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contents

30 2 33

2 Minister’s INTERVIEW

22 Workplace Wellbeing

6 SECTOR Overview

25 Training & Development

Michael Creed TD, Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, speaks exclusively to Food Ireland on the potential implications of Brexit, the ambitious targets of Food Wise 2025 and the challenges facing the Irish agri-food sector in the months ahead. Paul Kelly, FDI Director, examines the challenges facing the Irish agri-food sector in the months ahead, as the Brexit negotiations continue, and argues the case for a Brexit response package that ensures efficient and open markets, domestically and internationally.

10 DAIRY

The EU-Japan trade deal could be great news for Ireland, according to Conor Mulvihill, Irish Dairy Industries Association Director.

12 Sugar Tax

Colm Jordan, Director of the Irish Beverage Council, argues that the forthcoming tax on sugar sweetened drinks (SSD) will not reduce obesity levels in Ireland.

14 Regulations

A year since their introduction, we’re still waiting for effective enforcement of the Grocery Goods Undertakings Regulations, argue Paul Kelly, FDI Director.

16 Prepared Consumer Foods

The Irish food and drinks industry continues to take a proactive role in reducing obesity and improving public health through the reformulation of products.

18 Beer Market

The markets for macro and micro beer are going from strength to strength, despite the looming spectre of Brexit, writes Jonathan McDade, Head of the Irish Brewers Association.

20 Fruit Juice

Colm Jordan, Director of the Irish Beverage Council, reminds us of the benefits of drinking 100% fruit juice.

Workplace wellbeing is not just an amorphous concept but a genuine concern, and one that can have a big influence on employee productivity, writes Dermot Doherty, Project Manager for the FDI Health Initiative. The Food Drink Ireland Skillnet provides enterprise-led training for the food and drink sector, helping to tackle a key challenge for industry, writes Mark Skinner, FDI Skillnet Manager.

26 Meat Science and Technology

Teagasc recently hosted the 63rd International Congress of Meat Science and Technology, which saw more than 450 papers presented on the future application of science and technology in the meat sector.

29 Marketing

Bord Bia and the Digital Marketing Institute have launched a new programme to up-skill food and drink marketers.

30 Brexit and the Irish Agri-Food Sector Food lawyer Raymond O’Rourke examines the likely implications of Brexit for the Irish agri-food sector, explains the potential scenarios and advises the Irish government on what they should seek as part of the negotiations.

33 Seafood

Ireland’s €1.1 billion seafood sector recorded growth of over 7% in 2016, according to BIM, whose mission is to provide supports to enable this valuable industry to achieve its full potential in the years ahead.

36 Packaging Optimisation

Repak’s “Prevent and Save” service helps members to optimise packaging systems and reduce costs, saving on both material and money.

21 Meat Sector

Irish beef and lamb processing companies have invested in a centre of excellence for meat processing research and innovation, Meat Technology Ireland. Food Ireland is published by: Tara Publishing Ltd 14 Upper Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 00 353 (0)1 678 5165 Fax: 00 353 (0)1 6785191 Email: kathleenbelton@tarapublications.ie Web: www.foodirelanddirectory.com

39 Education

UCC has solidified its reputation as the ‘Food University’ with the establishment of the UCC Food Institute, which will encompass the largest concentration of food-related education and research resources in Ireland.

40 Inline Instrumentation

Food plants can reduce production down time, off-spec product and time-consuming manual grab sampling with inline instrumentation.

42 Food Safety

safefood’s Knowledge Network is a professional networking platform for those working or having responsibility for food safety on the island of Ireland.

44 Packaging

Limerick Packaging celebrated 15 years in business in June, with the company having grown to be one of the most innovative and impressive packaging businesses in the country, serving businesses across Ireland and the UK.

48 Traceability

Food manufacturers and suppliers can bring the benefits of a new era in food traceability to customers with cloud and mobile technology, such as fTRACE from GS1 Ireland.

51 Dairy Ingredients

Truly Grass Fed from Glanbia Ingredients Ireland is a premium grass fed ingredient brand for food and nutrition customers to support and endorse their natural brands in market.

52 Capital Investment Programmes Food manufacturing companies should employ experienced and competent professional advisors when undertaking capital investment programmes.

53 Machinery & Service

Belfast-based Value Stream Machinery supply quality food processing machinery, as well as the engineering expertise to keep you running.

LISTINGS SECTION

Product & Service Index 54 Company Listings 57 68 Relevant Organisations Year Planner 70 Three-year Calendar 72

Managing Director: Patrick Aylward Editorial and Marketing Director: Kathleen Belton

Editor: John Walshe Advertising Sales: Brian Clark Production: Ciara Conway Design: Tony Hunt Printed by: WG Baird

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 1


minister’s interview

Putting Ireland First! Michael Creed TD, Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, speaks exclusively to Food Ireland editor, John Walshe, on the potential implications of Brexit, the ambitious targets of Food Wise 2025 and the challenges facing the Irish agri-food sector in the months ahead.

W

hen Michael Creed TD became Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine in May 2016, he could have been forgiven for thinking he’d have an easier time of it. But then June 23, 2016, saw the UK’s population voting to leave the EU, a seismic political shift whose aftershocks will be felt for years to come and one that has huge implications for our food and drinks industry. Trade with the UK fell by 8% in 2016, triggered by challenging exchange rates, uncertainty arising from Brexit and further competitive pressures, yet our nearest neighbour remains our biggest export market, accounting for 37% of all agri-food and drink exports in 2016, while 32% of exports went to continental EU markets and the remaining 31% went to international markets. Last year, however, remained a record year for agri-food and drink exports, which reached a record high of €11.15 billion. 2016 saw increased exports to international and emerging markets such as North America (+€200m to reach €1.1 billion), China (+35% to reach €845m) and the rest of Asia (+6% to reach €330m).

Food Wise 2025 The ambitious targets in Food Wise 2025, launched in 2015 as a 10-year road map for the industry, didn’t account for anything as momentous as Brexit. So it’s fair to say that the current Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine has more on his plate (excuse the pun) than previous incumbents. The affable Corkonian remains bullish that the figures set out in the original document, including 2 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

an 85% increase in exports to €19 billion and the creation of 23,000 additional jobs, are achievable. “I am confident,” he insists. “That’s not to be blind to the challenges that we face but in the light of those challenges, like Brexit, the global trade environment, where major players like the US are in isolationist mode and are retreating from global trade agreements, it has never been more important to have a road map for the industry to reach its potential and to do so in a sustainable way.” The targets set out in Food Wise 2025, he argues, “are not abstract figures plucked out of the air by this Department. We facilitated its compilation and we are charged with driving its implementation – I chair the implementation group on a regular basis – but the collaborative approach that created Food Wise means that it is really a document that is owned by the industry, not the Department. “There are over 400 recommendations in the Food Wise report and we have made a lot of progress on them. Some have already been achieved, others are on the way and some have yet to be activated. But that is the value of having an implementation process.” Intelligent and articulate, Creed isn’t blind to the challenges still faced by many agri-food businesses, from farmers to production plants. “Individual farmers will perhaps ask themselves ‘should I pause my investment in my dairy farm because prices were poor last year?’. That’s an understandable commercial decision, as is an agri-food business deciding that it needs to have greater clarity around the UK market before diversifying. Those are decisions that individual


minister’s interview This notion that no deal is better than a bad deal in my view makes no sense… We currently export north of a billion euro in beef to the UK and just under €1 billion in dairy, so no deal on Brexit would be carnage. It’s the worst possible scenario

businesses will make, but the overview of Food Wise is that these are sustainable and achievable targets, given the right environment. A lot of the things that are identified as impediments, regardless of Brexit or anything else, are things that would be important to do anyway. “I’m satisfied that we are making progress. I’m satisfied that there is an unfulfilled potential in the industry that can be achieved. But I do accept that a lot of this is contingent on commercial decisions that will be made by businesses.”

Ireland and Brexit: The Reality

economy. “I’ve had bilateral meetings with almost every colleague that I sit around the Council of Ministers table with, but specifically with key political players in the debate and Ministers from other countries that are similarly exposed. Across Europe, if you are a southern European state or a former accession member state, Brexit is not as important. But in value terms, the Netherlands has about the same exposure to the UK market as Ireland, so the Dutch, the Danes, the Belgians, French and Germans are important voices in the context of Brexit.” He described noises from the European Parliament, European Council and indeed Theresa May’s Article 50 letter as reassuring but Creed stresses that “there is no room to rest here and we need to ensure that we build on those foundations throughout the Brexit negotiations”.

The Food Wise targets were set prior to the UK’s decision to leave the EU, which has thrown a Brexit-shaped spanner into the works. So what are the measures that the Department of Agriculture is taking Deal or No Deal? in relation to Brexit and do state agencies How will the Department and government need more resources to support industry support and protect the agri-food industry in going forward? the event of a hard Brexit or no deal at all, which Michael Creed TD, Minister for Agriculture, “We had an awful lot of work done would severely limit access to the hugely imporFood and the Marine. in this Department, even before I was tant UK market? appointed, and we had hoped that a lot of that would have been “One of our asks has been continued, unfettered access to the shredded,” the Minister admits, “but unfortunately, it’s centre stage UK market, with some restraint on the UK in its capacity to do since June 23 last year.” standalone trade deals that would undermine our product on their One of the Irish industry’s primary concerns regards access to the supermarket shelves. This notion that no deal is better than a bad UK market, with the worry that tariffs could make exports across deal in my view makes no sense: no deal is the worst possible thing, the Irish sea unsustainable for some companies, where margins because it would mean that the UK falls out of the EU, almost by are already squeezed tight. The Minister and his Department accident. 53% of our beef exports go to the UK market, equating to are extremely cognisant of this worry, and the Minister has met about 250,000 tonnes of beef: no deal would suddenly mean tariffs with representatives from the biggest multiple groups in the UK, in excess of 50% on that. A third of our dairy exports, which go to “reinforcing our commitment with our retail partners there,” as well the UK, would be in line for punitive tariffs also. We currently export as sitting down with representatives of the British food and drink north of a billion euro in beef to the UK and just under €1 billion in industry, primary producers in the UK. dairy, so no deal on Brexit would be carnage. It’s the worst possible “What we are doing there is trying to reinforce the hard-won scenario.” yards we have earned in terms of having our goods on UK superHowever, he argues that this ‘no deal’ scenario is unlikely as it market shelves,” he stresses. “We’re also trying to shape the narrative would pretty much lead to “mutually assured destruction”. of the Brexit debate in the UK and lead them to an understanding “We have to get a practical, working deal, in terms of continued not just about Ireland’s unique exposure but that we have shared access with the least amount of additional cost to business,” he interests in that space, like the human capital issue, which is already stresses. “But it’s also important that the UK don’t have the capacity beginning to manifest itself. So we want to shape the best possito go out and sign trade deals for hormone-treated beef coming ble narrative and approach in the UK. Is that successful? It’s very from South America, for example.” difficult to know. We are getting very different and often conflicting impressions of what the UK government policy is going to be on an Crossing Borders? almost daily basis. I have been somewhat reassured of late, though, Another area of major concern is the potential for the reintroducby British industry beginning to stand up and insisting that its voice tion of a hard border with Northern Ireland, which will be the UK’s needs to be heard in this debate, calling for a better understanding only land border with the EU, post-Brexit. Neither the Irish nor UK by government of what Brexit means for business.” Governments want check points or any physical infrastructure at The other side of Brexit, according to the Minister, is creating the border but convincing the EU might prove tricky. Minister Creed awareness within the EU of Ireland’s exposure to the UK market has had “direct personal engagement with Michel Barnier [European and the potential implications of a so-called “hard Brexit” on our Chief Negotiator for Brexit] on the range of issues we have dis-

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 3


minister’s interview cussed, including the Border. My colleague, Charlie Flanagan (Minister for Justice and Equality) took Mr Barnier to the Border region so there would be a practical understanding of the issues there. “The Border is important for a number of reasons,” he continues. “The whole island approach we have to agri-food is hugely important to both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. In 2015, we exported about €750m of exports to Northern Ireland and they exported €670m of goods to the Republic. We process 30% of their liquid milk; 55,000 cattle went North in 2015 and 400,000 sheep came south. So we are obviously concerned about anything that’s an impediment to that close relationship and we made that clear to Michel Barnier.” The Minister also feels that the border represents far more than just an economic divide, given our history, and fears for “the psychological scars that would re-emerge if a hard border was in place. I think that is something the Government has been really strong on in the context of the Good Friday Agreement,” he insists. “We are co-guarantors of that and want to ensure we don’t do anything to lead us back on a slippery slope to a period in our history where nobody wants to go.” He takes comfort from the comments of former Secretary General of the European Union, Catherine Day, recently where she said that the European Union’s capacity for innovation around complex issues is endless, yet he’s realistic enough to admit “that capacity will be really tested here”.

Seafood: A Particular Challenge Ireland’s seafood industry is “one of the most challenging sectors” when it comes to Brexit, the Minister feels, particularly given the UK’s recent decision to withdraw from the London Fisheries Convention, which predates the UK joining the EU, and allows vessels from other countries, including Ireland, to fish in UK waters. “In value terms, Irish seafood is a billion euro industry with over 11,000 employees but 60% of our most valuable stock is caught in UK territorial waters. Our second most valuable stock is prawns, and 43% are caught in UK territorial waters. So we are in danger of losing the farm in terms of access to those waters. That is a real challenge for us and we have been working very hard with like-minded states who are equally adversely impacted, including Belgium, the Netherlands, Denmark, Sweden, Germany, France and Spain. What we are anxious to ensure is that any resolution of fisheries is dealt with in the broadest possible trade context, not just UK access for its fisheries products into the EU market but also their access to exporting financial services from London or Nissan cars from Sunderland into the European Union: the quid pro pro for that is that we retain access to UK territori-

Ireland’s seafood industry is “one of the most challenging sectors” when it comes to Brexit. 4 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

al waters. Otherwise, that is a huge threat to our industry.” The Independent Aquaculture Licensing Review Group recently submitted a report to the Minister on changes to the aquaculture licensing system, which was deemed a priority by Food Wise 2025, and the next step, according to Minister Creed, is an implementation process, “exactly mirroring what is in Food Wise, not just having a glossy document but acting on it. To give you an idea of the potential, we in Ireland produce 15,000 tonnes of farmed fish: the Scots produce 100,000 tonnes and the Norwegians produce 1m tonnes of it. I think the pitch for us is in the organic side: I think that’s where the premium market is and it is a good fit for us.”

International Market Access Unit Given the need to find new markets abroad for indigenous produce to dilute our reliance on the UK, I wondered if the International Market Access Unit in the Department of Agriculture and Food needs increased funding or a new structure to help the Irish agri-food sector to break into new markets? “We export to more than 180 countries around the world and our dairy products are in over 130 countries, so we need an adequately resourced Market Access Unit at any given time,” Creed notes. “It obviously has accelerated importance now and we do need more resources. We are in the business of putting those resources in place.” These include increased resources in the Department of Agriculture and Food, Bord Bia and other state agencies, the Minister states. Work has already begun on this, including the recent Brexit Barometer carried out by Bord Bia and a similar exercise conducted by Enterprise Ireland. “We are now following up in terms of what are the identified gaps that need to be plugged in terms of resources, getting feet on the street in terms of accessing new markets, and being a direct resource to individual companies to enable them perhaps to reduce their exposure to the UK market,” he reveals. “I don’t think we should frighten the horses in that we are not saying to any company that they need to get out of the UK. Geography is always going to be one of the biggest determinants of trade and the UK remains one of the best markets for us to be in. It’s also important in terms of the overall picture to remember that we are also the biggest export market for the UK agri-food sector, who exported €3.7 billion of food here in 2015. “So we have a job of work underway, but I’m satisfied that we are doing the right things because we have made an extensive effort to engage with industry both inside and outside the farm gate. So we are led by industry and we activate the agencies to assist in delivery, and the Market Access Unit is critical to that.”


minister’s interview We are anxious to ensure that any resolution of fisheries is dealt with in the broadest possible trade context, not just UK access for its fisheries products into the EU market but also their access to exporting financial services from London or Nissan cars from Sunderland into the European Union: the quid pro pro for that is that we retain access to UK territorial waters. Otherwise, that is a huge threat to our industry.

The Minister himself has been flying the flag for Irish produce across the world, with a series of high profile trade missions designed to increase access for Irish agri-food and drink products to emerging markets. “In the first 12 months that I have been here, I’ve been in South East Asia, including Vietnam, Korea and Singapore, as well as China, North Africa, the Middle East, the US and Mexico and we are looking at more trade missions before the end of the year,” he reveals. “It’s not a case of spinning the globe and seeing where we’d like to go; these trade missions are informed by Food Wise, which is the industry’s commercial nous coming into play and highlighting regions where opportunities exist.” Some industry commentators have been critical of the fact that when the Government “opens up” a new market for export, very little product flows through the gap. But the Minister maintains that opening up new markets can be important in terms of allowing exporters to leverage the best price in existing markets, aside entirely from the potential of the new market itself. “We used to export a lot of pork to Russia, for example: then the Russian ban came into effect. China had been open but wasn’t a huge market for us: now, after the UK, China is our second biggest destination for pork exports. Opening up new markets is crucial, both in terms of the Brexit situation and other geopolitical manoeuvring, so we are working extremely hard on removing technical barriers to trade in existing markets and opening up new markets for Irish agri-food products.”

Becoming Cost Competitive Now more than ever, Ireland needs a robust and competitive agrifood sector. Ireland in general is viewed as an expensive place to do business, with energy, insurance, rates etc very high here. What can be done to address this in general terms to help our agri-food business to become more competitive on an international scale? “Competitiveness is key,” he agrees, “so input costs are important.” He cites the “extensive engagement” between the Department of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation and the insurance industry on the “significant cost” of insurance here, and the fact that “the cost of capital for investment purposes is significantly out of kilter here”. To address the latter, January saw the Department of Agriculture unveil the Agriculture Cashflow Support Loan Scheme, a €150m fund for farmers, available via AIB, Bank of Ireland and Ulster Bank, at low-cost interest rate of 2.95%. “This was ground-breaking in terms of a state-sponsored initiative and also in terms of the interest rate.

It was over-subscribed multiples of times,” he reveals. “This was primarily a fund for primary producers, but I think the lessons from that need to be reflected right across the industry. In the context of Brexit, these are critically important lessons: how can we make businesses that are now exposed in the UK for currency reasons more competitive? Are there costs where businesses are paying over the odds that we can reduce and help them to further invest in their business or ease their cash-flow difficulties?” Another issue for Irish food and drink suppliers, in a local context, is effective enforcement of regulations. A year since the introduction of the Grocery Goods Undertakings Regulations, the question remains whether the Competition and Consumer Protection Commission has the power to punish breaches of the regulations in a similar manner to the UK watchdog. “They are just over 12 months in operation,” the Minister states. “I think there is a lot of work being done in the Department of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation on examining what are the lessons of the first 12 months. Once we have that, we can draw conclusions as to whether we need to add teeth to the regulations. I think it is abundantly clear that in the food chain, from the primary producer to the ultimate consumer, the people who get the worst deal are at the extreme ends and the people in the middle are rarely seen to suffer from the volatility of the market. There is a slice and a margin for everybody but it’s not guaranteed to the primary producer and there’s no guarantee that the ultimate consumer isn’t paying over the odds as well. I think the report currently being put together will assist us in ascertaining what are the next steps we need to take.” Finally, we come to the issue of the Sugar Sweetened Drinks Tax. There is an argument that the forthcoming sugar tax will do little to actually tackle obesity. Countries like Denmark have found sugar taxes to be ineffective, which serve to damage the competitiveness of food companies for little or no return in terms of health benefits. “I’m familiar with the concerns around this,” the Minister concludes. “There are equally very valid public health concerns around the epidemic that is obesity and we are unfortunately at the vanguard of that. We need to find a way to address that. I appreciate the concerns of the food industry on it but this is a ticking time bomb from a public health point of view and we need to address it.” • Note, the interview with Minister Creed was carried out prior to the release of the UK Government’s Brexit position papers. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 5


sector overview Paul Kelly, FDI Director, examines the challenges facing the Irish agri-food sector in the months ahead, as the Brexit negotiations continue, and argues the case for a Brexit response package that ensures efficient and open markets, domestically and internationally.

Brexit a Huge Concern for Agri-Food

I

reland’s largest indigenous sector, with 230,000 linked jobs, has seen exports grow by over 40% since 2010 to reach €11.15 billion in 2016. The sector’s continuing ambition is reflected in the €19 billion export target in Food Wise 2025. This ambition is, however, grounded in the reality that Ireland’s food and drink industry faces an extremely challenging climate in 2017 and beyond in domestic and export markets. The UK vote to leave the EU is a fracture of the single market and the most immediate challenge facing the Irish agri-food sector. Market diversification and overall export growth will be challenged by a new global trade environment caused by the US withdrawal from TTP negotiations, a general move away from multi-lateral to bi-lateral deals and the potential for trade wars, which could result in a damaging displacement effect in markets. The EU single market faces other challenges beyond Brexit, including a number of member states attempting to introduce mandatory country of origin labelling.

The Fall-Out from Brexit The fall-out from Brexit will make it increasingly difficult for agrifood and drink companies to retain their position within the UK food supply chain. The products made in Ireland are often particularly suited to the British market and the commercial relationships 6 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

are well developed, often having been built up over generations. So diversification isn’t easy and even where possible, it can take many years to gain a foothold in new markets. Brexit related currency movements have already had an impact on exports, making it more difficult for Irish exporters to compete with UK producers in Britain. This has already manifested itself in recent weak food exports. A very real risk for agri-food and drink is that processors selling primarily to the UK market will choose to move their manufacturing operations to Britain as a way of avoiding possible future trade barriers and hedging against currency volatility. We also face the prospect of indigenous food and drink companies losing market share to lower priced Sterling imports. So what can we do about these threats? Any deal must ensure a smooth exit, comprehensive transitional arrangements and the closest possible relationship into the future. It must also recognise the unique economic and political challenges for Ireland and include a range of specific measures to address these.

The British-Irish Trading Relationship An early focus on avoiding a hard border with Northern Ireland is vital, but the Irish approach must also be informed by the greater


sector overview Brexit brings a significant risk of regulatory divergence, and with that comes the likelihood of different and potentially lower standards. This will serve to increase costs and the complexity of doing business.

economic importance of the eastwest Irish-British trading relationship. Additionally, alleviation measures will be needed to support indigenous exporters. A temporary EU state aid framework is needed to support those trading through any adjustment period and the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund should be reformed to ensure it can address the economic fallout of Brexit. Funds amounting to 5% of the value of current annual indigenous export sales to the UK will be needed annually from domestic and EU sources to help Irish businesses innovate, diversify into new markets, train staff and invest for the future. The longer term opportunities largely remain for the Irish food and drink sector. However, the immediate response must be to ensure the sector is fit for purpose to meet the substantial challenges ahead in a world that has changed radically in 12 months. This brings into sharp focus the need to ensure the necessary policy measures are implemented so that the Irish food sector is highly cost competitive and innovative.

