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Irish Pharmachem Cover09

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Contents

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MINISTER’S FOREWORD A partnership approach between industry and universities is crucial if Ireland’s Life Sciences sector is to progress, writes Conor Lenihan TD, Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation . . . . . . . . . 3 SECTOR OVERVIEW Matt Moran, PharmaChemical Ireland, writes on how Ireland’s pharmachem sector is bucking the recessionary trend, and analyses what needs to be done to ensure future success . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

COVER STORY The role of Facility Manager has changed dramatically and is now seen very much as a value-adding industry partner. Georg Kürfgen, of HOCHTIEF Facility Management explains the advantages for the pharmachem sector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 SCIENCE FOUNDATION IRELAND Science Foundation Ireland is committed to building a world-class research environment in Ireland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 SOLVENTS Mullingar-based Soltec have been successfully recovering and recycling solvents in Ireland since 1994 . . . . . . . 20

BIOTECHNOLOGY Access to funding is vital for the future of the Irish biotechnology sector, according to Michael Gillen, Director, Irish BioIndustry Association and Senior Executive, Pharmachemical Ireland . . 8 MEDICAL DEVICES & DIAGNOSTICS Has the global economic climate affected the medical devices industry and its potential for future growth? Sharon Higgins, Director of the Irish Medical Devices Association, thinks not. . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 PERSONALISED D MEDICINE Andy Sutton, R&D Investment Specialist, Invest Northern Ireland, reports on the development of personalised medicine and companion diagnostics, and highlights some Northern Irish projects set to dramatically impact on this important sector . . . . . . . 13

PHARMACEUTICALS IN EUROPE The European pharmaceutical industry needs to act now if it’s not going to lose out to the US and emerging economies, according to the Irish Pharmaceutical Healthcare Association . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 PROCESSS SAFETY The Responsible Care ethic helps the companies of PharmaChemical Ireland (PCI) to operate safely, profitably and with due care for future generations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 LABORATORY SUPPLIES Fisher Scientific is the laboratory products supplier of choice for many within the scientific community in Ireland . . . . . 26 COUNTERFEIT MEDICINES Counterfeit medicines don’t just cost money: in some cases, they can cost lives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

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PRODUCT TRACEABILITY Pharmaceutical companies, IT providers and GS1 recently teamed up to pilot a complete item-level traceability system within the pharmaceutical supply chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 PACKAGING Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd sources, supplies, installs and after-sales services a comprehensive range of end-of-line packaging/materials handling/industrial washing equipment to the Irish pharmachem sector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT Lean, agile and resilient pharmaceutical supply chains: jargon or action? Edward Sweeney, Director of Learning at NITL, finds out. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 EU EMISSION TRADING SCHEME Erik O’Donovan, IBEC, on how the EU Emission Trading Scheme (ETS) is set to impact on Irish business, including our pharmachem sector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 RECRUITMENT Patrick O’Loughlin, founder of the O’Loughlin Partnership, assesses the current and future employment opportunities in the Life Sciences sector . . . . . 42

LISTINGS Chemical Suppliers . . . . . . . . 44 General Suppliers . . . . . . . . . 46 Company Listings . . . . . . . . . 54 Year Planner . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Useful References . . . . . . . . . 68 Irish Pharmachem 2009 gratefully acknowledges the assistance of PharmaChemical Ireland in the production of this publication. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, but the publisher cannot accept responsibility for errors or omissions.


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Foreword 3,4

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MINISTER’S FOREWORD

PARTNERSHIP: THE KEY TO GROWTH

T

he pharmaceutical industry is an extremely important industry and one that has enjoyed extraordinary success in Ireland, particularly over the past two decades. As a result, I am now very pleased to say that:

under the National Development Plan 2007 to 2013, to implement its vision as set out in its Strategy for Science, Technology and Innovation, published in 2006.

PARTNERSHIP APPROACH

• Ireland is a unique location for To achieve and sustain the goal we Pharma & Biopharma investment; have set ourselves, a partnership • We are the number one location in approach will be crucial. That is, the Europe for life sciences projects; scientific research community in our • Eight of the top 10 Pharma compahigher education institutions must nies have operations in Ireland; work closely with their colleagues in • Pharmaceutical Exports are currentindustry for the greater good of the ly valued at €34 billion annually; economy and Irish society. • Some 45,000 people are employed We have already seen good in Life Sciences, including 20,000 in Conor Lenihan TD, Minister for Science, progress in this regard with the nurpharmaceuticals; turing and development of indusTechnology and Innovation. • Six of the World’s top 10 drugs are try/academic partnerships, largely on made in Ireland; the back of Government funding through Enterprise • There has been major progress in recent years in the Ireland and Science Foundation Ireland. amount of R&D being undertaken in Ireland. In the highly competitive and rapidly changing global markets now evolving, success will go to those who use TRANSFORMING THE LIFE SCIENCES SECTOR knowledge to read trends and react first. Creative ideas, new and better ways of working, innovative products and services, as well as improved ways of marketing and deliver30 years ago, the industry was almost non-existent in ing goods to the world, will be the drivers of future success. Ireland. The work of our industrial development agencies and strong backing from Government has transformed that situation. BREAKING NEW GROUND Today, the world-leading overseas companies with substantial overseas operations in Ireland include many of the Irish life science research continues to break new ground leading companies in the life sciences sector, encompassing in many areas and global competitiveness is already emergpharmaceuticals, biopharmaceuticals and medical devices. ing in fields such as molecular cell biology, human genetOver the past decade, the Government has strongly ics, glycobiology, immunology and cancer. This extends committed to building the infrastructure to support a beyond a strong base in fundamental basic research and has healthy, vibrant industry in the life sciences sector. The moved increasingly towards a highly productive interface establishment of the Programme for Research in Third with Ireland’s large industrial and pharmaceutical sectors. Level Institutions focused on building world class research Particularly encouraging progress has been made in facilities and capability under the National Development areas that impact human health, including pharmaceutical Plan 2000-2006. In addition, Science Foundation Ireland formulation technology, medical diagnostics and the underwas established to promote world-class research activity, inipinning science of biosensor research. A large number of tially focusing on Biotechnology and ICT, and more recentresearch groups have also embraced new platforms for ly, through the extension of its remit, also on Sustainable genomic and proteomic research that are already facilitatEnergy and Energy-Efficient Technologies. ing major strides in the study of a range of human diseases. Looking at the global market, we see that revenues from THE GLOBAL MARKET prescription drugs are valued at over $643 billion and projected to grow to €810 billion by 2010. Ireland is very forWith these foundations in place, the Government has tunate to have a major slice of this enormous market and to have shared in the substantial growth and success of the committed to further developing the life sciences sector 3


Foreword 3,4

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MINISTER’S FOREWORD industry in recent years. There are approximately 90 blockbuster drugs on the market, that is, drugs achieving sales over $1billion per annum. Today, the top 10 drugs account for around 10% of total industry revenues. Of these top ten drugs, six are manufactured in Ireland.

THE CHALLENGE AHEAD As regards global pharma industry challenges, it is clear that the traditional Pharma sector is experiencing somewhat slower growth, due to a combination of factors. Globally, there has also been some decline in R&D productivity. Like all countries, we in Ireland are also facing huge challenges from the global credit crunch. Our ability to respond to this is strengthened by the fact that we are now ‘coming off the back of’ a period of 15-20 years where GDP expanded greatly and the employment base doubled, from 1.1m to 2m. Nevertheless, the Government must of course strive to get banking and finance back to more normal operation, and to restore order to the Public Finances. On the industrial side, we remain committed to maintaining the Corporation Tax rate at 12.5%. We are determined that the business and regulatory environments will continue to be strongly proenterprise. We will continue to seek to strengthen our com-

petitiveness, through addressing issues on costs, infrastructure, education and training, and science, technology and innovation. In these ways, we are determined to secure a bright future for industrial production in Ireland, to the benefit of all sectors, including, of course, the pharmaceutical sector. Conor Lenihan TD, Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation.

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SECTOR OVERVIEW

PHARMACHEM SECTOR BEATING THE RECESSION

I

n these times of economic gloom and doom, it is easy to overlook some of the country’s more stable sectors. The Irish pharmachem sector falls into this category; a sector that has grown quietly in the Celtic Tiger years, driven by factors other than those that have fed our tiger. The sector was not driven by access to credit and was not linked to the construction sector. Instead, it flourished on the back of more deep-seated strengths within the economy here: high standards of education, competitive rates of corporation tax, an innovative and resourceful workforce and an inherent ability to comply with tough and demanding regulations overseen by an array of regulators. Ireland has had enormous exporting success is in attracting some of the world’s leading pharmaceutical companies. Nearly all the Botox in the world is made in Westport by US company Allergen, while the world’s top-selling pharmaceutical, anti-cholesterol medicine Lipitor, with revenues of over $12 billion is made solely in Cork by Pfizer. These are not isolated examples. The success of the industry is repeated time and time again across the country, particularly in hubs such as Cork and Dublin. Eight out of the top 10 pharmaceutical companies in the world operate out of this country. Ireland is rightly viewed as one of the premier global locations for the manufacture of pharmaceutical and chemical products.

Matt Moran, PharmaChemical Ireland, writes on how Ireland’s pharmachem sector is bucking the recessionary trend, and analyses what needs to be done to ensure future success.

the sector as an exporter from 48.2% of the national total to the figure of 51.2% this year. The most recently published figures for 2009 reflect a continuation of this bucking of overall trends by this important sector. For instance, trade figures published by the CSO in April show the chemicals sector ahead by 6%, whereas the value of all other exports fell by 14%. Production volumes for chemicals were up by as much as 20% in February 2009, with pharmaceutical volumes up by over 11% in the same month. The sector paid over €3 billion last year in corporation tax. The sector employs over 24,000, with at least twice that number working in businesses that supply goods and services to the industry.

POSITIVE BUSINESS SECTOR

A recent survey of business sentiment conducted by IBEC revealed that the pharmachem sector is one of the more positive business sectors in Ireland. According to the survey, 76% of Irish business views business sentiment as being poor or very poor: this contrasts with the pharmachem sector, where 33% of companies view sentiment as being average or good. Not wildly optimistic but certainly not overly pessimistic. Matt Moran, PharmaChemical Ireland. A quick survey of 20 companies in the sector indicated that they plan to spend around €350m on various capital projects this year. These range from plant upgrades through expansions, BUCKING THE TREND right the way up to developing green-field facilities. Merck, Sharp and Dohme, Gilead Sciences, Servier, Pfizer and EliLilly are mid-construction on major builds this year. This Ireland can be rightly proud of its pharmachem sector and is all cause for optimism but not for complacency. despite the present recessionary conditions that prevail in As most commentators have observed, many of the Ireland, the sector remains relatively strong. Export figures products currently manufactured in this country are due for 2008 recently published by the Central Statistics Office to come off patent in the next 2-3 years. Once a pharma(CSO) reveal that the sector exported products to the value ceutical comes off patent, there is a strong downwards of €44.17 billion, which represents 51.2% of the national pressure on price, as generic alternatives enter the market, total. This compares to exports of €43.07 billion in 2007. which consequently drives revenues down. Unfortunately, Of particular note is the increase in relative importance of 5


Sector Overview 5,6,7

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SECTOR OVERVIEW world could save $10 billion by taking just 16% off their cost of goods: these savings will be found in the manufacturing function. Ireland must look to positioning itself at the forefront of such innovation. Major multinationals are dedicating effort and resources to innovating at the level of the factory: bringing the lab into the workplace and using knowledge to compete. Herein lies a huge opportunity for this country to move centre-stage.

GROWING INTELLECTUAL CAPACITY Ireland is already known as a hub for the manufacture of pharmaceuticals and chemicals; the challenge is to become a hub for the development and scaling-up of these existing products. If we do this, we secure the sector for the long term, as we will be able to grow brainpower or intellectual capital in this country. Ireland can become the place where pharmaceutical companies reduce the time it takes to get a drug from the clinic to the market. In a business where days saved amount to multiples of millions of euro in savings, the strategic advantage that would accrue to this country is clear. By so doing, Irish sites can use their key roles within major multinational companies to leverage their position to encourage the global parent to centralise more and more knowledge-based activities in the Irish “hub”. Such a strategy is clearly outlined in the “Smart

research pipelines are quite dry at the moment, so new products which could replace these are more difficult to come by. In the pharmaceutical sector in this country, this means change. It means giving global companies new reasons to base major facilities here and setting Ireland apart from rival economies chasing the same investments. To achieve this, Ireland will need to broaden the industry’s footprint.

WORKING SMART Although Ireland will never be able to compete directly with low-cost economies on cost grounds, there remain many areas where Irish companies can look to secure a competitive advantage in the market. We can still get an advantage by working smarter and better than our trading partners. This requires a better use of technology, devising more clever ways of doing business and keeping costs under control. Major industry regulators such as the powerful US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) are actively encouraging the pharmaceutical industry to look to improve the manufacturing process. It is estimated that the top 30 pharmaceutical companies in the 6


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SECTOR OVERVIEW

– the laboratory – is antiquated or doesn’t even exist. I cannot envisage Ireland being successful in delivering a smart economy in the future without scientists.

COMPANIES DO NEED TO BE ENCOURAGED TO INVEST IN INNOVATION IN THIS COUNTRY Ireland needs not only to continue its investment in an R&D infrastructure but to expand this to include the space between research and manufacturing: e.g. process design and development, product optimisation taking the product from the clinic or design laboratory to the market. This will allow the country to leverage and develop its existing manufacturing base. Finally, it is worth pointing out that if Ireland is going to be successful in persuading global pharmaceutical companies to invest in innovation, it is crucial that our healthcare policy complements this and supports access to innovative medicines and medical technologies. It is important that the Irish Government continues to take a longer term view of the cost of medicines - one that regards money spent on medical treatments as an investment in a nation’s health and economic prosperity. Such an approach sends a strong signal to pharmaceutical companies that the medicines they are manufacturing in this country will be available to the Irish patients that need them. Now is the time for all the actors to come together – industry, Government and the research community – to make sure that Ireland achieves this objective to innovate to manufacture to innovate, a virtuous cycle for the Ireland of the 21st Century. A strong pharmachem sector is good for the health of this economy as well as the health of its citizens. A strong pharmachem sector is vital if Ireland’s economy is to be truly smart once the global upturn comes.

Economy” document recently published by Government. The document makes a number of recommendations to enhance the active management and the taxation treatment of Intellectual Property in this country. Swift action by Government in this area will greatly enhance the possibility of the Irish hub concept becoming a reality. It is also important that Government continues to vigorously defend the preferential rate of Corporation Tax that prevails here.

INVESTING

IN AN

R&D INFRASTRUCTURE

Finally, the pharmachem/biopharma sector still believes that it is crucial that Government enhances the R&D Tax Credit scheme by moving from a system based on incremental investment in research to one based on absolute investment in research (the so-called volume based method). The Smart Economy strategy rightly highlights the need to enhance skills in mathematics and science. It outlines a number of welcome recommendations but fails to make reference to the six point action plan proposed by the Task Force on Physical Sciences established by Government some years ago. Though Government did move on some of the recommendations made by this group, it largely ignored a strong recommendation to invest in first class laboratories with adequate technical support at second level. It is hard to imagine encouraging our brightest and best to study science if the very place where science comes to life

7


Biotechnology 8,9

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BIOTECHNOLOGY

FUNDING THE IRISH BIOINDUSTRY

W

hen the corresponding article was written last year, we didn’t have an inkling of the fundamental shift that would occur in the world economy over the following 12 months. A deep global recession, depressed valuations, even more demanding regulators and investors becoming increasingly risk averse has made the last 12 months the most challenging in living memory. Although biotechnology has developed treatments and cures, continued investment and innovation cannot be taken for granted, with the global economy in a tailspin, unemployment increasing and investment falling off dramatically. These are unprecedented times for the global biotechnology industry, yet it is in the face of such adversity that the true value of biotechnology can be evaluated. Biotechnology has developed hundreds of new life-saving therapies that have saved millions of lives; biotechnology is at the forefront of developments to feed a growing world population; and advances in biotechnology are moving the world towards a sustainable and green economy, where renewable and clean energy are the norm. For this technology to continue to provide sustainable solutions, adequate sources of finance must be made available.

EUROPEAN FUNDING

Michael Gillen, Director, Irish BioIndustry Association and Senior Executive, Pharmachemical Ireland.

Today, one of the main barriers in Europe to successful entrepreneurship, innovation and product development is the lack of different forms of finance, from seed capital to IPO and secondary offerings. The lack of available capital has a great impact on the economic and industrial evolution of the European biotech industry. This has become even more acute in the last 12 months as sources of funding become increasingly scarce.

IRISH

FUNDING

high tech sectors. So in June 2009, the Irish BioIndustry Association, in conjunction with the Irish Medical Devices Association, the Irish Software Association / ICT Ireland and PharmaChemical Ireland, together with our colleagues from the policy division of IBEC, held a one day workshop/seminar to help members: • Become informed about what R&D funding supports are currently available through Irish and European agencies; • Learn about tax savings via R&D Tax credits, IP and BES; • Engage/network with funding agencies and experts during the day; • Hear case studies from companies that have successfully availed of R&D funding. Presentations from Enterprise Ireland, IDA Ireland, Science Foundation Ireland, venture capitalists, tax experts discussing both tax credits and the BES, and advice on FP7 demonstrated that there is still money available for innovative companies. A feature of the workshop was the testimonies from companies, ranging in size from large multinationals to small indigenous operations, which have been through the experience of getting money. Real companies that accessed real money over the last year shared their stories and highlighted ups and downs. For example, there is over €400m venture capital funding available in Ireland at the moment.

Access to funding is vital for the future of the Irish biotechnology sector, according to Michael Gillen, Director, Irish BioIndustry Association and Senior Executive, Pharmachemical Ireland.

- SHOW ME

THE

MONEY!

In Ireland, we became aware that the traditional sources of funding for a number of our members were drying up. In discussions with our colleagues here in IBEC, we found that this experience was being replicated throughout many of the 8


Biotechnology 8,9

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BIOTECHNOLOGY Three key messages emerged from this workshop: 1. There is still significant funding available for innovative companies. 2. Biotechnology and other high tech companies are collaborating to innovate for growth, and this is not just within sectors. Convergence of technologies between different sectors is happening in Ireland. 3. Ireland is ideally placed to benefit from the global economic recovery.

R&D SURVEY In a follow-up survey of those who attended the workshop, 95% said that they were more likely to apply for R&D funding after the event. There were other interesting facts that emerged from this survey. • 57% of attendees have availed of R&D Tax Credits, though it was strongly felt that Ireland needs to eliminate the practice of using the year 2003 as the basis for calculation of incremental spend on eligible R&D.

61% had availed of Enterprise Ireland funding and 69% had availed of IDA Ireland funding.

THE FUTURE So where does this leave the Irish Biotechnology sector? In its recent report ‘The Bioeconomy to 2030’, the OECD considered the role that biotechnology will play in addressing the most serious challenges to world economies over the next two decades. Some of the principle policy conclusions are to:

• 15% availed of BES. Can this be improved upon? While there is no tax advantage for the company in receipt of the BES, securing this funding will enhance the ability to attract other external sources of funding.

• Prepare the foundation for the long-term development of the Bioeconomy; • Reduce barriers to biotechnology innovation; • Promote the integration of biotechnology research across commercialisation.

• 13% of attendees have availed of R&D Funding through Science Foundation Ireland (SFI). Given the sums involved (€195m in 2009; €1.2 billion spend in six years), there is huge scope for improvement as a staggering 87% of companies didn’t think that they could avail of such funding. SFI would love to get even more industrial involvement in their various projects and the most recently announced Strategic Research Cluster, led by well known oncologist, Professor John Crown in Dublin City University, features industrial partners such as GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Merck Sharpe & Dohme, Novartis, Roche, Amgen, Erigal, Caliper Life Science, Anticancer Inc.

All of these require funding and despite the global downturn, innovation is still being funded in Ireland. But there is even more to be gained. According to the OECD, approximately 75% of the future economic contribution of biotechnology and large environmental benefits are likely to come from the areas of agricultural and industrial biotechnologies. Yet today, over 80% of the research investment in biotechnology goes to health applications (in Ireland this is in excess of 90%). Health biotechnology is costly and is justified with commensurate health improvements. Regenerative, personalised and preventative medicines are the future and will have far-reaching consequences for the well-being of society. But biotechnology can play an even greater role in sustainability and will play a much greater role in addressing global environmental issues such as climate change and food production. Yes, Ireland remains in the midst of an unprecedented economic contraction. But as the incoming Director General of IBEC, Danny McCoy, said recently, “We have been quicker than other countries in similar circumstances in addressing our difficulties and that is to be commended and will stand us to the good.” It’s a well-worn phrase that the darkest hour is just before the dawn. Biotechnology will be at the dawn of the new day for Ireland. The future is bright for Bio!

