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KINFOLK

MINIMALISTIC “I am a minimalist. I like saying the most with the least.” INTERVIEWS

Marlous Stoelinga, Renate de Graaf

FEATURES

Stil Life

CITY TRIPS

Berlin


Known for its enduring aesthetics and functions, the Datejust is the archetype of the classic watch. Built the Rolex Way in 1945, it was the world’s first self winding, waterproof wristwatch chronometer to display the date in a window at 3 o’clock on the dial, consolidating all the major innovations that Rolex had brought to the modern wristwatch until then. Emblematic and timeless, the datejust has spanned eras, while retaining the enduring codes that today still make it one of the world’s most recognisable watches. it doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.


AMERONGEN INTERIEUR www.amerongen.nl


original Design by . made by


ECUADOR REPUBLIC


In to the woods K I K I

W W W. M A D E U PA B R A N D . C O M


KINFOLK

FOUNDER & CREATIVE DIRECTOR

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS

STYLING, HAIR & MAKEUP

I S S U E 31

Nathan Williams

Oliver Hugemark Ulrika Luksevica

Rebecca Chang Ashleigh Ciucci Cobalto Studio Lix Daxauer Taan Doan Lianna Fowler Paul Frederick Andreas Frienholt Céline Gaulhiac Lucy Gibson Cyril Laine David Nolan Sandy Suffield Camille-Joséphine Teisseire

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying or other electronic or mechanical methods, without prior written permission of the editor, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical revieuws and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law. for permission request, write the editor, addressed “Attention: Kinfolk Permissions.” at the address below.

EDITOR-IN-CHEF

John Clifford Burns EDITOR

Harriet Fitch Little ART DIRECTOR

Christian Moller Andersen DESIGN DIRECTOR

Alex Hunting

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS

Michael Anastassiades Jonas Bjerre-Paulsen Andrea Codrington Lippke Ilse Crawford Margot Henderson Leonard Koren Hans Ulrich Obrist Amy Sall Matt Willey WORDS

BRAND DIRECTOR

Amy Woodroffe COPY EDITOR

Rachel Holzman COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR

Jessica Gray PRODUCER

Cecilie Jegsen PROJECT MANAGER

Garett Nelson CASTING DIRECTOR

Sarah Bunter SALES & DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR

Frederic Mähl SALES & DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR

Kasper Schademan

Alex Anderson Ellie Violet Bramley John Clifford Burns Katie Calautti Cody Delistraty Harriet Fitch Little Candice Frederick Nikolaj Hansson Hugo Macdonald Sarah Moroz Justin Myers John Ovans Debika Ray Asher Ross Tristan Rutherford Neda Semnani Charles Shafaieh Ben Shattuck Suzanne Snider Pip Usher Molly Young CROSSWORD

Molly Young PUBLICATION DESIGN

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Gustav Almestal Ian Berry Luc Braquet Jessica Brilli Rala Choi Nicholas Alan Cope Pelle Crépin Jerome De Perlinghi Bogdan Dreava Christopher Ferguson Lasse Flode Jean-Marie Franceschi Alex Freund Francois Halard Adam Katz Sinding Saul Leiter Salva Lopez Christian Moller Andersen Jacopo Moschin Justin poulsen Dan Smith Bachar Srour Aaron Tilley Zoltan Tombor Dominique Vellay Dennis Weber

info@kinfolk.com www.kinfolk.com Published by Ouur Media Amagertorv 14, level 1 1160 Copenhagen, Denmark The vieuws expressed in Kinfolk magazine are those of the respective contributors and are not necessarily shared by the company or its staff SUBSCRIBE Kinfolk is published four times a year. To subscribe, visit kinfolk.com/subscribe or email us at info@kinfolk.com CONTACT US If you have questions or comments, please write to us at info@kinfolk.com. For advertising inquiries, get in touch at advertising@kinfolk.com