Brexit Response Package This requires a Brexit response package that ensures efficient and open markets domestically and internationally, including: ◆ An intense and ongoing focus on cost competitiveness led by the Department of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation in areas such as labour, energy and insurance; ◆ The re-introduction of the Employment Subsidy Scheme and the Enterprise Stabilisation measures which were last applied during the financial crisis in 2009-2011; ◆ €25m in funding for market diversification and product innova tion measures, administered by Bord Bia and Enterprise Ireland. In addition, trade support measures including export trade financing and export credit guarantees to support the continued development of international export markets; ◆ Increased resourcing of the international market access unit of the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine and rapid implementation of the new resources /structure; ◆ A finance package that includes sustainable financing via funding from the Irish Strategic Investment Fund and the Strategic Banking Corporation of Ireland. Meeting the needs of consumers and wider society is at the heart of every food business. Our reputation as food producers and exporters is underpinned by our food safety

standards and sustainability credentials. Industry also seeks to continue to engage in a constructive way with government on societal challenges such as obesity.

The Risk of Regulatory Divergence

It is also important that food regulation remains a high priority throughout Brexit negotiations and any future free trade agreement with the UK. Regulatory divergence as a result of Brexit is a significant risk factor that Irish food and drink companies must plan for. EU food safety legislation and compliance by food business operators underpins consumer confidence, as the standards are the highest in the world. However, Brexit brings a significant risk of regulatory divergence, and with that comes the likelihood of different and potentially lower standards. This will serve to increase costs and the complexity of doing business. It will be important to maintain equivalent standards on food safety, animal health, welfare and the environment. Government must support measures to ensure safe, sustainable, high quality and nutritious food production including: ◆ Maintain a world class food safety regime; ◆ Ensure supply chain integrity and identification / management of emerging risks and threats; ◆ Support by Government for voluntary industry efforts on health, nutrition and responsible consumption; ◆ Ensure an evidence-based approach to public health policy making, including full engagement with industry; ◆ Avoid discriminatory taxes and other measures on food and beverages;

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 7


sector overview

Ensure climate change policies recognise the sustainable grass- based food production system in Ireland; ◆ Government to ensure that EU’s 2030 Climate and Energy Framework results in a fair effort sharing commitment for Ireland; ◆ Ensure the review of EU ETS does not exclude Irish agri-food installations from carbon leakage provisions.

Skills Development

We must also ensure a strong focus on national research, skills development and apprenticeships in the agri-food sector, including: ◆ Ensure a taxation environment which encourages increased investment in innovation; ◆ Continue the strong focus on and investment in industry-led applied and fundamental research, in particular in Technology Centre initiatives and increased access to Horizon 2020 funding; ◆ Continue budgetary support for technology transfer and adoption at primary production level; ◆ Streamline and simply the application processes for access to innovation supports, particularly for SMEs; ◆ Ensure the skills base of the agri-food industry reflects not just the current business demands but the challenges of future growth in existing and new markets; ◆ Increase funding supports for enterprise led training initiatives, including Skillnets and industrial apprenticeships; ◆ Continue to build on the ‘Food Marketing Graduate’ Programme to deliver high quality talent to the industry.

Deep Links to the Wider Economy The agri-food industry has deeper linkages to the wider economy than the rest of manufacturing. It accounts for almost half of direct expenditure by the entire manufacturing sector in the Irish economy (€2.1 billion on payroll; €7.9 billion on Irish materials; €1.8 billion on Irish services). As a result, the sector has a high employment 8 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

multiplier, which means that it supports employment in other parts of the economy in a way that other sectors don’t. Uniquely, this economic activity is consistently dispersed throughout all regions of Ireland, especially rural areas. It is therefore also at the heart of the social fabric of rural Ireland. Failure to implement policies to support the sector will be damaging to the wider economy and not just the food and drink industry. And the reverse is true too. Implementing these policies to support the growth ambition of Ireland’s food and drink industry will bring enormous benefits to the wider economy.

A very real risk for agri-food and drink is that processors selling primarily to the UK market will choose to move their manufacturing operations to Britain as a way of avoiding possible future trade barriers and hedging against currency volatility.


dairy

Ireland Eyes Slice of Japanese Cheese Market

The EU-Japan trade deal will provide for the full elimination of tariffs for hard cheeses such as cheddar.

The EU-Japan trade deal could be great news for Ireland, according to Conor Mulvihill, Irish Dairy Industries Association Director.

T

HE political announcement of an EU-Japan trade deal has been warmly welcomed by Irish Dairy Industries Association (IDIA), but Director Conor Mulvihill warned that it would take a concerted long term effort to take advantage of the deal. Japan is the world’s third largest economy, over 15 times bigger than Ireland’s economy and has a position as a major high value food importer, bringing in over €60 billion worth of goods a year, while its cheese market is worth an estimated €3 billion annually. Speaking from Brussels at the political announcement of the Free Trade Agreement, Mulvihill urged government agencies to work with member companies to put in place an immediate plan to drive Irish dairy’s position in the market. He welcomed comments by Minister Creed that “no time would be wasted” and the IDIA has already been in touch with Bord Bia to explore options. He also commended the work done by The Agriculture Commissioner Phil Hogan in driving forward personally a deal on dairy in Tokyo with his Japanese counterparts.

A Growing Market Ireland currently lies ninth in the league table of cheese exporters to Japan, with 4,110 tonnes of cheese being exported to the market in 2016, which represented a 43% increase on 2015 Irish exports. With Australia achieving cheese exports of 86,000 tonnes and New Zealand 61,000 tonnes to Japan in 2016, it shows the potential of the market if we invest in ground work. Euromonitor currently projects a 5% year-on-year growth rate for the Japanese cheese market, as domestic tastes embrace cheese, especially as an accompaniment to alcohol, which demonstrates the scope for growth in the market. Other dairy segments are also significant in the Japanese dairy market, with the yogurt market alone being valued at €7.65 billion. While the final text of the agreement has to be finalised for cheese and dairy products in general, significant market access 10 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/182017

improvements were agreed for the EU’s core export products to Japan. The agreement itself has to be fully finalised but will provide for the elimination of tariffs for hard cheeses such as cheddar which is key for Ireland, as well as European staples such as parmesan and gouda. Currently, these tariffs are up to 28.9% and under the new agreement, they will be eliminated over 15 years.

Mitigating the Brexit Pain Mulvihill pointed to the recent extensive work IDIA has done with cheddar manufacturing companies, quantifying the Irish cheese industry’s exposure to cheddar sales to the UK in the face of Brexit, and he noted that this deal might present an opportunity to mitigate some of the exposure. Mulvihill also underlined the potential for other value added dairy products like infant formulae and dairy based specialised nutrition ingredients, where the agreement provides for a duty free Tariff Rate Quota (TRQ) for whey products with specific protein content, tariffs will be reduced by 70%. Export figures show that Ireland is already the third biggest exporter to Japan of casein. For skimmed milk powder (SMP) for feeding, an important export interest for the Irish and EU dairy industry, tariffs will be reduced by 95%. In addition, a sizeable quota for SMP/butter and condensed milk will give us preferential access besides the existing WTO quota. All Figures from: Japanese import Data http://www.clal.it/en/?section=stat_giappone http://www.euromonitor.com/dairy-in-japan/report https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/03/worldsbiggest-economies-in-2017/ http://www.worldatlas.com/articles/the-countries-importing-themost-food-in-the-world.html


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sugar tax

Colm Jordan, Director of the Irish Beverage Council, argues that the forthcoming tax on sugar sweetened drinks (SSD) will not reduce obesity levels in Ireland.

Playing Politics

with Ineffective Policy

A

tax on sugar is falsely considered a silver bullet to solve the problem of obesity in Ireland. It is not. Nowhere in the world have we seen any evidence that a tax reduces obesity levels. In four countries where sugar sweetened drink taxes were introduced (Mexico, France, Denmark, Hungary), obesity actually increased. Despite this, a tax on sugar-sweetened drinks (SSD) was included in Budget 2017. It’s to be introduced in April 2018. The Irish Beverage Council (IBC), the Ibec group that represents soft drinks, juices and bottled water companies, made a 17,000-word submission to Government arguing against another tax on business in early January. Ibec and Food and Drink Ireland (FDI) also made substantive submissions, focusing on the economic impact of a discriminatory tax and the complications due to Brexit for a truly north/south and east/west industry.

Reducing Sugar Through Reformulation Soft drinks companies have been to the fore in in reducing sugar content through 12 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

Colm Jordan, Director, Irish Beverage Council.

investment in reformulation of products and introduction of innovative new lines containing less or no sugar and fewer or no calories since the 1970s.

At the beginning of 2016, the Irish food and drink industry became the first in the world to publish exact details about the efforts of industry reformulation. The Food Drink Ireland Reformulation Report was launched by then Minister for Health, Leo Varadkar TD, and proved conclusively the positive impact industry efforts have had on consumption. IBC members took 10 billion calories out of the Irish diet each year between 2005 and 2012. 10% of all sugar contributed to the Irish diet by soft drinks was also reduced in these seven years. This was at no cost to consumers. A sugar-sweetened drinks tax would threaten soft drinks companies’ capacity to continue investment in such initiatives. This voluntary action to reformulate by industry came years ahead of the Department of Health’s call to work with industry on a roadmap for reformulation targets. Work has already begun on Food Drink Ireland’s second reformulation report. Soft drinks contribute less than 3% of calories to the average daily diet. Experts,


sugar tax from the World Health Organisation to the European Commission, acknowledge that rising obesity levels are due to a wide range of factors. These include modern lifestyles which expend less energy than in the past, a reduction in physical exercise over the past 30 years, unbalanced diets and lack of nutrition knowledge. Taxation does nothing to address these.

Declining Comsumption Levels A recent World Health Organisation (WHO) Europe report showed Irish 11-15 year olds who consumed soft drinks on a daily basis, fell by 70%, from 37.3% in 2002 to 11.1% in 2014. The report highlighted Ireland as one of 32 countries throughout the continent of Europe with the ‘greatest overall decrease’. The Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) survey asked about the frequency of consumption of ‘soft drinks that contain sugar’, providing examples to aid respondents. Just 11% of Irish 11-15 year olds drink sugary soft drink daily, that’s 39% less than their European counterparts (18%). The decrease is the one of the largest out of 32 countries surveyed in Europe, from Iceland to Russia. Irish 11 year old boys recorded one of the largest reductions, with an 83% fall in the numbers drinking sugary soft drinks daily. The same survey of Irish 11, 13 and 15 year olds found that from 2002 to 2014: ◆ daily fruit consumption increased 26%; ◆ daily vegetable consumption increased 12.5%; ◆ daily sweets consumption decreased 49%; ◆ moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity of 60 minutes or more a day decreased 4%; ◆ vigorous-intensity physical activity four or more times a week decreased 4%; ◆ TV viewing two hours or more on a weekday decreased 24%; ◆ computer use of two hours or more on a weekday increased 203%.

Daily soft drink consumption in Ireland (%)

Girls and boys

2002 2006 2010 2014

11-15 year olds

37.3 23.4 19.8 11.1

11 year olds

29.7 17.7 15.1 7.6

13 year olds

37.5 24.7 20.4 12.1

44.9

15 year olds

24

13.8

Source: WHO (HBSC)

A tax on sugar-sweetened drinks is a way of looking tough on obesity, without actually being tough on obesity. It is, in reality, the acceptable face of populist politics

The Case for a Holistic Approach The results prove that a holistic approach to tackling childhood obesity is needed. Focusing on one single ingredient or product does not take account of the multifactorial causes of childhood obesity. The singling out of the soft drinks industry by way of the proposed sugar sweetened drink tax is unjustified. A tax on sugar-sweetened drinks is a way of looking tough on obesity, without actually being tough on obesity. It is, in reality, the acceptable face of populist politics.

27.8

The Department of Health’s own impact assessment of sugar tax failed to find a single real-world evidence-based study that suggests the success of a sugar tax in decreasing national obesity figures. The proposed sugar-sweetened drinks tax is poorly targeted and inequitable. It will mean price increases for over 70% of the population, while less than 4% of individuals who consume sugar-sweetened drinks

daily fall into the obese category. A major global study on obesity by McKinsey’s showed that obesity is a multi-factorial problem with no single solution. The same report found taxation to be the 13th most-effective approach out of 16. If we are to honestly tackle our obesity problem we need a voluntary approach, to work together with Government for the ‘Healthy Weight for Ireland’ action plan. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 13


regulations

The Grocery Regulations: One Year On A year since their introduction, we’re still waiting for effective enforcement of the Grocery Goods Undertakings Regulations, argues Paul Kelly, FDI Director.

F

DI welcomed the introduction last year of grocery sector regulations by the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation. The regulations, which FDI had long campaigned for, can help address the major imbalance in the relationship between major grocery retailers and suppliers.

Facing Unfair Practices Five large retailer groups now control 89% of the Irish market. Food and drink companies face a range of unfair practices, including a failure to respect contractual terms, de-listing threats and unilateral deductions off-invoice without sound business reasons. One year since the activation of the Grocery Regulations, it is worth recalling that the Competition and Consumer Protection Act 2014 gave powers to the Minister for Enterprise to make these Grocery Regulations but in doing so, the Minister was to give due regard to a number of principles outlined in the Act. These included: ● the desirability of the promotion of competitive trade between grocery goods undertakings; ● the importance of grocery goods undertakings conducting their trading relationships in good faith and in a fair, open and transparent manner; ● the importance of providing grocery goods undertakings with reasonable certainty in respect of the risks and costs of trading; ● the impact on the development and maintenance of strong, 14 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/182017

innovative, efficient and competitive production and supply bases in the grocery goods sector.

Enforcement in the UK Last year, the UK supermarket chain Morrisons was forced to repay cash and discipline staff after it was found to have breached the grocery market code of conduct for a second time by demanding lump sums of about £2m from suppliers, following an intervention by the UK Grocery Code Adjudicator (GCA). The GCA said Morrisons admitted to making 19 requests which were above and beyond agreed deals with suppliers in contravention of the UK Grocery Code. Food and drink companies and consumers are best served by a grocery market that is both fair and competitive, one that offers choice and convenience, and provides an outlet for new products and suppliers. The new rules have the potential to help to address some of the unfair pressures and demands currently put on suppliers by major retailers. In short, they present a unique opportunity to create a fair trading environment in the Irish grocery sector. However, to protect food and drink suppliers, the importance of effective and efficient enforcement of the Regulations is paramount. The Competition and Consumer Protection Commission (CCPC) must be a strong voice on these issues and it is clear that the proactive approach of the UK Grocery Code Adjudicator is a good model that should be followed here to ensure the principles of fair trading, enshrined in the legislation, are adhered to.


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28.06.17 12:47


prepared consumer foods

The Benefits of Reformulation Sub-population with biggest reduction in mean intakes of nutrients

-

RS

LE

RS LE RS

LE

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RS

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EN

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AGE

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AD

EN

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AGE

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C

AD

AGE

EN

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SODIUM

U LT S

TE

SUGAR

AD

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SATURATED FAT

U LT S

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TOTAL FAT

AD

RS

(minimum % reduction in mean daily intakes for consumers of reformulated products) All groups saw reductions but who benefited most?

TE

HOO

Potential impact on population of Ireland* What could happen if all food and beverage companies with similar products reformulated in a similar way to the 14 FDII companies SODIUM REDUCTION

ENERGY REDUCTION

Adults

Teenagers

88

LDRE

SC

RS

HI

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AGE

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SUGAR REDUCTION

15lbs

319 Children

tsp of salt per year

of excessive weight gain over 10 years prevented

tsp of sugar per year

SODIUM REDUCTION

ENERGY REDUCTION

SUGAR REDUCTION

74

Teenagers

tsp of salt per year

Children

20lbs

of excessive weight gain over 10 years prevented

186 Teenagers

tsp of sugar per year

Actual impact on population of Ireland by the 14 FDII members* SODIUM REDUCTION

TE

The Irish food and drinks industry continues to take a proactive role in reducing obesity and improving public health through the reformulation of products.

The FDII /Creme Global Reformulation Project Report Key Results

Teenagers

12

tsp of salt per year

SODIUM REDUCTION

Children

9

tsp of salt per year

SUGAR REDUCTION

Teenagers

42

tsp of sugar per year

SUGAR REDUCTION

Adults

24

tsp of sugar per year

All information based on The FDII /Creme Global Reformulation Project report. * Comparisons provided by Dr Mary McCreery, Consultant Registered Dietician Nutritionist

F

ood Drink Ireland recently presented its report on the impact of reformulation at the Food Industry Summit in the Aviva Stadium, Dublin. The Food Drink Ireland (FDI) Reformulation Project report, compiled by leading analysts Creme Global, used data on 600 products from 14 of Ireland’s major food and drink companies and was supported by the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI). It showed that during the seven years (2005-2012) covered by the research: • Salt content of the products analysed reduced by 37%; • Sugar content fell by 14%; • The amount of energy as measured in calories sold over the seven years to 2012 reduced by 12%; • Both total fat and saturated fat intake reduced by approximately 10%. “Reformulation is one of the most effective ways in which the food and drink industry can contribute to reducing obesity and improving public health, but never before has its true impact on the diet of the entire nation been analysed,” noted FDI’s Director of Prepared Consumer Foods, Kevin McPartlan. “While personal responsibility will always be the most significant factor in having a healthy diet, by reducing the levels of fat,

16 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

Kevin McPartlan, FDI’s Director of Prepared Consumer Foods.

saturated fat, salt and sugar in our recipes, industry is demonstrating its absolute commitment to play its part.”

Expanded Research FDI is currently gathering data for the report of the second phase of its reformulation project. The expanded research will also include analysis of the impact of reduced package sizes and fortification of food and drink products with extra nutrients. This will be included in a follow-up report due to be published by the group next year. “We will also analyse how changes to package sizes will help reduce the levels of fat, saturated fat, salt and sugar consumed in Ireland,” McPartlan said. “Food companies are

often criticised for smaller unit size, particularly for snack and confectionery products, but small reductions in package sizes reduce portion size and have a positive impact on the national diet. “In addition to reducing the level of certain nutrients in products, such as saturated fats, food companies also add others, such as dietary fibre, iron, folic acid and Vitamin D as a positive contribution to improved public health,” he added. “The next iteration of our project will demonstrate the real-life changes to consumption levels of these nutrients in Ireland.”

Setting Reformulation Targets The Department of Health has announced plans to create a National Technical Working Group on reformulation. The Minster of State responsible for health promotion has said this group will set Irish targets for reducing fat, sugar and salt and will publish a roadmap for action at the end 2017. FDI will present the views, challenges and opinions of the food industry and call for no arbitrary targets to be introduced. It will use the results of its reformulation reports to demonstrate the commitment of and efforts taken by food and drink companies in Ireland to create a healthier national diet.


NATURAL INGREDIENTS

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W

ith wellness-inspired living experiencing a boom the world over, NCC Food Ingredients is continuing to focus

on extending its range of natural ingredients.

NEW FROM NCC

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NCC Food Ingredients division is now representing Daepyung,

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demand for clean labels and natural products.

Daepyung has developed a revolutionary Enzyme Treated

McConnell recently travelled to FIC Shanghai to meet with new and existing producers and suppliers. McConnell’s key

Stevia which does not have the bitter aftertaste normally associated with other Stevia products.

takeaway from his time in Shanghai is that, “FIC China is far

What is it Enzyme Treated Stevia?

bigger and more comprehensive than either its European or US

Enzyme Treated Stevia is one of the most highly advanced

equivalent. The focus of suppliers at the show was adding value

types of stevia products. It has been widely used in various

and addressing the growing consumer awareness of healthier

food and beverage industries. Enzyme Treated Stevia

ingredients especially in sugar, sodium, and fat reduction. “This sits perfectly with NCC’s own health and wellness platform,” said McConnell, “where we are working hard with customers on exciting NPD projects to meet their demands.”

is produced by adding glucose to stevia extracts using glucosyltransferase. The enzyme process improves taste quality by reducing the bitter taste of stevia and making solubility higher than in general stevia extracts. Given the emphasis on clean labels and health and wellness for consumer demand, Enzyme Treated Stevia will continue to

HEALTH AND WELLNESS PLATFORM With over 20 years’ experience in the food industry, Fintan McConnell is uniquely positioned to lead NCC into the future with a wealth of experience and knowledge in new product

grow in the industry. NCC is attending Food Matters Live, London and FIE, Frankfurt in November 2017

development, research and development, and specialty ingredient sourcing. To meet growing consumer demand, NCC is working with its key suppliers to deliver ingredient solutions that include clean label options and scientific or market-leading ingredients. These solutions cover the areas of sugar, salt (sodium), fat reduction and replacement, along with protein and mineral fortification – all helping to support the development of customers’ formulated products. At the forefront of this development its new ingredient offering Enzyme Treated Stevia.

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23/08/2017 15:34


beer market

The Beer Necessities The markets for macro and micro beer are going from strength to strength, despite the looming spectre of Brexit, writes Jonathan McDade, Head of the Irish Brewers Association.

B

eer is Ireland’s favourite alcoholic beverage and its popularity remains intact as the sector evolves to meet the changing demands of the beer drinkers. The brewing sector has emerged from a challenging period and finds itself in a better place, with increased production, driven by export demand and an unprecedented number of beer brands available to consumers. Last year, the Irish Brewers Association’s Beer Market Report showed that overall beer production rose for the first time in half a decade. Although beer consumption had fallen marginally in 2015, exports went up by 16%. The export demand is in line with improving economic conditions in Europe. In 2016, beer exports rose further by 9% to €290m, thus confirming the growing popularity of Irish beer abroad.

The Craft Beer Revolution The success of Ireland’s major brewers is also being mirrored by Ireland’s craft beer sector, which has expanded at an impressive rate in recent years. The number of microbreweries is expected to reach one hundred by the end of this year, a significant milestone, considering there were only a handful of microbreweries in Ireland seven years ago. Last year’s microbrewery market share was estimated to be 3.4%, an increase from 2.5% market share in 2015. One of the most interesting developments in the craft beer sector is happening in Leinster House, with Labour TD, Alan Kelly’s ‘Craft Drinks Bill’ being universally praised as it passed second stage in the Dáil. The bill, if enacted, will allow craft

18 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18


beer market breweries and distilleries to sell product on-site without requiring a full on-trade license. This bill will enable micro-brewery visitors to sample more of Ireland’s ever expanding range of craft beers. The bill still needs to be passed through committee stage before eventually moving to the Seanad but the universal backing of the bill is encouraging.

Setting Industry Standards The wider brewing sector has also been keen to improve how draught beer is delivered to consumers in bars, hotels and restaurants. Last year, the Irish Brewers Association launched its technical dispense programme, which now sets a minimum industry standard for beer dispense operators in the sector. Enhancing the professional development of Ireland’s dispense technicians ultimately benefits the consumer as it increases the likelihood of the perfect pint being served at every order. Earlier this year, the Irish Brewers Association launched its cooling specifications document, which is designed to save energy usage for draught beer cooling systems. The document was developed by Ireland’s major brewers in close collaboration with manufacturers of beer cooling equipment and the installers of draught beer cooling systems. This is a sound example of the brewing industry’s commitment to the environment in terms of saving energy.