• Only 6% of attendees have availed of R&D Funding through InterTrade, yet over 1,450 companies have participated directly in ITI programmes, with a reported business value of more than €210m. Again, there is huge scope for more uptake of the funding available. • Only 13% of attendees have availed of R&D Funding through European Supports. The overall funding for FP7 is €50.5 billion and the programme runs until 2013. In the first two years of FP7 to date, 104 Irish companies have received over €25m of direct funding (81 of these were SMEs), but more crucially, they have access to over €350m worth of R&D as part of European consortia. When it came to the more established sources of funding, the figures were better but still left room for improvement. 9


Medical Devices 10,12

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MEDIC AL DEVICES & DIAGNOSTICS

THE FUTURE FOR MEDICAL DEVICES

T

he global economic crisis and recession have shaken many governments and industries. However, a recent survey conducted by Eucomed of 100 top executives at medical technology manufacturers across Europe defies this trend, with only 20% of respondents noticing a significant negative impact on their business, while to the contrary, 50% expect 5% growth in 2009 and two thirds expect more than 5% growth in 2010/2011. The study also found that while investments have remained the same or have only been moderately reduced, approximately one third say new business investment has actually increased. However, 80% of respondents agree that hospitals are struggling financially, price pressure is increasing, and tendering and contracting conditions have worsened. While the sector is clearly not recession-immune, this data clearly shows that it is more resistant to recession that other markets have been and MedTech is still an attractive and viable alternative prospect for investors.

Has the global economic climate affected the medical devices industry and its potential for future growth? Sharon Higgins, Director of the Irish Medical Devices Association, thinks not.

MEDICAL DEVICES

Europe, per head of population. Today, there are currently over 140 medical technology companies in Ireland, exporting €6.2 billion worth of product. Indeed, Ireland is the second largest exporter of medical products in Europe, second only to Germany. Last year was exciting for the industry in Ireland. The IDA approved investments in 20 med. tech. companies, including three new clients. Over the last four years. Enterprise Ireland has made strategic R&D investments in more than 70 high technology companies.

GROWTH OPPORTUNITIES Technological advances and convergence across the subsectors provide high growth opportunities for those companies prepared to adapt and equip themselves to take advantage of these changes. Ireland is well placed to capitalise on the growing global market for medical technology products and services. The challenge is to continue to develop and integrate the broad range of strategic competencies and support systems that will enable this island to compete as a mature, high value-added economy, with innovation at its core. Medical technology companies in Ireland are re-investing in upgrading their facilities, expanding research and development capability, and establishing global business service operations. Ireland now has a highly capable workforce, who are skilled innovators, driving down costs by introducing business excellence models, while at the same time developing new opportunities for business and product development to secure long-term growth.

IN IRELAND

What does all of this mean for the industry in Ireland? To answer that question, it’s important to understand the breadth and scope of the industry here and the drive of the leadership teams here to transform their organisations and to be ready to compete for global investments now and in the future. Four decades of developing appropriate policies and competing for international investment have resulted in seven of the world’s top 10 medical devices and diagnostic companies locating in Ireland. Over the past decade, the number of people employed has grown by 50% to over 25,000, representing nearly 10% of Ireland's total manufacturing workforce. Ireland boasts the highest number of people working in the industry compared to any country in

KNOWLEDGE-DRIVEN MARKET The Irish medical devices sector continues to develop in a knowledge-driven market, which reflects the global changes in Ireland’s industrial base and the significant evo10


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Medical Devices 10,12

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MEDIC AL DEVICES & DIAGNOSTICS past, innovative thinking is what transformed the landscape for business in Ireland, making Ireland one of the most open economies in the world. It is important that while industry plays its part, that the Government constantly reviews and enhances the supports available to provide a positive business environment. In some cases, minor changes could have the potential to have enormous positive impact. A simple example would be if we were to alter the way that R&D tax credits are allocated. The existing R&D tax credit scheme needs to be reformed so that it can provide increased flexibility to firms in relation to how the value of the credit is off-set against other taxes. This could be done at no additional cost to the Government and would greatly increase the benefit of the scheme in attracting mobile R&D projects to Irish-based multinationals.

lution in Ireland’s export capabilities. It is changing from being prominently manufacturing to being more complex and driven by R&D. It now involves intensive collaboration between a broad range of partners, including research institutions, clinicians, manufacturing companies and government agencies. Ireland has an ample supply of clinicians, engineers and scientists with innovative ideas to address patient needs. Further developing linkages between these key partners will be key to ensuring that new and more effective medical products can make it to market quickly for the benefit of patients worldwide. Leaders from across industry, academia, government agencies and hospitals presented at the 7th Western Vascular Institute Symposium in Galway, in a session co-hosted by IMDA, Georgia Tech and the Western Vascular Institute, which showed how Ireland is uniquely positioned to lead the way in Europe for medical device research, development and commercialisation in that sector. Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) CSETS & Strategic Research Clusters (SRCs) help link scientists and engineers in partnerships across academia and industry. The outputs address crucial research questions, foster the development of new and existing Irish-based technology companies, attract industry that could make an important contribution to Ireland and its economy, and expand educational and career opportunities in Ireland in science and engineering. IMDA and SFI will jointly host a CSETs/SRC’s forum to provide information for the sector later this year or early next year.

SUMMARY The Irish Medical Devices Association is focused on a strategy (www.imda.ie/0/strategy) to enhance our manufacturing capability, deliver commercialised product to market and attract global business services activity. We are working to support focused collaboration between industry with our academic and clinical colleagues and we are seeing a lot of positive activity, auguring well for the continued development and commercialisation of new products here. In summary, Ireland now boasts a significant cluster of medical device and technology companies. There is much to be proud of, much to be confident about and lots of hard work required to ensure continued success – but I have no doubt that we can deliver if we all work together.

GOVERNMENT SUPPORTS The industry response in this fast-changing global environment must be competitive in every aspect of operations. With the appropriate government economic and educational polices, we see there being plenty of scope for the continued success of the sector over the years ahead. In the 12


Invest NI 13,14

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PERSONALISED MEDICINE

NI’S BIOMARKERS FOR SUCCESS

T

Andy Sutton, R&D Investment Specialist, Invest Northern Ireland, reports on the development of personalised medicine and companion diagnostics, and highlights some Northern Irish projects set to dramatically impact on this important sector.

here is huge pressure on the entire Pharma and Biotech sector to drastically improve the success rate of bringing drugs through development and approval. At the same time, the industry is facing huge pressure due to failing drug pipelines, the unacceptably high cost of development and a challenging reimbursement landscape. Superimposed on this “perfect storm”, there is acceptance in the industry that many drugs are not effective in large proportions of the population. Arising from this mêlée of problems and financial pressures is the concept of personalised medicine and companion diagnostics. The idea that a drug could be targeted to patients who would be identified as “responders” is beguiling to an embattled sector. Furthermore, the prospect is even more tantalising if the diagnostics industry sector could capitalise on new companion diagnostics to identify and monitor these targeted patients.

The complex regulatory landscape governing “combination products” [therapeutic and diagnostic co-developed] is deterring many Pharma/Biotech companies from developing true companion diagnostics, despite an avowed intent by the FDA to move towards therapeutics supported by companion diagnostics.

TARGETED THERAPEUTICS

In spite of the development and regulatory hurdles surrounding companion diagnostics, there is however a growing “personalised medicine” industry emerging to support the development of targeted therapeutics. This takes the form of both genomic and proteomic tools to identify biomarkers that would stratify patients into likely “responders” and non responders in the mid phase of clinical development. Organisations that possess robust and validated tools to enable the identification of biomarkers to underpin stratified clinical trials look set to capitalise on a unique constellation of issues facing the industry. The field of “Personalised Medicine” presents a number of exciting, as well as challenging, opportunities for investors. The FDA and EMEA have highlighted the need for better “product evaluation tools” in the drug development process, which will produce safer and more effective drugs, and in turn lead to improved patient outcome.

BIOMARKERS The National Cancer Institute in the US uses the definition of a biomarker as “a biological molecule found in blood, other body fluids, or tissues that is a sign of a normal or abnormal process, or of a condition or disease. A biomarker may be used to see how well the body responds to a treatment for a disease or condition: also called molecular marker and signature molecule”. Clearly, biomarkers are critical to the drive towards personalised medicine and increasingly form a central pillar in the design and implementation of clinical development. While emphasis has been placed on the need for better biomarkers, the reality is that the type of tools required to deliver new biomarkers must also improve, as must the ability to mine increasingly complex data. Increasingly, the Clinical Research Organisations [CRO] and Pharma companies are seeking technologies to underpin biomarker discovery and clinical trials design, both in the generation of analytical data and its interpretation. 13


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PERSONALISED MEDICINE covery and disease profiling within the bounds of current clinical practice and also opens up the use of personalised medicine research to the vast amount of well documented archived FFPE tissue held around the world. This world first places Almac Diagnostics at the forefront of Personalised Medicine research. Professor Tony Bjourson, Director of the top RAE rated Biomedical Research Institute and the Clinical Translational Research and Innovation Centre (C-TRIC), has developed a unique signature that will enable clinicians to assess the likelihood of breast cancer patients going on to develop invasive metastatic disease. The test, which is currently undergoing extensive clinical validation, will enable clinicians at the very earliest phase of intervention to plan the management of the patient, based on a test which has the potential to make a significant impact on the patient’s chances of survival.

GROWING SECTOR

PROTEIN CHIP TECHNOLOGY

These needs are driving the emerging market for biomarkers. A recent review puts the value of the global market for cancer diagnostics in particular at approximately US$6 billion, ahead of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. By 2015, the biomarker market is forecast to be worth over US$20 billion as the cardiovascular and CNS biomarker market segments begin to mature, with the launch of a number of diagnostic tests to guide the treatment of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases (Source: Cancer, CNS & Cardiovascular Biomarkers, Players, Products and Prospects, Epsicom Business Intelligence August 2008). In addition, the market would appear to be driven by economic pressure on the Pharma/Biotech sector to make earlier go/no-go decisions on new drugs, to expedite shorter clinical trials using surrogate end points, to better stratify responders earlier, and to segment markets and monitor responders. There are many personalised medicines on the market, including Herceptin, Pegasys, Glivec, Coumadin, Vectibix, and Azathiprine, many designed or adventitiously found to be more efficacious in certain patient populations. To date, Herceptest is only one real example of a companion diagnostic co-developed at the time of the therapeutic [albeit by two separate companies].

Randox Laboratories is one of those hidden gems. This 600+ person company nestling in the countryside on the shores of Lough Neagh is one of the UK’s leading Bioscience R&D companies. It has developed the world’s first automated biochip array platform that allows multiple antibody based tests to be conducted on a biochip the size of a British 20p coin. Multiplexed or array tests are widely recognised as the way forward in the field of Personalised Medicine, giving a more comprehensive view of the patient sample, enabling more accurate diagnosis and treatment. The ability to measure up to 20 different components simultaneously on a single chip in a small blood sample is set to revolutionise clinical testing across multiple diseases and lead to better healthcare for all. Professors Patrick Johnston and Paul Harkin of The Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, are both at the leading edge of biomarker discovery and Personalised Medicine. Professor Harkin is conducting research aimed at developing a test that can identify patients with a dysfunctional BRCA1 gene. BRCA1 is typically inactivated through mutation in hereditary breast cancer and may also be switched off in the more general sporadic form of the disease. A test that can work in both hereditary and sporadic disease would be of significant benefit. Professor Johnston is looking at markers which indicate susceptibility or resistance to commonly used drugs in colorectal cancer. Both have the potential to generate discoveries that will identify new biomarkers that will lead to targeted and selective therapies, both ultimate goals for personalised medicines. The research base in Northern Ireland may be small but with a significant density of excellent centres in biomarker discovery and clinical validation and industrial capability to move products forward, the Province is well placed to take part in the revolution that is Personalised Medicine.

PERSONALISED MEDICINE

IN

NI

Researchers and companies in Northern Ireland are developing biomarkers, drugs and platform technologies that will significantly contribute to the whole field of Personalised Medicine and are thus placed to capitalise on the emerging marketplace for personalised medicine. Almac Diagnostics are a world leading company, having recently introduced their Disease Specific Array products for conducting gene expression studies on both frozen and formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue. This, for the first time, opens up the possibility of bringing biomarker dis14


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Cover Story 16,17

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COVER STORY

FROM SERVICE PROVIDER TO SOLUTION MANAGER The role of Facility Manager has changed dramatically and is now seen very much as a value-adding industry partner. Georg Kürfgen, of HOCHTIEF Facility Management explains the advantages for the pharmachem sector.

W

hereas just a few years ago a facility manager was simply a building manager, the former “caretaker” image has, meanwhile, undergone radical transformation. A significant change of perception is taking place throughout industry, where the facility manager is now regarded as the initiator of innovative process solutions. Process orientation in the core business of industrial enterprises is nothing new. Now, however, the time has come to focus attention on production-related secondary processes, in collaboration with companies such as HOCHTIEF Facility Management. Georg Kürfgen, Spokesman of the Management Board of HOCHTIEF Facility Management, explains the added value of integrated facility-management solutions for industry.

Georg Kürfgen, HOCHTIEF Facility Management.

Why is integrated facility management (FM) steadily gaining ground in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries? Competition is getting tougher, cost pressure is increasing. Enterprises have to react to this situation by optimising site structures and reorganising secondary processes. Outsourcing of complex processes to external partners is an approach that is frequently practiced with great success. Integrated facility managers with a high level of core process know-how and a good knowledge of industry-specific rules, such as cGMP, as well as plant engineering, production environments and media, are suitable partners to provide scope for development of a company’s true core business.

industries, complex system services are more important than isolated individual services. For example, the service provider has to take account of the special requirements arising out of cGMP rules. Only then can potential synergies be exploited and workflows optimised. Only a facility manager with a total overview can create more scope for a company’s core business. That assures quality of production, lowers costs, and thus, leads to distinct competitive advantages. Interfacing problems, such as frequently arise in collaboration with multiple service providers, are eliminated. That creates greater transparency and lowers costs. A good facility manager is nowadays more than just a service provider but instead a solution manager.

What are the advantages of contracting out facility-management services to a single integrated service provider, as against concluding individual contracts? In order to appreciate the demands on modern facility management solutions from an industrial standpoint, it is crucial to understand facility management as a process-oriented managerial task. The facility manager has to work eye-toeye with the production or site or works manager. Thus, an integrated FM service provider is far more than a building manager. Above all in the chemical and pharmaceutical

How far does such full service go? Our services range from performing complex secondary processes all the way to assuming complete responsibility for the management of an industrial park. One such example is the Philips Rothe Erde Industrial Park in Aachen, Germany. The tasks undertaken by HOCHTIEF Facility Management at this Philips site include technical, commercial, and infrastructural facility management, as well as production-related services. We have taken on the park management in the form of an outsourcing agreement and 16


Cover Story 16,17

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COVER STORY in this way we were also able to acquire new, highly qualified staff for our team. How can one recognise a suitable integrated FM service provider? Particularly for services close to the core process, it is important for a facility manager to possess extensive industry-specific specialist knowledge. He must be in a position to analyse the current situation of an enterprise, to identify possible cost drivers, and to develop practice-oriented management concepts. In addition, he should be able to point to meaningful reference projects. In order to maintain high quality standards for technical operation, he must have qualified experts at hand for all technical services. HOCHTIEF Facility Management possesses a high level of technical competence in differing, technically highly demanding sectors, particularly in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. We are, therefore, in a position to integrate workflows of an enterprise close to its core processes. Examples can be seen in the GMP-compliant maintenance of ultrapure water units or of plants for raising pure steam.

As operator of an industrial site, the facility manager has a more global view of plant and processes and of operating costs in an enterprise. He, thus, quickly identifies optimisation potential and, possessing the specialist knowledge of the contractor, he can sustainably exploit it. If an energy contractor and a facility manager can work hand in hand, as is the case under one roof at HOCHTIEF, this co-operation is clearly based on well-established understanding and trust and a mutually beneficial transfer of know-how. A well-functioning team of specialists acting in partnership can tackle the challenges arising in an industrial environment directly without having to first come together.

Energy is an important topic today. For industrial companies in particular, energy contracting is considered to be an attractive option for reducing costs and the burden on the environment. Hitherto, this service has often been provided by subsidiaries of large power companies. What is the advantage of this service being offered by the subsidiary of a facility-management company, as in the case of HOCHTIEF? The advantage clearly lies in holistic, transparent, and dependable solutions for the client. An energy contractor primarily supplies operating media, such as heat, cold, electricity, steam, and compressed air to an industrial enterprise. In addition, he plans, finances, and operates the appropriate energy supply facilities.

How will developments in the field of integrated facility management proceed from here? Facility managers in possession of far-reaching knowledge of industry will increasingly become partners for complex secondary processes. Rather than working through rigid service checklists, leaving little room for optimisation, they will instead assume a high level of responsibility on the basis of service level agreements. Individual development of solutions customised to meet client demands is where the future of facility management lies. The service provider must be in a position to think one step ahead, to recognise interdependencies as well as possible synergies within complex process chains and offer appropriate efficient solutions. Our broad range of clients and the wide spectrum of services provided by HOCHTIEF amply testify that facility management has been redefined. A fitting example is seen in the operation of clean rooms in chip production or pharmaceutical research. Here, we assure ultrapure production and research conditions round the clock, 365 days a year. For more information, see www.hochtief-facilitymanagement.de or www.hochtief-energymanagement.de.

17


Science Foundation 18,19

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S C I E N C E F O U N D AT I O N I R E L A N D

RESEARCH FOR IRELAND’S FUTURE

G

iven the turbulent events in the global economy over the past year, the world has rapidly become a very different place. Investment in scientific and engineering research now provides the means by which an economic upturn can be created and, importantly, sustained in the medium to long-term. In recent years, Ireland, through substantial Government investment, has made significant progress in building its scientific research capacity. Last December, the Irish Government reiterated this commitment, through the publication of its strategy for economic recovery, ‘Building Ireland’s Smart Economy: A Framework for Sustainable Economic Renewal’. This strategy has, at its core, a sustained commitment to innovation, to attracting world-class researchers to Ireland, and to harnessing opportunities from diverse research areas.

Science Foundation Ireland is committed to building a world-class research environment in Ireland, investing in research teams to generate new knowledge, leading edge technologies and competitive enterprises in the fields of science and engineering.

INVESTING

This framework builds on the previously published Government Strategy for Science, Technology & Innovation (SSTI) 2006-2013, which aims to ensure that Ireland remains a key location for leading edge research and development, and the quality jobs it can deliver. The focus is essentially about the utilisation of human capital – the knowledge, skills and creativity of people – and our ability and effectiveness in translating the outputs into valuable processes, products and services. It is clear that successful economies of the future will be those that embrace knowledge and learn how to use it. For Ireland, this involves bringing together our best scientists, educators, engineers and entrepreneurs to work across sectors and industries. THE

IN THE

FUTURE

SFI is investing in high quality investigators and research teams, who are most likely to generate new knowledge, leading edge technologies and competitive enterprises in the fields of science and engineering which underpin the broad areas of:

UTILISING HUMAN CAPITAL

POWERING

Since its establishment in 2000, SFI has approved over 2,300 awards across all its programmes, representing a substantial investment commitment of over €1.2 billion as it continues to build a world-class research environment in Ireland. SFI, over the next five years, intends to maintain the momentum and to firmly establish Ireland as a centre for excellent research in leading areas of science and technology. SFI activities have become increasingly relevant to the economy and the strategy for the next five years will continue this trend, in the belief that highquality scientific research and researchers are the drivers needed to develop Ireland into a high-value, knowledge-based economy.