MICHELLE


Bread & Flowers


Issue 31

Welcome The spring issue of Kinfolk builds on our foundational interest in design to consider the discipline in its most ambitious manifestation: architecture. Mid-century architect and furniture designer Charlotte Perriand, whose archives we delve into in this issue, once wrote: “The extension of the art of dwelling is the art of living.” We interrogate this close relationship between external surroundings and interior well-being and meet the architects chipping away at the partition wall between the two. Buildings affect the mood and behavior of their inhabitants. Equally, the things we build – or wish to build – reflect our own state of mind; they’re blueprints of the ways in which we hope to reinvent our world. This issue of Kinfolk explores the opposing forces that shape our physical environments, paying homage to both the architects with dreams too big for city planners to swallow – as in our investigation into the history of utopian design – and the architects preserving their charming urban fabrics from being swallowed, such as Anne Holtrop and Noura Al Sayeh Holtrop, who are holding on to the heritage of their beloved Bahrain as the Arabian Gulf continues to develop at turbo-speed. We also interview those who have

managed to bridge the divide between fact and fiction by making their strangest whims a reality: like Asif Khan, whose belief in a future where architecture is “light =, intelligent and simple” inspired him to build with bubbles, and Richard England, whose Maltese monuments to postmodernism we explore in one of our fashion shoots. Elsewhere in the issue, we meet Sharon Van Etten, who talks about why she chose to study psychology while writing her new album, and we spend a day in rehearsals with Kyle Abraham – the choreographer making history at New York City Ballet. Writer Ellie Violet Bramley explores the history of marriage, narrating the changing nature of an institution no longer wedded to the idea that death us do part; composer Ryuichi Sakamoto describes the creativity that comes when considering his own mortality; and palliative care expert BJ Miller proposes a new meditation with which we might all rethink the inevitable. As the weather becomes warmer, we turn our faces upward – and toward a cheerier outlook for spring; this issue’s essays also find our writers lingering on balconies, musing on the contradictions of “turning over a new leaf ” and biting into the juicy mythology of the peach.

JOHN CLIFFORD BURNS 13


PART ONE

20

Starters

Behind the scenes 24

Marlous Stoelinga 28

Renate de Graaf

PART T WO

32

Features

Still life

“You lose that wild openness you might feel in your own life.” S T I L L L I F E - P. 3 2

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CONTENTS


WASH & DRY THE LIPS


PART THREE

Minimalistic

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The Beach

‘I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.’ T H E B E AC H - P. 4 4

PART FOUR

Directory

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67

Berlin

Stockist

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69

Cross word

Credits

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The last word

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CONTENTS


IT TAKES TIME


For the natural look


1 Starters

20

24

28

Behind the scenes

Marlous Stoelinga

Renate de Graaf


Behind the scenes Kinfolk magazine; made by Renate de Graaf; assistents; Michelle, Azumi, Elise

‘It’s all about having fun and making serieusly good pictures’

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STARTERS

Berlin and The Netherlands


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STARTERS


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MARLOUS STOELINGA


My name is Marlous Stoelinga, I am thirty-eight years old and live in Bennekom. I am an independent entrepreneur, a proud mother of four and married with a lovely man from Limburg. I got a daily challenge, to have balance between my work as a virtual assistant, my kids, my home chores and my spare time. If I have spare time, which I don’t give myself a lot because I can’t sit still, then I love to read a good book, or I like to crochet. But I also like to get busy with my own interior and change if needed or make adjustments. I look forward to moving to our new house, so I can start over again with my interior. Inspiration I get out of a happy client

and that gives me strength and motivation. Because of that I realize why I am doing my work. The nature is also a part of my thinking about the future and my ambition, where do I want to go, and it gives me idea’s. Also, what I love and what I am interested in is other cultures. It shows me that life is not al about a believe but believe in each other. And that’s how I have a whole other perspective of people with other habits or believes. I am convinced that we are strong enough together to get a much better way of living, if we just believe in it. To give the future a more beautiful longer wat of living, I try together with my family to live sustainable. We

safe where it is possible. As an example: no unnecessary packaging to purchase, consume as much plastic as possible and we use solar energy. I think its important to let the new generation grow and show them the consequence of living life like most people do (not sustainable). They are the future and put hopefully a new generation on this beautiful world