The Troika of Challenges Ahead On the face of it, the brewing sector has moved from recovery mode to expansion on many fronts in recent years. However, the brewing industry is facing the challenging troika of regulation, taxation and Brexit. In June, the new Taoiseach Leo Varadkar announced his intention to pass the Public Health (Alcohol) Bill, which he originally drafted as Minister for Health in December 2015. The bill, in its current form, poses problems for the sector as it seeks to minimise visibility of beer in retail outlets, impose a Minimum Unit Price on alcohol for consumers, place severe restrictions on advertising and force brewers to place misleading health warning labels on pre-packed beer. The annual threat of an increase in excise on beer is ever present, despite Irish beer drinkers already paying the third highest rate of excise in the EU. Beyond the immediate legislative threats, the uncertainty of Brexit has already had an impact on the industry, particularly due to

Beer should not be viewed as a sin that needs to be regulated and taxed. It should be treated as a cultural asset that plays a crucial role in powering the engine of the Irish food and drinks market

Sterling’s devaluation. In order to mitigate the currency fluctuations, the Government should decrease excise rates, impose no further costs to businesses, ensure that a hard border with Northern Ireland is not reintroduced and amend the Public Health (Alcohol) Bill. Amendments to the Bill should include:

◆ ◆ ◆ ◆

putting current advertising codes on a statutory footing; adopting the standard EU label for alcohol; banning the below-cost selling of alcohol; allowing all beer brands to be visible for consumers at retail outlets.

Failure to act could impact Ireland’s vibrant craft sector and stifle product innovation for Ireland’s major breweries. Beer should not be viewed as a sin that needs to be regulated and taxed. It should be treated as a cultural asset that plays a crucial role in powering the engine of the Irish food and drinks market.

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2015/16 2017/18 | 13 19


fruit juice

Why 100% Fruit Juice Still Reigns Colm Jordan, Director of the Irish Beverage Council, reminds us of the benefits of drinking 100% fruit juice.

O

ur breakfast habits and their tendency to change over time has always been a hot topic for discussion among foodies and nutritionists. In recent years, however, the consumption habits of breakfast eaters and drinkers have become more and more varied. Getting a good breakfast is one of the most important things we can do to sustain a balanced diet but it’s crucial that our healthy breakfasts are served up with the right combination of elements. As with many changing dietary trends, it is common to see once-reigning staples fall out of favour, while others take their place in a blaze of popularity. Replacing parts of our diet with new elements leads to learning about new foods but sometimes it can cause us to forget the values of others.

Fruit Juice Matters Over the course of the Fruit Juice Matters programme, we have found that many people, in their enthusiasm to adopt as healthy a diet as possible, often overlook many of the 20 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

benefits of drinking 100% fruit juice in the morning. One major example of this is the fact that many people are unaware that orange juice, due to its vitamin C content, helps the absorption of iron. In a country where iron deficiency is a serious problem (a recent survey suggested that 42% of Irish women could be at risk of iron deficiency), this is a major issue. This is something we should most certainly bear in mind when choosing how to kick-start the day. Often when people embrace new options in terms of eating and being healthy, old favourites (like juice) come under the microscope, and this is something that the Fruit Juice Matters programme welcomes. It’s very important, however, to ensure that any information that may contribute to the debate is as accurate as it can be. Orange juice is often lumped into the same bracket as sugar sweetened drinks, but this is far from a fair comparison. Perhaps the most important difference between orange juice and sugar sweetened drinks is their very different relationship with sugar. The

sugar content of 100% fruit juice is a topic that is raised frequently, but it can often be misleading.

Naturally Occurring Sugars It’s not surprising, given the endless noise that surrounds added sugar, simple sugars, table sugars etc. that consumers are often confused in terms of 100% fruit juice’s sugar content. 100% fruit juice comes straight from real fruit, with nothing added to it. The sugars, carbohydrates and fibre in 100% fruit juice are naturally occurring and, under European and national legislation, it is strictly forbidden to add sugars to 100% fruit juice. There is no doubt that having a good breakfast is crucial to getting a good start to the day, but we all know how hard that can be with all the pressures of work, family and whatever else the day might throw up! While there will always be many options to choose from, and trends that will come and go, there aren’t many which are as pure, nutritious and convenient as a small glass of 100% orange juice, as part of a balanced breakfast.


meat sector

Pictured at the launch of Meat Technology Ireland are Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Michael Creed TD, with John Malone, Chairman, Meat Technology Ireland; Former Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation, Mary Mitchell O’Connor TD; Professor Gerry Boyle, Director of Teagasc; CEO Enterprise Ireland, Julie Sinnamon and Dr Noel Cawley, Chairman of Teagasc.

Innovating for Growth

Irish beef and lamb processing companies invested in a centre of excellence for meat processing research and innovation. Meat Technology Ireland, a collaboration between industry and academia, supported by Enterprise Ireland, was launched earlier this year and will be an important enabler in the expansion of Irish beef and sheepmeat exports, writes Joe Ryan, Director, Meat Industry Ireland.

T

he meat sector in Ireland, from farm through to processing and export, remains one of the most important indigenous industries in the national economy, supporting in excess of 120,000 farmers and generating total sales of €4.4 billion, with 2016 exports in excess of €3.5 billion. Approximately 10,000 jobs are directly provided by meat processing across rural Ireland, with additional associated jobs in distribution, transport and services. Significant investment continues to be made by all Meat Industry Ireland (MII) members in state of the art processing facilities to ensure that companies are in a position to compete not just on a European scale, but increasingly on a global scale. The beef and sheepmeat industry has transformed from what was predominantly a frozen commodity trade 20 years ago to now supplying fresh premium cuts to blue-chip customers across Europe and internationally.

Ambitious Growth Targets The current Food Wise 2025 strategy has set ambitious growth targets for the agrifood sector, with the aim of increasing export value to €19 billion by 2025. Within the meat sector, the potential exists to further scale up activity and the industry itself has an overall ambition to grow exports by in excess of €1 billion, delivering new revenues and jobs through farming and value-added processing and in the wider economy.

There are many challenges facing the sector, not least the huge uncertainty surrounding Brexit and the future trading relationship with the UK market. Other challenges include market access, trade agreements, competitiveness and climate change. These challenges serve to highlight the importance of underpinning competitiveness, differentiating Irish meat from its competitors and providing a scientific basis to substantiate the health, safety and sustainability claims we make regarding Irish beef and sheepmeat.

Meat Technology Ireland In this context, a group of MII beef and sheepmeat processing members have committed considerable investment funds, with strong support from Enterprise Ireland, into the establishment of Meat Technology Ireland, which is an internationally leading centre of excellence for beef and sheepmeat processing research and innovation. Research themes include the areas of genomics, meat tenderness, shelf-life extension, meat characterisation and grading, health benefits of Irish grass-fed beef and sheepmeat, and identification of new products / processes within meat processing. The centre, which is hosted by Teagasc, was launched in April 2017 and the output of Meat Technology Ireland will be an important enabler in the further expansion of Irish beef and sheepmeat exports, meeting marketplace requirements and growing

value in our economy. In addition to Teagasc, as host institute, the other partner academic institutions include University College Cork (UCC), Dublin City University (DCU), Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT) and the Irish Cattle Breeding Federation (ICBF). The meat processing members of the new initiative include ABP Food Group, Ashbourne Meats, Dawn Meats, Dunbia, Hilton Foods, Irish Country Meats, Kepak, Liffey Meats and Slaney Foods. This is a significant strategic investment, involving collaboration with the research community in identifying transformative outcomes that will deliver sustainable benefits to the beef and sheepmeat sectors. The involvement of nine major beef and sheepmeat processing companies in this innovative industry-led collaboration is a clear demonstration of the industry’s commitment to delivering on the growth potential of our sector and adding to its already strong contribution to the rural economy.

Joe Ryan is Director of Meat Industry Ireland, the sector association within Ibec that represents the meat processing industry in Ireland. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 21


workplace wellbeing

Why Workplace Wellbeing Works for Employers and Employees

Workplace wellbeing is not just an amorphous concept but a genuine concern, and one that can have a big influence on employee productivity, writes Dermot Doherty, Project Manager for the Food Drink Ireland Health Initiative. 22 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18


workplace wellbeing

O

n Friday, March 31 last, tens of thousands of public and private sector employees across every sector took to the streets, roads and parks around their workplaces. They were all participating in the ‘Lunchtime Mile’, one of the numerous activities taking place across the country as part of Ireland’s third National Workplace Wellbeing Day. Over 500 organisations signed up for the Food Drink Ireland (FDI) initiative, supported by Ibec, which aims to improve employee wellbeing through promoting better exercise and nutrition in the workplace. A person will spend around 80,000 hours working throughout their lives and the workplace, as a result, can have a profound effect on their health. Over four million days are lost by small businesses alone in Ireland each year due to absenteeism at a cost of over €490m to the companies involved. Presenteeism, where employees turn-up for work despite being ill or having health problems, has an even greater impact and accounts for an estimated loss of productivity that is 7.5 times greater than absenteeism. Yet today, just over a quarter (25%) of Ireland’s workforces reach the recommended level of over 150 minutes of moderate physical activity every week.

Wellbeing in the Workplace The World Health Organisation believes the workplace is the ideal setting to promote health to a large proportion of the population. It directly influences the physical, mental, economic and social well-being of workers. Many workers in Ireland today across the public and the private sector are also parents, which extends the realm of influence for workplace initiatives around health and wellbeing to the next generation, by positively affecting the health of families, as well as reaching further out into the wider community and society. Employers and employees in Ireland are increasingly shaping the working environment to actively improve the health of their workforce. A growing number of employers are introducing initiatives as well as facilities into the workplace which are designed to support and encourage healthier lifestyles amongst their employees. These range from providing secure bike racks and shower facilities, weekly fruit boxes and health talks, to the implementation of structured company-wide wellbeing programmes, which seek to make employees better informed about their health and wellbeing and support them in making the changes that are necessary for them to lead a healthier lifestyle.

Raising Awareness There is also greater emphasis nationally on the promotion of wellbeing in the workplace and growing support for such initiatives, as the popularity of National Workplace Wellbeing Day amongst employers and employees alike over the past three years illustrates. Simplicity is seen as being key to the success of the FDI initiative, which is part of an ambitious programme of activities being undertaken by FDI under its Health Initiative to help in the fight against obesity.

Employers are simply asked to place a special emphasis on health and wellbeing that will encourage staff to think a little more about their health on the day. This could involve promoting initiatives or facilities that are already available within the organisation or doing something special on the day. Since it first began in 2015, hundreds of employers and thousands of employees across the public and private sector have participated in the campaign. In addition to the ‘Lunchtime Mile’, an activity that is simple and free for any employer to arrange, no matter where their company is based or its size, the activities they have organised on the day have included health checks, exercise and fitness classes, nutrition talks and cookery demonstrations. This year, participation grew to over 500 organisations, which highlights a growing interest in employee wellbeing among organisations of all sizes and sectors, as more employees have access to health and wellbeing initiatives within the workplace than ever before.

Recognition Last year, FDI expanded the National Workplace Wellbeing Day programme to include the Workplace Wellbeing Day Awards, another key focus of their Health Initiative. The awards recognise and reward Irish organisations that support and promote best practice

in workplace wellbeing. They have already proven popular with employers and FDI hope they will encourage an even greater number to do more in this area by adopting a collaborative approach to employee wellbeing. Irish Life Assurance was named Ireland’s best large employer in this year’s Awards, which are sponsored by Mercer, while Helsinn Birex Pharmaceuticals took the honours in the medium size category. The award for best small company went to MCI (formerly Ovation Group), a Dublin destination management company.

Benefits of Workplace Wellbeing Research¹ commissioned by FDI to mark this year’s National Workplace Wellbeing Day clearly demonstrates that employers offering health and wellbeing initiatives for their employees are likely to fare better when it comes to productivity levels, as well as staff recruitment and retention. The research was conducted online by Behaviour & Attitudes FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 23


workplace wellbeing ble working hours (62%), better holiday allowance (59%), training and development opportunities (52%) and workplace wellbeing programmes and facilities, including showers and bike racks (38%), are the key benefits that are important to employees when selecting an employer and all these benefits are more important now than a year ago.

Plans For 2018

on a nationally representative sample of 18-65 year old people employed in the Republic of Ireland. The fieldwork was carried out from January 25 to February 2, 2017. A total of 996 employees participated in the survey. The survey across the public and private sector showed that four out of five employees (80%) report a positive link between their health and wellbeing and their organisation’s productivity, while seven in 10 (70%) maintain that employers should encourage them to be healthier. Employees also view health initiatives in the workplace as evidence of their employer’s interest in their wellbeing, an important consideration for employers at a time when some sectors are struggling to recruit and retain staff. According to the research, three out of five employees (62%) are likely to stay longer with an employer that is interested in their wellbeing, while almost half (49%) say that would consider leaving an employer who isn’t. Wellbeing initiatives also feature strongly amongst employees’ preferred benefits when it comes to choosing an employer. Flexi-

Planning is already under way for Ireland’s fourth National Workplace Wellbeing Day. Details and the date are expected to be announced in the autumn, together with the entry requirements for the National Workplace Wellbeing Awards. Meanwhile, employers seeking information on the campaign can visit fooddrinkireland.ie/ wellbeing. ¹ The research was conducted online by Behaviour & Attitudes on a nationally representative sample of 18-65 year old people employed in the Republic of Ireland. The fieldwork was carried out from January 25 to February 2, 2017. A total of 996 employees participated in the survey. About the Author Dermot Doherty is the Project Manager for the Food Drink Ireland Health Initiative. If your organisation is interested in becoming involved in the work of the Food Drink Ireland Health Initiative, please feel free to contact Dermot at any stage. Email: Dermot.Doherty@Ibec.ie Telephone: (01) 6051620 Web: www.fooddrinkireland.ie

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training & development

Lakeland Dairies Class of 2016 Graduates receive their certification along with Lucia O’Neill, Graduate Programme Manager, Lakeland Dairies; Michael Hanley, CEO, Lakeland Dairies; and Mark Skinner, Network Manager of the Food Drink Ireland Skillnet.

Upgrade your skill set with FDI Skillnet The Food Drink Ireland Skillnet provides enterprise-led training for the food and drink sector, helping to tackle a key challenge for industry, writes Mark Skinner, FDI Skillnet Manager. 2017 continues to be a very challenging period for the food and drink sector from a skills perspective. With the economy firmly on the road to recovery, unemployment levels have now fallen below 6%. As a result, access to talent is now a key challenge and this challenge is further exasperated for our sector as we face the consequences from Brexit and the need to maintain competitiveness. To address these challenges, the Food Drink Ireland Skillnet last year delivered over 4,000 days training to over 750 employees from over 100 companies in the sector. These programmes have all been developed with direction from our Steering Group of leading learning and development experts within the sector. Funding for these programmes came from member companies and Skillnets, which itself is funded by the National Training Fund (NTF) through the Department of Education and Skills (DES). This year, demand levels for current programmes remains very high, particularly in the areas of leadership development, people management and graduate development, as well as commercial, financial and lean skills.

Developing New Programmes In addition, new programmes are being developed to address future skills needs in areas including International Selling, Food and Drink Regulation as well as Employee Engagement. On top of this, additional programmes will be developed to address specific knowledge gaps that will result from the practical roll-out of Brexit.

Membership of the network is free and is open to companies from the Meat, Dairy, Consumer Foods and Beverages sectors. Benefits of membership include: • Industry specific training that’s relevant to your business; • Up to 60% saving on the cost of training due to network purchasing power plus part-government funding; • Flexible training that is delivered at times that suit your company; • Saving time on procurement, as all courses procured by the network are done so to ensure all trainers meet the quality standards of the sector and that value for money is achieved; • Opportunity to collaborate and learn from colleagues across the industry.

New Apprenticeships Outside the Food Drink Ireland Skillnet, Food Drink Ireland is also in the process of developing two new apprenticeships for the sector. The first is a three-year apprenticeship for Maintenance Technicians, while the second is a two-year programme for Process Operatives. More information can be found on www.fooddrinkireland.ie or by contacting Mark Skinner, Food Drink Ireland Skillnet Manager on (01) 6051615 or mark.skinner@ibec.ie. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 25


meat science & technology

Teagasc Host International Meat Congress Teagasc recently hosted the 63rd International Congress of Meat Science and Technology, which saw more than 450 papers presented on the future application of science and technology in the meat sector.

T

he 63rd International Congress of Meat Science and Technology (ICoMST 2017) was hosted by Teagasc in August 2017 at the Rochestown Park Hotel, Cork, and was chaired by Teagasc’s Assistant Director of Research, Declan Troy. Over 450 papers were presented at the congress, many by Teagasc researchers. The role of meat in strategies to achieve a sustainable diet lower in greenhouse gas emissions was presented by Dr Maeve Henchion, Teagasc’s Rural Economy and Development Programme. Dr Henchion highlighted the complexities regarding sustainability in terms of meat consumption and highlighted possible strategies that could be implemented to mitigate its climatic impact. Dr Henchion outlined how sustainable diets are possible without the elimination of meat: “For instance, overconsumption of food in general, beyond our nutritional requirements, was found to be a significant con-

26 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

Declan J. Troy, Teagasc, Congress Chair, opens the 63th International Congress of Meat Science and Technology.

tributor of emissions. Nonvoluntary and voluntary mitigation strategies offer potential to reduce dietary greenhouse gas emissions. All mitigation strategies require careful consideration but on-farm sustainable intensification perhaps offers the most promise. However, a balance between supply and demand approaches is encouraged,” she noted. “Health should remain the overarching principle for policies and strategies concerned with shifting consumer behaviour towards sustainable diets.”

Demand for Protein Demand for protein is continuously increasing and despite advances in research and development of alternative protein sources, animal protein still holds a key role in the supply of this essential nutrient. Teagasc researcher, Dr Anne Maria Mullen explains: “Approximately half of the live weight of animals raised to produce meat is categorised as ‘the fifth quarter’, com-

Pictured at ICoMST are Joe Spzalek, ABP; Jamie Cafferky, Teagasc, who won an award for best industry relevant oral presentation at the conference; Michael Creed TD, Minister for Agriculture, Food & the Marine; and Declan Troy, Congress Chairman, Teagasc.

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meat science & technology manding lower market values than prime meat cuts. From the sustainability as well as from the protein quality points of view, it makes sense to explore the available sources of high quality protein already available, but not utilised to its fullest potential.” Her talk summarised current opportunities for aggregating value to some of these protein-rich co-products from the meat processing chain, underpinned by research advances on both technical and social aspects. The work is part of a large research initiative looking at the exploration of Irish meat processing streams for recovery of high value protein based ingredients for food and non-food uses – the ReValueProtein project.

Carbon Monoxide in Meat Packaging Carbon monoxide (CO) has many value-added benefits in meat packaging due to its colour stabilising effects and enhancement of meat quality attributes. The regulation of CO within meat packaging varies worldwide and remains a topical and controversial issue. CO is prohibited in the EU for use in meat packaging, mainly due to fears it may mask spoilage, therefore misleading consumers. The issue of consumer acceptance of CO was not considered. Teagasc’s Dr Lauren Van Rooyen explains: “Applying CO pre-treatments prior to vacuum packaging enhances colour, while allowing discolouration to occur by the use-by-date, thereby addressing concerns about safety. Recent work showing European consumer acceptance of CO in meat packaging demonstrates its future potential within the EU. The information provided may support framing future policies intended to assure consumer protection, safety, choice and interest. Re-evaluation of permitting CO as a packaging gas within the EU may be warranted.” The main theme of the 63rd ICoMST was ‘nurturing locally, growing globally’. Teagasc’s Assistant Director of Research and Congress Chair, Declan Troy explains: “In addressing this, it was considered how science can offer the meat production and processing sector solutions to enable it to nurture sustainably at local level, while offering opportunities to grow globally.”

Animal Welfare Evaluations World renowned animal behaviour expert Professor Temple Grandin was one of the keynote speakers at ICoMST 2017. Her talk focussed on onfarm conditions that compromise animal welfare that can be monitored at the slaughter plant. She said that handling and stunning at slaughter plants has greatly improved through the use of numerical scoring. Her presentation encouraged the use of numerical scoring systems at slaughter plants to assess conditions that compromise welfare that occurred either during transport or on the farm. “Some of the transport problems that can be assessed are bruises, death losses, and injured animals,” she explained. “Welfare issues that occurred on the farm that can be assessed at the abattoir are body condition, lameness, lesions, injuries, animal cleanliness and internal pathology.” She also noted that there are important welfare issues that cannot be assessed at slaughter. They are on-farm euthanasia methods, use of analgesics during surgeries, and the type of animal housing systems. She stressed that welfare evaluations at slaughter have the potential to greatly improve welfare. Professor Grandin is a designer of livestock-handling facilities and a Professor of Animal Science at Colorado State University. She has designed facilities located in Ireland, the United States, Canada, Europe, Mexico, Australia, New Zealand, and other countries. In North America, almost half of the cattle are handled in a centre track restrainer system that she designed for meat plants. Curved chute and race systems she has designed for cattle are used worldwide and her writings on the flight zone and other principles of grazing animal behaviour have helped many people to reduce stress on their animals during handling. Professor Grandin is also internationally famous as a spokesperson on autism and 28 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

Pictured at the International Congress of Meat Science and Technology (ICoMST) in Rochestown, Cork are (l-r): Ciara McDonnell, Teagasc; keynote speaker Professor Temple Grandin, Colorado State University, USA; Michael Creed TD, Minister for Agriculture, Food & the Marine; and Declan Troy, Congress Chairman, Teagasc.

was the subject of the award-winning, semi-biographical film, Temple Grandin.

Award Winners Dr Carlos Alvarez, a post-doctoral researcher in the Department of Food Quality and Sensory Science, Teagasc Food Research Centre, Ashtown, won runner-up in the International Meat Secretariat Prize at the congress for his work on the Re-Value Protein project. Teagasc Walsh Fellow Jamie Cafferky, Department of Food Quality and Sensory Science, Teagasc Food Research Centre, Ashtown, won the ABP student award for best industry relevant oral presentation at the congress for his work on sensory and texture attributes of beef.


marketing

Eileen Bentley, Bord Bia and Sara Mitchell, Poulet Bonne Femme at the launch of ‘Think Digital’, a new digital marketing programme designed to address the digital skills gap in the industry.

Food Companies Encouraged to Think Digital Bord Bia and the Digital Marketing Institute have launched a new programme to up-skill food and drink marketers.

B

ord Bia have announced a partnership with the Digital Marketing Institute to offer Irish food and drink companies an opportunity to grow and develop their online presence with a view to increasing brand awareness and sales. ‘Think Digital’ is a six-month digital marketing programme available to all Irish food and drink companies, designed specifically to address the digital skills gap in the industry. According to Indecon, Irish consumers spend €850,000 per hour online, a 20% increase since 2012, which is expected to grow by a quarter in next 3-5 years (Source: Assessment of the Macro-Economic Impact of Internet/Digital on the Irish Economy; Indecon). While the numbers purchasing food and groceries remain relatively low at 8%, CSO data shows that 86% of people use the internet to find information on goods and services (Source: Information and Communication Technology household survey). “The fact that four out of five people are using the internet to research products presents a huge opportunity for food and drink companies and it is imperative that brands are well-represented, discoverable and, where possible, available to purchase online,” noted Eileen Bentley, Bord Bia. “The feedback we are receiving from businesses is that there is always a need for up-skilling in the ever-changing world of online marketing and the ‘Think Digital’ programme offers just that. Irish food and drink companies are producing some of the finest products in the world and we need to make sure that they are competent when it comes to telling people about what they have to offer.”

Digital Skills Gap A recent report by the Digital Marketing Institute on the Marketing Skills Gap in Ireland, the UK and USA showed that only 8% of marketers tested achieved entry level digital marketing skills and 86% of marketers in Ireland believed that they will need to

improve their digital marketing skills to remain competent in their current role in the future (Source: 2016 Digital Marketing Institute Digital Marketing Skills Report, Missing The Mark - The Digital Marketing Skills Gap In the USA, UK & Ireland, compiled by Behaviour & Attitudes on the Marketing Skills Gap in Ireland, the UK and USA). “Even though digital marketing has become increasingly essential for businesses, there is a persistent global and local skills gap that threatens to undermine future organisational growth,” explains Cathal Melinn, Digital Marketing Institute. “There is an urgent need for digital skills education for professionals and we are delighted to be able to offer training to Irish food and drink companies, so they can take advantage of the rapidly expanding market opportunities.”