• Biotechnology; • Information and communication technology; • Sustainable energy and energy efficient technologies. The ultimate goal of the investment in SFI is that economic benefit should, in due course, arise from the actions and projects funded. Substantial benefits have already arisen from this investment by Government: SFI has made a major contribution to many of the key R&D projects established by Enterprise Ireland and IDA Ireland. For example, 56 new projects secured by IDA Ireland in 2008 (compared to 39 such projects in 2003) were RD&I projects which have been attracted here due to significant involvement with top class researchers funded by SFI. The number of researchers within enterprise increased from 6,937 in 2001 to 8,304 in 2007, an increase of 20%. The number of PhD-qualified researchers has, however, increased from 420 in 2001 to 1,191 in 2007 (an increase of 183% over the same period): in particular, there was a 43% increase between 2005 and 2007. Publications and Citations data provide a key indicator for academic research excellence. SFI researchers have driven Ireland’s bibliometric output from well below the European average in 2003 to well over that average currently. Ireland has

SMART ECONOMY

Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) published its Strategy for the period 2009-2013 in March this year. That Strategy, ‘Powering the Smart Economy’, responds to the Building Ireland’s Smart Economy framework and to the SSTI by focusing on four strategic objectives: - Human Capital; - Quality Output; - Global Reputation; - Knowledge Transfer. 18


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S C I E N C E F O U N D AT I O N I R E L A N D anostics). The BDI industry partners include Becton Dickinson and Co., Analog Devices Inc., Hospira Inc., Inverness Medical Innovations Inc., Enfer Technologies Ltd, and Amic AB. See www.bdi.ie for more information. REMEDI was established in National University of Ireland, Galway, in 2003 to conduct research in regenerative medicines, an emerging field that combines the technologies of gene therapy and adult stemcell therapy. REMEDI’s industrial collaborators include Medtronic Vascular (Galway). For more information, see www.remedi.ie.

moved from 647 publications per million population (below the EU average) to 1,100 (34% above the EU average). More importantly, the quality of that output has driven Ireland from a global citation ranking of 27th in 2003 to 17th in 2008. Total R&D spending has almost trebled over 10 years and Ireland’s total expenditure on R&D had risen to 1.56% of GNP at end 2006. Total R&D spending across all sectors of the economy – the OECD derived indicator called Gross Expenditure on Research and Development (GERD) – is expected to climb to €2.6 billion in 2008, which is equivalent to 1.66% of GNP. Business Expenditure on Research and Development (BERD) rose to an estimated €1.56 billion in 2006 – a 17% increase on the previous year – almost double the level recorded in 2000. This trend continued in 2007, with BERD climbing to €1.60 billion. It is estimated that BERD will reach €1.68 billion in 2008.

DEVELOPING LINKS

WITH INDUSTRY

In addition to working with the other agencies, it is crucial for SFI and its funded researchers to develop strong links with industry. It will be key industry partners who pose the questions and through partnership with academic researchers find the solutions to technological, environmental, medical and economic issues. It is these industry partners who, in association with SFI-funded projects, will commercialise the outputs of the research. This is where the economy benefits and Ireland moves up the value chain. Smaller incremental changes in the existing operations will also follow, thereby increasing the competitiveness of business in Ireland. Collaboration between SFI researchers and industry has increased significantly. SFI researchers now collaborate with over 279 companies, 173 multinational corporations and 106 SMEs. In particular, SFI’s nine Centres for Science, Engineering and Technology (CSETs) and 18 Strategic Research Clusters (SRCs) are at the leading edge of this process by collaborating with multinational companies such as GlaxoSmithKline, Proctor & Gamble, Eli Lilly, Merck Sharp & Dohme, Schering Plough, Pfizer, Abbot, Becton Dickinson, and also with smaller Irish companies, such as Alimentary Health. IDA Ireland and Enterprise Ireland play an important role, together with SFI, in encouraging this collaborative process. Examples of these collaborative SFI CSETs in the Life Sciences include: The Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC) in University College Cork (UCC): its research is focused on the exploration and exploitation of gut microbiota in health and disease. The APC has grown in scope, scale and international stature since its launch four years ago as an SFI CSET. The APC’s collaborative partners include GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), Teagasc, and Alimentary Health. The primary objective of Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), based in Dublin City University, is the development of novel diagnostic devices enabling early-stage diagnosis and monitoring of major diseases. These devices are targeted for use at the point-of-care and will ultimately enable efficient coupling of diagnosis and treatment (ther-

WORLD CLASS RESEARCH TEAMS The Irish Government’s Strategy sets down the goal of seeing Ireland recognised as an internationally renowned location for excellence in scientific research. Over the coming years, SFI will continue its efforts to build world-class research teams, increase the number of high quality researchers and therefore contribute to increasing the output of PhD students required by high-tech companies. SFI will be to the forefront in implementing initiatives which will provide a solid basis for Ireland's future economic development. For more information about the cutting edge research SFI supports, see www.sfi.ie.

SFI STRATEGIC RESEARCH CLUSTERS (SRC’S) – LIFE SCIENCES Solid State Pharmaceuticals Cluster (SSPC), University of Limerick; The Network of Excellence in Functional Biomaterials (NFB), National University of Ireland, Galway; The Glycoscience Research Cluster, National University of Ireland, Galway; The Irish Drug Delivery Network , University College Dublin; The BioNanoInteract Cluster, University College Dublin; Molecular Therapeutics for Cancer, Dublin City University; Reproductive Biology Research Cluster, University College Dublin; Immunology Research Centre (IRC), Trinity College Dublin; Advanced Biomimetics for Solar Energy Conversion, University College Dublin; Irish Separation Science Cluster, Dublin City University.

19


Soltec 20

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SOLVENTS

THE SOLTEC EFFECT: RECOVERING AND RECYCLING OF SOLVENTS

I

Mullingar-based Soltec have been successfully recovering and recycling solvents in Ireland since 1994 and have been steadily increasing the size of their solvent distilling capacity.

n recent years, events globally have focused minds on the protection of the environment, perhaps more than ever before. Entrepreneurs and investors who traditionally would have simply ignored recycling imperatives or environmental concerns are now (thankfully) jumping on the green bandwagon in their droves. One company which didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need Kyoto 2 or global recession to realise the importance of protecting the environment is Soltec (Ireland) Ltd, based in Mullingar. Their solvent recycling service grew out of an idea by its founder, Michael Corcoran, back as early as 1994. For many years, Michael had been working as a supplier to the motor trade, including supplying solvent thinners to paint shops and auto body shops. Such businesses are heavily dependent on solvents to thin the spray paint used in auto-reworking. Pharmaceutical companies, on the other hand, produce solvent as a waste, which incurs a major cost straight onto their bottom line in its disposal. Michael realised the potential to fulfil a need in one of his markets by recovering the waste from another.

THE PROXIMITY PRINCIPLE

During the past 15 years, Soltec have been steadily increasing the size of their solvent distilling capacity. Their plant in Mullingar is the only commercially operated solvent recovery plant in the Republic. Their process provides an excellent opportunity for companies who produce waste solvent to have their hazardous waste recycled within Ireland. Much of the material they recover is also reused within the domestic market, including, in some cases, selling it back to its source company where it had originally been treated as waste. Soltec have even been successful in sourcing export markets for their processed thinners in the UK. In their 15 years in operation, Soltec have developed a sound customer base in various industries, from pharmaceutical to medical devices, as well as the print, engineering and motor trades. They are EPA licensed and hold waste collection permits for most of the county councils throughout the country. In 1997, Soltec also reached ISO 9001:2000 standard.

HAZARDOUS WASTE - COST SAVINGS Companies who produce waste solvent will also typically have other types of solid hazardous waste for collection, such as contaminated wipes, empty unclean containers, PPE etc. Soltec are developing solutions to collect these types of waste more-and-more cost effectively. In particular, they are placing a big drive on marketing their HazBox and HazBag solutions. Put simply, these UN-approved waste containers have saved companies from the cost of using open-top barrels for bulky light hazardous waste. While customers may sometimes need to alter the way they collect waste at the production floor, the cost savings can be considerable and will easily justify some minor system changes. For more information about Soltecâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s services, simply log on to www.soltec.ie, call 044 9335133 or email tom@soltec.ie

20


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Europe 22,23

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16:27

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PHARMACEUTIC ALS

IN

EUROPE

IS EUROPE LOSING GROUND?

T

he pharmaceutical industry has been a significant contributor to the health and wealth of the European Union since its establishment. Through the discovery of new medicines and the continued improvement of existing medicines, European citizens have enjoyed significant improvements in their quality of life and huge reductions in mortality resulting from diseases such as HIV/AIDS, cancer and cardiovascular disease. Due to these developments, people in Europe can expect to live up to 30 years longer today than they did a century ago. In addition to contributing significant social and health benefits, the research-based pharmaceutical industry is also a key asset of the European economy. There is growing evidence of the added value of medicines in the healthcare context, both in terms of global cost savings, as well as increasing the quality of care. Medicines not only provide the best treatment for many diseases, but can also generate savings by substantially reducing costs in other branches of healthcare. The industry is one of Europe’s top performing hightechnology sectors, representing no less than 19% of total EU private expenditure and 3.5% of EU manufactured exports. In 2007, the pharmaceutical industry invested about €26 billion in R&D in Europe. The industry also provides a high number of jobs in member states: recent studies in some countries showed that the research-based pharmaceutical industry generates three to four times more employment

The European pharmaceutical industry needs to act now if it’s not going to lose out to the US and emerging economies. The Irish Pharmaceutical Healthcare Association assess the contribution of the pharmaceutical industry to the EU and the development The High Level Pharmaceutical Forum.

indirectly than it does directly, a significant proportion being high value added jobs. For example, it is estimated that approximately 107,000 work in R&D related to the pharmaceutical industry in Europe alone.

STRENGTHENING COMPETITIVENESS

Despite the substantial health and economic contributions by the industry to Europe, there is now more than ever a clear need to strengthen the competitiveness of the European pharmaceutical industry in order to compete successfully with the United States and emerging economies. The United States still dominates the biopharmaceutical field, accounting for the three quarters of the world’s biotechnology revenues and R&D spending. In 2007, North America accounted for 45% of world pharmaceutical sales, against 31% for Europe. Between 1990 and 2008, R&D and investment in the United States grew by 5.6 times, whilst in Europe, it grew only 3.5 times. According to IMS Health data, 65% of sales of new medicines launched during the period 2002-2007 were generated on the US market, compared with 24% on the European market. However, the US is not Europe’s only competitor. Today, there is also rapid growth in the research environment in emerging economies such as China and India, resulting in closures of R&D sites in Europe and openings of new sites on the Asian continent, which will show dramatic effects in the next few years if nothing is done to maintain the pharmaceutical discovery expertise in the EU.

WHY EUROPE

IS

L AGGING BEHIND

Compared to the US and these emerging markets, Europe is still seen as a less attractive R&D investment in terms of market size and incentives for the creation of new innovative biotech companies. The lack of attractiveness of Europe for the pharmaceutical industry is attributed to a number of factors, some of which are addressed by the High Level Pharmaceutical Forum (HLPF) which was established in 2005. The HLPF involved a number of important stakeholders in the healthcare environment, including Ministers from all EU Member States, members of the European 22


Europe 22,23

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PHARMACEUTIC ALS

IN

EUROPE

Parliament, the pharmaceutical industry, health professionals, patients and health insurers. In an effort to address the declining competitiveness of the research-based pharmaceutical industry in Europe, the HLPF formed working groups to examine the following three issues â&#x20AC;&#x201C; information to patients on disease and treatment options, pricing and reimbursement of medicinal products and relative effectiveness assessments.

WHAT CAN BE DONE? The conclusions and recommendations of these working groups were published in October 2008. The report stressed the need to provide citizens with more information in effective communication formats, both electronic and non-electronic means, while taking account of local traditions, healthcare systems and languages. The Forum also recommended that Member States, the Commission and health actors should consider new collaborations in the field of information to patients, that such collaborations should respect transparency, disclosure of financial and other support as well as a definition of responsibilities. The Forumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s report also addressed the need to improve information flow, in terms of both patient access to information and data sharing in research and development, principally the improvement of data availability and transferability. Member States and stakeholders were encouraged to regularly exchange information in order to con-

solidate scientific evidence at national level, to provide this evidence to pricing and reimbursement authorities and to inform healthcare professionals and patients on the most effective medicines. Member States were also called upon to agree on a clear set of expectations on innovations they consider to be valuable. Communication of these common expectations aims to give companies clear direction on healthcare priorities and indications on the evidence needed by authorities. By addressing the declining competitiveness of the industry in Europe and helping it regain its position as worldwide leader and centre of excellence, Europe stands to benefit substantially from a strong, indigenous researchbased pharmaceutical industry that will attract and retain talent and ultimately result in early access to better treatments for European patients.


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PROCESS SAFETY

RESPONSIBLE CARE AND PROCESS S AFETY

R

esponsible Care was launched in Ireland in June 1992 and under the Responsible Care concept, Chief Executive Officers of PharmaChemical Ireland (PCI) member companies commit their companies to work together to: • Continuously improve the environmental, health and safety knowledge and performance of technologies, processes and products over their life cycles so as to avoid harm to people and the environment; • Use resources efficiently and minimise waste; • Report openly on performance, achievements and shortcomings; • Listen, engage and work with people to understand and address their concerns and expectations; • Co-operate with governments and organisations in the development and implementation of effective regulations and standards, and to meet or go beyond them; • Provide help and advice to foster the responsible management of chemicals by all those who manage and use them along the product chain.

The Responsible Care ethic helps the companies of PharmaChemical Ireland (PCI) to operate safely, profitably and with due care for future generations, according to Michael Gillen, Senior Executive, PCI.

vention and control of incidents that have the potential to release hazardous materials and energy. Process safety risks are real risks to any business in the chemical industry and it makes perfect business sense to manage such risks in a proactive manner. Successful companies view process safety as an integrated course of action that not only uses technology but also include management's active involvement. This involvement includes both setting the tone for a process safety culture, monitoring ongoing application and the use of process safety principles when making operational and technical decisions.

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY VERSUS PROCESS SAFETY Zero incidents alone do not prove process safety excellence. The disjoint between occupational safety management and process safety management is often the cause of failure for traditional safety management programmes. This difference in safety management approach is not always appreciated and understood when safety statistics and auditing programmes report back high compliance. Two recent publications on developing process safety performance indicators have changed the way that information on major hazard risks can be collected and utilised. ‘Developing Process Safety Indicators – A Step-by-Step Guide’ and ‘Process Safety Leading and Lagging Indicators’ both set out a simple methodology that provides companies with key information on the performance of the most important protection systems they have in place. In addition, the Process & Plant Safety Issue Team (PPSIT) of Cefic has started work on identifying opportunities to improve process and plant safety, by measuring performance and recognising trends. While Responsible Care has always captured key health & safety indicators, it

LEARNING LESSONS The pharmachemical industry has a strong tradition of learning lessons from one another: indeed it can be said that this principle is at the core of Responsible Care. There is currently a strong worldwide focus on process safety and this is understandable when viewed against the backdrop of incidents such as Texas City and Buncefield. Process Safety is a disciplined framework for managing the integrity of operating systems and processes handling hazardous materials by applying good design principles, engineering, and operating practices. It deals with the pre24


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PROCESS SAFETY

is hoped to have specific process safety indicators for inclusion in the data collection for 2010.

PROCESS SAFETY SUB-GROUP Closer to home, PCI hosts a process safety sub-group where companies actively engage with one another to share good practice and information on process safety incidents. All of the companies in the group have mechanisms and arrangements in place to incorporate learning from others within their process safety management programmes. This group has now extended their work by utilising a ‘process safety alert’ system on the PCI website. Here, members can share their experiences, in a totally anonymous manner, with the wider PCI membership. An outline of an incident is presented, followed by findings of the investigation, what actions were taken and what lessons were learned (see example in panel). This is another illustration of how process safety continues to be at the core of Responsible Care for the Irish pharmachemical sector.

SAMPLE PROCESS SAFETY ALERT FROM PHARMACHEMICAL IRELAND: FLEXIBLE TUBING INCIDENT Incident: During charging of sodium methoxide from drum to reactor using pump, the tubing of the pump became detached from the pump, causing material to be sprayed onto process chemists, resulting in skin and eyes exposure to material. The process being carried out at the time of the incident was a new process to the plant. The sodium methylate in methanol charge (approximately 15kg) and was being transferred to the reactor using a diaphragm pump and PFA tubing via a line filter set up on the outlet of the pump. The incident occurred during the fourth batch of the campaign. The pump, tubing and filter had previously been used for the same reagent in the first three batches of the campaign, followed by a DMF rinse after the sodium methylate in methanol charge. The incident occurred within a couple of minutes into the charge as only 2kg had entered the reactor. Investigation: Maintenance personnel investigated the pump and tubing set-up and found that the compression fitting onto the tubing was not securing the tubing to the pump sufficiently. FORMAL ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS ALSO COMPLETED. Actions: The compression fitting in this pump and pumps used for similar charges were changed to a stainless steel compression fitting and pressure tested. The stainless steel compression fitting secured the tubing into the pump. Removal of all ‘old’ type fittings from site and stores and replacement with new grooved Swagelok types. Lessons learned: Requirement for site-wide design guidelines and risk assessment procedure for small flexible reagent charging systems – already exist for cylinder reagent charging skids. In future, this will include pressure testing if possible, inspection routines etc: work still ongoing. See www.pharmachemicalireland.ie for more information.

25


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L A B O R AT O R Y S U P P L I E S

SUPPLYING THE SCIENTIFIC COMMUNITY

A

s part of Thermo Fisher Scientific, the world leader in serving science, many of Irelandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pharmaceutical laboratory personnel turn to Fisher Scientific, not only for their global purchasing power, but, more importantly, for the procurement solutions and services they provide through a dedicated and friendly team. As their business expands, so does their product and supplier breadth, with more than 245,000 individual product lines now available. These include consumable and equipment product brands from the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premium manufacturers, laboratory and specialty chemicals, bioreagents and their own Fisherbrand label, which delivers comparable quality to premier products at affordable prices.

1955, Cole-Parmer has been a leading global source of laboratory and industrial fluid handling products, instrumentation, equipment and supplies. Cole-Parmer is a proven expert in the fields of temperature measurement and control, electrochemistry, and fluid handling. Cole-Parmer products are sold throughout the world through company-owned customer channel outlets and a strong network of international dealers. In addition to their outstanding portfolio of industryleading brands and proprietary products, including the market leading pumping and tubing brand, Masterflex, Cole-Parmer is renowned for exceptional customer and technical support. Customers can rely on a worldwide team of highly trained technical application specialists to assist them in selecting products tailored to their specific application needs, as well as to help troubleshoot existing systems. An integrated global logistics network and e-commerce capabilities, embodied by the cutting-edge web site and online catalogue, allows ColeParmer to deliver the latest technologies and products reliably and efficiently.

Fisher Scientific is the laboratory products supplier of choice for many within the scientific community in Ireland.

COLE-PARMER AGENCY In 2009, Fisher Scientific Ireland expanded its portfolio with the incorporation of the Cole-Parmer agency. Since

26


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L A B O R AT O R Y S U P P L I E S MANAGED SERVICES SOLUTIONS

to manage a large number of suppliers and time-consuming order placement.

Excellent, readily available products are only part of the winning formula at Fisher Scientific. They continue to steadily expand their support team to meet growing customer needs and draw upon the pool of scientific talent for which Ireland has a global reputation. They also have the relevant laboratory and supply chain logistics expertise to provide tailored solutions to the most exacting of customer requirements. For example, one of the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies, located in the Cork area, recently added a managed service solution to support its laboratory requirements at one of its production facilities. After completing an intensive needs analysis, including key performance reporting criteria, Fisher Scientific invested in a new Cork-based warehouse and added inventory to support the specific needs of this customer. Support from stocks in Dublin and the UK further ensure that they’re able to meet the customer’s unusual demand for certain core lines. This includes managing all the individual stores, at multiple locations, that provide availability of general laboratory consumables, chromatography supplies and chemicals on a daily basis. The fact that they directly manage stock replenishment has freed laboratory personnel from having

E-COMMERCE UNDERPINNING CUSTOMER SERVICE A robust e-commerce system and leading web-based catalogue enable Fisher Scientific to provide the pharmaceutical sector with world-class customer service that helps drive business growth. Soon they’ll be re-launching their website with major new features that will help customers tailor content to their specific areas of interest, speed the sourcing of laboratory products and make the site an invaluable technical resource. For more information, contact: Fisher Scientific Ireland Suite 3 Plaza 212 Blanchardstown Corporate Park 2 Ballycoolin Dublin 15 Tel (01) 885 5854 Fax: (01) 899 1855 Email: fsie.sales@thermofisher.com Web: www.ie.fishersci.com

Waste Management Services CONTACT US Dublin Office 4 Haddington Terrace Dun Laoghaire, Co Dublin Ireland Tel: +353 1 280 4534 Cork Office Unit 11 South Ring Business Park Kinsale Road, Cork Ireland Tel: +353 21 483 7100

Hazardous Waste Management

Total On Site Waste Management

Solvent Recovery Facility

Hazardous Waste Facility Tolka Quay Road Dublin Port Dublin 1 Ireland Tel: +353 1 280 4534

Laboratory Chemicals

Email: info@indaver.ie Web: www.indaver.ie

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Counterfeit Medicines29,30

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COUNTERFEIT MEDICINES

THE HIGH PRICE OF COUNTERFEITING

C

ounterfeit medicines are not a new phenomenon and have resulted in huge social and economic costs on a global scale. Counterfeiting is not just limited to high value branded medicines: it includes everything the pharmaceutical industry produces, from therapeutic and life saving prescription medicines to generic therapies for malaria, AIDS/HIV and TB. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that the counterfeit medicines business is worth up to £18 billion. According to the WHO, more than 50% of medicines offered by websites that conceal their physical addresses are fake. It also estimates that 8-10% of the medicines in the global supply chain are counterfeit, reaching as high as 25% in some countries. Counterfeit medicines are entering Europe’s legitimate supply chain in increasing numbers. More than 4.081 million counterfeit medicines packs were seized at Europe’s borders in 2007, a 51% increase on the previous year. The WHO report that around 1% of medicines in Europe are now counterfeit.