‘They are the future and put hopefully a new generation on this beautiful world’

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Renate de Graaf

My name is Renate de Graaf. I am twenty-one years old and I live in Bennekom. I am passionate about photography, so I made it my job. I am a proud photographer. When I was twelve, I got for my birthday my first SLR camera, if I say it right, a Canon 500D. It started all with me taking a picture of my two cats. Mickey who is a male, black with white paws and Binkie an orange male, he looks like Garfield. Because it was my first time, I had my camera on automatic mode. One click, and it was done. But after a while, and me getting older, I discovered a lot about the camera and photography. It started with automatic mode went further to hand mode. It started with pictures of cats and I evolved myself and started to make headshots,

abstract and more. When I was fifteen, I needed to make a choice between education. I needed to study something. And even though it was obvious what was the right fit, I choose the do an education in Art & Design. Doing crafts, design logo’s or more, and do styling, I was interested in that a lot. After two years of cutting and doing crafts, my favorite class was photography, so I switch education. I am now doing 3 years photography and I love it. It is really my passion, so I don’t regret the choice I made back then. In the last few years I learned a lot! And there is still a little stylist/ designer in me, and I use it all the time.

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2 Features

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Still life


BEN SHATTUC K

Still Life

We enjoy stories more when we know the ending.


For other uses, see Still Life (disambiguation).“Naturaleza muerta” redirects here. For other uses, see Naturaleza muerta (disambiguation).

A still life (plural: still lifes) is a work of art depicting mostly inanimate subject matter, typically commonplace objects which are either natural (food, flowers, dead animals, plants, rocks, shells, etc.) or man-made (drinking glasses, books, vases, jewelry, coins, pipes, etc.). With origins in the Middle Ages and Ancient Greco-Roman art, still-life painting emerged as a distinct genre and professional specialization in Western painting by the late 16th century, and has remained significant since then. One advantage of the still-life artform is that it allows an artist a lot of freedom to experiment with the arrangement of elements within a composition of a painting. Still life, as a particular genre, began with Netherlandish painting of the 16th and 17th centuries, and the English term still life derives from the Dutch word stillev Early still-life paintings, particularly before 1700, often contained religious and allegorical symbolism relating to the objects depicted. Later still-life works are produced with a variety of media and technology, such as found

objects, photography, computer graphics, as well as video and sound. The term includes the painting of dead animals, especially game. Live ones are considered animal art, although in practice they were often painted from dead models. Because of the use of plants and animals as a subject, the still-life category also shares commonalities with zoological and especially botanical illustration. However, with visual or fine art, the work is not intended merely to illustrate the subject correctly. Still life occupied the lowest rung of the hierarchy of genres, but has been extremely popular with buyers. As well as the independent still-life subject, still-life painting encompasses other types of painting with prominent still-life elements, usually symbolic, and “images that rely on a multitude of still-life elements ostensibly to reproduce a ‘slice of life’”.[2] The trompe-l’œil painting, which intends to deceive the viewer into thinking the scene is real, is a specialized type of still life, usually showing inanimate and relatively flat objects.

“You lose that wild openness you might feel in your own life.” KINFOLK

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Still-life paintings often adorn the interior of ancient Egyptian tombs. It was believed that food objects and other items depicted there would, in the afterlife, become real and available for use by the deceased. Ancient Greek vase paintings also demonstrate great skill in depicting everyday objects and animals. Peiraikos is mentioned by Pliny the Elder as a panel painter of “low” subjects, such as survive in mosaic versions and provincial wall-paintings at Pompeii: “barbers’ shops, cobblers’ stalls, asses, eatables and similar subjects”. Similar still life, more simply decorative in intent, but with realistic perspective, have also been found in the Roman wall paintings and floor mosaics unearthed at Pompeii, Herculaneum and the Villa Boscoreale, including the later familiar motif of a glass bowl of fruit. Decorative mosaics termed “emblema”, found in the homes of rich Romans, demonstrated the range of food enjoyed by the upper classes, 34