Practical Application of Digital Knowledge The ‘Think Digital’ programme is open to all Irish food and drink companies and will incorporate 10 modules which can be completed online over a six-month period. Bord Bia will also host a number of seminars in its creative space, the Thinking House, which will demonstrate the practical application of the digital knowledge in the food world. Participants will hear from a range of food brands, retail analysts and digital experts, offering insights on how to achieve success online. According to the Digital Marketing Institute report, strategy and planning is cited as the leading digital skills gap in organisations. In Ireland, research and insights, as well as analytics and reporting also register as areas of concern. Addressing this, taught module topics on the ‘Think Digital’ programme will include Strategy and Planning; Analytics; Search Marketing (SEO) and (PPC); Digital Display Advertising; Email Marketing; Social Media Marketing and Mobile Marketing. Participants will also receive ongoing support and resources from Bord Bia and the Digital Marketing Institute throughout the year. For further information, see www.bordbia.ie/thinkdigital. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 29


brexit and the irish agri-food sector

Dealing with the reality of

Food lawyer Raymond O’Rourke examines the likely implications of Brexit for the Irish agri-food sector, explains the potential scenarios and advises the Irish government on what they should seek as part of the negotiations.

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ver the last months, many of you have probably attended various Brexit breakfasts and found yourself, confused, unsure and sometimes wondering what is all the fuss about. Maybe like decimalisation back in the 1970s, it will all work out fine in the end, with limited disruption to your business. As a specialist Food Lawyer with many years experience working for the EU institutions, my view is that you should be vigilant and prepare for many changes in your sector in the future, whether you export or import food products to/from the UK. Politicians regularly use easily understandable phrases in media interviews so we have heard a lot about ‘frictionless’ and ‘seamless’ borders; that the EU as a whole has as much to lose from Brexit as the UK. With the UK leaving the European Union, the important issue for the Irish retail food sector is what will be the future relationship between the UK and the future EU 27 (including Ireland).

The Single Market and Customs Union For the food retail trade, two of the most important aspects of existing economic and trading relationships between Ireland and the UK are the Single Market and the Customs Union. The Single Market consists of four freedoms: free movement of persons, goods, services and capital. The important freedom for the retail food sector is goods – but what does it actually mean? It means 30 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

that the legislation covering the composition, hygiene and labelling of foodstuffs is completely harmonised. There are national exceptions in particular cases but in reality, if you produce a food product, it must be produced under hygienic conditions, be labelled and undergo official controls at the Irish level under rules all agreed at EU level. The outcome of this process is that your food product can be traded throughout the EU without hindrance, once it is produced in accordance with these EU-wide rules. The Customs Union is a foundation of the European Union and an essential element in the functioning of the Single Market. The Customs Union facilitates free trade between EU states by ensuring that they all charge the same import duties to countries outside the union. The countries also agree not to impose tariffs on goods travelling between countries in the union. The agreement reduces administrative and financial trade barriers, such as customs checks. The majority of work undertaken by Member State customs administrations deals with EU external trade with third countries.

Dreams of a Frictionless Future The UK Government has said that it wants to leave the Single Market and the Customs Union but that it will be able to negotiate an arrangement whereby trade will flow between the UK and the EU in much the same fashion as it does at present. The EU Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier,


brexit and the irish agri-food sector speaking to the EU’s Economic and Social Committee on July 6, could not have been clearer: “I have heard some people in the UK argue that one can leave the Single Market and keep all of its benefits: that is not possible. I have heard some people in the UK argue that one can leave the Single Market and build a Customs Union to achieve ‘frictionless trade’: that is not possible.” He went on to state definitively that only membership of both the Single Market and the Customs Union permitted the current “frictionless” trading arrangements the UK Government constantly makes reference to in all its statements about Brexit.

The Divorce Settlement: Possible Scenarios The negotiations taking place at present are to deal with what might be called the ‘divorce’ settlement – what are the outstanding budgetary liabilities for the UK since the EU has a multiannual financial framework (2014-2020); the rights of EU citizens living in the UK and the border arrangements between Northern Ireland/Ireland. Once settlement on these issues has been agreed, then the EU and the UK will begin discussions on the future trading arrangements between the EU and UK. If a ‘divorce’ settlement can be agreed, what are the post-Brexit options for the UK: Norway (European Economic Area - EEA): continued full access to Single Market, must fully adopt EU regulations without any chance to amend. Fully integrated Customs Union arrangement with the EU, which includes no tariff access to the EU. Switzerland (European Free Trade Area – EFTA): not full access to Single Market; rather sector-by-sector agreements. Fully integrated Customs Union arrangement with the EU, which includes no tariff access to the EU. Turkey-EU Customs Agreement: partial access to Single Market and tariffs apply to certain goods. World Trade Organisation (WTO) rules – same access to Single Market as Russia or China, which is limited sector-by-sector. Tariffs applied to all goods. None of these arrangements will be good for Ireland but obviously the Norway or Switzerland options offer the least disturbance to trade between Ireland and the UK. The difficulty is that the UK Government has boxed itself into a corner by stating before the negotiations have begun that they don’t want to be part of the Single Market and the

Customs Union. The Turkish example may therefore seem attractive but is really only a marginally better version of WTO rules.

Free Trade Agreement The UK has stated that it would like to negotiate a Free Trade Agreement with the EU: such Agreements are similar to those that the EU has recently negotiated with Canada and Japan, which took many years to complete. In the interim, the UK would be allowed trade normally as it does at present for a few years BUT they would have to pay for the privilege and I am sceptical whether the Westminster parliament and UK media would accept the scenario where they must pay large sums of money to an organisation, the EU, which they thought they were leaving.

Advice for Ireland In my opinion, I don’t see the UK Government changing their view on leaving the Single Market and Customs Union, so we are facing a Free Trade Agreement at best or even a WTO situation at worst. In that case, I believe the Irish Government should: 1. Advocate that tariff rates on food and agricultural products exported to/imported from the UK should be 0% as they are at present by incorporating the EU Schedules of Concessions into a Free Trade Agreement. If the UK is in a WTO situation, again Ireland should negotiate with its EU partners for the lowest possible tariff rates. 2. Obtain a commitment that the UK agrees to legislative equivalence with the EU’s stringent food safety rules. 3. Negotiate with our EU partners so that UK agrees to a minimal customs regime for food products from EU countries, in particular Ireland, covering all issues from documentation to VAT/tax matters.

About the Author Raymond O’ Rourke is a qualified Barrister and a specialist food regulatory and consumer affairs lawyer. He worked for many years in legal firms both in Brussels and Dublin and now has his own law practice. He is a member of the management board of both Bord Bia and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) where he is vice chair, and was previously a Board Member of the FSAI, and current Chairman of the Consumers Association of Ireland (CAI).

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 31


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seafood Pictured are (l-r): Gavin Duffy, Conference Moderator; Jim O’Toole, CEO, BIM; and Michael Creed TD, Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine.

Seafood Showing Healthy Growth Ireland’s €€€1.1 billion seafood sector recorded growth of over 7% in 2016, according to BIM, whose mission is to provide supports to enable this valuable industry to achieve its full potential in the years ahead.

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reland’s Seafood Sector grew by 7.4% in 2016, contributing €1.1 billion in GDP to the Irish economy according to Bord Iascaigh Mhara’s (BIM) annual ‘Business of Seafood’ report, which was launched at BIM’s National Seafood Conference, ‘Winning in a Changing Environment’. Growth in the industry has primarily been driven by another strong year of domestic seafood sales at €380m and an increase in private investment by seafood enterprises. “We have a valuable and sought after raw material that is in great demand on our key markets, contributing €376m in fish landings alone, €167m in farmed fish and shellfish and employing 11,000 people in our coastal communities,” noted Jim O’Toole, BIM’s CEO. “The task facing the sector now is to build on this growth, add value and diversify to withstand current challenges, including Brexit.”

The CEO stressed that BIM will continue to provide supports to enable this valuable industry to achieve its full potential, while the conference set out how they intend to future proof the sector in the years ahead. Key performance figures from BIM’s ‘Business of Seafood’ report for the year 2016 include: €376m of fish was landed in our ports (domestic and foreign landings); €167m of fish and shellfish were farmed (13% increase on 2015) ; €543m – the value of fish landed and farmed before any value is added; Ireland exported €559m of Irish seafood; Ireland imported €276m worth of seafood (UK was the main import country worth €186m); Ireland’s main markets in 2016 were EU

• • • • • •

(including the UK) €429m; Asia €46m and Nigeria/N. Africa €46m; Domestic sales were valued at €380m in 2016 (Salmon was the top selling species valued at €94.5m) ; 9,257 people are directly employed in the sector – an increase of 4.5% on 2015. 11,000 people are employed directly and indirectly, predominantly in coastal communities. BIM’s Business of Seafood Report is available on http://www.bim.ie/our-publications/ corporate-&-other-reports/

• •

Growing Appetite for Seafood Continued investment and support, combined with buy-in from the industry itself, have created a firm foundation on which to build and develop for the future. Irish FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 33


seafood seafood has become an industry with the resilience to withstand potential challenges and the drive and passion to reach its full potential. This puts the sector in a solid position to take advantage of the world’s ever-increasing appetite for seafood. The world is now eating more fish per person than ever before – approximately 20 kilos a year – and this is expected to increase by 50% by 2030. Demand is projected to be particularly high in Asia, with its strong cultural preference for seafood. Combine this with the growing trend towards health and wellness and the opportunities for seafood are significant. Ireland has the ambition to position itself as an international leader in the global seafood industry. Building on its natural advantages, including access to some of the most productive fishing grounds in the EU, a commitment to sustainable fishing and the development of a high-quality aquaculture sector, the industry is committed to meeting the ambitious targets set out in the Food Wise 2025 strategy. It is now receiving more financial support than ever before through the European Maritime Fisheries Fund (EMFF), and combined with increased investment from the private sector, demonstrates a growing confidence in the sector. BIM is working closely with the industry to ensure that this increased investment is channelled into areas that will deliver the best results: driving growth in the short and medium term, but also future-proofing to cope with the unexpected. These efforts will benefit the Irish economy as a whole, as well as the industry and our coastal communities, which are its backbone. There has been a strong rise in domestic retail sales, which are now worth €239m. Salmon and cod are the two top-selling species, with salmon in particular experiencing

Cuan Dilleen, Evan Dilleen and Zoey O’Connor are pictured looking through BIM’s Sustainability Atlas.

double digit growth (11.5%) last year. There has also been significant new investment in the seafood industry, with financial support from the EMFF and private investment both contributing to a more modern fleet, increased processing capacity, and a focus on new product development and innovation. Greater sales and investment have led to a welcome expansion in employment. There are more than 9,200 people working in the fishing, aquaculture and processing sectors, and this figure rises to 11,000 when ancillary employment is included. Most of this employment is centred in Ireland’s coastal communities. The growth in these three key areas, domestic sales, investment and employment, has resulted in a positive outlook within the industry and a strong sense for forward momentum.

The Global Market The task facing Irish seafood now is to build on this momentum and to position Ireland

as a key player in the supply of quality, sustainably-sourced seafood to a global market. BIM is supporting the industry’s efforts to achieve this goal through a range of initiatives built around skills, sustainability, competitiveness and innovation. The agency already has a strong reputation for providing training but it is also looking at the big picture, and working with the entire sector to ensure it has the appropriate skills to develop and thrive. Not only must fishermen concentrate on their catch and vessel, they must also speak the language of finance and sustainability. Seafood processors need to invest in R&D talent and business expertise and fishmongers need to offer convenient, pre-prepared fish to their customers. Initiatives such as the Seafood Development Centre Graduate Programme have produced a new generation of talented individuals who are driving the industry forward. Ireland’s green credentials enjoy an excellent reputation in our key markets, as can be seen from the success of Bord Bia’s Origin Green programme. The fact that seafood companies are some of the programme’s most engaged participants by sector is testament to their commitment to sustainability. BIM is supporting that commitment with programmes for the entire industry, from fishermen to farmers to processors, ensuring that Ireland can continue to develop its sustainable practices.

Sustainability and the Future

Jim O’Toole, CEO of BIM, speaking at BIM’s National Conference, ‘Winning in a Changing Environment’. 34 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

BIM recently facilitated a Sustainability Knowledge Sharing trip for 10 leading Irish seafood companies to Silver Hill Farm in Co. Monaghan to deliver valuable insights and learnings around the area of sustainability from an innovative Irish company that has


seafood

effectively eliminated waste from their business. The participating seafood companies: Sofrimar, Kish Fish, Island Seafood’s, McBride Fishing, Atlantis, Oceanpath/Dunns Seafare, Killybegs Seafood’s, Premier Fish and Irish Fish Canners have been working with both BIM through the Green Seafood Business Programme and Bord Bia to drive sustainability in their businesses and in particular to achieve the high standards set out under Bord Bia’s Origin Green programme. Later this year, a leading seafood processor will host a delegation from other Irish food sectors in order to showcase the innovations and achievements of the seafood sector in the area of sustainability. BIM recently published its first Environmental Sustainability Atlas, a comprehensive compendium of all the environmental activities in which it is engaged across the sea fishing, fish farming and seafood processing sectors. It reviews the tools available for improving overall environmental performance, such as management systems and voluntary standards, details the various training and awareness initiatives provided by BIM, and highlights projects and interventions across a number of key environmental aspects where improvements have been, and continue to be, achieved. The report concludes with a look into the future – detailing potential BIM projects already in the early stages of

planning, and topics being explored with a view to developing new initiatives to ensure that BIM remains at the forefront of environmental seafood sustainability. For the full report, see: www.bim.ie/media/bim/content/ publications/corporate-other-publications/ BIM-Environmental-Sustainability-Atlas.pdf. Another important project saw BIM join forces with the Centre for Applied Marine Sciences at Bangor University, Wales, on a €1.4m pilot project to create a portal that will bring together scientific research in the Irish Sea from both Ireland and Wales. This collaborative project has been funded by the European Regional Development Fund through the Wales Ireland Cooperation and will focus on information of particular relevance to the mussel producing sector in the pilot phase. It is hoped that the successful trialling of the pilot project will pave the way for the sharing of valuable data across the board in relation to the Irish Sea.

Building Competitiveness Building competitiveness is essential to increase profitability and market share. To achieve this, Ireland’s fragmented seafood industry can restructure into organised networks that share resources and information. It must attract new investment, expand the raw material base by attracting new landings

to Irish ports, measure itself against international competitors and build scale so it can compete in the global market. One of the biggest opportunities for increasing the value of the seafood sector is through greater innovation. Currently, Ireland exports 70% of its seafood as a bulk commodity but the way of the future is value-added seafood – and to achieve this, it will be necessary to develop new consumer-friendly products, as well as innovative techniques that can overcome the challenges of shelf life and transportation. BIM is working closely with the industry and other agencies, both in Ireland and internationally, to build our innovation capabilities. The seafood industry has faced many challenges in the past and has shown itself to be resilient and resourceful in meeting and overcoming those challenges. The realities of Brexit are still uncertain, but BIM will support industry to minimise the effects of a changing relationship with the UK. Aquaculture activities are helping Ireland expand its raw material base. Ireland’s seafood industry has demonstrated its capacity to be dynamic, exciting and brimming with potential. BIM is working with the industry to ensure this potential is harnessed and that the sector receives the support it needs to achieve its ambition. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 35


packaging optimisation

Repak’s ‘Prevent and Save’ Service

Repak’s “Prevent and Save” service helps members to optimise packaging systems and reduce costs, saving on both material and money.

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epak is a for purpose organisation set up by industry in 1997 to deliver a packaging compliance scheme for its 2,000 members with EU packaging waste legislation requirements. If your business has a turnover of greater than €1m and places 10 tonnes or more of packaging on the Irish market, then Repak can help you with your obligation. Since the formation of Repak (not for profit), Ireland has grown packaging recycling from around 15% at that time to 70% today. The benefits of joining Repak are many and include: Full legal compliance for packaging placed on the market; A cost-effective solution as an alternative to self-compliance; One of the lowest cost compliance schemes in Europe; Full reporting to the Local Authorities

• • • •

36 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

and the Environmental Protection Agency; No requirements to display that you take back packaging or to have an on- site recycling facility for that packaging; No bi-annual public notification on national newspapers; No quarterly and annual reporting to the local authorities; License to use the international Green Dot symbol; Access to Repak’s dedicated member- ship team who are there to help you with all aspects of your membership. However, Repak doesn’t just offer compliance; they also help members to optimise packaging and reduce costs through their free ‘Prevent and Save’ programme.

• • • • •

The Role of Packaging Packaging plays an essential role in containing, preserving and protecting the food

products we buy on a daily basis. Along with these critical functions, packaging also provides the consumer with information about the food they buy and is the primary tool used to enhance its sales appeal. Today, many food companies are looking for a competitive advantage by reducing their overall cost base. One approach to this is to reduce the costs associated with packaging, especially reducing the amount of packaging a company places on the market.

Repak’s ‘Prevent and Save’ Programme Repak helps and encourages members to prevent packaging waste through their ‘Prevent and Save’ packaging optimisation programme. Their dedicated packaging technology team can assist your business on any aspect of sustainable packaging design and look at ways to optimise existing


packaging optimisation packaging systems. This can save on both material and money for your business. It is also free of charge to Repak members. Waste prevention methods help create less packaging waste in the first place. These methods include prevention (removal or avoidance of certain packaging) and minimisation (lightweighting of packaging). This ‘stop waste before it happens’ strategy is an integral part of how the food industry now approaches packaging decisions, avoiding overpackaged, disposable, and non-reusable or non-recyclable products where possible.

Getting the Balance Right There are already economic incentives to reduce excess packaging. Businesses are constantly looking to reduce their product costs while Repak’s ‘pay by weight’ fee structure is designed to discourage companies from producing excess packaging. Less packaging is not necessarily more environmentally friendly though. Food needs to be protected at various stages of the production supply chain, particularly during storage and shipping. The shelf life of perishable products is also highly important. If poor packaging results in a product becoming unusable, the overall impact on the environment through increased food waste can be much more negative. The challenge now facing business is to achieve a balance between reducing the volume of packaging used, while still serving customers’ needs with a quality product and packaging that drives sales through shelf appeal.

Free Packaging Optimisation Survey By analysing all types of packaging, both into and out of a company, and by examining product (primary), grouped (secondary) and transport (tertiary) packaging, Repak’s packaging team can find ways of optimising packaging systems as a whole, so that your business can achieve the best use of available resources. This in turn helps to reduce the overall amount of packaging you place on the Irish market. This short on-site survey usually leads to: Reduced materials procurement costs, through less packaging being required; Savings in producer responsibility fees, by reducing the amount of packaging being placed on the market. Whether you manufacture packaged food products or sell them, Repak can look at your existing waste management practices and make some suggestions that could save money on your waste bills.

• •

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Confidential Report on Reducing Packaging Costs After completing the on-site survey, Repak will provide you with a detailed confidential report, which guides your company through the steps required to realise a reduction in your packaging costs and packaging waste. Repak will follow up with you where you need any assistance. Typical recommendations include: Removal of non-essential packaging;

• • Lightweighting of material; • Introduction of closed-loop packaging return systems; • Pallet layout redesign to maximise load efficiencies; • Recommendations to increase recycling

and reduce your waste bills.

The Prevent and Save section of the Repak website is regularly updated with tips and industry case studies, showing examples of how Repak members are improving their packaging systems and reducing packaging waste. These publications are free of charge to Repak members and are designed to share best practice amongst members. Repak are always looking for members to participate. To avail of this free service, contact either Brian Walsh (01 4619205) or Colm Munnelly (01 4619237) or email prevention@repak.ie for more information.


education

Food For Thought

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CC has solidified its reputation as the ‘Food University’ with the establishment of the UCC Food Institute, which will encompass the largest concentration of food-related education and research resources in Ireland. Food has been a critical aspect of the UCC identity since the foundation of the Dairy Science faculty in 1929. Since then, UCC has produced world-class graduates in the areas of food and dairy technology, including industry leaders such as Dan MacSweeney (Carbery), Dr John O’Brien (Nestlé) and Denis Brosnan (Kerry). The university has also evolved over this period, with course developments across the wider spectrum of food, including Food Business and Marketing, Food Microbiology and Nutritional Studies.

Collaborative Research Centre UCC’s Food Industry Training Unit (FITU), first established in 1993, is also widely recognised across the national food industry due to its excellence in the provision of skills training and professional development courses. Now, in 2017, as the European food market enters into a challenging and dynamic period, UCC is ready more than ever to provide expertise and learning in the food sphere through the establishment of the UCC Food Institute. The UCC Food Institute is a collaborative research centre, combining all disciplines across the food spectrum into a single onestop-shop for stakeholders. This single Institute will provide access to world experts and the most current research, whilst streamlining branding and alumni engagement. Prof. Paul Ross, Head of the College of Science, Engineering and Food Science, says, “Over the past

Minister Michael Creed meets the new UCC President Professor Patrick O’Shea, along with Professor Paul Ross, UCC; Mary McCarthy Buckley, UCC; and Professor Paul McSweeney, UCC, on a courtesy visit to hear about Food Research and Business at UCC.

50 years, UCC has always been a world-leader regarding food and dairy science and the new Institute will strengthen this position with a strong emphasis on trans-disciplinarity, sustainability and innovation. It will provide a united identity for food in the university and for our stakeholders.” The UCC Food Institute will officially launch at the close of this year. For further information, contact Dr Karen McCarthy, Institute Manager, at Karen_mccarthy@ucc.ie or at 021 4903810.

Food Industry Training Unit Continuing Professional Development and Training for the Food Industry

Information on courses from: Mary McCarthy-Buckley Food Industry Training Unit College of Science, Engineering and Food Science University College Cork E-mail m.mccarthybuckley@ucc.ie www.ucc.ie/en/fitu FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 39


inline instrumentation

Supplementing Lab Analysis Food plants can reduce production down time, off-spec product and time-consuming manual grab sampling with inline instrumentation.

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ood plant managers are faced with many challenges today, not the least of which is ensuring product quality. Depending on the product being made, they may have to meet the requirements of the Food & Drug Administration (FDA), European Union (EU), and other agencies and regulations, including cGMP, GFSI, ISO, HACCP, SQF, SID etc. These regulations specify proper ingredients, chemical and biological hazards, procedures and sanitary conditions. Food plant managers also have to meet the expectations of consumers for proper taste and texture. For example, the pH of certain products is critical, because it can affect taste as well as food safety. When adding citric acid to jams, beverages and other products for acidification, pH must be carefully controlled. On top of the obvious food safety and product quality challenges, a plant manager also needs to address operational issues and goals such as:

• • • • • •

Product loss reductions; Variable in raw materials; Resource conservation, such as energy and water reductions; Loss of qualified operators and maintenance people; Need to reduce operating and maintenance budgets; Prepare and manage documentation for internal and external audits.

inline, a sudden deviation would be detected, allowing for instant corrective action that could save the batch. Inline analysers are not available for every type of measurement in the food industry, but are available for many of the common measurements now being performed in labs. A list of typical measurements available with inline instruments include: • • • • • • • • • •

Mass flow for accurate recipe management; Density; Concentration % (solids, alcohol, etc.); pH (using non glass pH sensors); Viscosity; Conductivity; Dissolved oxygen; Chlorine; Turbidity; Colour.