Counterfeit medicines don’t just cost money: in some cases, they can cost lives. The Irish Pharmaceutical Healthcare Association reports on what can be done to curb the counterfeiters.

FIGHTING

THE

COUNTERFEITERS

Pharmaceutical companies currently devote huge resources to fighting counterfeit medicines. The Pharmaceutical Security Institute (PSI) is an industry wide programme dedicated to countering the rapidly increasing trade in illegal and counterfeit medicines and is funded by the majority of international researchbased companies through IFPMA, of which the Irish Pharmaceutical Healthcare Association (IPHA) is a member. The PSI’s functions include the supervision of worldwide enquiries into counterfeiting and liaison with law enforcement agencies to bring the perpetrators to justice, in addition to developing global security strategies to ensure public safety and product integrity. The pharmaceutical industry works closely with law enforcement and regulatory agencies in both developed and developing countries to implement a multilayered security strategy focused on both prevention and enforcement.

THE ONLINE ISSUE The increased availability of prescription medicines online has also created an outlet for the sale of counterfeit medicines – a report published in 2008 revealed that a frightening 62% of medicines purchased on the internet were fake or substandard. IPHA encourages patients to purchase prescription medicines through authorised distribution channels only and continues to raise awareness of the dangers of purchasing medicines online. The pharmaceutical industry spends billions in developing reliable, safe, life-saving and life-enhancing medicines. The system that enables such medicines to reach patients, through the collaboration of regulators, pharmacists, healthcare professionals and the manufacturers of medicines, has protected Irish consumers very successfully. To decrease the threat of counterfeit medicines, it is necessary for the pharmaceutical industry, legislators and regulators to work together in a bid to protect patient safety.

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COUNTERFEIT MEDICINES

OPERATION PANGEA The absence of a universally accepted definition for ‘counterfeit’ medicines makes information exchange between countries very difficult, in addition to limiting the ability to understand the true extent of the problem at a global level. In a bid to address the problem on a global scale, ‘Operation Pangea’ was established, involving coordinated action by the Permanent Forum on International Pharmaceutical Crime, Interpol and the WHO’s International Medical Products Anti-Counterfeiting Taskforce (IMPACT). The programme aimed to target the illegal sale of medicines to the public and targeted internet pharmacies in 10 countries selling counterfeit pharmaceuticals, including Ireland. The internet pharmacies that were raided as a result of the operation were primarily sellers of prescription medicines. In Ireland, the Irish Medicines Board, Revenue Commissioners and the Irish Customs Service collaborated with Interpol in Operation Pangea to shut down an internet pharmacy hosted in Ireland that allowed customers to link into internet sales of prescription-only medicines from a website based outside of the country. Under Irish law, the sale of prescription-only medicines by mail order or online is illegal. Operation Pangea is an example of how different stakeholders can work together effectively to tackle this increasing problem.

AGREEING

ON

rity. A pilot project, which will see the mass serialisation of pharmaceutical products, was launched in Sweden in 2009. Industry has also called for: – A ban on repackaging of pharmaceutical products; – Clearly defined liabilities for all involved in the distribution chain (including brokers, traders and agents); – Stricter auditing rules and controls of the supply chain; – Application of penalties for trafficking in counterfeits; – Patients to be encouraged to purchase prescription medicines through authorised distribution channels only.

LEGISLATION

The EU Pharmaceutical Package, which has begun the co-decision procedure in the European Parliament, includes draft counterfeit medicines legislation which has taken note of industry’s calls and includes proposals for: • Increased Good Manufacturing Practice inspections on a risk basis in non-EU countries; • The use of tamper evident packaging; strengthening of product identification at individual pack level; • A ban on repackaging of medicines and auditing of the entire medicines supply chain.

In order to further eradicate the trade of counterfeit medicines, international anti counterfeiting legislation and frameworks regarding counterfeit medicines need to be agreed, ensuring that there is: – Adequate traceability of medicines through the utilisation of technologies such as 2D bar coding; – Deterrents, sanctions and enforcement measures for those found to be involved in the trade of counterfeit medicines; – Standardised packaging and labelling, which is often changed, due to parallel importers; – Enhanced cross country enforcement of the law and greater interagency cooperation, which would see the Government, the pharmaceutical industry, healthcare professionals, police and customs authorities, postal services and public health authorities working together to protect patient safety.

WHAT

THE INDUSTRY

Only when these are implemented will European patients be guaranteed a genuine pharmaceutical product.

NEEDS

The European pharmaceutical industry recently proposed a European track and trace system to enhance product secu30


Product Trace GS1 31,32,33

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PRODUCT TRACEABILITY

BUILDING BRIDGES ACROSS THE SUPPLY CHAIN

F

Pharmaceutical companies, IT providers and GS1 recently teamed up to pilot a complete item-level traceability system within the pharmaceutical supply chain.

inding strategies that improve patient safety is a hot topic for pharmaceutical companies and healthcare providers alike. With errors in medication administration and the problem of counterfeit drugs entering health services both increasing, it’s essential that technologies which can track drugs and monitor their progress throughout the entire supply chain are implemented as soon as possible. Getting the correct, authentic drugs to patients quickly and accurately is an essential component in reducing medical errors and increasing patient safety. Implementing systems that support the traceability of products also helps to ensure product recalls are effected thoroughly and swiftly, preventing patients being exposed to sub-standard or dangerous drugs. Quite apart from improving patient safety, having the means to automate key elements of the global pharmaceutical supply chain and receive live information about the location of products significantly improves visibility, reduces administrative overheads and consequently delivers tangible efficiencies.

Global Environment) project, a threeyear research and development project part funded by the EU. One of its Business Application work packages was the Pharma Traceability Pilot, which aimed to demonstrate full itemlevel traceability in a live operating environment. The project’s overarching objectives were to implement a complete supply chain traceability system for pharmaceutical products to improve patient safety and increase supply chain efficiency. Additionally, this would facilitate the development of related supply chain applications such as electronic pedigree, authentication, recall, inventory management and financial reconciliation.

IMPLEMENTING THE TRACEABILITY TRIAL The project - the operational pilot having been completed in May 2008 - is the only one of its kind in the world to involve the trialling of such a comprehensive standards-based tracking and tracing system within a live, end-to-end supply chain spanning drug packaging and distribution, right through to their receipt at the hospital pharmacy.

PILOTING TRACEABILITY TECHNOLOGIES For the past two and a half years, members of the pharmaceutical supply chain user community and a group of innovative IT solution providers, together with GS1, the global standards organisation, have been participating in the BRIDGE (Building Radio frequency IDentification solutions for the

Pilot participants included: • Drugs companies: Athlone Laboratories, Actavis and Sandoz • Dutch contract packer: Tjoapack • Distributors: Kent Pharmaceuticals and CPG Logistics • Transport provider: Movianto • Wholesaler: UniChem • Recipient/customer: Barts and the London NHS Trust • Equipment and printing solution vendors: Domino • Project management and business consulting: JJ Associates • Technical design and software development: Melior Solutions • EPCIS database provision: VeriSign Inc • Provision of coding structure, standards and RFID consultancy: GS1 UK A range of technologies and standards were implemented to allow 15 different types of drugs to be tracked from the start of their journey at the packaging plants – one in Ireland, one in the Netherlands - to the end, at Barts and the London hospital.

The GPS trace of product shipped from Athlone Pharmaceuticals to Kent Pharmaceuticals.

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PRODUCT TRACEABILITY

TECHNOLOGY AND STANDARDS Data Matrix symbology was used on all levels of product packaging, from individual items to product bundles, cases, pallets and even transport lorries. It was chosen for its cost effectiveness and robustness, as well as its ability to carry a 4-string data structure, which was first deployed by GS1 Ireland during the NCHCD Haemophilia Medication pilot of early 2006. In this case, the structure comprised the GTIN, serial number, expiry date and batch number. In addition, RFID tags were employed on cases and pallets in hybrid labels, with printed bar codes. Selected pallets were also fitted with active devices to allow GPS tracking across the international supply chain. Every single pack of each product involved was assigned a unique serial number. Using this, allied with the process of aggregating the contents to other packaging levels that were also assigned unique serial number identifiers, allowed full traceability of every single item from the packaging line to the final destination. Printing systems were installed that enabled the required codes to be assigned, printed and checked within the production line. EPCIS, EPCglobal’s network standards for supply chain-wide data collection, was also implemented to capture data at each ‘handover’ point in the journey.

Preparing the BRIDGE trial packs at Athlone Pharmaceuticals.

by bar code scanners. This would later allow full evaluation of the technologies used in this process. Each pallet was given an SSCC identifier, which was encoded on the pallet label as a 2-D Data Matrix code, GS1-128 barcode and onto an EPC Gen 2 standard UHF RFID tag.

THE PILOT PROCESS GOES LIVE

Step 4 Upon despatch, each pallet was scanned onto a vehicle, each of which was assigned a unique GS1 GRAI (Global Returnable Asset Identifier) code number that was also scanned so that all its contents were associated to it. For those pallets implanted with a GPS tracking device, their unique codes were linked to the EPCIS system via mobile tracking and read at regular intervals to check their progress, which was recorded as part of the chain of custody process. Data was sent back to a central server for display on a map.

Prior to the pilot commencing, all participants received in-depth training on the systems they would be responsible for or operate. During the pilot’s operation, all technology partners provided on-site and phone-based application support, recording issues and rectifying glitches. Step 1 At the patient pack level, each item was coded with a unique SGTIN (Serialised Global Trade Item Number), in the form of a 2-D Data Matrix code, together with the expiry and batch information.

Step 5 At each stage of the journey to the wholesaler, pallets were scanned as they were removed from one vehicle and scanned again as they were loaded onto the next vehicle. This was carried out using mobile phones, loaded with decoding software that scanned the Data Matrix code and sent the data via SMS to an EPCIS database, so that each transaction or movement was recorded.

Step 2 Packs were aggregated into a case coded with an SGTIN, correctly identifying the contents as a grouped trade item. The case label was a hybrid, or multi-format type, capable of storing the SGTIN code and expiry/batch information as a Data Matrix code, GS1128 linear barcode and human readable text. The SGTIN was also encoded into the RFID tag. This ensured that the case label would be readable, no matter what system was used downstream.

Step 6 When the pallets reached the wholesaler, they were scanned with a barcode scanner (and the data sent to the respective EPCIS database). Then each pallet was moved through an RFID portal, data from which was stored separately to enable easy comparison between the two methods.

Step 3 Finally, cases were scanned as they were aggregated onto pallets. The RFID tag was also scanned to provide alternative data that could be compared to the data read

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PRODUCT TRACEABILITY

Step 7 Warehouse staff picked the required products for delivery to Barts, scanning the products into a tote box, which was uniquely identified using a GRAI code. The tote was labelled, bearing a Data Matrix code and an SSCC label applied on the folded lid to act as an anti-tamper device. As they were loaded for delivery, each tote was again scanned.

GS1 Standards in Healthcare

Step 8 Once at the hospital pharmacy, staff scanned the SSCC code to record receipt of the goods and all contents were checked against the tote manifest, which was generated from the EPCIS record.

DRAWING POSITIVE CONCLUSIONS

GS1 Standards enable the effective and efficient use of Scanning Technology and Traceability Systems throughout the Healthcare Sector.

Currently, all the data collected during the pilot is being evaluated and key learnings are being developed. However, what is clear is that the pilot was an overall success and that the technology required to implement full international supply chain traceability systems is available today. Good communication and collaboration between trading partners was vital to the success of this project. The use of open systems information standards with the hybrid environment of data carriers – GS1 Data Matrix and RFID – supported this by maximising system interoperability. Coupling the 4-string data set with the EPCIS system delivered complete traceability. As each participant in the supply chain recorded the movement of the products in and out of their custody, the data that was sent to their respective EPCIS databases formed the necessary traceability information. Cumulatively, and in a live scenario, this could deliver significant efficiencies and reduce costs. Having the product code, serial number, batch number and expiry date aligned to the EPCIS system also supports future recall capabilities, inventory management and financial reconciliation, which will generate further process efficiencies. In the context of BRIDGE project collaboration, the traceability data collected has been shared with the BRIDGE work packages, notably Work Packages 2/3 (supply chain serialisation software) and Work Package 5 (counterfeit product analysis) to supplement their project findings. The real-world nature of the pilot highlighted issues that will require solutions prior to future implementations. For example, the complexity of coding and printing within the production line environment requires meticulous planning. Packaging design may have to take into consideration the space required to print Data Matrix symbology. Staff training and robust intuitive applications will also play a crucial role in the success of any traceability solution implementation. Regardless of these concerns, traceability systems will have an incredibly positive impact on improving patient safety and reducing the scourge of counterfeit drugs. For more information about this pilot and to access all the reports pertaining to the BRIDGE project, visit: www.bridge-project.eu/ or see www.bridgewp6.eu.

Our Standards: • Improve supply chain Visibility, Efficiency and Effectiveness • Help combat counterfeiting through authentication • Ensure traceability of medicines and medical instruments • Enable a faster and more efficient product recall GS1 Standards support the 5 medication RIGHTS 1 The RIGHT Patient 2 The RIGHT Medication 3 In the RIGHT Dose 4 At the RIGHT Time 5 By the RIGHT Route

improving patient safety by reducing risk through certainty

GS1 Ireland, The Nutley Building, Merrion Road, Dublin 4 T (01) 208 0660 F (01) 208 0670 E info@gs1ie.org W www.gs1ie.org

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PA C K A G I N G

GOLIATH GOES FROM STRENGTH TO STRENGTH

W

Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd sources, supplies, installs and after-sales services a comprehensive range of end-of-line packaging/ materials handling/ industrial washing equipment to the Irish pharmachem sector.

ith experience gained through many years of successful project delivery for discerning bluechip customers throughout Ireland, the expertise of its international partners/suppliers and the skills of its factory trained staff, Tipperary-based Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd is perfectly positioned to meet the demands of its customer base. The company recognises the importance of the pharmachem sector to the Irish economy and concentrates on this critical market segment via its trading division, Goliath Pharma, with projects successfully delivered during the past 12 months to companies such as Wyeth Medica, P&G, Oral-B, Norbrook Labs, Centocor, Carbon Group, Niche Generics and Servier.

EXTENSIVE PRODUCT RANGE The Goliath Pharma product range consists of the following distinct items; • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

In addition, the following complementary (ancillary) items are provided by Goliath in order to offer a fully integrated turn-key service: • Weighing Systems • X-Ray/Metal Detection Goliath also offers a project management/packaging consultancy service to assist in the early determination of customers’ particular packaging equipment requirements. Goliath serves the following segments of the Irish PharmaChem sector: pharmaceutical; biotech; chemical; healthcare; medical devices and contract packing. Goliath is the Irish partner to a number of internationally known specialist packaging equipment suppliers, including Filamatic, Pester Pac Automation, Newman Labelling Systems, Soco System, Newsmith, Toppy, MJ Maillis and JBT. The capabilities of the more important of these international partners (to the pharmachem sector) are highlighted below.

FILAMATIC

Liquid Filling Systems Shrink Wrapping, Banding & Over Filamatic has designed and manufactured Wrapping liquid filling equipment for over 50 years. Cartoning Servicing the pharmaceutical, biotech, diagCase Erecting, Case Packing & Bagnostic, healthcare, specialty chemical and Newman Labelling Systems has been in-Box Systems food industries, Filamatic provides a wide a world leader in the supply of Manual & High Speed Labelling range of equipment that can be customised pharmaceutical labelling systems Systems (bottles, tubes, vials, cases etc) to suit your unique application and/or budfor over 60 years. Case Sealing get. Each unit is custom-built to provide Conveying Systems increased throughput and faster changeover, while reducing Pallet Inverting & Exchange (Fixed, Mobile & downtime and increasing overall equipment effectiveness. Automatic In-line) Pallet Stacking / Handling PESTER Scissors & Vacuum Lifting Systems Materials Handling Systems (Reel, Drum & Product Pester is a leading international manufacturer and supplier of Manipulators) shrink wrapping, banding, case packing and palletising equipPallet Elevating Systems ment, with a particular focus on the pharmaceutical industry. Palletising Systems (Gantry, Articulated Arm & Layer) Headquartered in Germany and with over 280 employees, the Stretch Wrapping company ensures that all customers’ packaging requirements are Strapping Systems (Case & Pallet) satisfied with machines of the highest reliability and quality. Washing Systems (Bottle, Jar, Box, Tray, Drum, With Irish references at P&G, Oral-B, Abbott Labs, Pallet, Keg & IBC etc) IVAX, Genzyme, GSK and Pfizer, amongst others, Pester AGV Transport has proven itself to be one of the best international Warehouse Management Systems (WMS) providers of validated equipment in this specialist field. 34


Shrink Wrapping

Bag-In-Box

Banding

Case Sealing

Liquid Filling

Conveying

Case Erecting

Labelling Systems

Case Packing

Check Weighing

Leaflet Dispensing Metal/X-Ray Detection

sales

installation

service

T: 067 37893 F: 067 34794 M: 087 1222816 info@goliath.ie www.goliath.ie BEECHWOOD, NENAGH, CO. TIPPERARY

Pallet Inverting

Palletising

Scissors Lifting

Stretch Wrapping

Vacuum Lifting

Strapping

Reel Handling

AGV Transport

Drum Handling

Washing Systems

Pallet Elevation

Warehousing

sales

installation

service


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PA C K A G I N G NEWMAN L ABELLING SYSTEMS

MJ MAILLIS

Newman Labelling Systems has been a world leader in the supply of pharmaceutical labelling systems for over 60 years and has built up an enviable reputation for high quality labelling equipment to meet the specific regulatory demands of the international pharmaceutical industry. The secret behind Newman’s success can be attributed to a combination of accuracy and reliability of equipment, quality and speed of validation, quality of after-sales service, engineering capability, staff experience and the stability of the company. Newman’s customers include the major global pharmaceutical manufacturers (including the world's Top 10) in addition to many smaller biotech companies, locally-based manufacturers and contract packers. Irish references include Allergan, Genzyme, IVAX and Helsinn Birex.

MJ Maillis UK, part of the global Maillis Group, are experts in the supply of automated/integrated strapping and wrapping systems. Based in Nottingham, MJ Maillis has enjoyed many years of successful project delivery, with over 2,000 installations. With wide ranging packaging expertise and an outstanding choice of high quality semi-automatic, automatic and high speed strapping and stretch-wrapping solutions, MJ Maillis is superbly placed to meet your complete end of line packaging needs.

JBT Automated guided vehicle systems by JBT (formerly FMC Technologies) provide automated material movement for customers in a variety of industries, including pharmaceutical, chemicals/plastics, hospital, warehouse/distribution and manufacturing. JBT is a world leader in AGV supply, with over 20 years’ experience.

SOCO SYSTEM Based in Denmark and founded in 1964, Soco System provides a complete range of end-of-line packaging equipment to the pharmachem sector. Incorporating carton erecting, pick & place, sealing, conveying, palletising and stretchwrapping solutions, amongst others, the company enjoys turnover in the region of €30m per annum.

JBT is a world leader in automated guided vehicle supply, with over 20 years’ experience.

SUMMARY

Soco System provides a complete range of end-of-line packaging equipment to the pharmachem sector, via Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd.

Goliath understands the specific needs of the pharmachem sector. From liquid filling, shrink-wrapping/banding, casepacking, labelling, palletising, pallet inverting to high speed washing, via partnerships with the above international companies, Goliath has positioned itself as a major provider of packaging equipment to the Irish pharmachem sector. Centrally located in Nenagh, Co. Tipperary, Goliath is less than two hours from all major markets, while trained engineers maintain spare parts and service all equipment installed with annual service contracts (reactive / preventative) available as preferred.

NEWSMITH The Newsmith name is synonymous with robust and reliable washing systems, designed for the particular requirements of the pharmachem industry. Newsmith has been manufacturing washing equipment since 1968 and has supplied hundreds of systems to the pharmachem sector, including Irish references at Organon, Pfizer, UCD and UCC. The Newsmith range includes the Series 80 Rack Washers (laboratory sector), Dynajet Cabinet Washers (trays, containers, pallets on trolleys etc), Rotary Bin Washers and high speed Conveyorised Systems (trays, drums, pallets, IBC’s etc).