and also functioned as signs of hospitality and as celebrations of the seasons and of life. By the 16th century, food and flowers would again appear as symbols of the seasons and of the five senses. Also starting in Roman times is the tradition of the use of the skull in paintings as a symbol of mortality and earthly remains, often with the accompanying phrase Omnia mors aequat (Death makes all equal). These vanitas images have been re-interpreted through the last 400 years of art history, starting with Dutch painters around 1600. The popular appreciation of the realism of still-life painting is related in the ancient Greek legend of Zeuxis and Parrhasius, who are said to have once competed to create the most lifelike objects, history’s earliest descriptions of trompe-l’œil painting. As Pliny the Elder recorded in ancient Roman times, Greek artists centuries earlier were already advanced in the arts of portrait painting, genre painting and still life.

FEAUTURES

STILL LIFE

by Ben Shattuck He singled out Peiraikos, “whose artistry is surpassed by only a very few...He painted barbershops and shoemakers’ stalls, donkeys, vegetables, and such, and for that reason came to be called the ‘painter of vulgar subjects’; yet these works are altogether delightful, and they were sold at higher prices than the greatest [paintings] of many other artists.”He singled out Peiraikos, “whose artistry is surpassed by only a very few...He painted barbershops and shoemakers’ stalls, donkeys, vegetables, and such, and for that reason came to be called the ‘painter of vulgar subjects’; yet these works are altogether delightful, and they were sold at higher prices than the greatest [paintings] of many other artists.”


BEN SHATTUC K

Middle Ages and Early Renaissance

In the late Middle Ages, still-life elements, mostly flowers but also animals and sometimes inanimate objects, were painted with increasing realism in the borders of illuminated manuscripts, developing models and technical advances that were used by painters of larger images. There was considerable overlap between the artists making miniatures for manuscripts and those painting panels, especially in Early Netherlandish painting. The Hours of Catherine of Cleves, probably made in Utrecht around 1440, is one of the outstanding examples of this trend, with borders featuring an extraordinary range of objects, including coins and fishing-nets, chosen to complement the text or main image at that particular point.

There was considerable overlap between the artists making miniatures for manuscripts and those painting panels, especially in Early Netherlandish painting. The Hours of Catherine of Cleves, probably made in Utrecht around 1440, is one of the outstanding examples of this trend, with borders featuring an extraordinary range of objects, including coins and fishing-nets, chosen to complement the text or main image at that particular point. Flemish workshops later in the century took the naturalism of border elements even further. Gothic millefleur tapestries are another example of the general increasing interest in accurate depictions of plants and animals. The set of The Lady and the Unicorn is the best-known example, designed in Paris around 1500 and then woven in Flanders. The development of oil painting technique by Jan van Eyck and other Northern European artists made it possible to paint everyday objects in this hyper-realistic fashion, owing to the slow drying, mixing, and layering qualities of oil colours. Among the first to break free of religious meaning were Leonardo da Vinci, who created watercolour studies of fruit (around 1495) as part of his restless exami-

nation of nature, and Albrecht Dürer who also made precise coloured drawings of flora and fauna.Petrus Christus’ portrait of a bride and groom visiting a goldsmith is a typical example of a transitional still life depicting both religious and secular content. Though mostly allegorical in message, the figures of the couple are realistic and the objects shown are accurately painted but the goldsmith is actually a depiction of St. Eligius and the objects heavily symbolic. Another similar type of painting is the family portrait combining figures with a well-set table of food, which symbolizes both the piety of the human subjects and their thanks for God’s abundance. Around this time, simple still-life depictions divorced of figures (but not allegorical meaning) were beginning to be painted on the outside of shutters of private devotional paintings. Another step toward the autonomous still life was the painting of symbolic flowers in vases on the back of secular portraits around 1475. Jacopo de’ Barbari went a step further with his Still Life with Partridge, Iron Gloves, and Crossbow Arrows (1504), among the earliest signed and dated trompe-l’œil still-life paintings, which contains minimal religious content.