Using inline analysers helps management deal with many issues. For example, the amount of disinfectant used on a hydro cooker for canned food needs to be closely controlled to ensure food safety, as overdosing can cause corrosion and waste of chemicals, while too little can compromise food safety.

Real Time Versus ‘Grab Time’

Inline Analysers in Action: Case Studies

Currently, food plants rely on laboratory analysis of samples collected manually to ensure product quality at various points in a process. Lab technicians periodically take a grab sample, hurry back to the lab for a quick analysis, and communicate the result to plant personnel. Operators and maintenance personnel then make adjustments and corrections to improve control of the process, or to make repairs when required. The challenge with relying on lab analyses is that it’s not done in real time, it’s time-consuming and it has possibility for manual errors. If it takes 30 minutes to grab a sample and analyse it, then the result represents where the process was 30 minutes ago. The result could be a spoiled batch. If the measurement had been done

One plant previously monitored disinfectant by taking grab samples to a lab for analysis twice an hour. Inline analysers were installed to measure free chlorine, pH, and conductivity of the disinfectant. Real-time measurement saved $13,000 annually in disinfectant costs by eliminating overdosing. These measurements also allowed the automation system to add make-up water, based on measured values, saving on heat energy and water usage, and producing less wastewater. The inline analysers also eliminated the need to send a lab worker to the hydro cooker two times an hour to take grab samples. The bottom line was a payback period of just seven months. In a similar example of how inline analysers can cut expenses, a cheese plant performed five clean-in-place (CIP) operations per

40 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

w


s

inline instrumentation

with Inline Measurements

day. The chemicals cost US$1,771 for a 30-gallon drum, and the plant used three to four drums per month. The plant installed an Endress+Hauser OUSAF11 optical phase separation sensor. Using visible and near-infrared wavelengths of light, the OUSAF11 can be used for product loss detection, interface detection, and suspended solids and turbidity measurements. By measuring phase separation between whey, water and CIP detergent in the line, operators were able to determine when the pre-rinse and CIP was complete, instead of relying on lab measurements and timing. Each CIP cycle was reduced by 15 minutes and the plant used 32% less CIP chemicals. The cost savings were $5,300 in the first three months on chemicals alone, plus savings from reduced energy and water use. The plant also increased equipment availability for processing by more than one hour per day.

Increased Reliability and Improved Capabilities Inline analysers are nothing new, of course. Many of these measurements have been available for several years and used for traditional process control. What’s new today is increased reliability, along with new features and capabilities. Improved Reliability: Experiences in the industry with analysers have been mixed. Trying to apply equipment designed for use in the lab directly in a process usually led to disappointments. Washdown, high temperatures, aggressive cleaning chemicals and other environmental factors often resulted in equipment failures and maintenance nightmares. These problems have been rectified by designing analysers and other inline instrumentation from the ground up for use on the plant floor and in the field. Seamless Integration: Traditionally, instruments were analogue devices with a single 4-20mA output. Today, the availability of digital outputs such as EtherNet/IP, Profibus, Foundation Fieldbus and Hart is making integration of information into automation and information systems

very easy, and also allowing multiple parameters to be obtained from a single device. For example, a Coriolis flowmeter can provide mass flow, volume flow, multiple totaliser values, density, viscosity and temperature 2 measurements, along with diagnostic information over one set of wires (or wireless). These digital protocols also help improve accuracy by eliminating A/D conversions and loss in resolution of signal transmission in an analog 4-20mA signal. Simplified Calibration: With the expansion of digital sensor technology, the lab can now take responsibility for calibration of quality-related measurements. For example, to calibrate a pH sensor in the past, calibration equipment had to be brought into the plant. Today, this calibration can be done in the lab in a controlled environment, and the pre-calibrated sensors can be easily placed in operation. Endress+Hauser Memosens and other similar technologies make this possible for pH, DO, conductivity, turbidity, chlorine and many other parameters. About Endress+Hauser Endress+Hauser are a leading supplier of products, solutions and services for industrial process measurement and automation. They offer comprehensive process solutions for flow, level, pressure, analysis, temperature, recording and digital communications across a wide range of industries, optimising processes with regards to economic efficiency, safety and environmental protection. Headquartered in in Reinach, Switzerland, the company employs over 12,000 staff worldwide, and is directly represented in nearly 50 countries, with customers including all of the key players across food & beverage, life sciences, chemical, oil & gas, power & energy, primaries & metals and water & wastewater industries. Here in Ireland, Endress+Hauser operates an international SAP IT Hub and sales and service centre, in Kill, Co. Kildare, as well as an operation based in the Fota Business Park, Cork, both serving its Irish client base.

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 41


food safety

Advancing Food Safety Knowledge and Skills safefood’s Knowledge Network is a professional networking platform for those working or having responsibility for food safety on the island of Ireland.

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s part of its all-island legislative remit, safefood has, the obligation to promote awareness of food safety issues amongst consumers and those professionals with a responsibility for food safety within the food supply chain including industry. Food safety is critical at all stages of the food chain, from farm to fork. Food safety is one of the central pillars on which the reputation and sustainability of the agri-food sector is built: it is a key element that underpins food production, ensuring that consumer expectations are met and that the highest levels of public health continue to be assured.

The safefood Knowledge Network To advance food safety along the food chain, safefood established a collaborative programme called the Knowledge Network, which is a professional networking platform for those working or having responsibility for food safety on the island of Ireland. The network facilitates the sharing of new research, best practice and all island networking through conferences and training. The Network takes a strategic approach to applying science based knowledge to current and emerging issues across the food chain. Through a variety of partnerships and joined up government working, the safefood Knowledge Network has attracted more than 2,600 members, who have benefited from the various services provided. On an all-island basis, the Network focuses on the

The safefood Knowledge Network has attracted more than 2,600 members, who have benefited from the various services provided.

The safefood Expert Group, including Prof. Chris Elliott (Chair) Pro Vice Chancellor, Queen’s University Belfast, Stephane Durand, Agri Food QUEST Manager; Micheál Cosgrove, Glanbia Milk; Michael Bell, Northern Ireland Food and Drink Association; Jenny Morris, Morrjen Consulting, London; Dr Kieran Jordan, Moorepark, Teagasc; Prof. David McDowell, Ulster University; Robin Irvine, Northern Ireland Grain Trade Association; and Dr Declan Bolton, Ashtown, Teagasc. Also present are Dr Gary Kearney (safefood) , Dr Linda Gordon (safefood) Dr Sarah Norberg (safefood) and Michael Hills (safefood) and Dr James McIntosh, (safefood).

following six different sectors: 1) Dairy 2) Poultry & white meat 3) Animal feed 4) Red meat 5) Fresh produce 6) Fish & shellfish To further help safefood achieve its goals, in 2016 they assembled a group of experts from industry, research and public health, who strategically lead their Network, guiding activities and advising on required training and supports, new services for members, and providing insights around both existing food safety risks and emerging issues.

Membership is Free Membership of this all island Knowledge Network is free and members include vets, environmental health officers, lab personnel; national food regulatory agency, public health and agriculture personnel; food safety researchers and trade representative bodies; as well as a variety of personnel in the food supply chain across primary production, processing, distribution, retail and catering. The Network assists these professionals to meet new and emerging challenges, with an overall aim of ensuring that consumers can continue to have confidence in the food they eat. Membership is also open to anyone with an interest in food safety, working in the wider public sector. In 2017 and beyond, the Network will continue to keep members up-to-date on food safety issues and trends. With the support of the Expert Group, this all-island initiative will ensure members have access to the very latest developments in food safety as they emerge. To join the safefood Knowledge Network, visit www.safefoodkn.eu.

Safety In Numbers!

Over the past five years, over 48 different Knowledge Network events were held across the island, with in excess of 2,800 attendees, who listened to over 300 presentations, including 82 international speakers. A total of 28 newsletters, together with 30 eNews network summaries (every three weeks), were distributed, and there were 2,985 uploads onto the network website, including news, events, discussions and forum postings. In addition, 101 videos have been produced by safefood, covering a broad range of food safety topics and conference reviews and interviews. safefood has also facilitated 52 food safety professionals participate in the Knowledge Network Training and Mobility Programme across the island. 42 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18


packaging

15 Years of

Limerick Packaging Limerick Packaging celebrated 15 years in business in June, with the company having grown to be one of the most innovative and impressive packaging businesses in the country, serving businesses across Ireland and the UK.

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hen a host of packaging consumers were asked to rank in order of importance the attributes that make a very good packaging supplier, unsurprisingly, quality came out on top, followed closely by on-time delivery, with price coming just third. What separates good packaging suppliers from truly excellent companies is how well they know and understand their customers’ business. On June 2, 2017, Limerick Packaging celebrated 15 years in business. On June 2, 2002, they set out with a vision to serve a select group of customers in the mid-west of Ireland by supplying them their corrugated packaging requirements, ‘on time everytime’. Today, the company has grown to almost 400 customers, covering the entire island of Ireland plus some valued customers in the UK. “In a world that is trying to deal with unprecedented turmoil, isn’t it wonderful to have one constant that can always be relied upon?” pondered Sales Director and co-owner, Mike Boland. “Limerick Packaging is that one constant, a packaging company that will always deliver quality products on time.” One thing that’s abundantly clear over the course of a visit to the Limerick Packaging facility is that every topic discussed always came around to one thing: the customer. Customer focus and customer needs are at the forefront of all operations in Limerick Packaging. Walking through their wonderful facility, one couldn’t help but be struck by the order, the

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cleanliness, the sense of purpose in all activities and by the large screens highlighting the call-offs for tomorrow; these are broken out by county to maximise transport usage and efficiency.

Customer-Centric Approach When asked what has been the main driver of Limerick Packaging’s success over the last decade and a half, Mike Boland is unequivocal in his answer: it is all down to customer support and loyalty. “We still service many of the customers that gave us business on day one,” he revealed. “In fact, the only customers we lost were ones that sadly no longer exist. Every day that shines over us, we work hard and smart for our customers so that they don’t have to. If I could put it in a nutshell, it would be delivery ‘on time, everytime’ and making our customers’ working life easy; these are our greatest attributes. “We want our activities to help our customers increase their sales,” Boland continued. “We want to help our customers reduce their overall costs and we want to provide packaging solutions that eliminate risk for our customers.” To further explain this three-pronged approach, the Sales Director noted how they strive in all of their retail-ready, shelf-ready packs to maximise shelf impact so that their customers can sell more of their product. Excellent graphics, colour consistency and shelf presence all lead to


packaging instant brand identification and more sales, he stated. Limerick Packaging’s design team creates design solutions that minimise the overall cost of production. Their approach is a holistic one, taking account of the product from the start of the production line, through to packing, palletisation, shipping and ultimate use, seeking out cost reductions at every stage. Minimising risk for customers is the third strand of their approach. The packaging must make it all the way to the end of the supply chain in good order, with the product inside completely intact and functional, thereby minimising or eliminating risk for customers. Good palletisation is achieved by designing boxes that fit and adequately protect the product to be shipped, while also fitting well and stacking safely on pallets, which in turn fit and fully utilise the trucks they will be shipped in. This is achieved by running all designs through a CAPE pallet optimisation program that clearly shows the best pack size and how best to stack it on a pallet.

wholly dependent on graphic accuracy and colour consistency. Good graphics will also attract the impulse buyer, and this is a great source of additional sales.”

One-Stop Shop

Looking to the Future

Limerick Packaging have amassed an impressive product range, which allows them to be a one-stop shop for their customers, if necessary. Their product range includes: • Corrugated Boxes (RSC, Die-Cut, Sheets, Pads, Divs. Etc.); • Litho Printed Cartons and Litho-Laminated Outers; • Shelf-Ready/Retail-Ready Packs; • High Quality Post Printed Corrugated Boxes; • Solid Board Leak-Proof Bases and Lids; • Industrial Polyethylene Bags, Sleeves and Sheets; • Labels; • Protective Foams (EPE,EPU, EPS, EPP); • Foam/Corrugated Composite Packs; • Bubble-Wrap, Rolls and Bubble Bags; • Pallet Edgeguards; • Packaging Assembly Machinery; • Pallet Wrap/Strapping/Strapping Accessories/Tapes; • POS/POP Stands, Bins and Signage. Limerick Packaging has experienced very large growth in litho printed cartons, litho-laminated boxes and high quality post-printed and pre-printed boxes. The print quality from all three is exceptional, while the litho-laminated designs on display in their facility are outstanding. Nothing is left to chance in the production of these packs. The accuracy is achieved by having a print specialist attending every first-off print run to ensure graphic accuracy and colour consistency. On all runs, colour management is achieved by electronic measurement to extremely tight tolerances. “This is essential if we are to assist our customers to increase their sales,” explained Mike Boland, “as instant on-shelf brand recognition is

So what does the future hold for this one of a kind packaging supplier? “More of the same and more of the different,” revealed Connie Ryan, Managing Director and co-owner. “More of the same in that we will continue to work hard for our customers so they don’t have to, and more of the different in that we will develop new products, new processes and achieve new accreditations so that we can enhance our offering to our customers. We are ISO9001:2008 and FSC accredited, we operate to BRC/ IOP and ISO14001 and we are currently working towards OSHAS18001 accreditation. “We thank all our wonderful customers for their support and business over the last 15 years and we hope we can retain their support and attract many new customers over the next 15. We are never happy and we are always striving to improve our performance and to create the ultimate customer experience. We are close but we are not there yet, and when we reach our goal, we will push on and once again try to set new standards for customer service.”

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 45


traceability

The future of

traceability

Food manufacturers and suppliers can bring the benefits of a new era in food traceability to customers with cloud and mobile technology, such as fTRACE from GS1 Ireland.

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obile technology is changing the way consumers make their purchases. Research conducted by PwC in 2017 found that 30% of Irish consumers see their mobile phone as being their main shopping tool in the future. 43% are already using their mobile phone to research products online. The move to mobile is presenting challenges for Irish food businesses. Whether it is about a product’s origin or sustainability credentials, Irish consumers are demanding more information about the food they consume. Those companies who can provide the right data to their customers stand to gain, while those who cannot provide this information will lose out. Sustainability criteria and information about a product’s origin, ingredients and production process are a valuable part of the social currency of food today. Irish suppliers can leverage and publish this information to build connections with both their retail customers and end consumers. Leading European retailers are already embracing the change, using solutions like fTRACE, which harness everyday technology such as mobile phones, barcodes and the cloud to meet the informational needs of consumers.

How does cloud-based traceability work? A cloud-based traceability platform enables suppliers, distributors and retailers, and other key parties along the supply chain, to upload specific 48 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

information about a product to a shared database. Their role in the supply chain, for example, as a raw ingredient supplier or a finished product manufacturer, will determine the kind of information that they contribute to the information pool. The traceability story of a product throughout its journey along the supply chain is strengthened by having a diverse and varied set of contributors, building a richer, more accurate profile of a product. Traceability is a shared responsibility. With all parties along the supply chain contributing, the integrity and reliability of the traceability information is not dependent on any one player.

Marketing and traceability combine in a powerful app Mobile apps are an integral part of daily life for consumers today. Leveraging the information supplied by approved suppliers and brand owners, an app for consumers has been created that enables shoppers to explore the traceability history that suppliers choose to share and the quality credentials of any given product, simply by scanning the barcode. Basic product information can be further enriched with photos, videos and even recipe suggestions. The traceability app has now become a powerful marketing channel right in the hands of the end consumer. The aim of fTRACE is to create a simple, fast and effective means for traceability, while at the same time providing a novel way for brand


traceability owners or retailers to communicate with their customers. This can be done with a touchscreen tablet at the meat or fish counter, or the shopper can simply scan the brand owner’s barcode of the product they are considering, using the consumer fTRACE app. This gives marketers a fresh way of communicating with consumers, and one that meets the growing consumer need for transparency and traceability of the products they purchase.

Enabled by standards through industry collaboration GS1 continues to be a leader in this space, as it works closely with industry to establish and implement standards-based solutions that offer peace of mind to suppliers, retailers and consumers. fTRACE is an example of a GS1 standards-encoded traceability platform that enables event-based traceability and is a means by which manufacturers and suppliers can share product information. Based on the GS1 EPCIS standard (now an ISO standard), fTRACE offers an innovative approach to traceability at every stage of the supply chain.

Fulfilling regulatory requirements The reliable fulfillment of legal requirements is more demanding than ever. Uploading product data to a platform such as fTRACE enables companies to gather and store regulatory traceability data in an easy and streamlined manner. As most companies are already in compliance with regulation, the cost of adoption is relatively lower than developing an entirely new solution, or critically in maintaining an outdated ‘one-up, onedown’ system. Many organisations are not finding it a challenge to consistently maintain system links and fragmented traceability data repositories over time. “With fTRACE, all companies have to do is publish the traceability data they already have in a standardised, GS1-compliant format, so that all stakeholders can access the data when necessary and applicable,” commented Alan Gormley, Head of Industry Engagement, GS1 Ireland. “fTRACE offers a greater efficiency, enabling higher-level standardised data management without interfering with existing IT systems. This means that business owners can achieve constant data quality throughout their enterprises, improving their process control while streamlining/saving costs.” In the unfortunate situation that an issue should arise with a food

Sustainability criteria and information about a product’s origin, ingredients and production process are a valuable part of the social currency of food today.

product, fTRACE makes it easy for retailers, suppliers and the consumer to identify the affected product and act accordingly. Seamless traceability means that the source of the issue or problem can be quickly determined and the associated risks mitigated. Critically, as fTRACE is capturing data dynamically, retailers can prevent the sale of a faulty product, and that is critical in terms of brand protection. The fTRACE app is now available on both the App Store and Google Play. To learn more about fTRACE, go to www.gs1ie.org/ftrace.

A cloud-based traceability platform enables suppliers, distributors and retailers, and other key parties along the supply chain, to upload specific information about a product to a shared database.

fTRACE is an example of a GS1 ❝ standards-encoded traceability platform

that enables event-based traceability and is a means by which manufacturers and suppliers can share product information... fTRACE offers an innovative approach to traceability at every stage of the supply chain.

❞ FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 49


dairy ingredients

Proven Natural Dairy

I

n December 2016, the Truly Grass Fed brand was launched by Glanbia Ingredients Ireland (GII). As Ireland’s leading dairy company, GII has a global reputation for producing top quality dairy products from its Irish family farm suppliers for export to more than 60 countries, and this new range of branded ingredients is the result of extensive work to raise the bar even higher through the creation of a new standard in dairy. Over many years, Glanbia Ingredients Ireland has been working with its farmers across a number of parameters to ensure that its milk suppliers deliver milk of exceptional quality, achieving the highest international sustainability standards, working in harmony with nature. With growing demand from food savvy consumers for proven naturalness, the ingredients producer set out to verify that its grass-fed dairy system truly delivers a wealth of benefits. The company’s vision for Truly Grass Fed is the creation of a premium grass fed ingredient brand for food and nutrition customers to support and endorse their natural brands in market, and its website, www.trulygrassfed.com, underlines its strength in the natural nutrition and eco-friendly arena.

The Best Natural Choice The Truly Grass Fed range is designed for customers and consumers who are looking for the best natural choice for their brands and food products. GII’s mission is to prove its natural dairy credentials by leading the journey to third party grass-fed verification. A core element of the Truly Grass Fed offer is non-GMO, and on March 24, GII announced that the products offered under its Truly Grass Fed range had been verified by the Non-GMO Project. The Non-GMO Project is a US-based non-profit organisation committed to preserving and building sources of non-GMO products, educating consumers, and providing verified non-GMO choices. It is North America’s most trusted seal for GMO avoidance for consumers who are concerned about what’s in their food. “There is significant and growing demand from our customers and consumers, particularly evident in North America, for transparency of ingredients used in products,” explained Seán Molloy, Direc-

Truly Grass Fed from Glanbia Ingredients Ireland is a premium grass fed ingredient brand for food and nutrition customers to support and endorse their natural brands in market. tor of Strategy and Supply Development at Glanbia Ingredients Ireland. “In many cases, it’s what drives their choices. Being awarded verification from a trusted organisation such as Non-GMO Project enables us to uphold food and nutrition companies’ natural brands in market.”

The Truly Grass Fed Seal Customers who include Truly Grass Fed ingredients in their branded products have the opportunity to use the Truly Grass Fed endorsement seal on their packaging, which informs their consumers on what Truly Grass Fed dairy ingredients are all about. The Truly Grass Fed brand signifies: • At least 95% grass fed; • Non-GMO Project verified; • rBST-free; • Antibiotic-free; • Animal welfare friendly; • Environmentally responsible. In addition to these key attributes, Glanbia is in the process of establishing an independent Grass Fed standard. This code of practice will give dairy processors in Ireland the opportunity to qualify as verified Grass Fed producers. Currently, Truly Grass Fed whey can be found in Garden of Life’s SPORT Certified Grass Fed Whey product, which launched in the United States in early 2017. “Our partnership with Garden of Life cements our belief in the quality of our new natural, grass fed range. As a trusted vegan brand, they have told us that in order to launch an animal protein product, they needed a holistic approach that started at the farm and traced every metric straight through to the tub,” revealed Nicola O’Connell, Head of Marketing at Glanbia Ingredients Ireland. “Truly Grass Fed continues to work with a range of valued partners in sports nutrition, bakery, butter, cheese, infant formula and more to extend the distribution and range of our offerings.” For more information, see www.trulygrassfed.com. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 51


capital investment programmes

Factors to Consider for Capital Investment Programmes

A

feature of food processing facilities is the constant capital investment in new equipment and or existing building modifications to accommodate customer demands or increasing product throughput. Undertaking works within a live production facility requires detailed planning and co-ordination of all components and required contractors/suppliers, so as to ensure that there are no production interruptions. If carefully researched and planned well in advance, the works can be carried out in a seamless manner. New or replacement equipment installations will usually require additional services, such as electrical supplies, water services, data collection, compressed air, refrigeration and ventilation, to name a few. Pre-planning for all of these works in advance of the equipment arrival can be achieved with planned work schedules at weekends or undertaking works during non-production hours.

Experienced and Competent Advisors Some basic issues are very often overlooked, such as how a new piece of production equipment can physically fit into the building, as existing doors may be too small. In some cases, the external wall or roof has to be temporarily removed to gain access and this would need careful and detailed planning in advance. All works undertaken would have to be compliant with food hygiene regulations, along with statutory requirements such as com-

52 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

pliance with Building Regulations and Health and Safety Welfare at Work Act regulations. In summary, food manufacturing companies should employ experienced and competent professional advisors when undertaking capital investment programmes. About The Author Fergus V. Carey, MRIAI, of Carey Associates Architects & Project Managers has over 30 years’ experience in the design, construction, commissioning of EU Licenced/Food Safety Authority procedures for all categories of food production and food related buildings.


machinery & service

Your Trusted Production Partner

VSM offer tried and tested machinery that ensures all the reliability and desired outcomes at value for money prices.

Belfast-based Value Stream Machinery supply quality food processing machinery, as well as the engineering expertise to keep you running.