To discuss your particular packaging equipment needs, please contact: George O’Leary, Director Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Beechwood, Nenagh, Co. Tipperary, Ireland. Tel: 067 37893 Fax: 067 34794 Mobile: 087 1222816 E-mail: info@goliath.ie service@goliath.ie Web: www.goliath.ie

TOPPY Toppy, based in Italy, specialises in providing a complete range of pallet inverting, retrieval, transfer and exchange equipment. The comprehensive product range incorporates both semi and fully automatic systems, plus mobile and fixed options. 36


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Industrial Packaging Ltd.

Irelands only manufacturer of fibre drums www.industrialpackaging.ie

Fibre Drums Plastic Drums IBCs Security Tags & Seals Small Sample Drums/Containers

Killarney Road, Bray, Co Wicklow Telephone: +353 1 2864010 Fax: +353 1 2864015 Email: sales@industrialpackaging.ie


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S U P P LY C H A I N M A N A G E M E N T

IMPROVING SUPPLY CHAIN PERFORMANCE

T

he international pharmaceutical business environment continues to develop at a rapid rate and Ireland remains a key global location for the sector. The important role of supply chain management (SCM) in better serving global markets cost effectively is widely acknowledged in the industry, and recent years have seen major developments in this area. However, development of an understanding of SCM and its role in improving business performance is often complicated by the terminology which has evolved over the years. This article explores the lean, agile and resilient concepts, with specific reference to their respective meanings and potential roles in improving supply chain performance in the pharma sector.

Lean, agile and resilient pharmaceutical supply chains: jargon or action? Edward Sweeney, Director of Learning, NITL, provides the answers.

LEAN SUPPLY CHAINS

improve this important aspect of customer service. From a financial perspective, going lean should reduce operating costs and facilitate more effective use of working capital and fixed assets, thus contributing significantly to overall profitability. This approach suggests that in going lean, the major benefits are derived directly from efficiency improvements. Lean thinking was popularised by the 1990 book “The Machine that Changed the World”. This book illustrated the significant performance gap between Japanese and western companies in the automotive sector and attributed the main reasons for this gap to the fact that Japanese approaches tended to use less of everything (e.g. less human effort, less stock and less time) across supply chain processes. In other words, Japanese supply chains tended to be leaner.

AGILE SUPPLY CHAINS

A cursory glance at a dictionary or thesaurus indicates that possible synonyms for ‘lean’ might include ‘thin’, ‘trim’ or ‘slim’. The most widely quoted antonyms of these words (i.e. words with the opposite meaning) include ‘fat’, ‘messy’ and ‘out of shape’. In the context of a business or a supply chain, lean was originally used to describe the situation where many of the non-value adding activities (NVAs) had been identified and eliminated. NVAs are activities which add cost without necessarily adding value. Value in this context can best be described as something which a customer is willing to pay for. Another perspective on NVAs is that they are activities which add time to supply chain processes without necessarily adding value from a customer point of view. The latter is important in two respects. Firstly, time is money and, therefore, taking unnecessary or wasteful time out of processes should lead directly to cost reductions. Secondly, taking wasteful time out of processes should result in faster product supply and, as a result,

In the case of the word ‘agile’, a dictionary or thesaurus indicates that possible synonyms might include ‘swift’, ‘responsive’ or ‘nim-

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S U P P LY C H A I N M A N A G E M E N T

RESILIENT SUPPLY CHAINS In the case of the word ‘resilient’, a dictionary or thesaurus indicates that possible synonyms might include ‘flexible’, ‘durable’ or ‘quick to recover’. Antonyms of these words might include ‘rigid’ and ‘inert’. The reality is that contemporary supply chains operate in uncertain and risky environments. Sources of risk include economic volatility, unpredictable natural phenomena (e.g. earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes) and political instability. In this context, there is a pressing need to develop supply chains which are resilient, i.e. that are capable of operating successfully in the face of these and other risks. Writing in a forthcoming book (Sweeney, 2009) a leading expert in this area, Professor Richard Wilding of Cranfield School of Management suggests that when building a resilient supply chain, four key things need to be considered. These are:

ble’. The most widely quoted antonyms of these words include ‘clumsy’, and (as with ‘lean’) ‘out of shape’. This suggests that the concepts of ‘speed of response’ and ‘flexibility’ are the keys to distinguishing between lean and agile. The need for agility in SCM is based on increasingly volatile market demand patterns and shortening product life cycles. The leading academic authority on agility, Professor Martin Christopher of Cranfield School of Management, states that: “Whilst ‘leanness’ may be an element of ‘agility’ in certain circumstances, by itself it will not enable the organisation to meet the precise needs of the customer more rapidly.” This implies that lean is effectively a subset of agile. Furthermore, the emphasis on speed is evident in Christopher’s use of the word ‘rapidly’. The implication here is that time is a key competitive weapon, with reduced new product introduction (NPI) and order fulfilment times, for example, providing the potential for significant performance improvement.

• • • •

Supply chain design; Creation of supply chain agility (see above); Building collaborative supply chain relationships; Creation of a supply chain risk management culture.

Each of these areas is important in its own right. However, it can be argued that collaboration with key suppliers and customers is one of the foundational principles for creating a resilient supply chain.

CONCLUSION The recent volatility in global markets has resulted in a situation where the effective management of pharma supply chains is becoming increasingly regarded as a major source of competitive advantage. However, this requires that the key SCM concepts of ‘lean’, ‘agile’ and ‘resilient’ are properly understood. The regulatory environment in which the industry operates, and the strict requirements associated with Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and Good Distribution Practice (GDP), bring particular challenges. However, the wider adoption of effective SCM has the potential to further improve shareholder value in all parts of the sector.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR EDWARD Sweeney is Director of Learning at NITL, where he has overall responsibility for all aspects of training and education provision. He is also active in research and carries out projects on many aspects of SCM on behalf of client companies. NITL (the National Institute for Transport and Logistics) is Ireland’s leading centre for education, research and consultancy in all aspects of sustainable transport and SCM. It is part of the Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT).

FOR MORE INFORMATION: ‘SUPPLY Chain Management and Logistics in a Volatile Global Environment’ by Edward Sweeney (2009) - with contributions from Martin Christopher, Richard Wilding and others - is available from Blackhall Publishing (visit http://www.blackhallpublishing.com/PGContent.php?UID=677).

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EU EMISSION TRADING SCHEME

THE EFFECTS OF ETS

T

he scientific consensus is that anthropogenic activities are contributing to the global challenge of climate change. In October 2008, the International Energy Agency’s ‘world energy outlook’ report made two major pronouncements – firstly, that ‘business as usual’ global energy supply and consumption trends are unsustainable, and secondly, that addressing climate change will require a decarbonisation of world energy sources i.e. a move away from a dependence on fossil fuels for energy.

Erik O’Donovan, IBEC, on how the EU Emission Trading Scheme (ETS) is set to impact on Irish business, including our pharmachem sector.

INTERNATIONAL CONTEXT

emissions by 20% based on 2005 levels and increase the penetration of energy from renewable sources to 16% by 2020. Several legislative instruments have been adopted as part of the package and published in the EU’s Official Journal on 5 June 2009, including: • Directive 2009/28/EC, which promotes the use of energy from renewable sources for power, heat and transport; • Directive 2009/29/EC, which amends and extends the EU emission trading scheme (ETS); • Decision 406/2009/EC, which provides for effort sharing by member states in reducing emissions from non-ETS sources; • Directive 2009/31/EC, which provides for the development of carbon, capture and storage technology.

Negotiations are already underway for a new, post-Kyoto agreement on addressing global climate change. These negotiations will come to a head in Copenhagen in December 2009. The EU has proposed that, as part of a new deal, developed countries should THE ETS REVISION reduce their emissions by 30% by 2020 compared to 1990 levels, and that The EU Emission Trading Scheme Michael Gillen, Director, Irish BioIndustry developing countries as a group should (ETS) is a policy mechanism that Association and Senior Executive, moderate their emissions through controls the quantity of carbon emisPharmachemical Ireland. nationally appropriate actions, to sions. The ETS is a ‘cap and trade’ achieve a level that would be 15-30% scheme that endows certain sectors in below their business as usual trend over the same period. Member States with a quota of emissions and allows trading of these quotas. In essence, EU-ETS places a price for EUROPEAN CONTEXT carbon emissions for power generation and certain energyintensive industrial activities. The EU has already adopted a leadership position by makThe principle of ETS is that the negative externality of ing a unilateral commitment that, in the absence of any new producing carbon is now internalised in the cost of proglobal agreement at Copenhagen, it will still reduce its emisduction and consumption, thus encouraging a decarbonisions by 20% by 2020 compared to 1990 levels. In sation of the economy. The ETS sector accounts for roughDecember 2008, the European Parliament approved a ly 34% of the total Irish GHG emissions. The bulk of Irish package of legally binding measures aimed at reducing EU carbon emissions originating from the business sector face greenhouse gas emissions and addressing climate change. a carbon price under the EU-ETS. The package includes EU targets of a 20% share for The quotas are currently allocated at national level, subrenewable energy sources in total energy consumption, a ject to approval by the European Commission. During first ETS trading period (2005-2007), Member States auc20% improved energy efficiency and a 20% reduction in EU tioned only very limited quantities of carbon allowances and greenhouse gas emissions, all by the year 2020. In the event for the second trading period (2008-2012), the majority of of a global agreement in Copenhagen, the EU will reduce carbon allowances were still allocated for free. its carbon emissions by 30% by 2020. The revised ETS, in the period 2013-2020, will remain The EU Climate and Energy Package provides the the EU’s key policy mechanism for addressing climate framework for how these objectives are to be achieved and change. However, the cap in the revised scheme will now has national implications. Ireland must reduce carbon 40


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EU EMISSION TRADING SCHEME be defined at EU level, not national level. There will be no free carbon allowances allocated to the power sector. Other sectors found by the Commission to be exposed to a significant risk of ‘carbon leakage’ will receive free allowances based on benchmarks, whose rules are yet to be defined, with allowances reducing annually to zero by 2027, the implication being that there will be continuous upward pressure on carbon allowance price, which has implications for electricity markets. Indirect carbon leakage is also provided for and allows for Member States to compensate certain installations for carbon costs passed on in electricity prices, where this passthrough may expose those installations to carbon leakage. The revenue from the auctioning of the allowances will support up to 12 carbon capture and storage demonstration projects and projects demonstrating innovative renewable energy technologies.

THE EU CLIMATE

AND

ENERGY PACKAGE

The EU Climate and Energy Package will require both EU and national actions to implement it. A great deal of work will be necessary to ensure the timely and effective delivery of a revised ETS in the context of a 20% or possible 30% reduction target by 2020. 15 comitology decisions must be taken to enable the revised ETS Directive come into operation. This will entail an intensive work programme over the next two years. The work is being progressed through the Climate Change Committee (CCC), chaired by the European Commission. Each Member State delegation is

considered to be a member of the CCC. The Commission have engaged consultants and public consultations are ongoing on the development of sectoral benchmarks for carbon leakage and the rules governing the logistics around the future auctioning of carbon allowances. At national level, efforts to address emissions from the non-ETS sector will be introduced on a rolling basis. IBEC has been engaging with the relevant officials in Government and representatives in Europe on the implementation of the package. In conclusion, the 2020 package agreed by the European Union’s institutions in December 2008, represents a major milestone in international policy on climate change. However, an enormous amount of work remains to be done in terms of delivering the logistical and operational framework necessary for a revised ETS in 2013. The evolution of this framework and its implications will be monitored keenly by all affected industrial sectors. Further Information: EU Commission web-site on ETS post 2012 http://ec.europa.eu/environment/climat/emission/ets_post2012_en.htm EU Commission public consultation on auctioning of carbon allowances (this consultation ends on 3 August 2009): http://ec.europa.eu/environment/climat/emission/auctioning_en.htm EU Commission consultative timetable on benchmarking: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/climat/emission/benchmarking_en.htm

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RECRUITMENT

CAREER PROSPECTS IN LIFE SCIENCES

T

Patrick O’Loughlin, founder of the O’Loughlin Partnership, on the current and future employment opportunities in the Life Sciences sector.

he Life Sciences sector (Pharmaceutical ~ Medical Device ~ Diagnostics) has thus far held up exceptionally well, with exports growing in quarter one of 2009: Pharmachem is growing by 5.2% and Medical Devices by 7.4%. Globally, we are seeing consolidation within the industry, with Pfizer taking over Wyeth and Merck Sharp Dohme acquiring Schering Plough for $41 billion. Historically, the industry was driven by developing blockbuster drugs and strong branding and marketing structures ensuring massive profits. During this era, these companies were not particularly concerned with the cost of manufacturing. However, the decline of the blockbuster drug is leading to a greater focus on cost of R&D and manufacturing. The current international recession, combined with global consolidation, has, in a way, made it easier for these corporations to implement major restructuring and rationalisation of their manufacturing cost base.

focus on global corporations on cutting costs and rationalising manufacturing structures. The world population is growing and the emerging markets are becoming wealthier, thus the demand for Life Sciences products will increase. I do not see significant expansion of commercial research career opportunities in Ireland within the Pharmaceutical sector. However, there will be growing opportunities in the commercialisation of new products (i.e. Technology Transfer, Process Development, Analytical Development, Regulatory Compliance/Approval). The ever increasing burden of compliance will guarantee a steady stream of opportunities in Quality Control, Assurance and Regulatory Affairs.

FALLING COST BASE Our cost base will slowly fall in line with our competitors’ and as the global economy moves out of recession, we should see a return in capital investment, which will offer better prospects for project and consulting engineers. There is a steady demand for process, production and automation engineers and this will continue as companies strive to reduce manufacturing costs through improvements in automation, manufacturing systems and energy efficiency programs. The Medical Devices industry will continue on its growth path, offering opportunities across all areas, including R&D (product development & design), manufacturing and business development. The Medical Devices sector, like the pharmaceutical sector, is dominated by a small number

MEDICAL DEVICES The Medical Device Sector has very different dynamic visà-vis the Pharmaceuticals Sector in that the core technologies have more in common with precision engineering, material science, and polymer processing then they have with Chemical Engineering, Chemistry or Biology. In 2008, Medical Device exports grew by 23% and because it is relatively easier to design a new instrument, device, or drug delivery system, compared to developing and commercialising a new drug, Ireland seems to have done exceptionally well in convincing US multinationals to set up R&D activities. Finally, Ireland is one of the top user friendly countries to set up business. The IDA, Enterprise Ireland, SFI and the Government, have shown a total commitment to moving the industry up the value chain and that is beginning to happen.

YOUR CAREER PROSPECTS So what does all this mean for your career prospects? There is no doubt that Ireland will continue to have a vibrant Life Sciences sector, regardless of the outcome of the current 42


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RECRUITMENT

ABOUT

THE

AUTHOR:

PATRICK O’Loughlin is founder of the O’Loughlin Partnership, established in 1990, which specialises in Executive Search, Selection and Interim Management focusing on the Life Sciences Sector ( Pharmaceutical ~ Diagnostics ~ Medical Device ~ Biologics). Tel: + 353 (0)1 2800430 or + 353 (0)86 2600227. Email: patrick@olpartners.com. careful look at your existing employer and make an assessment of the organisation’s strategic direction. Ask yourself if your current employer’s strategies are broadly aligned to current thinking regarding the future direction of the Life Sciences industry. Take a more global perspective and be prepared to relocate to a job that will accelerate your career progression. For the very brave, you might want to consider joining a more commercially focused and dynamic private enterprise or emerging R&D company. Too many executives, who find themselves in a demanding role, become complacent when it comes to managing their career. I am not suggesting that you do not show total commitment and loyalty to your current employer but you must always look at the bigger picture to ensure you maximise your career prospects.

of large MNC’s: however, there is a growing group of indigenous SME companies who can offer good career prospects in a dynamic and commercial working environment.

PLANNING YOUR FUTURE CAREER For those who are already climbing the career ladder, either as manager or technology/scientific leader, don’t spend too long waiting to see what happens next! Take a

Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Stockists and Distributors of Metal, Plastic & Fibre Board Drums Please contact: David O’Neill St. Brendan’s Road, Portumna Co. Galway Tel: 09097 41148/9 Fax: 09097 41459 Mob: 086 6992693 Email: sales@quitmannoneill.com Web: www.quitmannoneillpackaging.com

Nationwide Delivery Service

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IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009 CHEMICAL SUPPLIERS

CHEMICAL SUPPLIERS ACIDS & ALKALIS ABB Ltd Albion Chemicals Ltd BASF Ireland Ltd Brenntag Ireland Camida Ltd Carbon Group Chemco Ireland Ltd Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Enva Ireland Ltd Fisher Scientific Goulding Chemicals Ltd Norman Lauder Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd Ocon Chemicals Ltd P.K. Chemicals Ltd SciChem Univar Ltd

BIOCHEMICALS Albion Chemicals Ltd BASF Ireland Ltd Brenntag Ireland Camida Ltd Chemco Ireland Ltd Fisher Scientific

BIOCIDES ABB Ltd Albion Chemicals Ltd BASF Ireland Ltd Brenntag Ireland Camida Ltd Carbon Group Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Univar Ltd

CATALYSTS Albion Chemicals Ltd BASF Ireland Ltd Brenntag Ireland Camida Ltd Chemco Ireland Ltd Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Norman Lauder Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd P.K. Chemicals Ltd

CHIRAL COMPOUNDS BASF Ireland Ltd Brenntag Ireland Camida Ltd Norman Lauder Ltd

EXCIPIENTS ABB Ltd Albion Chemicals Ltd BASF Ireland Ltd Betco Marketing Ltd Brenntag Ireland Camida Ltd Carbon Group Chemco Ireland Ltd Norman Lauder Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd Ocon Chemicals Ltd P.K. Chemicals Ltd Univar Ltd

FINE CHEMICALS Albion Chemicals Ltd BASF Ireland Ltd Betco Marketing Ltd Brenntag Ireland Camida Ltd Carbon Group Chemco Ireland Ltd Fisher Scientific Norman Lauder Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd Ocon Chemicals Ltd P.K. Chemicals Ltd SciChem

GASES Albion Chemicals Ltd BASF Ireland Ltd Brenntag Ireland Corcoran Chemicals Ltd

HETEROCYCLICS Albion Chemicals Ltd BASF Ireland Ltd Brenntag Ireland Camida Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd

INORGANIC CHEMICALS ABB Ltd Albion Chemicals Ltd BASF Ireland Ltd Brenntag Ireland Camida Ltd Carbon Group Chemco Ireland Ltd Enva Ireland Ltd Fisher Scientific Goulding Chemicals Ltd Norman Lauder Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd Ocon Chemicals Ltd P.K. Chemicals Ltd SciChem Univar Ltd

L ABORATORY REAGEANTS BASF Ireland Ltd Brenntag Ireland Fisher Scientific National Chemical Co. Ltd Ocon Chemicals Ltd SciChem

MISC. CHEMICALS ABB Ltd BASF Ireland Ltd Brenntag Ireland Camida Ltd Carbon Group Chemco Ireland Ltd Enva Ireland Ltd Fisher Scientific Norman Lauder Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd Ocon Chemicals Ltd P.K. Chemicals Ltd Univar Ltd

OILS, FATS AND WAXES Albion Chemicals Ltd BASF Ireland Ltd Brenntag Ireland Carbon Group Corcoran Chemicals Ltd P.K. Chemicals Ltd

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ORGANIC INTERMEDIATES ABB Ltd Albion Chemicals Ltd BASF Ireland Ltd Brenntag Ireland Camida Ltd Chemco Ireland Ltd Norman Lauder Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd Ocon Chemicals Ltd TopChem Laboratories Ltd Univar Ltd

ORGANOMETALLICS BASF Ireland Ltd Brenntag Ireland Camida Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd Ocon Chemicals Ltd

REAGENTS

SOLVENTS

BASF Ireland Ltd Brenntag Ireland Camida Ltd Fisher Scientific Norman Lauder Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd SciChem

SILANES ABB Ltd BASF Ireland Ltd Brenntag Ireland Camida Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd Ocon Chemicals Ltd P.K. Chemicals Ltd Univar Ltd

ABB Ltd Albion Chemicals Ltd BASF Ireland Ltd Betco Marketing Ltd Brenntag Ireland Camida Ltd Carbon Group Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Fisher Scientific Norman Lauder Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd SciChem Univar Ltd

SURFACTANTS ABB Ltd Albion Chemicals Ltd BASF Ireland Ltd Brenntag Ireland Camida Ltd Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Fisher Scientific Norman Lauder Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd Univar Ltd

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IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009


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IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009 GENERAL SUPPLIERS

GENERAL SUPPLIERS ACCESS CONTROL IMEC Technologies

ACTUATORS Festo Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Norgren Ireland Ltd Schuf Valve Technology Tyco Valves & Controls Distribution

AERATORS Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd ITT Water & Waste Water Ireland Ltd

AGITATORS Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Lianco Odenberg Engineering Ltd Quitmann Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill Packaging Ltd WrenTech Ltd

AIR FILTRATION/MONITORING / POLLUTION CONTROL Lianco Norgren Ireland Ltd Shaw Scientific Ltd

ALARMS P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd

ALUMINIUM PRODUCTS Topchem Laboratories Ltd

ANALYSIS SERVICES Anecto Catalent Pharma Solutions

ANALYTICAL EQUIPMENT Calibration Technology Classic Technology Ltd Fisher Scientific National Instruments Pollution Control Systems Ltd Sartorius Mechatronics Ltd

SciChem Shaw Scientific Ltd Waters Chromatography Ireland

A SSOCIATIONS Irish Exporters Assoc.-Life Sciences Irl.