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BEN SHATTUC K

Later Renaissance

SIXTEENTH CENTURY

Though most still lifes after 1600 were relatively small paintings, a crucial stage in the development of the genre was the tradition, mostly centred on Antwerp, of the “monumental still life”, which were large paintings that included great spreads of still-life material with figures and often animals. This was a development by Pieter Aertsen, whose A Meat Stall with the Holy Family Giving Alms (1551, now Uppsala) introduced the type with a painting that still startles. Another example is “The Butcher Shop” by Aertsen’s nephew Joachim Beuckelaer (1568), with its realistic depiction of raw meats dominating the foreground, while a background scene conveys the dangers of drunkenness and lechery. The type of very large kitchen or market scene developed by Pieter Aertsen and his nephew Joachim Beuckelaer typically depicts an abundance of food with a kitchenware still life and burly Flemish kitchen-maids. A small religious scene can often be made out in the distance, or a theme such as the Four Seasons is added to elevate the subject. This sort of large-scale still life continued to develop in Flemish painting after the separation of the North and South, but is rare in Dutch painting, although other works in this tradition anticipate the “merry company” type of genre painting. Gradually, religious content diminished in size and placement in this type of painting, though moral lessons continued as sub-contexts.[19] One of the relatively few Italian works in the style, Annibale Carracci’s treatment of the same subject in 1583, Butcher’s Shop, begins to remove the moral messages, as did other “kitchen and market” still-life paintings of this period.[20] Vincenzo Campi probably introduced the Antwerp style to Italy in the 1570s. The tradition continued into the next century, with several works by Rubens, who mostly sub-contracted the still-life and animal elements to specialist masters such as Frans Snyders and his pupil Jan Fyt. By the second half of the 16th century, the autonomous still life evolved. The 16th century witnessed an explosion of interest in the natural world and the creation of lavish botanical encyclopædias recording the discoveries of the New World and Asia. It also prompted the beginning of scientific illustration and the classification of specimens. Natural objects began to be appreciated as individual objects of study apart from any religious or mythological associations. The early science of herbal remedies began at this time as well, which was a practical extension of this new knowledge. In addition, wealthy patrons began to underwrite the collection of animal and mineral 36

FEAUTURES

specimens, creating extensive cabinets of curiosities. These specimens served as models for painters who sought realism and novelty. Shells, insects, exotic fruits and flowers began to be collected and traded, and new plants such as the tulip (imported to Europe from Turkey), were celebrated in still-life paintings. The horticultural explosion was of widespread interest in Europe and artist capitalized on that to produce thousands of still-life paintings. Some regions and courts had particular interests. The depiction of citrus, for example, was a particular passion of the Medici court in Florence, Italy. This great diffusion of natural specimens and the burgeoning interest in natural illustration throughout Europe, resulted in the nearly simultaneous creation of modern still-life paintings around 1600. At the turn of the century the Spanish painter Juan Sánchez Cotán pioneered the Spanish still life with austerely tranquil paintings of vegetables, before entering a monastery in his forties in 1603, after which he painted religious subjects. SEVENTEENTH CENTURY

Prominent Academicians of the early 17th century, such as Andrea Sacchi, felt that genre and still-life painting did not carry the “gravitas” merited for painting to be considered great. An influential formulation of 1667 by André Félibien, a historiographer, architect and theoretician of French classicism became the classic statement of the theory of the hierarchy of genres for the 18th century: Celui qui fait parfaitement des païsages est au-dessus d’un autre qui ne fait que des fruits, des fleurs ou des coquilles. Celui qui peint des animaux vivants est plus estimable que ceux qui ne représentent que des choses mortes & sans mouvement ; & comme la figure de l’homme est le plus parfait ouvrage de Dieu sur la Terre, il est certain aussi que celui qui se rend l’imitateur de Dieu en peignant des figures humaines, est beaucoup plus excellent que tous les autres ... He who produces perfect landscapes is above another who only produces fruit, flowers or seafood. He who paints living animals is more estimable than those who only represent dead things without movement, and as man is the most perfect work of God on the earth, it is also certain that he who becomes an imitator of God in representing human figures, is much more excellent than all the others ...”.