V

ALUE Stream Machinery are proud to boast over 20 years of experience working in the food manufacturing industry. The company directors’ careers span sectors such as meat, grain, dairy and snack foods from the perspective of operations, production and engineering. Indeed, their experiences of the day-to-day challenges ensure that VSM are perfectly placed to offer solutions that they know work for you. “We have felt the strain of 3am machinery breakdowns, felt the drain in our pockets of excessive charges for replacement parts and felt the frustration at manual processes which could deliver so much more,” explains Richard Stewart Maunder, Director.

required,” Richard notes. “They are happy to support you as part of a team, on a project, or as an individual trouble shooter. We are flexible, and always keen to offer our services to new clients.” Their existing client base includes household names from the Irish food and drink industry, including Tayto, Glanbia, Fane Valley and Rich Sauces. They also offer a condition monitoring service, which involves the real time monitoring of machinery through analysis of motors, equipment or plant. The vibration, temperature and/or thermal analysis helps to identify any weaknesses in machinery performance to schedule maintenance, and address the issue to prevent failure. This type of predictive maintenance can help to lengthen the normal lifespan of a machine.

Broad Range of Services Their services include but are not limited to: • Supplying machinery which provides excellent value for money; • Contractual service – supply of mechanical and electrical engineers; • Condition monitoring – both electrical and mechanical; • Predictive maintenance – from complete factory coverage to critical equipment; • Production optimisation and throughput increases; • Line and factory automation VSM supplies food processing machinery for all sectors. “Our experience has taught us that price tags don’t always reflect quality of goods, and so we offer tried and tested machinery that ensures all the reliability and desired outcomes without the hefty charges,” explains Richard. For further information on the machinery VSM supply, visit www.valuestreammachinery.com. VSM also pride themselves on supplying high calibre mechanical and electrical engineers who are fully qualified and experienced. “Our engineers are able to adapt to any working environment and can quickly assess the situation at hand and take action where

I-Line VSM have recently launched I-Line, their latest plug and play system to track real time stoppages in line performance. I-Line not only identifies stoppages as they occur, but also categorises these events and provides the ability to trend and analyse the data collated. Information is presented in a clear and user friendly dashboard, giving insight into the detail of just one line, or multiple lines in a department, factory or site. This technology translates stoppages into financial terms, helping you to understand the implications of these events for the wider business. “As an interactive system, I-Line facilitates a targeted approach to troubleshooting by allowing the user to generate and direct actions to other parts of the business in response to the event which has occurred,” Richard notes. Based in Belfast, VSM offer a range of services to meet food manufacturing and processing needs. “We are flexible and open to discussion on how we can best help you with whatever issue you are facing,” Richard reveals. For more information, see www.valuestreammachinery.com, email info@valuestreammachinery.com or call 0044 28 90730153. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 53


Food

IRELAND 2 017/18 Ye a r b o o k & D i re c to r y

Product & Service Index

ACCREDITATION

Air Products Ireland Ltd Codico Distributors Ltd GS1 Ireland

ARCHITECTS / FOOD RELATED BUILDINGS Carey Associates

BARCODING / LABELLING ADC Barcode AIS Ltd ALS Labelling Solutions Avery Weigh-Tronix Codico Distributors Ltd Com-Plas Packaging DSG Packaging Ltd GS1 Ireland Heavey Technology JMC Packaging Ltd Label One Ltd New Era Packaging Ltd Obeeco Ltd SAI Global Tekpak Automation Ltd Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd Wrap It Packaging

EDUCATION /TRAINING / CERTIFICATE /CONSULTANCY

Festo Ltd GS1 Ireland Irish National Accreditation Board Limerick Packaging National Standards Authority Of Ireland (NSAI) Safefood SAI Global UCC - School of Food and Nutritional Science UCD School Of Agriculture and Food Science

ENERGY / UTILITIES MANAGEMENT Dalkia

FOOD SAFETY AUDITING GS1 Ireland SAI Global

54 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

CONSULTANTS Air Products Ireland Ltd Cross Refrigeration GS1 Ireland Q-Lab Ltd SAI Global Value Stream Machinery CONTROL /INSTRUMENTATION Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd P.J. Bonner & Co. Ltd Cross Refrigeration Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd HYGIENE Cross Refrigeration Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Enviroclad Systems Ltd Safefood Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Stone Food Machinery Value Stream Machinery TESTING/INSPECTION Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Cross Refrigeration DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd P.J. Bonner & Co. Ltd Q-Lab Ltd QPM Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Teagasc Food Research Programme Moorepark and Ashtown Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd TRACKING SYSTEMS ADC Barcode Codico Distributors Ltd GS1 Ireland Heavey Technology Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd WrenTech Ltd

FOOD LUBRICANTS Topaz

GENERAL SERVICES /SUPPLY TO THE TRADE Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd AIC Plastic Pallets Ltd

All in All Ingredients Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix BIM/Irish Sea Fisheries Board Blenders Ltd Bord Bia - The Irish Food Board Calor Gas Codico Distributors Ltd Com-Plas Packaging Festo Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Ltd Healy Group Heavey Technology Innovate Food Technology Irish National Accreditation Board JMC Packaging Ltd Limerick Packaging National Chemical Company National Standards Authority Of Ireland (NSAI) Pegler & Louden Pharmafoods Ltd Puratos Crest Foods Ltd Q-Lab Ltd Rennick Solicitors Saica Packaging Ireland Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland T.S. O’Connor & Son Ltd Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd

HEALTH & SAFETY

Enviroclad Systems Ltd SAI Global Value Stream Machinery WrenTech Ltd

INDUSTRIAL WASHING EQUIPMENT Stone Food Machinery

INGREDIENTS

AB Mauri UK & Ireland All in All Ingredients Ltd Andrew Ingredients Ltd Camida Ltd Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Glanbia Ireland Healy Group Heterochem (Dist.) Ltd Kiernan’s Food Ingredients Ltd


product & service index National Chemical Company Nutrition Supplies O’Brien Ingredients Ornua PK Chemicals Ltd Puratos Crest Foods Ltd Trilby Trading Ltd D.D. Williamson (Ireland) Ltd

IT SERVICES & OUTSOURCING ALS Labelling Solutions Dalkia DSG Packaging Ltd Innovate Food Technology Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd

MATERIALS HANDLING SERVICE

CONTROL / INSTRUMENTATION Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Dalkia Irish Lift Trucks Manotherm Ltd Odenberg Engineering Ltd P.J. Bonner & Co. Ltd QPM Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Tekpak Automation Ltd WrenTech Ltd MACHINERY / EQUIPMENT ABB Ltd Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd AIC Plastic Pallets Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Dalkia Fischbein-Saxon Irish Lift Trucks JMC Packaging Ltd Kuka Robotics Ireland Obeeco Ltd Odenberg Engineering Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Security Pak Ltd Stone Food Machinery Syspal Tekpak Automation Ltd Toyota Material Handling Ireland Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd PALLETS, CRATES & CONTAINERS AIC Plastic Pallets Ltd Dollard Packaging Ltd Industrial Packaging Ltd Irish Lift Trucks JMC Packaging Ltd Limerick Packaging Odenberg Engineering Ltd Saica Packaging Ireland Schoeller Allibert Ltd Syspal WrenTech Ltd

PUMPS & VALVES Dalkia Festo Ltd Irish Lift Trucks Pegler & Louden Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd WrenTech Ltd REFRIGERATION / COLD STORAGE Air Products Ireland Ltd Cold Move Cross Refrigeration CRS Mobile Cold Storage Ltd Dalkia DSG Packaging Ltd Festo Ltd Irish Lift Trucks Odenberg Engineering Ltd Ornua Schoeller Allibert Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Syspal TransStock Warehousing & Cold Storage Ltd

Measom Freer & Co. Ltd New Era Packaging Ltd NPP Group Ltd Obeeco Ltd Ornua T.S. O’Connor & Son Ltd Packex Industries Ltd P.C. Packaging Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Schütz (Ireland) Ltd Sealed Air Ltd (Cryovac) Security Pak Ltd Smurfit Kappa Ireland Syspal Tekpak Automation Ltd The Packaging Centre Ltd Versatile Packaging Ltd Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd

PEST CONTROL /FLY SCREENS

TRANSPORT & LOGISTICS Avery Weigh-Tronix DSG Packaging Ltd Irish Lift Trucks Johnston Logistics Ornua Schütz (Ireland) Ltd Storage Ltd Toyota Material Handling Ireland TransStock Warehousing & Cold Storage Ltd WrenTech Ltd

Mitie Rentokil Pest Control

WASTE MANAGEMENT/RECYCLING Avery Weigh-Tronix Irish Lift Trucks Repak Ltd

BAKERY Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Cross Refrigeration DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Obeeco Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd Puratos Crest Foods Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Syspal Value Stream Machinery Versatile Packaging Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd

PACKAGING /DESIGN / LABELLING

ADC Barcode AiP Thermoform Packaging Air Products Ireland Ltd ALS Labelling Solutions Celtic Sales Company Ltd Com-Plas Packaging Corcoran Products (Irl) Ltd Diamond Corrugated Dollard Packaging Ltd DSG Packaging Ltd Elopak Festo Ltd GS1 Ireland Greiner Packaging Ltd Industrial Packaging Ltd Innovate Food Technology JMC Packaging Ltd Kiernan’s Food Ingredients Ltd Label One Ltd Limerick Packaging

PLANT MAINTENANCE

Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd P.J. Bonner & Co. Ltd Dalkia National Chemical Company Obeeco Ltd Value Stream Machinery

PROCESSING EQUIPMENT

DAIRY Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Cross Refrigeration David Kellett & Partners Ltd DSG Packaging Ltd Elopak Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Obeeco Ltd FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 55


product & service index Odenberg Engineering Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Syspal Value Stream Machinery Versatile Packaging Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd DRINK Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Cross Refrigeration DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Obeeco Ltd Odenberg Engineering Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Syspal Value Stream Machinery Versatile Packaging Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd FRESH FOOD Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Cross Refrigeration DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Obeeco Ltd Odenberg Engineering Ltd

Pharmafoods Ltd Puratos Crest Foods Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Syspal Value Stream Machinery Versatile Packaging Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd MEAT, FISH & POULTRY Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Cross Refrigeration DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Obeeco Ltd Odenberg Engineering Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Stone Food Machinery Syspal Value Stream Machinery Versatile Packaging Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd MACHINERY AUCTIONEERS Air Products Ireland Ltd Cross Refrigeration WASTE WATER EQUIPMENT Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Stone Food Machinery

PRODUCTION OPTIMISATION Value Stream Machinery

RECRUITMENT ICDS Recruitment Consultants Innovate Food Technology

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT BIM/Irish Sea Fisheries Board Bord Bia - The Irish Food Board Innovate Food Technology National Chemical Company Ornua Safefood Teagasc Food Research UCC - School of Food and Nutritional Science Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd WrenTech Ltd

STAINLESS STEEL FABRICATION Cross Refrigeration QPM Ltd Syspal Teknomek Industries Ltd WrenTech Ltd

TRADE ASSOCIATIONS GS1 Ireland Repak Ltd

Highly efficient businesses deserve highly efficient partners. www.toyota-forklifts.ie

Call Toyota for all your material handling needs. www.toyota-forklifts.ie or Toyota Material Handling Ireland at Toyota Ireland, Killeen Road, Dublin 12. Tel: 01 4190200.


Food Ireland 2012

a

Company listings ADC Barcode Ltd

Address: Unit 8, Willow Business Park, Knockmitten Lane, ADC Barcode Ltd ABB Ltd A Dublin 12. Address: Unit 8, Willow Business Address: Auriga House, (01) 465 6480 Tel: Precedent Drive, Rooksley, Fax: (01) 465 6487 Park, Knockmitten Lane, Milton Keynes, MK13 8PQ. Email: ciaranf@adcbarcode.com Dublin 12. Tel: (0044) 1908 350 300 Web: www.adcbarcode.com Telephone: (01) 465 6480 Fax: (0044) 1908 350 301 Main Products & Services: Fax: (01) 465 6487 Email: robotics@gb.abb.com Thermal transfer printers, Email: ciaranf@adcbarcode.com Web: www.abb.com EU178 software, labels, thermal foil, scanners. Web: www.adcbarcode.com ABB Ltd www.abb.com/robotics Main Products & Services: Main Products/ Thermal transfer Address: Auriga House, ABB is a leading supplier of Services: printers, EU178 software, Precedent Drive, industrial robots, Advanced Packaging labels, thermal foil, scanners. Rooksley, Milton Keynes, modular manufacturing Machinery Ltd MK13 8PQ. systems and service. A Address: 718 Northwest strong solutions focus Advanced Packaging Telephone: (0044) 1908 350 300 Machinery Ltd Business Park, helps manufacturers Fax: (0044) 1908 350 301 Address: 718 Northwest Dublin 15. Ballycoolin, improve productivity, (01) 861 2141 Tel: Business Park, Email: robotics@gb.abb.com product quality and Fax: (01) 861 2142 Ballycoolin, Dublin 15. Web: www.abb.com worker safety. ABB has Email: s.dallas@test.ie Telephone: (01) 861 2141 www.abb.com/robotics installed more than Fax: Web: www.packagingmachinery.ie (01) 861 2142 200,000 robots world wide Contact: UK & Ireland - Robotics Main Products & Services: Email: s.dallas@test.ie Robotics Group: Contact: Ireland Managing Director: Metal detectors, x-ray Sales & Marketing Web: www.packagingmachinery.ie inspection systems, Chris Withey Manager: Mike Wilson Main Products/ Metal detectors, x-ray check weighers & label Main Products/ ABB is a leading UK & Ireland – Robotics Services: inspection systems, applicators. Services: supplier of industrial Managing Director: check weighers & label Contact: Technical Director: Chris Withey robots, modular applicators. Stephen Dallas

manufacturing systems Contact: Technical Director: and service. A strong Stephen Dallas solutions focus helps manufacturers improve productivity, product quality and worker safety. ABB has installed AB Mauri UK & Ireland Address: more than 190,000 Barn Way, Lodge Farm, AIC Plastic Pallets robots worldwide. AIC Plastic Pallets Ltd Ltd Northampton, NN5 7UW. Address: The Woodlands, Address: The Woodlands, Contact: Tel: Ireland - (0044) 1604 755 522 Carrigmore, Ballineen, Carrigmore, Ballineen, Fax: Robotics Group: (0044) 1604 752 470 Co. Cork. Co. Cork. Email: Damien.McDonald@abmauri.com Tel: (023) 884 7333 Sales & Marketing Web: www.abmauriukandireland.com Telephone: (023) 884 7333 Fax: (023) 884 7671 Manager: Nigel Platt Main Products & Services: Fax: (023) 884 7671 Email: info@aicplasticpallets.com Dough conditioners, Email: info@aicplasticpallets.com Web: www.aicplasticpallets.com yeast, soya flours, sour Web: www.aicplasticpallets.com Main Products & Services: doughs, cake & donut AB Cheesemaking Main Products/ Materials handling Plastic, timber and aluminium mixes, icings & fillings. pallets, pallet boxes, totes, Address: 7 Daybell Close, Services: platforms, pallets, Contact: Director of Sales (Ireland): storage boxes, stacking containers, boxes, plastic Bottesford, Nottingham, Damien McDonald containers, slipsheets, linbins, & wooden, ISPMI5 NG13 0DQ, bespoke pallets and boxes compliance, trays, tote England. (aluminium and plastic). boxes, plastic pallets, Telephone: (0044) 1949 842 867 Contact: Joe O’Flynn plastic tote boxes, Fax: (0044) 1949 842 867 plastic pallet boxes, Email: chrisashby@ slipsheets, linbins, plastic abcheesemaking.co.uk buckets, bespoke pallets Web: www.abcheesemaking.co.uk (aluminium and plastic). Contact: Joint Managing Director: Main Products/ Cheesemaking training Charles O’Donovan Services: and consultancy. Joint Managing Director: Contact: Christine Ashby Jerry O’Flynn 3 7 food ireland

AiP Thermoform Packaging Unit 1 A Ballymaley AiPAddress: Thermoform Packaging Business Park, Barefield, Ennis,

Address: Unit 1 A Ballymaley Co. Clare. Tel: (065)Business Park, 686 4486 (065)Barefield, 689 3479 Fax: Email: john@aip.ie Ennis, Web: www.aip.ie Co. Clare. Main Products & Services: Telephone: (065) 686 4486 Design and manufacture Fax: (065) 689 3479 Services of Thermoform Packaging for the Irish market. Email: john@aip.ie Web: www.aip.ie Products Ireland Ltd MainAir Products/ Design and manufacture Address: Unit 950, Western Services of Thermoform Packaging Industrial Estate, for the Irish market. Road, Dublin 12. Killeen Contact: John Mulleady Tel: 1800 99 50 29 Email: ieinfo@airproducts.com www.airproducts.ie Web: Main Products & Services: Air Products brings you the latest, most innovative solutions in cryogenic freezing, chilling, cooling and Modified Atmosphere Air Products IrelandPackaging. Ltd Freshline Gases® include CO2, Nitrogen Address: Unit 950, Western and Oxygen in liquid or gaseous Industrial Estate, form. Backed by over 40 years’ Killeen Road, knowhow in food processing. To findDublin 12. out more please visit Telephone: 1800 99 50 29 our website. Email: ieinfo@airproducts.com Contact: Air Products on 1800 99 50 29 Web: www.airproducts.ie AISProducts/ Ltd - Automatic Main Air Products brings Services: you the latest, most Identification Systems Address: Unit 48, Canal Walk, innovative solutions Park West Industrial Park, in cryogenic freezing, Nangorchilling, cooling and Road, Dublin 12. (01) 620 5742 Tel: Modified Atmosphere Fax: (01) 620 5735 Packaging. Freshline Email: info@aisltd.ie Gases® include CO2, Web: www.aisltd.ie Main Products &Nitrogen and Oxygen Services: in liquid or gaseous RFID equipment,automatic form. Backed by over 40 labelling, print & apply systems, years’ knowhow in food industrial barcode scanning, 2D barcode equipment, processing. To find out hand held readers, mobile more please visit our computers, fixed mount website. scanning, label printers, mobile Contact: Air Products on printers, desktop printers, 1800 99 50 29 industrial printers, barcode printers, labels & ribbons. Supply, install & maintenance of auto ID products. Custom solution development for product traceability suitable for you. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 57

Company Listings

company listings


whERE ALL ThE ELEmENTS

COmE TOgEThER company listings Andrew Ingredients Ltd

B

Address: 27 Ferguson Drive, Knockmore Hill Industrial LIFE SCIENCE Park, Lisburn, Co. Antrim, INDUSTRIAL INgREDIENTS BT28 2EX. Tel: (048) 9267 2525 (048) 9263 3840 Fax: Email: johngraham@andrewingredients.co.uk Bord Bia Web: www.andrewingredients.ie The Irish Food Board Main Products & Services: Address: Clanwilliam Court, Bakery ingredients, flour, BIM/Ireland’s Seafood Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2. bread, cake and confectionery Development Agency Tel: (01) 668 5155 mixes, gluten free mixes, icings, Address: Crofton Rd, Dun Laoghaire, Email: info@bordbia.ie dried fruit, savoury and sweet Co. Dublin. Web: www.bordbia.ie sauces, colours and flavours, (01) 214 4100 Tel: Main Products & Services: baking powders, raising agents, Fax: (01) 284 1123 Marketing, promotion sugar etc. Email: info@bim.ie and development of Irish Web: www.bim.ie food, drink & horticulture. Main Products & Services: Avery Weigh-Tronix has its Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM) Instantising Milk Powders with Lecithin challenges. Address: Dublin: helps to develop the Irish Seafood Whether it isAirton controlling of a high Park, Airtonthe Road,rate of hydration Industry by providing technical Tallaght, Dublin 24. expertise, businessthe support, protein powder or the rapid wetting of a high fat powder, Tel: (01) 400 0720 funding, training and promoting Calor Gas choiceFax: of Lecithin to improve the instantising responsible properties of a (01) 400 0750 environmental Long Mile Road, Address: powder is essential. As not one Lecithin resembles Antrim: practice.another, Dublin 12. Lane,Newtownabbey, 1 Sentry the importance of making the right decision cannot be Tel: y o u r1850 812 450 Co. Antrim, BT36 4XX. Email: info@calorgas.ie overstated. Tel: (028) 9083 9092 Blenders Ltd Web: www.calorgas.ie Fax: (028) 9083 5393 Address: Unit 4, IDA Centre, Main Products & Services: irelandinfo@awtxglobal.com Email: Dublin 8. Newmarket, Camida wants to understand the application and customer Supplier of LPG (Liquefied i s o v e r Web: www.averyweigh-tronix.com Tel: (01) 453 6960 Petroleum Gas) needs /ireland to choose the Lecithin that suits you and your product. Fax: (01) 453 7607 Tailored energy solutions for Main Products & Services: Email: viscosity, sales@blenders.ie Wetting and flow-properties, flavour, colour, GM the food production sector. Avery Weigh-Tronix/GSE Web: www.blenders.ie Contact: Sales and Marketing Director: status and many other properties must be adapted to the indicators and weighing Main Products & Services: Kevin Donnelly. needs of the finished product. We analyse yourMayonnaises, needs. We equipment; Labelling dressings, equipment; Atex Systems for bouillons, cooking tailor each approach to the individual processing plant andsauces, Food & associated industries; table sauces, carvery sauces, with over 40 Liquid years experience across andcombined bag filling; Vessel of Dairy relishes in bulk catering, sachets we manage and hopperthe weighing; Europe, process and most importantly add and retail jar formats.Branded Lorry weighbridges label. and private value to your&end product. Camida Ltd Management systems; CamidaNew Ltd., Tower House, Address: Quay, Clonmel, Recipe and Q.C. software. Co. Tipperary. New Quay, Clonmel, A full range of maintenance This service is provided by a dedicated and experienced team Tel: (052) 612 5455 support contracts. Emergency Co Tipperary, Fax: (052) 612Ireland. 5466 with in-depth technical and market knowledge and who breakdown service; Legal Mobile: 086-2413223 Metrologyfocused Verification,approach Full deliver a customer toP.J. your business. Bonner & Co. So Ltd Email: INDUSTRIAL joe.guiney@camida.com LIFE SCIENCE INgREDIENTS range of calibration services t: +353 52 6125455 Calibration,for Instrumentation challenge Camida to find tailor-made solutions you and & Web: www.camida.com including UKAS; High precision Weighing Main Products & Services: e: joe.guiney@camida.com your production. balances, project management Address: 35 Western Parkway Ingredients (Food, Beverage, and project support; m: +353 86 2413223 Business Centre, Ballymount Feed). Lecithin, Esters (Fatty Provide service for all Drive, Ballymount, Dublin 12. w: www.camida.com acids & MCT Oils), Emulsification PLEASE DIRECT YOUR ENQUIRIES TO jOE gUINEY manufacturer’s brands,not only (01) 450 5050 Tel: systems, Sweeteners (Sucralose, Avery Weigh-Tronix equipment; Fax: (01) 450 5183 Stevia, NHDC), Vitamin blends, software contract support; Email: sales@pjbonner.com systems, Meat Flavour Full range of equipment hire: Web: www.pjbonner.com Functional blends (Texture & Fullrange of consumable Main Products & Services: Yield improvers). products, Printheads,Thermal Supply, Service and Calibration Feed Sector – Vitamins (Dry and transfer ribbons and labels. 3 02/06/2015 12:48 of Instruments, Controls, liquid form), Glycinates (Copper, Weighing. Iron, Manganese & Zinc), Contact: Managing Director: Organic acids (buffered propion Patrick M Bonner ic acid & buffered formic acid). Service Manager: Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). Roddy Jefferson Contact: Sales Manager: Joe Guiney

