Resident Magazine NY

Page 32

fashion

The Only Pant in Scarlet Red with AYSHA NY Satin Moto Jacket. Photo Credit: Jana Schuessler Photography

AYSHA NY

Helping New York Make a Clothing Comeback By Lauren Bens

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ith uniquely inspired pieces and a popular collection of luxury loungewear looks, AYSHA NY is not just a clothing line, but a lifestyle. Fans of the brand are part of a movement dedicated to women’s empowerment. During the pandemic, Aysha has remained committed to manufacturing her clothing in New York and giving back to the city which has allowed her to fulfill her fashion dreams. LB: How did you get your start in designing? What was the inspiration behind the brand? A: At 12 years old, I moved from Lahore, Pakistan, to a small town in New Jersey and strug-

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gled trying to fit into American culture. So, in my quest to fit in and feel good, I turned to fashion to help me. I used my sense of style to set me apart and I soon learned that fashion is not just a piece of clothing, it is part of our identity. At such a young age, I realized that my choices in what I wore could control and create a perception of how others treated me. I lived by this mindset while I worked in the financial sector of New York City, and although I thrived, I was unfulfilled. I quit my lucrative job and moved to Europe. To gain entry into this new world, I launched a fashion consultancy specializing in sourcing fabric and hand embroidery from India and Pakistan. I spent the next five years in Milan and Paris, where after much

ado, I got the privilege to work with high-end luxury fashion houses, including Dior and Dolce Gabbana, among others. This led me to want to start my own brand in NYC. LB: Have you always been dedicated to making all of your clothes in NYC? A: Being in New York City was always a dream for me, like so many other people around the world. I started out with partially producing our collections in New York City and the rest was outsourced from overseas. However, during COVID, New York was hit hard and so many small family-owned businesses were closing left and right. At that moment, I personally made a pledge in wanting to play an