How stock laughter became a laughingstock


BEN SHATTUC K

Dutch and Flemish painting

The symbolism of flowers had evolved since early Christian days. The most common flowers and their symbolic meanings include: rose (Virgin Mary, transience, Venus, love); lily (Virgin Mary, virginity, female breast, purity of mind or justice); tulip (showiness, nobility); sunflower (faithfulness, divine love, devotion); violet (modesty, reserve, humility); columbine (melancholy); poppy (power, sleep, death). As for insects, the butterfly represents transformation and resurrection while the dragonfly symbolizes transience and the ant hard work and attention to the harvest.

Still life developed as a separate category in the Low Countries in the last quarter of the 16th century.The English term still life derives from the Dutch word stilleven while Romance languages (as well as Greek, Polish, Russian and Turkish) tend to use terms meaning dead nature. 15th-century Early Netherlandish painting had developed highly illusionistic techniques in both panel painting and illuminated manuscripts, where the borders often featured elaborate displays of flowers, insects and, in a work like the Hours of Catherine of Cleves, a great variety of objects. When the illuminated manuscript was displaced by the printed book, the same skills were later deployed in scientific botanical illustration; the Low Countries led Europe in both botany and its depiction in art. The Flemish artist Joris Hoefnagel (1542–1601) made watercolour and gouache paintings of flowers and other still-life subjects for the Emperor Rudolf II, and there were many engraved illustrations for books (often then hand-coloured), such as Hans Collaert’s Florilegium, published by Plantin in 1600. Around 1600 flower paintings in oils became something of a craze; Karel van Mander painted some works himself, and records that other Northern Mannerist artists such as Cornelis van Haarlem also did so. No surviving flower-pieces by them are

known, but many survive by the leading specialists, Jan Brueghel the Elder and Ambrosius Bosschaert, both active in the Southern Netherlands. While artists in the North found limited opportunity to produce the religious iconography which had long been their staple—images of religious subjects were forbidden in the Dutch Reformed Protestant Church—the continuing Northern tradition of detailed realism and hidden symbols appealed to the growing Dutch middle classes, who were replacing Church and State as the principal patrons of art in the Netherlands. Added to this was the Dutch mania for horticulture, particularly the tulip. These two views of flowers—as aesthetic objects and as religious symbols— merged to create a very strong market for this type of still life. Still life, like most Dutch art work, was generally sold in open markets or by dealers, or by artists at their studios, and rarely commissioned; therefore, artists usually chose the subject matter and arrangement. So popular was this type of still-life painting, that much of the technique of Dutch flower painting was codified in the 1740 treatise Groot Schilderboeck by Gerard de Lairesse, which gave wide-ranging advice on colour, arranging, brushwork, preparation of specimens, harmony, composition, perspective, etc.