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58 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18


company listings Main Products & Services: Energy Management Services, Utilities Management Services, Maintenance, Lighting & Corcoran Products (Irl) Ltd Technical Services. Address: 17 Parkgate Street, Dublin 8. Corcoran Chemicals Limited Contact: Business Delvelopment (01) 633 0400 Tel: Kingsbridge House 17-22 Parkgate Street Manager, Energy & Dublin 8 Fax: (01) 679 3521 Ireland Utilities: Alan Keogh Email: info@corcoranproducts.com Web: www.corcoranproducts.com Diamond Corrugated Main Products & Services: Address: 12-13 Pennyburn Suppliers of packaging to Industrial Estate, Londonderry, the food, pharmaceutical and Northern Ireland, chemical industry. BT48 OLU. Contact: Derek Lennon (048) 7126 2957 Tel: Fax: (048) 7126 7094 Email: mail@diamondcorr.com Cross Refrigeration (Irl) Ltd Web: www.diamondcorr.com Address: Nationwide with offices in Main Products & Services: Armagh, Cork, Corrugated, multi-point Dublin and Limerick. glued, litho-laminated Tel: Armagh: (028) 3752 6090 corrugated, folding Cork: (021) 430 2321 cartons. Dublin: (01) 451 1915 Contact: Sales & Marketing Limerick: (061) 417 415 Manager: Joanne Beckett Email: info@cross-group.org Corcoran Products (Irl.) Limited

Carey Associates

Architects for the Food Industry Address: Office 1, Second Floor, Building 3b, Killegland Street, Ashbourne Town Centre, Ashbourne, Co. Meath A84 NX77 Tel: (01) 835 1572 Email: info@careyassociates.ie Web: www.careyassociates.ie Main Products & Services: Architects and Project Managers Contact: Fergus Carey MRIAI

Celtic Sales Co (Cork) Ltd

Address: Unit 3b, Waterfront Business Park, Little Island, Cork. Tel: (021) 429 7984 (021) 429 7990 Fax: Email: mary@celticsales.com Main Products & Services: Packaging materials for fresh food. Contact: Mary O’Brien

Cold Move

Kingsbridge House 17-22 Parkgate Street Dublin 8 Ireland

Web: www.cross-group.org Main Products & Services: Energy management & all major types of Refrigeration and Air Conditioning systems installed & commissioned. www.crossdirect.ie offers commercial refrigeration, best prices, delivered direct with in one week of order! Dedicated Refrigeration and Air Conditioning rental business check out: www.crosshire.ie

Address: Glenasaul Industrial Park, Oranmore, Co. Galway. Tel: (091) 792 926 Mobile: 086 8091 893 CRS Mobile Cold Storage Ltd Email: innovation@coldmove.ie Address: Carnisle, Kildalkey, Co. Meath. Web: www.coldmove.ie Tel: (046) 943 5000 Main Products & Services: Corcoran Products (Irl.) Limited House Fax: (046) 943 5068 Controlled Storage & Kingsbridge 17-22 Parkgate Street Dublin 8 Email: enquiry@crs.ie Distribution. Ireland Web: www.crs.ie Main Products & Services: Increase your on-site cold Corcoran Chemicals Limited Kingsbridge House storage capacity: CRS offer a 17-22 Parkgate Street Dublin 8 wide range of temperature conIreland trolled storage solutions both Corcoran Chemicals Ltd new and professionally refurAddress: 17 Parkgate Street,Dublin 8. bished for rent and purchase. Tel: (01) 633 0400 Fax: (01) 679 3521 info@corcoranchemicals.com Email: Web: www.corcoranchemicals.com Main Products & Services: Dalkia Distributors of raw materials Address: 145 Lakeview Drive, Airside for the food, pharmaceutical, Business Park, Swords, Co. Dublin. polymer & chemical industry. Tel: (01) 870 1200 Contact: Sales Fax: (01) 870 1201 Email: info@dalkia.ie Web: www.dalkia.ie (tel) (fax) (email)

+353-1 63 30 400 +353-1 67 93 521 info@corcoranchemicals.com

(tel) (fax) (email)

+353-1 63 30 400 +353-1 67 93 521 info@corcoranchemicals.com

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(tel) (fax) (email)

+353-1 63 30 400 +353-1 67 93 521 info@corcoranchemicals.com

(tel) (fax) (email)

+353-1 63 30 400 +353-1 67 93 521 info@corcoranchemicals.com

Dollard Packaging Ltd

Address: Units 6-11, Eklad Park, Malahide Road Industrial Park, Malahide Road, Dublin 17. Tel: (01) 847 0044 Email: sales@dollard-packaging.ie Web: www.dollard-packaging.ie Main Products & Services: Print and Packaging.

Donoghue Packaging

Address: Donpack Business Park, Bandon, Co. Cork (023) 884 2111 Tel: Fax: (023) 884 1211 Email: donpack@donpack.ie Web: www.donpack.com Main Products & Services: Heavy duty packaging products. Contact: Managing Director: Ray Donoghue

DSG Packaging Ltd

Address: L2 Toughers Industrial Park, Newhall, Naas, Co. Kildare. Tel: (045) 454 900 Email: rdoyle@dsgpack.ie Web: www.dsgpack.ie Main Products & Services: Specialists in Contract Packaging, Outsourcing and “End of Line” Filling and Packaging Services. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 59


company listings

E Elopak

Address: 67 Broomhill Road, Tallaght, Dublin 24. Tel: (01) 452 1111 Web: www.elopak.com Main Products & Services: Liquid Packaging, Milk, Soup and Juice Cartons, Packaging Machines.

Endress+Hauser Ireland Ltd

Address: Exchequer House, Embassy Office Park, Kill, Co. Kildare. Tel: (045) 989 200 Email: info@ie.endress.com Web: www.ie.endress.com Main Products & Services: Endress+Hauser are a global leader in instrumentation solutions and services for the food and beverage industry.

Enviroclad Systems Ltd

Address: Unit 57B, Hebron Industrial Estate, Hebron Road, Co. Kilkenny. Tel: (056) 775 2866 Fax: (056) 777 0955 Email: info@enviroclad.com Web: www.enviroclad.com Main Products & Services: Supply and Fitting of Enviroclad Hygienic Wall and Ceiling Cladding in P.V.C. for the Food Industry.

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Fischbein-Saxon

Address: 274 Alma Road, Enfield, Middlesex, EN3 7BB, England. Tel: (0044) 844 372 2877 Fax: (0044) 844 372 2876 Email: sales@fischbein-saxon.co.uk Web: www.fischbein.com/eastern Main Products & Services: If your business consists of ‘bagged products’, in any industry, Fischbein has a solution to fulfil your needs. From low-cost Manual sealers, semi-automated Industrial bag sealers and sewing systems and sewing consumables, to high speed fully automated bagging and palletizing solutions. With finance available at cost effective rates, companies can invest in technology now, enabling them to produce their products faster, neater and with lower labour costs, within minimal initial financial outlay. Contact: Sales & Services Manager: Barry Cox

Fisher Scientific Address: Suite 3, Plaza 212, Blanchardstown, Corporate Park, Ballycoolin, Dublin 15, DI5VY66. Tel: (01) 885 5854 Fax: (01) 899 1855 Email: fsie.sales@thermofisher.com Web: www.ie.fishersci.com Business: Laboratory supplies, Chemicals, Consumables, Reagents, Equipment & Instruments.

G Festo Ltd

Address: Head Office: Unit 5, Sandyford Park, Sandyford Industrial Estate, Dublin 18. Tel: (01) 295 4955 Fax: (01) 295 5680 Email: sales_ie@festo.com Web: www.festo.com/ie Main Products & Services: Automation Technology · Industrial Automation · Electrical Automation · Process Automation Training & Consulting Food, Beverage & Packaging Expertise 60 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

INGREDIENTS IRELAND

Glanbia Ireland

Address: Ballyragget, Co. Kilkenny. Tel: (056) 8836346 Email: jennygraham@glanbia.ie www.glanbiaingredientsireland.com Web: Main Products & Services: Dairy ingredients Contact: Marketing Communications Manager: Jenny Graham

Greiner Packaging Ltd

Address: Killyman Road Industrial Estate, Dungannon, County Tyrone, Northern Ireland BT 71 6LN Tel: (0044) 28 8772 3131 (0044) 28 8772 7318 Fax: Email: office.gb@greiner-gpi.com Web: www.greiner-gpi.com Main Products & Services: Greiner Packaging is a leading supplier of plastic food packaging in the UK, Europe and North America, leading the way with innovation technology and decoration.

GS1 Ireland

Address: Second Floor, The Merrion Centre, Nutley Lane, Donnybrook, Dublin 4. Tel: (01) 208 0660 Fax: (01) 208 0670 Email: info@gs1ie.org Web: www.gs1ie.org Main Products & Services: Global Supply Chain Standards Body. Barcode Numbers, Barcode Manager, Barcode Symbols, EDI Message Standards, Data Synchronisation Catalogue (GDSN), EPC/RFID, Traceability Standards, fTrace, Barcode and EDI Message Verification, Advisory and Training Services. Contact: Chairman: John O’Callaghan (Musgrave Group) Vice Chairman: Thomas Shortall (Kerry Foods) Chief Executive Officer: Mike Byrne


company listings

H Healy Group

Address: HCL House,Second Avenue, Cookstown Industrial Estate, Tallaght, Dublin 24. D24 XDR5 Tel: +353 (0)1404 9200 Fax: +353 (0)1404 9201 Email: info@healy-group.com Web: www.healy-group.com Main Products & Services: Healy Group are a solutions-driven agent and distributor, supplying high-quality food ingredients, chemicals, nutraceuticals and raw materials. We are committed to providing an excellent range of products and unrivalled technical support to all of our customers. From beverages to bakery, pharmaceuticals to cosmetics, our customers can depend on the collective experience and expertise of our dedicated team.

Heterochem (Dist.) Ltd

Address: Unit 49, Baldoyle Industrial Estate, Dublin D13 H2N2 Tel: (01) 839 3127 Fax: (01) 832 5746 Email: info@heterochem.com Web: www.heterochem.com Main Products & Services: Acidulants, Antifoams, Antioxidants, Emulsifiers, Flavours, Colorants, Preservatives, Starches, Sweeteners. Contact: Account Managers: Lara Fearon (lara@heterochem.com), Noelle Shannon (noelle@heterochem.com), Paul Byrne (paul@heterochem.com).

HH SOLUTIONS

Address: 12 Ritaville, Old Cork Road, Limerick. Tel: (061) 603 742 Email: info@hhsolutions.ie Web: www.hhsolutions.ie Main Products & Services: Food Probes & Data Services: Loggers & Wireless Monitoring Systems. Irish agents for Eltex of Sweden & Comark Ltd. Contact: Sales Manager: Garry Tuite

I ICDS Recruitment Consultants

Address: 24 Upper Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 632 1200 (01) 676 2292 Fax: Email: info@icds.ie Web: www.icds.ie Main Products & Services: Recruitment Consultants Contact: Recruitment Director: Anthony McLoughlin

Industrial Packaging Ltd

Address: Killarney Road, Bray, Co.Wicklow. Tel: (01) 286 4010 Fax: (01) 286 4015 Email: sales@industrialpackaging.ie Web: www.industrialpackaging.ie

Innovate Food Technology

Address: 2nd Floor, 6 South William Street, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 707 9856 Fax: (01) 707 9661 Email: info@innovatesolutions.ie Web: www.innovatesolutions.ie Main Products & Services: Food recruitment, software, food consumer research.

Irish Exporters Association

Address: 28 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 661 2182 Email: iea@irishexporters.ie Web: www.irishexporters.ie Main Products & Services: Food and Drink Export Ireland, a division of the IEA, provides assistance to Irish food and drink companies in the home market and to increase their sales abroad.

Irish Lift Trucks

Address: Clonlara Avenue, Baldonnell Business Park, Baldonnell, Dublin 22. (01) 403 4100 Tel: Fax: (01) 403 4183 Email: info@irishlifttrucks.ie Web: www.irishlifttrucks.ie Main Products & Services: Materials Handling Equipment/Forklifts. Contact: Conal McCourt / Wayne Uzell

Irish National Accreditation Board

Address: Wilton Park House, Wilton Place, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 607 3003 Email: inab@inab.ie Web: www.inab.ie

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JMC Packaging Ltd

Address: 37 Seagoe Industrial Estate, Craigavon, Co. Armagh, BT63 5QE. Tel: 028 3839 1723 Mobile: +353 86 0234177 Email: jgovender@jmcpackaging.co.uk Web: www.jmcpackaging.co.uk Main Products & Services: Specialists in packaging materials and equipment. Shrink wrap equipment, tray sealing equipment, automatic label applications, automatic stretch wrappers, checkweighing & metal detections, polyolefin shrink film, smoothwall foil trays, soft fruit punnets, food grade stretch film & lidding film and meat & poultry trays. Contact: Jason Govender (086 0234177).

Johnston Logistics Ltd

Address: Blackchurch Business Park, Rathcoole, Co. Dublin. Tel: (01) 401 3333 Fax: (01) 458 8015 Email: info@jol.ie Web: www.johnstonlogistics.ie Main Products & Services: Warehousing & Logistics. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 61


company listings Kuka Robotics Ireland

K David Kellett & Partners Ltd

Address: Great Western Street Wednesbury, West Midlands WS10 7LL United Kingdom Tel: (0044) 121 505 9970 (0044) 121 505 6589 Fax: Email: mariewinmill@kuka-robotics.co.uk Web: www.kuka-robotics.co.uk Food Main Products & Services: Robotics, Service and Training.

Main Products & Services: Distributor of process instrumentation and controls. Contact: Managing Director: Robert V. Gilbert Director & Project Sales Engineer: Robert C. Gilbert

Ireland 2012

Company Listings

Address: Maple Court, Measom Freer & Co. Ltd Wormbridge House, Address: 37/41 Chartwell Drive, Wigston, Wormbridge, Leicester, LE18 2FL, England. Hereford, HR2 9DH. L Tel: (0044) 116 288 1588 Contact: Sales Director: (0044) 1981 570 611 Tel: Mark Freer Fax: (0044) 116 281 3000 Email: davidkellett@davidkellett.co.uk Technical Directo Label One Ltd Email: sales@measomfreer.co.uk Main Products & Services: Andrew Freer Address: 3 Advantage Way, Web: www.measomfreer.co.uk Label One Ltd Dairy Engineering, Filtration Ballygomartin Industrial Main Products & Services: Address: 3 Advantage Way, Systems/Membranes, RO, UO, Estate, Ballygomartin LogoPak International Ltd Freer manufacture Measom N and Ballygomartin UF & MF. Osmosis®, Ultra Road, Belfast BT13 3LZ. Address: Enterprise House, stock quality plastic bottles, Industrial Estate, Filtration and Micro Filtration, custom moulded bottles, George Cayley Drive, Telephone: (048) 9077 7444 Ballygomartin Road, Effluent Treatment, Spiral Wound Clifton Moor, dropper caps, scoops, measures, Fax: (048) 9077 4067 Belfast BT13 3LZ. and Plate & Frame, Cheese York, boxes, jars, tubes, fasteners etc, (048) 9077 7444 Tel: Maturing Vacuum Pouches. Email: info@labelone.ie YO30 4XE. for food use. Services include 3D Web: www.labelone.ie Fax: (048) 9077 4067 Contact: Managing Director: design, in-house tool making and Main Products/ Self-adhesive labels, Telephone: (0044) 1904 692 333 Email: info@labelone.ie David Kellett National Chemical Company screen printing. (0044) 1904 690 728 Services: Web: www.labelone.ie extended content leaflet Fax: Address: NCC House, Main Products & Services: labels. Email: salesonweb@logopak.net Kiernan’s Food 42 Lower Leeso Self-adhesive labels, extended Contact: Sales Manager, ROI: Web: www.logopakprintandapply.co.uk Street, Dublin 2. Ingredients Ltd content leaflet labels. Chris Moore Main Products/ Print & Apply Telephone: (01) 613 1400 Address: Unit 8 Steadfast Industrial Estate, Fax: (01) 634 0132 087 252 3335 Services: Labelling Systems, Carrickmacros, Co. Monaghan. Email: sales@ncc.ie software solutions, (042) 966 2096 Tel: Web: www.ncc.ie labels & ribbons. Fax: (042) 966 3954 Main Products/ Food Ingredient Contact: General Manager: Email: info@kiernans.ie Services: Acetic Acid, Adi Web: www.kiernans.ie Wilson Clark National Chemical Company Acid, Agar, Algin Main Products & Services: Address: NCC House, Amino Acids, As Seasoning, sauces, marinades, M 42 Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2. Acid, Benzoates, cures & packaging. Tel: (01) 613 1400 Calcium Propion Manotherm Fax: Ltd (01) 661 6261 Carrageenan, Ca Limerick Packaging Limerick Packaging Address: 4 Walkinstown Road, Email: sales@ncc.ie & Caseinates, Ch Address: Eastlink Business Park, Dublin 12. Address: Eastlink Business Park, Powders, Citrate Web: www.ncc.ie Ballysimon Road, Limerick. Telephone: (01) 452 2355 Ballysimon Road, Citric Acid - Pow Main Products & Services: Tel: (061) 400 035 Fax: Co. Limerick. and Liquid, Colo (01) 451 6919 Food Ingredients: Fax: (061) 400 036 Email: info@manotherm.ie Telephone: (061) 400 035 - Synthetic and Acidulants,Preservatives, Email: info@lmkpkg.ie Website: www.manotherm.ie Fax: (061) 400 036 Natural, Dairy B Biocides, Enzymes, Texturants, Web: www.limerickpackaging.ie Main Products/ Distributors of Email: info@lmkpkg.ie Dehydrates, Dex Hydrocolloids, Stabilizers, Main Products & Services: Egg Powders, En Services: controls & Web: www.limerickpackaging.ie Antioxidants, Carriers, Binders, Corrugated Boxes, Polythene Fibre – Cellulose instrumentation. Main Products/ Corrugated Boxes, Gelling agents, Fibres, Sweeteners Bags, Edgeguards, Palletwrap, Flavours, Fructos Contact: Managing Director: Services: Polythene Bags, (natural & high intensity), Amino Strapping, Tapes. Gelatin, Glucona Acids, Colours, Fats & Oils, Starches, R.V. Gilbert Edgeguards, Palletwrap, Contact: Mike Boland Glycerine, Guar Texturizers, Clean Label ingredients, Director & Project Strapping, Tapes. Gum, Gum Arab Other general ingredients. Sales Engineer: Contact: Mike Boland Inulin, Lactates, L Ingredients Sourcing: Robert C. Gilbert Acid, Lecithin, Li NCC Ireland has many years Sweeteners, Loc of expertise in the sales, marketLINPAC Allibert Measom Freer & Co. Ltd Bean Gum, MSG ing and distribution of speciality Address: 17 Ridgeway, Address: 37/41 Chartwell Drive, Acid, Milk Powde ingredients and commodities Quinton Business Park, Wigston, Leicester, Nitrates, Nitrites from global producers. NCC’s Bimingham, B32 1AF, LE18 2FL, Pectins, Phospha award winning service assists United Kingdom. England. & Phosphoric Ac clients to innovate and become Telephone: (0044) 1606 56 1929 Telephone: (0044) 116 288 1588 Potassium Sorba more cost efficient, we do this by Manotherm Ltd Fax: (0044) 1606 56 1998 Fax: (0044) 116 281 3000 Silica’s, Sodium sharing our expertise in research Address: 4 Walkinstown Road, Email: brendan.mcgarry@linpac.com Email: sales@measomfreer.co.uk Diacetate, Starch based smart sourcing solutions Dublin D12 RP83 Web: www.linpacallibert.com Web: www.measomfreer.co.uk Modified, Native and supply chain management. Tel: (01) 452 2355 Clean Label, Swe Main Products/ Plastic Materials Handling Main Products/ Measom Freer Contact: Product Manager: Fax: (01) 451 6919 - Natural and Ar Services: Products - Boxes, Bins, Services: manufacture and stock Fintan McConnell Email: info@manotherm.ie Tartaric Acid, Vit WWW.FOODIRELANDDIRECTORY.COM Trays, Pallets etc. quality plastic bottles, (fmcconnell@ncc.ie) Web: www.manotherm.ie

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I WON’T BE IMPRESSED BY TECHNOLOGY UNTIL I CAN DOWNLOAD

M

FOOD!

Contact: Sales Manager, Ireland: Brendan McGarry 62 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 087 676 7161

custom moulded bottles, dropper caps, scoops, measures, boxes, jars, tubes, fasteners etc, for food use. Services include 3D design, in-house tool making and screen

Whey Powders, W Protein Concent Xanthan Gum. Packaging: HDPE & Stainles IBCs (intermedia bulk containers) accessories (cap


company listings National Standards Authority of Ireland (NSAI)

Address: 1 Swift Square, Northwood, Santry, Dublin 9. Tel: (01) 807 3800 (061) 332 982 Fax: Email: info@nsai.ie Web: www.nsai.ie Main Products & Services: Certification and inspection services to national & interna- tional product & management system standards including ISO 22000, ISO 9001, OHSAS and BRC Global Food Standard.

O

Obeeco Ltd

Address: Annaville Avenue, Blackrock, Co. Dublin. Tel: (01) 278 2323 (01) 278 2374 Fax: Email: sales@obeeco.ie Web: www.obeeco.ie Main Products & Services: Packaging Processing and Automation Machinery. New Era Packaging Ltd Coding and Printing Solutions Address: Drogheda Industrial Estate, and Materials. Donore Road, Contact: Sales Director: Richard Burke Drogheda, Managing Director: Olive Walker Co. Louth.

(041) 987 5600 Tel: Fax: (041) 983 4481 Email: dnevin@newera.ie Web: www.newera.ie Main Products & Services: Self-adhesive labels for all end-users and manufacturers.

NPP Group Ltd

Address: Unit 509, Mitchelstown Road, Northwest Business Park, Ballycoolin, Dublin 15. Tel: (00353) (0) 1 880 9299 Fax: (00353) (0) 1 880 9298 Email: sales@npp.ie Web: www.npp.ie Main Products & Services: Flexible plastic packaging distributors. Contact: Sales Director: Eoin McDonagh

Nutrition Supplies

Address: Innishannon, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 477 5522 Fax: (021) 477 5449 ursula.lecane@nutritionsupplies.ie Email: Web: www.nutritionsupplies.ie Main Products & Services: Vitamin & Nutrient Precision Premixes.