AUTOCLAVES Fisher Scientific Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd SciChem Shaw Scientific Ltd WrenTech Ltd

AUTOMATION P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd Classic Technology Ltd Eurothem Ireland Ltd Festo Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd National Instruments Norgren Ireland Ltd Sepha Ltd

BALANCES

BARRIERS SAFETY Odenberg Engineering Ltd WrenTech Ltd

BIOTECHNOLOGY Callaghan Engineering Catalent Pharma Solutions FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Ltd Fisher Scientific Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd PM Group

BLENDERS Fisher Scientific Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Lianco WrenTech Ltd

BLISTERING / DE-BLISTERING Sepha Ltd

BLOWERS Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Lianco

BPRV

P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd Calibration Technology Fisher Scientific Irish National Accreditation Board Sartorius Mechatronics Ltd SciChem Shaw Scientific Ltd WrenTech Ltd

BARCODING/L ABELLING/ TRACEABILITY Catalent Pharma Solutions Fisher Scientific Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd GS1 Ireland IMEC Technologies New Era Packaging Ltd Odenberg Engineering Ltd Weber Labelling & Coding Zetes 46

BS&B Safety Systems Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd

BURSTING / RUPTURE DISCS BS&B Safety Systems Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd

CABINETS Festo Ltd Fisher Scientific Lianco Logstrup (Ireland) Ltd ProSys Sampling Systems Ltd Sartorius Mechatronics Ltd WrenTech Ltd


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CAD Anecto Callaghan Engineering FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd PM Group

CALIBRATION Astech Ireland Ltd P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd Calibration Technology Classic Technology Ltd Eurothem Ireland Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Irish National Accreditation Board Ocon Chemicals Ltd Sartorius Mechatronics Ltd Waters Chromatography Ireland

CENTRIFUGES Fisher Scientific GEA Process Technologies Ltd Sartorius Mechatronics Ltd SciChem Shaw Scientific Ltd

CHEMICAL CONSULTANTS Callaghan Engineering Enva Ireland Ltd Topchem Laboratories Ltd

CHROMOTOGRAPHY Callaghan Engineering Fisher Scientific Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd SciChem Waters Chromatography Ireland

CLEANROOMS Callaghan Engineering Charpak Medical Dalkia Fisher Scientific PM Group WrenTech Ltd

CLEANING SERVICES/ EQUIPMENT

COLD CHAIN PACKAGING Catalent Pharma Solutions Cross Technical Solutions GS1 Ireland Smurfit Kappa Ireland Weber Labelling & Coding

COMPRESSED AIR/ COMPRESSORS Festo Ltd Norgren Ireland Ltd

COMPUTER SYSTEMS Eurothem Ireland Ltd IMEC Technologies Weber Labelling & Coding

CONDENSORS Cross Technical Solutions Graham Hart (Process Technology) Ltd

CONDITION MONITORING

DEHUMIDIFIERS Cross Technical Solutions

DESIGN Callaghan Engineering Cross Technical Solutions FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd PM Group

DISPERSERS Lianco Ocon Chemicals Ltd WrenTech Ltd

DISTILLATION Fisher Scientific Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd WrenTech Ltd

DRAINS

National Instruments

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT Callaghan Engineering PM Group

CONVEYORS Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Lianco Weber Labelling & Coding WrenTech Ltd

COOLING SYSTEMS Cross Technical Solutions Graham Hart (Process Technology) Ltd

DATA ACQUISITION P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd Eurothem Ireland Ltd National Instruments Waters Chromatography Ireland Weber Labelling & Coding Zenith Technologies

Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd

47

Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd

DRIERS Complas Packaging Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd Lianco WrenTech Ltd

DRUMS/CONTAINERS Complas Packaging Ltd Fisher Scientific Indaver Ireland Industrial Packaging Ltd Interpac Norman Lauder Ltd Quitmann Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill Packaging Ltd WrenTech Ltd

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY Invest Northern Ireland

EDUCATION & TRAINING Calibration Technology FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Ltd Festo Ltd

GENERAL SUPPLIERS

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009


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IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009 GENERAL SUPPLIERS

Hazchem Training Ltd Henley Forklift Group Ltd Irish Exporters Assoc.-Life Sciences Irl. NITL PM Group Waters Chromatography Ireland

EFFLUENT MONITORING/ TREATMENT Astech Ireland Ltd Axium Process Carbon Group Dalkia Enva Ireland Ltd ITT Water & Waste Water Ireland Ltd Norgren Ireland Ltd Norman Lauder Ltd Pollution Control Systems Ltd

ELECTRICAL Callaghan Engineering Cross Technical Solutions

ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS Cross Technical Solutions

ENERGY EFFICIENCY / MANAGEMENT Callaghan Engineering Cross Technical Solutions Dalkia ESB Independent Energy FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Irish National Accreditation Board PM Group Sustainable Energy Ireland

ENGINEERING SERVICES

E NVIRONMENTAL CONSULTING PM Group

ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES/ EQUIPMENT Astech Ireland Ltd Callaghan Engineering Cross Technical Solutions Dalkia Enva Ireland Ltd Environmental Protection Agency FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Ltd IMEC Technologies PM Group Pollution Control Systems Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd

EVAPORATORS Cross Technical Solutions Fisher Scientific Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd Graham Hart (Process Technology) Ltd Lianco

EXPLOSION PROOFING BS&B Safety Systems Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Gunnebo Ireland Ltd Norgren Ireland Ltd Sartorius Mechatronics Ltd

EXPLOSION PROTECTION / PANELS BS&B Safety Systems Ltd

EXTRUDERS

P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Lianco Odenberg Engineering Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd WrenTech Ltd

FILTERS Axium Process Fisher Scientific ITT Water & Waste Water Ireland Ltd Nederman Ltd Norgren Ireland Ltd Ocon Chemicals Ltd

FILTRATION Axium Process Carbon Group Enva Ireland Ltd Fisher Scientific GEA Process Technologies Ltd ITT Water & Waste Water Ireland Ltd Lianco Nederman Ltd Norgren Ireland Ltd Ocon Chemicals Ltd SciChem

FLOW CONTROL P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd Classic Technology Ltd Festo Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Manotherm Ltd Norgren Ireland Ltd Tyco Valves & Controls Distribution

FLUID HANDLING

Lianco Callaghan Engineering Cross Technical Solutions Dalkia Eurothem Ireland Ltd FDT Consulting Engineers & Lianco Project Managers Ltd Festo Ltd Nederman Ltd PM Group

FILLING EQUIPMENT

FACILITY DESIGN PM Group

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Dalkia Norman Lauder Ltd

48

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FUME CUPBOARDS Fisher Scientific Nederman Ltd SciChem Shaw Scientific Ltd WrenTech Ltd

FURNACES Eurothem Ireland Ltd Fisher Scientific SciChem

GAS DETECTION P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd Classic Technology Ltd Fisher Scientific

GAUGES P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd Classic Technology Ltd Fisher Scientific Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd Manotherm LtdRS Norgren Ireland Ltd

GLASSWARE Fisher Scientific Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd SciChem

GRINDING Fisher Scientific Lianco

HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL/TREATMENT Enva Ireland Ltd Hazchem Training Ltd IMEC Technologies Indaver Ireland Interpac Ocon Chemicals Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Sepha Ltd Soltec (Ireland) Ltd

HEALTH & SAFETY/FIRST AID Fisher Scientific Hazchem Training Ltd SciChem

HEAT EXCHANGERS Axium Process Cross Technical Solutions Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd Graham Hart (Process Technology) Ltd Lianco ProSys Sampling Systems Ltd Tyco Valves & Controls Distribution WrenTech Ltd

HEATERS Lianco

HOMOGENISERS Fisher Scientific Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd Lianco WrenTech Ltd

HOSES

INSPECTION EQUIPMENT P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd National Instruments Sartorius Mechatronics Ltd Sepha Ltd

INSTRUMENTATION Astech Ireland Ltd P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd Classic Technology Ltd Cross Technical Solutions Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd Manotherm Ltd National Instruments Norgren Ireland Ltd Tyco Valves & Controls Distribution Waters Chromatography Ireland Zenith Technologies

IT Callaghan Engineering National Instruments Weber Labelling & Coding

INVESTMENT Science Foundation Ireland (SFI)

Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Micro Hydraulics Ltd/Micro Industries Ltd Nederman Ltd Norgren Ireland Ltd

HUMIDITY/HUMIDIFIERS Classic Technology Ltd Cross Technical Solutions Interpac

HYDRAULICS Micro Hydraulics Ltd/Micro Industries Ltd

INCINERATION Indaver Ireland

INCUBATORS Fisher Scientific Ocon Chemicals Ltd SciChem Shaw Scientific Ltd 49

INVESTMENT PROMOTION AGENCY IDA Ireland

L AB EQUIPMENT/SUPPLIES Astech Ireland Ltd Calibration Technology Classic Technology Ltd Fisher Scientific Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Lianco National Instruments Ocon Chemicals Ltd ProSys Sampling Systems Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Sartorius Mechatronics Ltd Sealpack Ltd SciChem Shaw Scientific Ltd Waters Chromatography Ireland WrenTech Ltd

GENERAL SUPPLIERS

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009


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IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009 GENERAL SUPPLIERS

LEGAL/FINANCIAL/ INSURANCE Matheson Ormsby Prentice

LOGISTICS C+G Logistics Group Celtic Forwarding Ltd GS1 Ireland Johnston Logistics Ltd

LIFTS & HOISTS Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Gunnebo Ireland Ltd Henley Forklift Group Ltd Lianco Norman Lauder Ltd WrenTech Ltd

MACHINE TOOLS Lister Machine Tools Ltd

MAINTENANCE Cross Technical Solutions Dalkia Festo Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Gunnebo Ireland Ltd Henley Forklift Group Ltd Lister Machine Tools Ltd Sartorius Mechatronics Ltd Waters Chromatography Ireland Weber Labelling & Coding

MATERIALS HANDLING/ FORKLIFTS/PALLET TRUCKS Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Henley Forklift Group Ltd Interpac Norman Lauder Ltd Odenberg Engineering Ltd WrenTech Ltd

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SERVICES Axium Process Callaghan Engineering Cross Technical Solutions Dalkia FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Ltd Festo Ltd Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd

MECHANICAL & PROCESS ENGINEERING Axium Process Callaghan Engineering Dalkia FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd Norgren Ireland Ltd Tyco Valves & Controls Distribution

MEDICAL DEVICE MANUFACTURE

MICROSCOPES Fisher Scientific Ocon Chemicals Ltd SciChem Shaw Scientific Ltd

MILLING Fisher Scientific Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd SciChem WrenTech Ltd

MIXERS Fisher Scientific Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd ITT Water & Waste Water Ireland Ltd SciChem WrenTech Ltd

NOISE/ODOUR CONTROL Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd

OEM MANUFACTURING

Croom Precision Medical

MEMBRANE FILTRATION SYSTEMS

B. Braun Medical Viking Pump (Europe) Ltd

PACKAGING/DESIGN

MICROFILTRATION

Axium Process NANOFILTRATION

Axium Process ULTRAFILTRATION

Axium Process

METERS P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd Classic Technology Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd Lianco Manotherm Ltd National Instruments

50

Anecto Catalent Pharma Solutions Charpak Medical Complas Packaging Ltd GS1 Ireland Interpac Measom Freer New Era Packaging Ltd NPP Group Ltd PrimePac Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Sealpack Ltd Smurfit Kappa Ireland Weber Labelling & Coding

PACKAGING/MACHINERY Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Interpac NPP Group Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Sepha Ltd Weber Labelling & Coding


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PALLETS Carbon Group Complas Packaging Ltd Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Interpac Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Smurfit Kappa Ireland WrenTech Ltd

PHARMACEUTICAL FABRICATION Axium Process

PIPES/CORES Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Industrial Packaging Ltd Smurfit Kappa Ireland

PLASTIC CONTAINERS PrimePac Ltd

PLASTIC CORES / TUBES Smurfit Kappa Ireland

PNEUMATICS P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd Festo Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Norgren Ireland Ltd

POLLUTION CONTROL Nederman Ltd Pollution Control Systems Ltd

POWDER HANDLING Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Lianco Odenberg Engineering Ltd ProSys Sampling Systems Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd WrenTech Ltd

POWER SUPPLY

PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS/ SWITCHES/VESSELS Axium Process P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd BS&B Safety Systems Ltd Classic Technology Ltd Cross Technical Solutions Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd National Instruments Norgren Ireland Ltd Ocon Chemicals Ltd

PRESSURE VESSELS Graham Hart (Process Technology) Ltd

PRESSURE RELIEF BS&B Safety Systems Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd Manotherm Ltd Norgren Ireland Ltd Tyco Valves & Controls Distribution

PROCESS CONTROL Astech Ireland Ltd Axium Process P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd Classic Technology Ltd FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd Lianco Logstrup (Ireland) Ltd National Instruments Norgren Ireland Ltd Pollution Control Systems Ltd Sartorius Mechatronics Ltd Zenith Technologies

PROCESS DESIGN

PROJECT MANAGEMENT Axium Process Callaghan Engineering Cross Technical Solutions GEA Process Technologies Ltd FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Ltd Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Odenberg Engineering Ltd PM Group Zenith Technologies

PROTECTIVE CLOTHING/ APPARATUS Albion Chemicals

PUMPS Fisher Scientific Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd ITT Water & Waste Water Ireland Ltd ProSys Sampling Systems Ltd Viking Pump (Europe) Ltd

REACTORS Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd Graham Hart (Process Technology) Ltd

RECRUITMENT Berkley Pharmaceutical FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Ltd ICDS Recruitment Consultants Life Science Recruitment Ltd O’Loughlin Partnership Science Recruitment Ireland Zenith Technologies

R&D

PM Group

PROCESS & MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CONTRACTORS Axium Process FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd

Dalkia ESB Independent Energy

51

Axium Process FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd Ocon Chemicals Ltd SciChem Sepha Ltd Topchem Laboratories Ltd

GENERAL SUPPLIERS

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009


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IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009 GENERAL SUPPLIERS

REFRIGERATION/FREEZING Baku GLS Ltd Cross Technical Solutions Dalkia Fisher Scientific GEA Process Technologies Ltd SciChem Viking Pump (Europe) Ltd

RENEWABLE ENERGY Dalkia ESB Independent Energy Sustainable Energy Ireland Viking Pump (Europe) Ltd

SANITARY TUBING Micro Hydraulics Ltd/Micro Industries Ltd

SCADA/DCS/MIS P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd Cross Technical Solutions Eurothem Ireland Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd National Instruments Weber Labelling & Coding Zenith Technologies

SCREENS Lianco

SCRUBBERS Graham Hart (Process Technology) Ltd

SEALS & GASKETS Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Micro Hydraulics Ltd/Micro Industries Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd

SIEVING Fisher Scientific Lianco SciChem

SOFTWARE

SUSTAINABILITY

P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd Crest Solutions Ltd Eurothem Ireland Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd IMEC Technologies Lianco Sartorius Mechatronics Ltd Waters Chromatography Ireland Weber Labelling & Coding Zenith Technologies

SOLVENT RECOVERY/ SERVICES FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Ltd Indaver Ireland Norman Lauder Ltd Soltec (Ireland) Ltd

STAINLESS STEEL/ FITTINGS/PRODUCTS Festo Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Interpac Micro Hydraulics Ltd/Micro Industries Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd

STEAM EQUIPMENT Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd

STORAGE/BUNDING Baku GLS Ltd C+G Logistics Group Carbon Group Chemco Ireland Ltd Industrial Packaging Ltd Interpac Johnston Logistics Ltd

SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT GS1 Ireland IMEC Technologies Johnston Logistics Ltd KWE (Ireland) Ltd NPP Group Ltd Smurfit Kappa Ireland

52

PM Group

TABLETING EQUIPMENT Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Lianco WrenTech Ltd

TANKS Axium Process Celtic Forwarding Ltd Complas Packaging Ltd Enva Ireland Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Industrial Packaging Ltd Micro Hydraulics Ltd/Micro Industries Ltd Norman Lauder Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd WrenTech Ltd

TEMPERATURE CONTROL P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd Classic Technology Ltd Cross Technical Solutions Eurothem Ireland Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Johnston Logistics Ltd Manotherm Ltd National Instruments

TESTING SERVICES Anecto Carbon Group Irish National Accreditation Board

THERMAL IMAGING/ THERMOGRAPHY P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd Cross Technical Solutions Dalkia FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Ltd Manotherm Ltd National Instruments


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TRANSPORT & LOGISTICS Baku GLS Ltd C+G Logistics Group Celtic Forwarding Ltd GS1 Ireland Hazchem Training Ltd Irish Exporters Assoc.-Life Sciences Irl. Johnston Logistics Ltd KWE (Ireland) Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd

TUBE SETS/DISPOSABLES Micro Hydraulics Ltd/Micro Industries Ltd

VACUUM SYSTEMS Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Lianco Nederman Ltd Norgren Ireland Ltd WrenTech Ltd

VALVES Axium Process P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd BS&B Safety Systems Ltd Festo Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ltd Lianco Manotherm Ltd Micro Hydraulics Ltd/Micro Industries Ltd Norgren Ireland Ltd ProSys Sampling Systems Ltd Schuf Valve Technology Tyco Valves & Controls Distribution

VALIDATION Astech Ireland Ltd Callaghan Engineering Catalent Pharma Solutions Classic Technology Ltd Crest Solutions Ltd Cross Technical Solutions FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Ltd PM Group Waters Chromatography Ireland Zenith Technologies

WASTE MANAGEMENT/ BALERS/RECYCLING Axium Process Carbon Group Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd IMEC Technologies Indaver Ireland Interpac Ocon Chemicals Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Soltec (Ireland) Ltd REVERSE OSMOSIS

VENTILATION

Axium Process

Callaghan Engineering Cross Technical Solutions Nederman Ltd

VISION SYSTEMS Crest Solutions Ltd Lister Machine Tools Ltd National Instruments

WAREHOUSE MANAGEMENT C+G Logistics Group Celtic Forwarding Ltd Complas Packaging Ltd Eurothem Ireland Ltd Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd GS1 Ireland IMEC Technologies Johnston Logistics Ltd Weber Labelling & Coding Zenith Technologies

WASHING EQUIPMENT GEA Process Technologies Ltd Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd SciChem

53

WATER TREATMENT ABB Ltd Axium Process Carbon Group Chemco Ireland Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd ITT Water & Waste Water Ireland Ltd Logstrup (Ireland) Ltd Norgren Ireland Ltd Norman Lauder Ltd PM Group Pollution Control Systems Ltd Univar Ltd

WEIGHING P.J. Boner & Co. Ltd Calibration Technology Classic Technology Ltd Fisher Scientific Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Sartorius Mechatronics Ltd Shaw Scientific Ltd WrenTech Ltd

GENERAL SUPPLIERS

SECTION B - GENERAL SUPPLIERS


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IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009

C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

COMPANY LISTINGS A

B

ANECTO Address:

ABB LTD Address:

Belgard Road, Tallaght, Dublin 24. Tel: (01) 405 7300 Fax: (01) 405 7327 Email: marketing@ie.abb.com Web: www.abb.com Type of Business: Lifescience solutions. Contact: Lifesciences: Daniel Keogh

Mervue Business Park, Co. Galway. Tel: (091) 757 404 Fax: (091) 757 387 Email: sales@anecto.com Web: www.anecto.com Type of Business: Dangerous goods packaging testing laboratory. Contact: Yvonne Kearney

Address:

Unit 1B, 11 Canal Bank, Parkwest Industrial Park, Nangor Road, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 620 9777 Fax: (01) 620 9722 Email: info@adcbarcode.com Web: www.adcbarcodesolutions.com Contact: Marketing Manager: Celine Wogan

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

AGB SCIENTIFIC LTD

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Address:

Orion Business Campus, Northwest Business Park, Ballycoolin, Dublin 15. Tel: (01) 882 2222 Fax: (01) 882 2333 Email: info@agb.ie Web: www.agb.ie www.labshop.ie Type of Business: Lab supplier.

Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Kilrane Business Pk, Rosslare Harbour Co. Wexford. (053) 916 1786 (053) 916 1789 leslie@bakugls.com www.bakugls.com Operations Director: Leslie Devereaux

Unit 47, Southern Cross Business Park, Boghall Road, Bray, Co. Wicklow. (01) 286 5303 (01) 286 5655 sales@astechireland.ie www.astechireland.ie Managing Director: Shay Vella Hancock

BASF IRELAND LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Type of Business: Contact:

Unit B7, Centre Point Business Park, Oak Road, Dublin 12. (01) 460 7070 (01) 461 0771 automationsales@atc.ie www.atc.ie Liam Prendergast Sales Manager

Bracetown Business Park, Clonee, Co. Meath. (01) 825 5701 (01) 825 2038 yvonne.mullins@basf.com www.basf.com Distributor of chemicals. Business Development Manager, Pharmaceutical Industry: Yvonne Mullins

B. BRAUN MEDICAL Address:

3 Naas Road Industrial Park, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 709 1801 Fax: (01) 709 1889 Email: bill.proctor@bbraun.com Web: www.bbraun.com Type of Business: OEM manufacturing. Contact: Business Unit Manager: Bill Proctor

AXIUM PROCESS Address:

The Woodlands, Carrigmore, Ballineen, Co. Cork. (023) 47333 (023) 47671 info@aicplasticpallets.com www.aicplasticpallets.com Director: Charles Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donovan

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

ATC AUTOMATION LTD

AIC PLASTIC PALLETS LTD Address:

Address:

ASTECH IRELAND LTD

ADC BARCODE SOLUTIONS Address:

BAKU GLS LTD

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Hendy Industrial Estate, Hendy, Swansea, SA4 0XP. (0044) 1792 883882 (0044) 1792 886049 info@axiumprocess.com www.axiumprocess.com Business Development Manager: Derek Davies 54

All this and more available online on www.irishpharmachem.com.


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BRIGHTWATER

CALLAGHAN ENGINEERING

Address:

Address:

BERKLEY PHARMACEUTICAL Address:

Tel: Email: Web: Contact:

Dublin: 509 The Capel Building, Mary’s Abbey, Dublin 7. Cork: Mill House, Carrigrohane, Co. Cork. (01) 872 4666 (021) 428 9600 pharma@berkley.ie www.berkley.ie Joanna Houston

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Dublin: 36 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. Cork: 49 South Mall, Co. Cork (01) 662 1000 (021) 422 1000 (01) 662 3900 (021) 422 4001 a.carty@brightwater.ie cork@brightwater.ie www.brightwater.ie Manager, Pharmaceutical: Adrian Carty

BS&B SAFETY SYSTEMS LTD Address:

BETCO MARKETING LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Exham House, The Fingerpost, Douglas, Co. Cork. (021) 436 4999 (021) 436 5739 dhalpin@betco.ie www.betco.ie Managing Director: Diarmuid Halpin

P.J. BONER & CO. LTD INSTRUMENT & WEIGHTING SPECIALISTS Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Type of Business: Contact:

35 Western Parkway Business Centre, Ballymount Drive, Ballymount, Dublin 12. (01) 450 5050 (01) 450 5183 info@pjboner.com www.pjboner.com Instrument & weighing specialists. Managing Director: Pat Boner

BRENNTAG IRELAND Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Unit 405, Greenogue Business Park, Rathcoole, Dublin 24. (01) 401 3500 (01) 405 3501 bill.maher@brenntag.ie www.brenntag.ie General Manager: Bill Maher

Raheen Business Park, Raheen, Co. Limerick. Tel: (061) 484 700 Emergency Delivery: 086 241 0615 Direct Line: 086 838 5556 Fax: (061) 352 240 Email: patrick.murphy@bsb.ie Web: www.bsb.ie Type of Business: Pressure relief devices. Contact: Sales Manager: Patrick Murphy

C

Dublin: Wentworth House, 19-20 Hogan Place, Lower Grand Canal Street, Dublin 2. Cork: Penrose House, Penrose Quay, Co. Cork. Tel: (01) 661 4420 (021) 455 1646 Fax: (01) 661 4424 (021) 455 1770 Email: donal.ocallaghan@calleng.ie willieomahony@calleng.ie Web: www.calleng.ie Type of Business: Engineering. Contact: Dublin Managing Director: Donal O’Callaghan Cork - Principal Electrical Engineer: Willie O’Mahony

CAMIDA LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Tower House, New Quay, Clonmel, Co. Tipperary. (052) 612 5455 (052) 612 5466 info@camida.com www.camida.com Company Secretary: Deirdre McGrath

CALIBRATION TECHNOLOGY

CARBON GROUP

Address:

Address:

Innovation Works, National Technology Park, Co. Limerick. Tel: (061) 503 132 Fax: (061) 338 065 Email: service@calibrationtech.ie Web: www.calibrationtech.ie Type of Business: Accredited calibration of all makes of laboratory equipment. Contact: Operations Manager: Brian Kelly

55

Factory Cross, Ringaskiddy, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 437 8988 UK Local Lo-Call: (0044) 8708 504 831 Fax: (021) 437 8950 Email: cdeegan@indigo.ie sales@carbon.ie Web: www.carbon.ie Type of Business: Pharmachemicals. Contact: Area Sales Manager: Carol Deegan

C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009


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IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009 C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

CATALENT PHARMA SOLUTIONS

CHARPAK MEDICAL

COMPLAS PACKAGING LTD

Address:

Address:

Address:

Unit 26, Cherry Orchard Industrial Estate, Dublin 10. Tel: (01) 620 0600 Fax: (01) 626 2815 Email: diarmuid.wilson@catalent.com Web: www.catalent.com Contact: Sales Director Ireland: Diarmuid Wilson

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

30 St. Peters Road, Huntingdon, Cambs. UK. 0044 1480 434434 0044 1480 434545 sales@charpak.co.uk www.charpak medical.com Director: Paul Smith

CORCORAN CHEMICALS LTD Address:

CELTIC FORWARDING LTD Dublin: Celtic House, 30 Marlborough Street, Dublin 1. Waterford: Belview Port, Slieverue, Co. Waterford. Limerick: 2 Church Street, Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Square, Co. Limerick. Tel: (01) 865 6000 (051) 851 821 (061) 467 969 Fax: (01) 874 6745 (051) 851 823 (061) 467 972 Email: info@celticfwd.ie Web: www.celticfwd.ie Type of Business: Shipping. Contact: Director: Finbarr Cleary Sales Manager: Gerald Kiernan Waterford: DGSA Tank Division Manager: Patty deCourcey

Address:

C + G LOGISTICS GROUP Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Westpoint Business Park, Navan Road, Mulhuddart, Dublin 15. (01) 820 8455 (01) 820 8457 info@cglogistics.ie www.cglogistics.ie General Manager/ Director : Patrick Wogan

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Naas Industrial Estate, Dublin Road, Naas, Co. Kildare. (045) 874 088/9 (045) 874 090 sales@complas.ie www.complas.ie Managing Director: Patrick Gregory

CHEMCO IRELAND LTD Address:

Unit 49, Robinhood Industrial Estate, Longmile Road, Dublin 22. Tel: (01) 829 3600 Fax: (01) 885 5029 Email: sales@chemco.ie Web: www.chemco.ie Type of Business: Chemical Distribution. Contact: Sales Director: Peter Fitzgerald

CHEMTEK SALES LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Estuary House, New Street, Malahide, Co. Dublin. (01) 845 3766/63 (01) 845 3172 sales@chemtek.ie www.chemtek.ie Director: David Shaw

Kingsbridge House, 17-22 Parkgate Street, Dublin 8. Tel: (01) 633 0400 Fax: (01) 679 3521 Email: info@corcoranchemicals.com Web: www.corcoranchemicals.com Type of Business: Distribution. Contact: Sales Department

CREST SOLUTIONS LTD Address:

Unit 5, Block 1, Waterfront Business Park, Little Island, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 452 4767 Fax: (021) 452 4763 Email: sales@crestsolutions.ie Web: www.crestsolutions.ie Type of Business: Vision systems. Contact: Director: Niall Carty

CLASSIC TECHNOLOGY LTD Address:

Unit 4, Block B, Johnstown Manor, Johnstown, Naas, Co. Kildare. Tel: (045) 896 660 Fax: (045) 896 713 Email: info@classictechnology.ie Web: www.classictechnology.ie Type of Business: Instrumentation. Contact: Director/Sales: William Kinsella UKAS Calibration: Patrick Kinsella 56

CROOM PRECISION MEDICAL Address:

Enterprise Centre, Croom, Co. Limerick. Tel: (061) 397 744 Fax: (061) 397 639 Email: info@croomprecision.ie Web: www.croomprecision.com Type of Business: Medical device manufacture. Contact: Managing Director: Patrick Byrnes


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CROSS TECHNICAL SOLUTIONS Unit 22, Kilcarbery Business Park, Nangor Road, Clondalkin, Dublin 22. Tel: (01) 405 6777 Fax: (01) 413 6932 Email: jmcgrath@cross technicalsolutions.ie Web: www.crosstechnical solutions.ie Type of Business: Refrigeration. Contact: Technical Director: Jonathan McGrath General Manager: Jason Keating

E

EUROLEC INSTRUMENTATION LTD

Address:

D DALKIA Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

145 Lakeview Drive, Airside Business Park, Swords, Co. Dublin (01) 870 1200 (01) 870 1201 info@dalkia.ie www.dalkia.ie Managing Director: Pat Gilroy Industrial Director Pharmaceutical & Health: Fergus Elebert Senior Operations Director (Deputy MD): Padraig Byrne

ENDRESS & HAUSER (IRELAND) LTD Address:

Clane Business Park, Clane, Co. Kildare. Tel: (045) 868 615 Fax: (045) 868 182 Email: info@ie.endress.com Web: www.endress.com Type of Business: Process automation solutions supplier. Contact: Sales Manager: Tony Donnelly

ENVA IRELAND LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web:

PO Box 3000, Johnstown Castle Estate, Co. Wexford. (053) 916 0600 (053) 916 0699 info@epa.ie www.epa.ie

Technology House, Cluan Enda, Dundalk, Co. Louth. Tel: (042) 933 3423 Fax: (042) 933 1758 Email: eurolec@esatclear.ie Web: www.eurolec-instruments.com Type of Business: Electronic instrumentation. Contact: Sales/Marketing Executive: Chris Mears

F FDT CONSULTING ENGINEERS & PROJECT MANAGERS LTD Address:

First Floor, 170 Walkinstown Road, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 429 1900 Fax: (01) 429 1901 Email: info@fdt.ie Web: www.fdt.ie Type of Business: Consulting engineers specialising in process engineering, project management & energy efficiency. Contact: Project Manager: Michael Clancy

ESB INDEPENDENT ENERGY Address:

DIONEX IRELAND LTD Unit 9A, Suite 3C, Plato Business Park, Damastown, Dublin 15. Tel: (01) 644 0064 Fax: (01) 885 1673 Email: ireland.info@dionex.com Web: www.dionex.com Type of Business: Scientific analytical equipment. Contact: Siobhan Curley

Raffeen Industrial Estate, Ringaskiddy, Co. Cork. (021) 438 7200 (021) 438 7299 cork@enva.ie www.enva.ie Sales Manager: Brian Magrane

Address:

Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Dublin: Woodford Business Park, Santry, Dublin 17. Belfast: 33 Clarendon Dock, Laganside, Belfast, BT1 3BG. (01) 862 8300 (028) 9051 1246 (01) 862 8350 (028) 9027 8400 info@esbie.ie www.esbie.ie Marketing Manager: John Conlon Customer Operations Manager: Susan Kinane Commercial Manager: Derek Russell 57

FESTO LTD Address:

Unit 5, Sandyford Park, Sandyford Industrial Estate, Dublin 18. Tel: (01) 295 4955 Fax: (01) 295 5680 Email: sales_ie@festo.com Web: www.festo.com/ie Type of Business: Automation company specialising in factory and process automation. Contact: Sales Manager: Brian Reardon

C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009


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IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009 C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

GUNNEBO IRELAND LTD Address:

FISHER SCIENTIFIC Address:

Suite 3, Plaza 212, Blanchardstown Corporate Park 2, Ballycoolin, Dublin 15. Tel: (01) 885 5854 Fax: (01) 899 1855 Email: fsie.sales@thermofisher.com Web: www.ie.fishersci.com Type of Business: Laboratory supplies. Contact: Marketing Manager: Tom O’Meara

GOLIATH PACKAGING SYSTEMS LTD Address:

Beechwood, Nenagh, Co. Tipperary. Tel: (067) 37893 Fax: (067) 34794 Email: info@goliath.ie Web: www.goliath.ie Type of Business: Supply & installation of packaging equipment and materials handling systems. Contact: Director: George O’Leary

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

GOULDING CHEMICALS LTD Address:

FLEXACHEM MANUFACTURING LTD Address:

Donnybrook Commercial Centre, Douglas, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 463 6742 Fax: (021) 489 1297 Email: sales@flexachem.com Web: www.flexachem.com Type of Business: Manufacturer/ Distributor. Contact: Commercial Director: Agnes Mullins

G GEA PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES IRELAND LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Ash House, Lime Tree Avenue, Millennium Park, Naas, Co. Kildare. (045) 981 200 (045) 981 232 postbox@geapt.ie www.geapt.ie Business Development Manager: Adrian Field

Centre Park Road, Marina, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 491 1611 Fax: (021) 491 1660 Email: pollockm@gouldings.ie Web: www.gouldings.ie Type of Business: Chemical distributor. Contact: Manager Industrial Chemicals: Matt Pollock

H

HazChem Training Limited HAZCHEM TRAINING LTD Address:

GRAHAM HART (PROCESS TECHNOLOGY) LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Friars Ind. Estate, Bradford Road, Idle, Bradford, BD10 8SW, UK. (0044) 1274 617021 (0044) 1274 618614 sales@graham-hart.com www.graham-hart.com Sales Director: Stephen Hart

GS1 IRELAND Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

The Nutley Building Merrion Road, Dublin 4. (01) 208 0671 (01) 208 0670 adreena.cullen@gs1ie.org www.gs1ie.org Marketing Executive: Adreena Cullen 58

Dublin: 601 Western Industrial Estate, Dublin 12. Cork: Unit 4, Hillview Campus, Euro Business Park, Little Island, Co. Cork. (01) 458 4836 (021) 452 4940 (01) 458 4835 (021) 452 4409 noel@gunnebolifting.com bryan@gunnebolifting.com www.gunnebolifting.com Managing Director: Patrick Doyle Director (Cork): Noel Howard Sales Rep (Munster Area): Bryan Davies

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

G10, Maynooth Business Campus, Maynooth, Co. Kildare. (01) 629 1800 (01) 629 1822 info@hazchem.ie www.hazchem.ie Director: Michelle Cleere

Visit www.irishpharmachem.com for the latest pharmaceutical and chemical updates.


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H.R. HOLFELD (HYDRAULICS) LTD Address:

HENLEY FORKLIFT GROUP LTD Address:

Henley Industrial Park, Killeen Road, Dublin 10. Tel: (01) 620 9200 Fax: (01) 626 5406 Email: henleysales@henley.ie mbyrne@henley.ie Web: www.henley.ie Type of Business: Forklifts. Specialists in flameproof forklift trucks. Contact: Director: Brian O’Connell

Tel: Fax: Email: Type of Business: Contact:

2-4 Merville Road, Stillorgan, Co. Dublin. (01) 288 7361 (01) 288 7380 pumps@holfeld.ie Process Pump Supplier. Business Development & Key Accounts: Emmet Connelly

I ICDS RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS Address:

HOCHTIEF FACILITY MANAGEMENT Address:

Ireland: HOCHTIEF Facility Management Ireland Ltd., Landscape House, Landscape Road, Churchtown, Dublin 14. Germany: HOCHTIEF Facility Management GmbH, Rhonestrasse 7, 60528 Frankfurt am Main. Tel: (01) 215 7000 +49 69 7117 2400 Fax: (01) 215 7070 +49 201 824 99157 Email: jeff.smith@hochtief.ie andreas.knupfer@hochtief.de Web: www.hochtief-fm.ie www.hochtief-facilitymanagement.com Type of Business: Facilities management. Contact: Business Support Director, Ireland: Jeff Smith Business Development Director, Germany: Andreas C. Knupfer

24 Upper Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 632 1200 Fax: (01) 676 2079 Email: info@icds.ie Web: www.icds.ie Type of Business: Recruitment consultants. Contact: Recruitment Director: Anthony McLoughlin

INDAVER IRELAND Address:

4 Haddington Terrace, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. Tel: (01) 280 4534 Fax: (01) 280 7865 Email: info@indaver.com Web: www.indaver.com Type of Business: Hazardous & nonhazardous waste disposal and recovery ensuring full compliance. Contact: Regional Sales Manager: Ger Walsh

INDUSTRIAL PACKAGING LTD Address:

Killarney Road, Bray, Co. Wicklow. Tel: (01) 286 4010 Email: mail@industrialpackaging.ie Web: www.industrialpackaging.ie Type of Business: Manufacturer of fibre drums. Contact: Managing Director: Norman Lee

INTERPAC Address:

IDA IRELAND Address:

Wilton Park House, Wilton Place, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 603 4000 Email: idaireland@ida.ie Web: www.idaireland.com Type of Business: Investment promotion agency. Contact: Manager - Marketing: Caitriona O’Kennedy

67E Heather Road, Sandyford Industrial Estate, Dublin 18. Tel: (01) 294 0600 Email: ian@interpac.ie Web: www.interpac.ie Type of Business: Packaging. Contact: Managing Director: Ian Sutton

IMEC TECHNOLOGIES Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

19-20 York Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. (01) 205 4200 (01) 205 4201 sales@imec.ie www.imec.ie General Manager: Joe Lynch

59

INVEST NORTHERN IRELAND Address:

Bedford Square, Bedford Street, Belfast, BT2 7ES. Tel: (048) 9069 8601 Fax: (048) 9043 6536 Email: patricia.oneill@investni.com Web: www.investni.com Type of Business: Economic development agency. Contact: Patricia O’Neill

C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009


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IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009 C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

J IRISH EXPORTERS ASSOCIATION LIFE SCIENCES IRELAND Address:

28 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 661 2182 Fax: (01) 661 2315 Email: raulmolina@ irishexporters.org Web: www.irishexporters.org Type of Business: Life Sciences Ireland is Industry Grouping within the Irish Exporters Association. Contact: Director Life Sciences Ireland: Pat O’Loughlin

IRISH NATIONAL ACCREDITATION BOARD, THE Address:

Wilton Park House, Wilton Place, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 607 3003 Fax: (01) 607 3109 Email: inab@inab.ie Web: www.inab.ie Type of Business: Provides accreditation of laboratories, certification & inspection bodies . Contact: Information Officer: Orla Doyle

JOHNSTON LOGISTICS LTD

NORMAN LAUDER LTD

Address:

Blackchurch Business Park, Rathcoole, Co. Dublin. Tel: + 353 1 401 3333 Fax: + 353 1 458 8015 Email: info@jol.ie chrisf@jol.ie Web: www.johnstonlogistics.ie Type of Business: Logistics & distribution. Contact: Sales Executive: Chris Fogarty

Address:

JVA ANALYTICAL LTD

Address:

Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Unit 1, Longmile Business Park, Longmile Road, Dublin 12. (01) 456 9822 (01) 456 9825 sales@jva.ie www.jva.ie Managing Director: John Ryan

K

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Address:

Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

2A Richview Office Park, Clonskeagh, Dublin 14. (01) 260 0442 (01) 260 0675 sales@nll.ie www.nll.ie Sales Manager: Susan Ellis

LENNOX LABORATORY SUPPLIES LTD John F. Kennedy Drive, Naas Road, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 455 2201 Fax: (01) 450 7906 Email: sales@lennox.ie greg@lennox.ie Web: www.lennox.ie Type of Business: Laboratory suppliers. Contact: Director: Gregory Kearns

LIANCO Address:

KWE (IRELAND) LTD

ITT WATER & WASTE WATER IRELAND LTD 50 Broomhill Close, Airton Road, Tallaght, Dublin 24. Tel: (01) 452 4444 Fax: (01) 452 4795 Email: flygtireland@flygt.com Web: www.flygt.ie www.ittwww.com Type of Business: Supplier of products, systems & services for the transport and treatment of water and waste water. Contact: Director/General Manager: Alison Kirwan

L

Dublin: Unit 4 Horizon Logistics Park, New Naul Rd, Harristown, Swords, Co. Dublin. Cork: Unit 4&5, South Ring West Business Pk, Tramore Road, Co. Cork. (01) 823 9600 (021) 497 5722 (01) 836 1111 (021) 497 5727 kwedub@ea.kwe.com kwecork@ea.kwe.com www.kwe.com Sales Manager: Karl O’Reilly

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Type of Business:

Contact:

LIFE SCIENCE RECRUITMENT LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Type of Business: Contact:

60

Rathclaren, Kilbrittain, Co. Cork. (023) 49681 087 260 5447 (023) 49677 lianco@iol.ie www.lianco.net Powder drying, processing, conveying, and containment. Sales Director: Finbar Smith

