing. Score: 62.4 Power of Love Short’s Brewing Co., Bellaire 2.5% ABV Looks like a rosé, and features a berry nose. Flavor is tart and fruity, yet herbal thanks to a hint of rosemary on the finish. Score: 61.8 ALSO TASTED Big Lake Shandy Big Lake Brewing Co., Holland

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Our panel chose Soft Parade Shandy as the top beer in a blind tasting of five shandies, a sampling that we conducted alongside a mishmash that included a handful of goses and “miscellaneous” styles suitable for summer. On the gose front, Green Zebra from Founders Brewing — a beer first brewed for ArtPrize 2017 — got our nod in a blind tasting. That’s despite some tasters swearing off the particular beer or watermelon flavoring in general — or both — before they knew the results. (Blind tastings are great equalizers that way.) Driving our mixed-style tasting was an overall theme of beers to hydrate with on a hot summer’s day. And it seems we have plenty of good company among fellow beer drinkers across the state. According to Newman-Bale, sales of lighter seasonals like Melt My Brain — a beer inspired by the gin and tonic cocktail — and Local’s Light American lager have been surging so far this year. “Just in general, the lighter, super crushable beers are just flying (off the shelves),” he said. n

Blueberry Lemonade Shandy Saugatuck Brewing Co., Douglas Skinny Dip Farmhaus Cider Co., Hudsonville

GOSE

(pronounced goes-uh) HIGHLY RECOMMENDED Green Zebra Founders Brewing Co., Grand Rapids 4.6% ABV Looks like a hazy wheat beer, but the aromas quickly prove shocking. This is a watermelon BOMB, with a salty finish. It reminded some of Sour Patch Kids candy. Surprisingly, it works. Score: 80.7

RECOMMENDED Passionfruit Gose Perrin Brewing Co., Comstock Park 4.5% ABV Pours hazy, with a nice head. Some sharp notes come through at first sniff, but the flavor is an inoffensive mix of fruity and salty, with a pleasing dry finish. Score: 64.5 Cucumber Lime Gose Arbor Brewing Co. 4.4% ABV Few beers have ever divided our tasters as much as this. Perhaps some just really dislike cucumber, which dominates this beer in aroma and flavor, where a hint of lime also comes through. Some liked it (hence its score), but a vocal minority described it as vomitous. Choose your own adventure. Score: 65.7

POTPOURRI FOR $600, ALEX RECOMMENDED Pooltime Bell’s Brewery Inc., Comstock 5.2% Hazy in appearance, this beer exhibited the characteristic estery notes befitting a Belgian-wheat hybrid. Fruit definitely sits in the background, forcing you to seek it out with your palate. Good if you prefer subtlety. Score: 63 ALSO TASTED Black and Blue Berry Fruitsicle Odd Side Ales, Grand Haven Melt My Brain Short’s Brewing Co., Bellaire


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WHITE FLAME BREWING CO. 5234 36TH AVENUE HUDSONVILLE, MI 49426

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

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LAST CALL BY NICK MACKSOOD PHOTO BY KATY BATDORFF

STRAWBERRY LEMONADE BOMB DUKE'S BAR There’s something special about a dive bar in the middle of the day during a workweek. Whether you’ve played hooky and hit the golf course in the morning or you’re an industry vet appreciating your quiet before the storm, dives are always a welcome retreat. And Duke’s even more so, now that its face-lift is complete. The new floorlength plate windows facing Michigan Street pep up the room and allow for some fine people-watching. All the more reason to toss back a few unmeasured shots, strong and sweet, of this Strawberry Lemonade Bomb, a.k.a. Pink Drink. No frills, folks, just the way we like it around here.

INGREDIENTS:

DINING SIGHTS | SOUNDS | SCENE

About a couple ounces of strawberry Stoli An ounce or so of lemonade Little bit of sour mix Splash of grenadine Splash of Red Bull Pour the Stoli, lemonade, sour mix and grenadine into an iced mixer. Shake thoroughly, then serve it up in a shot glass topped with a splash of Red Bull.

42 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018


30% “In The Biz” Discount

Free Juke Box ALL NIGHT! 6pm

6/30 - SLIM TIM

BEAN BAGS & BEER PONG

7/6 - 90’S FRIDAY JOHN BELTRAN SUMMER CAMP WITH

THURSDAYS

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6pm to Close

7/14 - DJ JAY VEE

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7/28 - ANTHONY BASILLE

DJ ENTERTAINMENT 9PM NO COVER! FRIDAY, JULY 6 WEAR RED, WHITE, BLUE>>>FREE COVER!

8/3 - MIX PACK

2 DRAFTS $5 PUB BURGERS

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2018 |

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linearrestaurant.com

@linearrestaurant

NOW OPEN River Front Patio Available Tues-Sat 11:30am - 11pm Sun 11:30am - 9pm

616-200-4343

1001 Monroe NW | 49503

Profile for Revue Magazine

Revue Magazine, July 2018  

REVUE is West Michigan's monthly arts & entertainment guide covering events, music, cultural arts, dining & drinking and more. Visit us at r...

Revue Magazine, July 2018  

REVUE is West Michigan's monthly arts & entertainment guide covering events, music, cultural arts, dining & drinking and more. Visit us at r...

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