O’Brien Ingredients

Address: 11 Magna Drive, Magna Business Park, Citywest, Dublin D24 T97Y Tel: 00353 [0]1 469 1400 Fax: 00353 [0]1 469 1360 Email: ingred@obrien-ingredients.ie Web: www.obrien-ingredients.ie Main Products & Services: Supplier of ambient, frozen and chilled ingredients to Bakery, Beverage, Confectionery, Dairy, Ice Cream, Feed, Pharmaceutical, Infant Formula and Savoury sectors in Ireland. Contact: Sales Account Manager: Jenny McEvoy

T.S. O’Connor & Son Ltd

Address: Unit C, 67 Heather Road, Sandyford Industrial Estate, Dublin 18. Tel: (01) 295 5696 Fax: (01) 295 5741 Email: andrew@bags.ie Web: www.bags.ie Main Products & Services: Printed Carrier Bags, Tapes, Labels & Flexible Packaging. Contact: Sales Manager: Andrew Haughton

Odenberg Engineering Ltd

Address: 2004 Orchard Avenue, City West Business Campus, Naas Road, Dublin 24. (01) 413 6200 Tel: Fax: (01) 457 0219 Email: info@odenberg.ie Web: www.odenberg.ie Main Products & Services: Robotics, mechanical handling systems. Contact: Business Unit Manager: James J. Deane

Ornua

Address: Grattan House, Mount Street Lower, Dublin 2. Tel: +353 1 661 9599 Fax: +353 1 661 2778 Email: communications@ornua.com Web: www.ornua.com Main Products & Services: Ireland’s largest exporter of dairy products

P Packex Industries Ltd

Address: Unit 1, Village Mills Business Park, Rathnew, Co. Wicklow. (0404) 69 851 Tel: Fax: (0404) 69 861 Email: sales@packex.ie Main Products & Services: High quality flexible packaging. Contact: Ivan Cruise

P.C. Packaging Ltd

Address: Derrynane House, Eadestown, Naas, Co. Kildare. Tel: (045) 883 510 Fax: (045) 880 934 Email: philip@pcpackaging.ie Web: www.pcpackaging.ie Main Products & Services: Packaging machinery/ shrink films, flexible packaging, Belca range of shrink wrappers, Ilapak flow wrapping, Sovereign labelling systems, Sick sensors.

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 63


company listings Pegler & Louden

Address: White Heather, Industrial Estate, 301 South Circular Road, Dublin 8. South Link Park, Ballycurreen Road, Grange, Co. Cork. (01) 416 5170 Tel: Fax: (01) 416 5175 (021) 497 7128 Main Products & Services: Industrial valves and actuators.

Pharmafoods Ltd

Address: Lower Waterford Road, Carrickbeg, Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary. Tel: (051) 645 066/645 084 (051) 645 033 Fax: Email: info@pharmafoods.net Web: www.pharmafoods.net Main Products & Services: Bilwinco Multihead Weighers, Mondini Tray Sealers Vacuum and Gas, Limitech Liquid Processing Equipment, Rovema Vertical Form Fill Sealers, Cartoning, Bag In Box, Abtech Premade Pouch Production for Tuna in Foil.

PK Chemicals Ltd

Address: Unit 23, Sandyford Office Park, Blackthorn Avenue, Sandyford Industrial Estate, Foxrock, Dublin 18. Tel: (01) 295 6977 Fax: (01) 295 8338 Email: graeme@pkchemicals.com Main Products & Services: Food Ingredients, Flavours and Colours. Contact: Technical Sales Manager: Graeme Locke

64 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

R Rennick Solicitors

Puratos Crest Foods Ltd

Address: 70 - 71 Dunboyne Business Park, Dunboyne, Co. Meath. Tel: (01) 825 5505 (01) 825 5506 Fax: Email: info_ireland@puratos.com Web: www.puratos.com Main Products & Services: Bakery, patisserie and chocolate ingredients. Belcolade Belgian chocolate, Puratos bakery & patisserie products, PatisFrance premium patisserie ingredients. Contact: General Manager: Sean McDaid

Q

Address: Main Street, Dunboyne, Co. Meath Tel: +353 1 825 1030 Fax: +353 1 825 1031 Email: info@rennickfoodlawyer.com Web: www.rennickfoodlawyer.com Main Products & Services: Legal & Business Advice Contact: Office Manager: Gemma McKenna

Rentokil Pest Control

Nationwide Coverage Tel: 1890 869 869 (045) 852 890 Fax: Email: pestcontrolinfo@rentokil.ie Web: www.rentokil.ie Main Products & Services: Suppliers of Pest Control to ISO 9001:2008 specification. Contact: Pest Control: Michael O’Mahoney

Q-Lab Ltd

Address: PO Box 27, Kerlogue Industrial Estate, Drinagh, Co. Wexford. Tel: (053) 914 5600 Fax: (053) 918 4575 Email: info@qlab.ie Web: www.qlab.ie Main Products & Services: Microbiological & chemical analysis of food, water & environmental samples. Contact: Managing Director: Anne-Marie Kelly Financial Controller: Aidan Byrne Chem. Lab. Manager: Peter O’Byrne Micro. Lab Manager Brian Healy Business Development Manager: Liz Morris

QPM Ltd

Address: Unit 12, Robinhood Business Park, Robinhood Road, Dublin 22. (01) 450 2421 Tel: Fax: (01) 450 2311 Email: enevin@qpm.ie Web: www.qpm.ie Main Products & Services: Metal detectors, x-ray, checkweighing, calibration, shrink wrapping machinery and materials, flow-wrapping, tray sealing. Contact: Eddie Nevin

Repak Ltd

Address: Red Cow Interchange Estate, 1 Ballymount Road, Clondalkin, Dublin 22. Tel: (01) 467 0190 Fax: (01) 403 0929 Email: info@repak.ie Web: www.repak.ie Main Products & Services: Repak was established through a voluntary agreement between industry and the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment as industry’s response to the producer responsibility obligations placed on Ireland by the EU Directive on Packaging Waste (94/62/EC). Operating on a not-for profit basis, Repak gives producers legal compliance with their obligation to fund the recovery and recycling of their used packaging. The fees our members pay us are used to fund the recovery and recycling of the packaging on the


company listings goods or services they provide to their customers. Repak is the only government approved packaging compliance scheme under the Waste Management Packaging Regulations 2007.

S safe food

Address: 7 Eastgate Avenue, Eastgate, Little Island, Co. Cork T45 RX01 Tel: 021 230 4100 021 230 4111 Fax: Email: info@safefood.eu Web: www.safefood.eu Main Products & Services: safefood is the all island public agency promoting food safety and healthy eating to consumers through education and awareness campaigns. It also acts as an independent source of scientific advice, commissions and funds relevant research, co-ordinates scientific co-operation and facilitates knowledge exchange among those working in the food sector and other key stakeholders.

SAI Global

Address: Block 3, Quayside Business Park, Mill St, Dundalk, Co. Louth. Tel: 042 932 0912 Email: information@saiglobal.com Web: www.saiglobal.com Main Products & Services: Food Safety certification, BRC Certification, GFSI Scheme Certification, Environmental Management, Quality Management Systems, Supply Chain Management, Aquaculture Services, Fishery Services, Compliance Solutions, Risk Management. Contact Operations manager: Bill Patterson

Saica Pack Ireland

Address: Ashbourne Industrial Estate, Ashbourne, Co. Meath. Tel: (01) 801 0400 (01) 835 1249 Fax: Email: michael.shaw@saica.com Web: www.saica.com Contact: Regional Sales Director, Ireland: Michael Shaw

Smurfit Kappa Ireland

Saica Pack Warrenpoint

Address: Ballymount Road, Walkinstown, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 409 0000 Fax: (01) 456 4509 Email: info@smurfitkappa.ie Web: www.smurfitkappa.ie www.skpackaging.ie www.smurfitkappadirect.ie Main Products & Services: Ireland’s leading manufacturer of packaging and point of purchase displays, with a wide product range to suit the needs of the food industry. Standard packaging & promotional products can now be bought on-line via our webshop at www.smurfitkappadirect.ie

Schütz (Ireland) Ltd

Address: 14 North Main Street, Wexford. Tel: (053) 914 7800 Fax: (053) 914 7799 Email: info@stonefoodmachinery.com Web: www.stonefoodmachinery.com Main Products & Services: MEVA Inlet Screens- Penstocks-Gunther Pickle Injectors & Tumblers- Industrial Cleaning Machines Contact: Val W. Stone Mobile: 086 257 0492

Saica Pack Lurgan

Address: 16 Robert Street, Lurgan, Co. Armagh, BT66 8BE. Tel: (0044) 28 3832 4222 Fax: (0044) 28 3832 1788 Email: david.nelson@saica.com Web: www.saica.com Contact: Plant Co-ordinator, David Nelson Address: Newry Road,Warrenpoint, Newry, BT34 3LB. Tel: (0044) 28 4175 2671 Fax: (0044) 28 4175 3103 Email: michael.shaw@saica.com Web: www.saica.com Contact: Regional Sales Director Ireland:Michael Shaw

Address: Townmore, Killala, Co. Mayo Tel: (096) 33044 Fax: (096) 33045 Email: info1ireland@schuetz.net Web: www.schuetz.net Main Products & Services: Manufacturer of IBCs and PE Drums.

Sealed Air Ltd

Address: Clifton House, 1 Marston Road, St. Neots, Cambridgeshire PE19 2HN. (0044) 148 022 4000 Tel: Fax: (0044) 148 022 4063 Email: cryovac.ukmkt@sealedair.com Web: www.sealedair.com Main Products & Services: Cryovac® Packaging Solutions, including films, barrier bags, rigid trays, punnets and pots. Diversey Hygiene Solutions including detergents, disinfectants, dosing equipment and energy and water management solutions. Contact: Timothy O’Connell Mobile: 086 225 3172

Stone Food Machinery Ltd

Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland

Address: Wilton Park House, Wilton Place, Dublin 2. (01) 808 2100 Tel: Fax: (01) 808 2002 Email: info@sei.ie Web: www.sei.ie Contact: Head, Energy Demand Management: Kevin O’Rourke Declan Healey

Syspal

Address: Cockshutt Lane, Broseley, Shropshire, TF12 5JA, England. Tel: (0044) 1952 883188 Fax: (0044) 1952 884 093 Email: sales@syspal.com Web: www.syspal.com Main Products & Services: Manufacturers of stainless steel and aluminium products, specifically designed for regulations within the food industry. Contact: Nicky Davies FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 65


The Packaging Centre Ltd For all your packaging needs

TPC

Fox & Geese House, Naas Road, Dublin 22. Tel: 01 450 8759 ~ Fax: 01 450 7567 www.thepackagingcentre.ie

Pantone 2935

company listings

T

The Packaging Centre Ltd For all your packaging needs

TPC

Fox & Geese House, Naas Road, Dublin 22. Tel: 01 450 8759 ~ Fax: 01 450 7567 www.thepackagingcentre.ie

The Packaging Centre

Teagasc Food Research Programme

Moorepark and Ashtown Address: Cork: Moorepark, Fermoy, Co. Cork. Dublin: Ashtown, Dublin 15. Tel: (025) 42 222 / (01) 805 9500 Email: mark.fenelon@teagasc.ie / declan.troy@teagasc.ie Web: www.teagasc.ie Main Products & Services: Research, development and innovation, food bioscience, food safety, food chemistry and technology, food industry development, pilot plant facilities, analytical services, training, consultancy. Contact: Mark Fenelon, Declan Troy.

Tekpak Automation Ltd

Address: Whitemill Industrial Estate, Wexford, Ireland. Tel: (053) 916 3033 Email: jkehoe@tekpak.ie Web: www.tekpak.ie Main Products & Services: Vision guided pick and place robots, product Contact: John Kehoe

Address: Fox & Geese House, Naas Road, Dublin 22. Tel: (01) 450 8759 (01) 450 7567 Fax: Email: sales@thepackagingcentre.ie Web: www.thepackagingcentre.ie Contact: Managing Director, Ivan Powell

Topaz Lubricants

Address: Topaz House, Beech Hill, Clonskeagh, Dublin 4. Tel: (01) 202 8888 Email: lubricants@topaz.ie Web: www.topaz.ie Main Products & Services: Lubricants: Food grade, Industrial, Marine, Vehicle and Plant.

Toyota Material Handling Ireland

Transtock Warehousing & Cold Storage Ltd

CMYK

Address: Christendom, Cyan:Ferrybank, 100 Co. Waterford. Magenta: 50 Tel: (051) 832 411 Fax: (051) 832 666 Email: info@trans-stock.com Web: www.trans-stock.com Main Products & Services: Warehousing and frozen and chilled cold storage, logistics.

Trilby Trading Ltd

Address: Boyne House, Boyne Business Park, Greenhills, Drogheda, Co. Louth. Tel: (041) 983 2137 (041) 983 5463 Fax: Email: sales@trilbytrading.ie Main Products & Services: Food Grade Vegetable Oils. Contact: sales@trilbytrading.ie

U

Address: Killeen Road, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 419 0200 Fax: (01) 419 0325 Email: materialhandling@toyota.ie Web: www.toyota-forklifts.ie Main Products & Services: Toyota forklifts and BT warehouse equipment. diesel/LPG and electric forklifts, powerpallet trucks, stackers etc.

UCC - Food Institute

Address: 3rd Floor, Food Science Building University College Cork, Cork. Tel: (021) 490 3810 Email: karen_mccarthy@ucc.ie Main Products & Services: Education, research, continuing education & training.

UCC - School of Food and Nutritional Sciences

Address: Room 242, Food Science Building, University College Cork, Cork. Tel: (021) 490 3393 Email: foodandnutrition@ucc.ie Web: www.ucc.ie/en/fns/ Main Products & Services: Education, research, continuing education & training.

66 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18


company listings

Address: O’Rahilly Building, University College Cork, Cork. Tel: (021) 490 2570 Email: foodbusiness@ucc.ie Web: www.ucc.ie/en/foodbus/ Main Products & Services: Education, research, continuing education & training.

UCC - Food Industry Training Unit

Address: Food Science Building, University College Cork, Cork. Tel: (021) 490 3363 Email: m.mccarthybuckley@ucc.ie Web: www.ucc.ie/en/fitu Main Products & Services: Education, research, continuing education & training.

UCD - School Of Agriculture and Food Science Address: UCD Agriculture and Food Science Centre, UCD, Belfield, Dublin 4. Undergraduate Programmes: UCD Agricultural Science and Veterinary Medicine programme Office UCD Agriculture and Food Science Centre. Tel: (01) 716 7194 Email: agandfoodprogrammes@ucd.ie Web: www.ucd.ie/agfood Postgraduate Programmes: UCD School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine UCD Veterinary Sciences Centre. Tel: (01) 716 6100 Email: agfoodvet@ucd.ie Web: www.ucd.ie/agfoodvet

V

Versatile Packaging Ltd

Address: Silverstream Business Park, Silverstream, Co. Monaghan. (047) 85 177 Tel: (047) 85 199 Fax: Email: info@versatilepackaging.ie www.versatilepackaging.ie Web: Main Products & Services: Food Packaging Materials and Equipment - Tray Sealers, CPET, Barrier, Antifog Films, Aluminium Trays, Stand Up Pouches, Vacuum Pouches, Pouch Filling & Sealing Equipment.

W Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd

Address: Kilcannon Industrial Estate, Old Dublin Road, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford. (053) 923 3778 Tel: (053) 923 3284 Fax: Email: sales@weberireland.com Web: www.webermarking.ie Main Products & Services: Print & Apply Labelling Systems, Desktop Printers, Laser Coders. Manufacturers of Blank& Pre Printed Labels. Contact: Patrick Hughes Mobile: 087 279 8925

D.D. Williamson (Ireland) Ltd

Address: Little Island Industrial Estate, Little Island, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 435 3821 Fax: (021) 435 4328 Email: info@ddwmson.com Web: www.ddwilliamson.com Main Products & Services: Caramel colours, natural colours, burnt sugars, natural colour blends, liquids & powders. Contact: Anne O’Dwyer

www.foodirelanddirectory.com

UCC - Department of Food Business and Development

WrenTech Ltd

Value Stream Machinery Ltd

Address: The Mount, 2 Woodstock Link, Belfast, BT6 8DD Tel: 0044 28 90730153 Email: info@valuestreammachinery.com Web: valuestreammachinery.com Main Products & Services: Machinery Supply & Installation, Condition Monitoring, Contractor Services. Contact: Director: Richard Stewart-Maunder

Address: Eversley, Church Bay Road, Crosshaven, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 483 2644 Fax: (021) 483 1363 Email: smurray@wrentech.ie/ mwren@wrentech.ie Web: www.wrentech.ie Main Products & Services: Ytron & Matcon Mixing & Blending, Powder Dispersion / ncorporation, Dust free transfer batch sytems, Powder bins / Silo discharging, Auger filling, Dosing,Formulation,Batching, Flexibatch. Contact: Siobhan Murray / Michael Wren FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 67


relevant organisations

relevant

Organisations AN BORD PLEANÁLA 64 Marlborough Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-858 8100 Lo-call: 1890 275 175 Email: bord@pleanala.ie Web: www.pleanala.ie

BORD BIA

Clanwilliam Court, Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-668 5155 Email: info@bordbia.ie Web: www.bordbia.ie

BORD GÁIS ENERGY

1 Warrington Place, Dublin 2. Tel: 1850 632 632 Emergency: 1850 205 050 Email: webqueries@bordgais.ie Web: www.bordgaisenergy.ie

BORD IASCAIGH MHARA

(Irish Sea Fisheries Board) BIM Dun Laoghaire, Crofton Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. Tel: 01-214 4100 Email: info@bim.ie Web: www.bim.ie

COMPETITION AND CONSUMER PROTECTION COMMISSION Bloom House, PO. Box 12585, Dublin 1. Tel: 1890 432 432 Web: www.consumerhelp.ie

CONSUMERS’ASSOCIATION OF IRELAND LTD 26 Upper Pembroke Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-637 3961 Email: cai@thecai.ie Web: www.thecai.ie

68 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

DRINKS INDUSTRY GROUP OF IRELAND (DIGI) Anglesea House, Anglesea Road, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4. Tel: 01-668 0215 Web: www.drinksindustry.ie

ENTERPRISE IRELAND

The Plaza, Eastpoint Business Park, Dublin 3. Tel: 01-727 2000 Email: client.service@enterpriseireland.com Web: www.enterprise-ireland.com

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH ASSOC. OF IRELAND

Heraghty House, 4 Carlton Terrace, Novara Avenue, Bray, Co. Wicklow. Tel: 01-276 1211 Email: info@ehoa.ie Web: www.ehai.ie

EUROPEAN COMMISSION IN IRELAND

European House, 12-14 Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-634 1111 Email: eu-ie-info-request@ec.europa.eu Web: www.euireland.ie

EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT

EXPERIAN IRELAND LTD Newenham House, Northern Cross, Ground Floor, Malahide Road, Dublin 17. Tel: 01-846 9200 Email: info@experian.ie Web: www.experian.ie

FOOD DRINK IRELAND (FDI) Confederation House, 84-86 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 1500 Email: firstname.surname@ibec.ie Web: www.fooddrinkireland.ie

FOOD PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT CENTRE Dublin Institute of Technology, Cathal Brugha Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-814 6080 Email: fpdc@dit.ie Web: www.fpdc.dit.ie

FOOD SAFETY AUTHORITY OF IRELAND Abbey Court, Lower Abbey Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-817 1300 Lo-call: 1890 336 677 Email: info@fsai.ie Web: www.fsai.ie

European House, 12-14 Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 7900 Email: epdublin@ep.europa.eu Web: www.europarl.ie

GUARANTEED IRISH LTD

EXCELLENCE IRELAND

The Metropolitan Building, James Joyce Street, Dublin 1. Lo-call: 1890 289 389 Email: wcu@hsa.ie Web: www.hsa.ie

68 Pembroke Road, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4. Tel: 01-660 4100 Email: info@eiqa.com Web: www.qmark.ie

1 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-661 2607 Email: info@guaranteedirish.ie Web: www.guaranteedirish.ie

HEALTH & SAFETY AUTHORITY


relevant organisations INVESTMENT DEVELOPMENT AGENCY (IDA) Wilton Park House, Wilton Place, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-603 4000 Email: idaireland@ida.ie Web: www.idaireland.com

IRISH BUSINESS & EMPLOYERS CONFEDERIATION (IBEC) Head Office, Confederation House, 84-86 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 1500 Email: info@ibec.ie Web: www.ibec.ie

IRISH SECURITY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION Chase House, City Junction Business Park, Northern Cross, Malahide Road, Dublin 17. Tel: 01-484 7206 Email: info@isia.ie Web: www.isia.ie

IRISH SMALL AND MEDIUM ENTERPRISES ASSOCIATION (ISME) 17 Kildare Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-662 2755 Email: isme@isme.ie Web: www.isme.ie

MANDATE

O’Lehane House, 9 Cavendish Row, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-874 6321 Email: mandate@mandate.ie Web: www.mandate.ie

NATIONAL DAIRY COUNCIL The Studio, 55C, Maple Avenue, Stillorgan, Co. Dublin. Tel: 01-290 2451 Email: info@ndc.ie Web: www.ndc.ie

THE PRIVATE SECURITY AUTHORITY Davis Street, Tipperary Town, Co. Tipperary. Tel: 062-31588 Email: info@psa.gov.ie Web: www.psa.gov.ie

REVENUE COMMISSIONERS Head Office, Dublin Castle, Dame Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-647 5000 Web: www.revenue.ie

RGDATA

Rock House, Main Street, Blackrock, Co. Dublin. Tel: 01-288 7584 Email: rgdata@rgdata.ie Web: www.rgdata.ie

SMALL FIRMS ASSOCIATION (IBEC) 84-86 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 1500 Email: info@sfa.ie Web: www.sfa.ie

TEAGASC FOOD RESEARCH CENTRE Ashtown, Dublin 15. Tel: 01-805 9500 Email: info@teagasc.ie Web: www.teagasc.ie

CUSTOMS PROCEDURES BRANCH St. Conlons Road, Nenagh, Co. Tipperary. Tel: 067 63370 Email: tarclass@revenue.ie Web: www.revenue.ie

FINANCE

Government Buildings, Upper Merrion Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-676 7571 Lo-call: 1890 661 010 Email: webmaster@finance.gov.ie Web: www.finance.gov.ie

HOUSING, PLANNING, COMMUNITY AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES, C/O NSAI 1 Swift Square, Northwood, Santry, Dublin 9. Tel: 01-807 3800 Email: info@nsai.ie Web: www.nsai.ie

Custom House, Custom House Quay, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-888 2000 Lo-call: 1890 202 021 Email: qcsofficer@housing.gov.ie Web: www.housing.gov.ie

WORKPLACE RELATIONS COMMISSION

JOBS, ENTERPRISE & INNOVATION

O’Brien Road, Carlow, R93 W7W2 Tel: (059) 917 8800 Web: www.workplacerelations.ie

Government Departments: AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND THE MARINE Agriculture House, Kildare Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-607 2000 Lo-call: 1890 200 510 Email: info@agriculture.gov.ie Web: www.agriculture.gov.ie

COLLECTOR GENERAL’S OFFICE VAT/PAYE/PRSI Sarsfield House, Francis Street, Limerick. Lo-call: 1890 203 070 Email: cgcustserv@revenue.ie Web: www.revenue.ie

COMPANIES REGISTRATION OFFICE Parnell House, 14 Parnell Square, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-804 5200 Lo-call: 1890 220 226 Email: info@cro.ie Web: www.cro.ie

23 Kildare Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-631 2121 Lo-Call: 1890 220 222 Email: info@djei.ie Web: www.djei.ie

JUSTICE AND EQUALITY 51 St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-602 8202 Lo-call: 1890 221 227 Email: info@justice.ie Web: www.justice.ie

SOCIAL PROTECTION Aras Mhic Dhiarmada, Store Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-704 3000 Email: info@welfare.ie Web: www.welfare.ie

VALUATION OFFICE Block 2, Irish Life Centre, Lower Abbey Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-817 1000 Email: info@valoff.ie Web: www.valoff.ie

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 69


2017/2018 Year Planner MON TUES WED THUR FRI

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70 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

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FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18 | 71


3 year calendar

Food www.foodirelanddirectory.com

72 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2017/18

IRELAND

Yearbook & Directory 2017/18


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Food Ireland Yearbook & Directory 2017/18  

An annual information guide & reference source of products and services for the food & drink manufacturing and processing industries in Irel...

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