4th Floor, Newmarket House, Newmarket Square, Dublin 8. (01) 685 4545 (01) 443 0524 admin@lifescience.ie www.lifescience.ie Specialist scientific recruitment consultancy. Director: Eamonn O’Raghallaigh


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LISTER MACHINE TOOLS LTD Address:

PO Box 838, Bluebell Industrial Estate, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 450 8866 Fax: (01) 450 9836 Email: sales@listermachinetools.com Web: www.listermachinetools.com Type of Sale of machine Business: tools & associated equipment. Contact: Liam Cashe

M MANOTHERM LTD Address:

4 Walkinstown Road, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 452 2355 Fax: (01) 451 6919 Email: info@manotherm.ie Web: www.manotherm.ie Type of Business: Distributors of controls and instrumentation. Contact: Managing Director: R.C. Gilbert

MATHESON ORMSBY PRENTICE Address:

70 Sir John Rogerson’s Quay, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 232 2000 Fax: (01) 232 3333 Email: helen.middleton@mop.ie Web: www.mop.ie Type of Business: Law firm Contact: Helen Middleton, Associate

MICRO HYDRAULICS LTD/ MICRO INDUSTRIES IRELAND Dublin: 2003 Orchard Avenue, Citywest Business Campus, Dublin 24. Cork: Unit 6/7 Cherrywood Business Park, Little Island, Co. Cork. Tel: (01) 463 9000 Fax: (01) 410 5609 Email: info@microhydraulics.ie Web: www.microhydraulics.ie Type of Business: Sanitary hose, tube & accessories. Contact: Sales Representative: Ralph Fitzsimons Sales Representative: Dave O’Donavan

MSL ENGINEERING LTD Address:

Rushbrooke Industrial Park, Cobh, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 481 5806 Fax: (021) 481 2965 Email: info@mslengineering.ie Type of Business: Mechanical engineering contractors. Contact: Managing Director: Maurice McGrath

N Address:

Address:

37-41 Chartwell Drive, Wigston, Leicester, LE18 2FL, UK. Tel: (0044) 1162 881588 Fax: (0044) 1162 813000 Email: sales@measomfreer.co.uk Web: www.measomfreer.co.uk Type of Business: Manufacturer. Contact: Sales Director: Mark Freer

Address:

Address:

NATIONAL CHEMICAL CO. LTD

MEASOM FREER

NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS

NCC House, 42 Lower Leeson St., Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 613 1400 Fax: (01) 634 0132 Email: info@ncc.ie Web: www.ncc.ie Type of Business: Distributor. Contact: Senior Product Manager: Christy Smith

61

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Measurement House, Newbury Business Park, London Road, Newbury, Berkshire, RG14 2PS. (01) 867 4374 (01) 867 4375 info.ie@ni.com www.ni.com/ireland Sales Manager Ireland: Seamus Casserly

NEDERMAN LTD Address:

Premier Business Centre, 3013 Lake Drive, Citywest Business Campus, Dublin 24. Tel: (01) 469 3729 Fax: (01) 469 3321 Email: ciaran.wilkinson@ nederman.ie Web: www.nederman.ie Type of Business: Fume, Dust & Materials Handling. Contact: Country Manager: Ciaran Wilkinson

NEW ERA PACKAGING LTD Address:

Drogheda Industrial Estate, Donore Road, Drogheda, Co. Louth. Tel: (041) 987 5600 Fax: (041) 983 4481 Email: enquiries@newera.ie Web: www.newera.ie Type of Business: Label printing. Contact: Director: David Nevin Director: Peter Higgins

C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009


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IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009 C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

P.K. CHEMICALS LTD Address:

NORGREN IRELAND LTD Address:

137 Slaney Close, Dublin Industrial Estate, Glasnevin, Dublin 11. Tel: (01) 830 0288 Fax: (01) 830 0082 Email: dublin@norgren.com Web: www.norgren.com Type of Business: Fluid and motion control. ‘Pneumatics’ automation components. Contact: General Manager: David Whelan

O’LOUGHLIN PARTNERSHIP Address:

1 Rowan Park Ave, Blackrock, Co. Dublin. Tel: (01) 280 0430 Fax: (01) 696 1029 Email: info@olpartners.com Web: www.olpartners.ie Type of Business: Executive search, selection & interim management. Contact: Managing Partner: Patrick O’Loughlin

Unit 23, Sandyford Office Park, Blackthorn Avenue, Foxrock, Dublin 18. Tel: (01) 295 6977 Fax: (01) 295 8338 Email: debbie@pkchemicals.com Type of Business: Chemical distributor. Contact: Office Manager: Sarah Murray

PM GROUP Address:

P PEGLER & LOUDEN IRELAND NPP GROUP LTD Address:

Unit 509, Mitchelstown Road, Northwest Business Park, Ballycoolin, Blanchardstown, Dublin 15. Tel: (01) 880 9299 Email: sales@npp.ie bmcmahon@npp.ie Web: www.npp.ie Type of Business: Flexible packaging suppliers & distributors. Contact: Commercial Director: Ken Martin

O

OCON CHEMICALS LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Unit 5, South Cork Industrial Estate, Vicars Road, Pouladuff, Co. Cork. (021) 431 8555 (021) 431 8560 sales@oconchemicals.com www.oconchemicals.com Managing Director: Frank Mulcahy

A DIVISION OF BSS (IRELAND) LTD Address: Dublin: 301 South Circular Road, White Heather Industrial Estate, Dublin 8. Tel: (01) 416 5170 Fax: (01) 416 5175 Email: jmelinn@pli.ie jgeraghty@pli.ie Web: www.fcx-pli.com Contact: Joe Melinn John Geraghty Pat Kelly John Quinn Cork: South Link Park, Ballycurreen Road Grange, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 497 7128 Fax: (021) 491 5213 Email: Cork: p.obrien@pli.ie p.cronin@pli.ie Web: www.fcx-pli.com Contact: Cork: Pat Cronin Pat O’Brien Colman Hesse

62

Tel: Email: Web: Contact:

Cork: Loughmahon Technology Park, Blackrock, Co. Cork. Dublin: Killakee House, Belgard Square, Tallaght, Dublin 24. (021) 435 8922 (01) 404 0700 info@pmg.ie www.pmg.ie Billy O’Neill Paul Hallam Business Development Marketing Executive: Vivki Shanahan

POLLUTION CONTROL SYSTEMS LTD Address: Tel: Email: Web: Contact:

Raffeen House, Ringaskiddy, Co. Cork. (021) 437 4237 info@biotector.com www.biotector.com Managing Director: Martin Horan

PRIMEPAC LTD Address:

Unit 2, Caulside Drive, Newpark Industrial Estate, Antrim, BT41 2DU. Tel: (0044) 2894 428 188 Fax: (0044) 2894 428 177 Email: sales@primepacltd.com Web: www.primepacltd.com Type of Business: Manufacturer & supplier of plastic containers. Contact: Director: John McGahon


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PROSCON LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Rushbrooke Commercial Park, Cobh, Co. Cork. (021) 481 1802 (021) 481 1804 info@proscon.com www.proscon.com Michael Horkan Business Development Manager

PROSYS SAMPLING SYSTEMS LTD Address:

Rosehill Business Park, Ballinacurra, Midleton, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 461 3890 Fax: (021) 461 3891 Email: info@prosys.ie Web: www.prosys.ie Type of Business: Design & maunfacture of sampling and isolators for the pharmaceutical and chemical industries. Contact: Managing Director: Michael McLoughlin

Q QUITMANN O’NEILL PACKAGING LTD Address:

St. Brendan’s Road, Portumna, Co. Galway. Tel: (090) 974 1148/9 Fax: (090) 974 1459 Email: sales@quitmannoneill.com Web: www.qonpack.com Type of Business: Packaging stockist & distributors. Contact: General Manager: David O’Neill

S

Contact:

SARTORIUS MECHATRONICS UK LTD Address:

Unit 41, The Business Centre, Stadium Business Park, Ballycoolin Road, Dublin 11. Tel: (01) 808 9050 Fax: (01) 808 9388 Email: info.ireland@ sartorius.com Web: www.sartorius.ie Type of Business: Laboratory & process technology provider. Sales & service of laboratory & process weighing equipment. Contact: Nick Parsons

SCIENCE RECRUITMENT IRELAND Address:

40 Grand Canal Street Upper, Dublin 4. Tel: (01) 667 5008 Fax: (01) 667 6714 Email: info@sri.ie Web: www.sri.ie Type of Business: Specialist science recruitment agency. Contact: Managing Director: Helen McGardle

SEALPACK LTD Address:

SCHUF VALVE TECHNOLOGY Address: Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Lehenaghmore, Togher, Co. Cork. (021) 483 7000 (021) 483 7030 sales@schuf.ie www.schuf.com Managing Director: Wolfgang Frank

Head of Industry Research Development: Dr. Paul Dodd

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Jamestown Industrial Centre, Jamestown Rd, Inchicore, Dublin 8 (01) 453 4387 (01) 453 2051 info@sealpack.ie www.sealpack.ie Production: Alan Saul Marketing:Barry Saul Sales: Joe Saul

SEPHA LTD SCICHEM

Address:

Address:

Unit 14, Barryscourt Business Park, Carrigtwohill, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 488 2388 Fax: (021) 488 2389 Email: cork@scichem.com Web: www.scichem.com Type of Business: Laboratory Suppliers. Contact: Branch Manager: John Molloy

SCIENCE FOUNDATION IRELAND (SFI) Address:

Wilton Park House, Wilton Place, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 607 3200 Fax: (01) 607 3201 Email: info@sfi.ie Web: www.sfi.ie Type of Business: Government funding agency for research. 63

Unit 25, Carrowreagh Business Park, Carrowreagh Road, Dundonald, Northern Ireland, BT16 1QQ. Tel: (048) 9048 48 48 +44 (0) 2890 48 48 48 Fax: (048) 9048 08 90 +44 (0) 2890 48 08 90 Email: info@sepha.com Web: www.sepha.com Type of Business: Manufacturer of laboratory scale blister packers, non-destructive leak testers & deblistering machines for the pharmaceutical industry. Contact: Account Manager UK & Ireland: Phil Stevenson

C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009


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IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009 C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

SHELL CHEMICALS

SOLTEC (IRELAND) LTD

Address:

Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

C/o Cork Bulk Storage Limited, Tivoli Industrial Estate, Co. Cork. (021) 491 8184 (021) 491 8184 mark.dalton@shell.com www.shell.com/chemicals Mark Dalton Solvents Sales Manager

SIEMENS LTD Address:

Fitzwilliam Court, Leeson Close, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 216 2000 Fax: (01) 216 2079 Email: industry.irl@siemens.com Web: www.siemens.ie Type of Business: Electrical engineering. Contact: Sales Engineer: Liam Cotter General Manager: Domhnall Carroll

SIGMA-ALDRICH IRELAND LTD Address:

Airton Road, Tallaght, Dublin 24. Tel: (01) 404 1900 Fax: (01) 404 1910 Email: safcei@sial.com Web: www.safcsupplysolutions.com Contact: Kate Buggle

SMURFIT KAPPA IRELAND Ballymount Road, Walkinstown, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 409 0000 Fax: (01) 456 4506 Email: info@smurfitkappa.ie Web: www.smurfitkappa.ie www.skpackaging.ie Type of Business: Packaging. Contact: Marketing Manager: Daragh Wall

Zone A, Mullingar Business Park, Mullingar, Co. Westmeath. Tel: (044) 933 5133 Email: info@soltec.ie Web: www.soltec.ie Type of Business: Soltec is Ireland’s only commercially operated solvent recycling plant. Solid hazardous waste collections also provided. Contact: Business Development Manager: Tom Griffith

SUSTAINABLE ENERGY IRELAND Address: Glasnevin, Dublin 9. Tel: (01) 836 9080 Fax: (01) 837 2848 Email: info@sei.ie Web: www.sei.ie Type of Business: Energy advice & information.

U

UNIVAR LTD Address:

536 Grants Crescent, Greenogue Business Park, Rathcoole, Co. Dublin. Tel: (01) 401 9800 Fax: (01) 401 9142 Email: pharma.sales@ univareurope.com Web: www.univareurope.com Type of Business: Ingredients pharma industry including API’s, excipients, process chems, solvents & intermediates. Contact: Account Manager: John McCluskey

V

T TOPCHEM LABORATORIES LTD Address:

70 Western Parkway Business Park, Ballymount Drive, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 460 8818 Email: sales@topchemlabs.com dwalsh@topchem.ie Web: www.topchem.ie Type of Business: Chemical synthesis. Contact: Managing Director: Dr. Donal Coveney

Address:

TYCO VALVES & CONTROLS DISTRIBUTION (HANLON O’GRADY & CO. LTD) Address: Victoria House, Beaumont Avenue, Churchtown, Dublin 14. Tel: (01) 295 1101 Email: tkilbane@tyco-valves.com Web: www.tycoflowcontrol-eu.com Type of Business: Industrial valves & controls. Contact: General Manager: Tony Kilbane 64

VIKING PUMP (EUROPE) LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

R79, Shannon Industrial Estate, Shannon, Co. Clare. (061) 471 933 (061) 475 046 coconnell@idexcorp.com www.vikingpump.com Customer Service Administrator: Claire O’Connell

Stay up to date on the latest developments at www.irishpharmachem.com.


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W

WEBER LABELLING & CODING

Zenith Technologies

Address:

Address:

WATERS CHROMATOGRAPHY IRELAND Address:

Unit 3.1 Woodford Business Park, Santry, Dublin 9. Tel: (01) 448 1500 Fax: (01) 448 1510 Email: ireland@waters.com Web: www.waters.com Type of Business: The company designs, manufactures, sells and services HPLC, UPLC, mass spectrometry instrument systems and support products, including chemistry consumables and post-warranty service plans. Contact: National Sales Manager: Joe Kildunne

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Kilcannon Ind. Est., Old Dublin Road, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford. (053) 923 3778 (053) 923 3284 sales@weberireland.com www.webermarking.com Operations Manager: Patrick Hughes

Portgate Business Park, Ringaskiddy, Co. Cork Tel: (021) 437 0200 Email: peter.sheehan@ zenithtechnologies.com Web: www.zenithtechnologies.com Contact: Sales & Marketing Manager: Peter Sheehan

ZETES Address:

WRENTECH LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Wrentech House, Crosshaven Hill, Crosshaven, Co. Cork. (021) 483 2644 (021) 483 1363 smurray@wrentech.ie www.wrentech.ie Sales Administrator: Siobhan Murray

Notes

65

National Technology Park, Plassey, Co. Limerick. Tel: (061) 333 188 1890 252 869 Lo-call Email info@ie.zetes.com Web: www.zetes.ie Type of Business: Zetes provides innovative solutions to address todays business challenges of improving efficiency, productivity & traceability through the supply chain. Contact: Marketing Director: Eva Birdthistle

C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2009


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USEFUL REFERENCES

USEFUL REFERENCES ACADEMY OF MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE Tel: (01) 677 5602 E-mail: mail@amls.ie Web: www.amls.ie ADVISORY COUNCIL FOR SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION Tel: (01) 607 3162 E-mail: firstname.surname@forfas.ie Web: www.sciencecouncil.ie AN BORD PLEANALA Tel: (01) 858 8100 LoCall: 1890 275 175 E-mail: bord@pleanala.ie Web: www.pleanala.ie CHAMBERS IRELAND Tel: (01) 661 2888 E-mail: info@chambers.ie Web: www.chambers.ie COMPANIES REGISTRATION OFFICE Tel: (01) 804 5200 LoCall: 1890 220 226 E-mail: info@cro.ie Web: www.cro.ie DEPT. OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS, UCD Tel: (01) 716 1825 DEPT. OF ENTERPRISE, TRADE & EMPLOYMENT Tel: (01) 631 2121 LoCall: 1890 220 222 E-mail: info@entemp.ie Web: www.entemp.ie DEPT. OF THE ENVIRONMENT, HERITAGE & LOCAL GOVERNMENT Tel: (01) 888 2000 LoCall: 1890 20 20 21 E-mail: press-office@environ.ie Web: www.environ.ie ELECTRICITY SUPPLY BOARD Tel: 1850 372 372 Web: www.esb.ie ENTERPRISE IRELAND Tel: (01) 727 2000 E-mail: client.service@ enterprise-ireland.com Web: www.enterprise-ireland.com

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH OFFICERS’ ASSOCIATION Tel: (01) 276 1211 Web: www.ehoa.ie

INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR PHARMACEUTICAL ENGINERING (ISPE) Tel: +32 2 743 4422 E-mail: ispe@associationhq.org Web: www. ispe.org

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Tel: (053) 916 0600 LoCall: 1890 335 599 E-mail: info@epa.ie Web: www.epa.ie

IRISH BIOINDUSTRY ASSOCIATION Tel: (01) 605 1584 E-mail: firstname.surname@ibec.ie Web: www.ibec.ie/ibia

BIOTECHNOLOGY IRELAND Tel: (01) 727 2692 E-mail: editor@biotechnologyireland.com www.biotechnologyireland.com

IRISH BUSINESS & EMPLOYERS CONFEDERATION (IBEC) Tel: (01) 605 1500 E-mail: info@ibec.ie Web: www.ibec.ie

FAS - TRAINING & EMPLOYMENT AGENCY Tel: (01) 607 0500 E-mail: info@fas.ie Web: www.fas.ie

IRISH CLEANROOM SOCIETY Tel: 087 285 9679 Web: www.cleanrooms-ireland.ie

FORFAS Tel: (01) 607 3000 E-mail: firstname.surname@forfas.ie Web: www.forfas.ie

IRISH COSMETICS, DETERGENT & ALLIED PRODUCTS ASSOCIATION Tel: (01) 605 1584 E-mail: alanna.mcguinness@ibec.ie Web: www.icda.ie

HEALTH AND SAFETY AUTHORITY Tel: 1890 289 389 E-mail: wcu@hsa.ie Web: www.hsa.ie

IRISH EXPORTERS ASSOCIATION Tel: (01) 661 2182 E-mail: iea@irishexporters.ie Web: www.irishexporters.ie

HEALTH RESEARCH BOARD Tel: (01) 234 5000 E-mail: hrb@hrb.ie Web: www.hrb.ie

IRISH MEDICAL DEVICES ASSOCIATION Tel: (01) 605 1529 E-mail: firstname.surname@ibec.ie Web: www.ibec.ie/imda

HIGHER EDUCATION AUTHORITY Tel: (01) 231 7100 E-mail: info@hea.ie Web: www.hea.ie

IRISH MEDICINES BOARD Tel: (01) 676 4971 E-mail: imb@imb.ie Web: www.imb.ie

IDA - INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY Tel: (01) 603 4000 E-mail: idaireland@ida.ie Web: www.idaireland.com

IRISH NATIONAL ACCREDITATION BOARD Tel: (01) 607 3003 Web: www.inab.ie

INSTITUTE OF CHEMISTRY OF IRELAND E-mail: info@instituteofchemistry.org www.instituteofchemistry.org

IRISH PATENTS OFFICE Tel: (056) 772 0111 E-mail: patlib@entemp.ie Web: www.patentsoffice.ie

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IRISH PHARMACY UNION Tel: (01) 4936401 E-mail: firstname.surname@ipu.ie Web: www.ipu.ie IRISH VENTURE CAPITAL ASSOCIATION Tel: (01) 276 4647 E-mail: secretary@ivca.ie Web: www.ivca.ie INVEST NORTHERN IRELAND Tel: (048) 9023 9060 E-mail: eo@investni.com Web: www.investni.com MANDATE TRADE UNION Tel: (01) 874 6321 E-mail: mandate@mandate.ie Web: www.mandate.ie NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR TRANSPORT & LOGISTICS (NITL) Tel: (01) 402 3000 E-mail: nitl@dit.ie Web: www.nitl.ie PARENTERAL DRUG ASSOCIATION (PDA) Tel: +1 (301) 656 5900 Web: www.pda.org PHARMACHEMICAL IRELAND Tel: (01) 605 1584 E-mail: pharmachemicalireland@ibec.ie Web: www.ibec.ie/ipcmf PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY OF IRELAND Tel: (01) 218 4000 E-mail: info@pharmaceuticalsociety.ie Web: www.pharmaceuticalsociety.ie REPAK Tel: (01) 467 0190 E-mail: info@repak.ie Web: www.repak.ie SCIENCE FOUNDATION IRELAND Tel: (01) 607 3200 E-mail: info@sfi..ie Web: www.sfi.ie


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Irish PharmaChem 2009  

An annual industry buyers guide published in association with Pharmachemical Ireland

Irish PharmaChem 2009  

An annual industry buyers guide published in association with Pharmachemical Ireland

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