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Flemish and Dutch artists also branched out and revived the ancient Greek still life tradition of trompe-l’œil, particularly the imitation of nature or mimesis, which they termed bedriegertje (“little deception”). In addition to these types of still life, Dutch artists identified and separately developed “kitchen and market” paintings, breakfast and food table still life, vanitas paintings, and allegorical collection paintings. In the Catholic Southern Netherlands the genre of garland paintings was developed. Around 1607–1608, Antwerp artists Jan Brueghel the Elder and Hendrick van Balen started creating these pictures which consist of an image (usually devotional) which is encircled by a lush still life wreath. The paintings were collaborations between two specialists: a still life and a figure painter. Daniel Seghers developed the genre further. Originally serving a devotional function, garland paintings became extremely popular and were widely used as decoration of homes. A special genre of still life was the so-called pronkstilleven (Dutch for ‘ostentatious still life’). This style of ornate still-life painting was developed in the 1640s in Antwerp by Flemish artists such as Frans Snyders and Adriaen van Utrecht. They painted still lifes that emphasized abundance by depicting a diversity of objects, fruits, flowers and dead game, often together with living people and animals. The style was soon adopted by artists from the Dutch Republic. Especially popular in this period were vanitas paintings, in which sumptuous arrangements of fruit and flowers, books, statuettes, vases, coins, jewelry, paintings, musical and scientific instruments, military insignia, fine silver and crystal, were accompanied by symbolic reminders of life’s impermanence. Additionally, a skull, an hourglass or pocket watch, a candle burning down or a book with pages turning, would serve as a moralizing message on the ephemerality of sensory pleasures. Often some of the fruits and flowers themselves would be shown starting to spoil or fade to emphasize the same point. Another type of still life, known as ontbijtjes or “breakfast paintings”, represent both a literal presentation of delicacies that the upper class might enjoy and a religious reminder to avoid gluttony. Around 1650 Samuel van Hoogstraten painted one of the first wall-rack pictures, trompe-l’œil still-life paintings which feature objects tied, tacked or attached in some other fashion to a wall board, a type of still life very popular in the United States in the 19th century. Another variation was the trompe-l’œil still life depicted objects associated with a given profession, as with the Cornelis Norbertus Gysbrecht’s painting “Painter’s Easel with Fruit Piece”, which displays all the tools of a painter’s craft. Also popular in the first half of the 17th century was the painting of a large assortment of specimens in allegorical form, such as the “five senses”, “four continents”, or “the four seasons”, showing a goddess or allegorical figure surrounded by appropriate natural and man-made objects. The popularity of vanitas paintings, and these other forms of still life, soon spread from Holland to Flanders and Germany, and also to Spain and France. The Netherlandish production of still lifes was enormous, and they were very widely exported, especially to northern Europe; Britain hardly produced any itself. German still life followed closely the Dutch models; Georg Flegel was a pioneer in pure still life without figures and created the compositional innovation of placing detailed objects in cabinets, cupboards, and display cases, and producing simultaneous multiple views. In Spanish art, a bodegón is a still-life painting depicting pantry items, such as victuals, game, and drink, often arranged on a simple stone slab,

and also a painting with one or more figures, but significant still-life elements, typically set in a kitchen or tavern. Starting in the Baroque period, such paintings became popular in Spain in the second quarter of the 17th century. The tradition of still-life painting appears to have started and was far more popular in the contemporary Low Countries, today Belgium and Netherlands (then Flemish and Dutch artists), than it ever was in southern Europe. Northern still lifes had many subgenres; the breakfast piece was augmented by the trompe-l’œil, the flower bouquet, and the vanitas. In Spain there were much fewer patrons for this sort of thing, but a type of breakfast piece did become popular, featuring a few objects of food and tableware laid on a table. Still-life painting in Spain, also called bodegones, was austere. It differed from Dutch still life, which often contained rich banquets surrounded by ornate and luxurious items of fabric or glass. The game in Spanish paintings is often plain dead animals still waiting to be skinned. The fruits and vegetables are uncooked. The backgrounds are bleak or plain wood geometric blocks, often creating a surrealist air. Even while both Dutch and Spanish still life often had an embedded moral purpose, the austerity, which some find akin to the bleakness of some of the Spanish plateaus, appears to reject the sensual pleasures, plenitude, and luxury of Dutch still-life paintings. Francisco de Zurbarán, Bodegón or Still Life with Pottery Jars (1636), Museo del Prado, Madrid Josefa de Ayala ( Josefa de Óbidos), Still-life (c. 1679), Santarém, Municipal Library Even though Italian still-life painting (in Italian referred to as natura morta, “dead nature”) was gaining in popularity, it remained historically less respected than the “grand manner” painting of historical, religious, and mythic subjects. On the other hand, successful Italian still-life artists found ample patronage in their day. Furthermore, women painters, few as they were, commonly chose or were restricted to painting still life; Giovanna Garzoni, Laura Bernasconi, Maria Theresa van Thielen, and Fede Galizia are notable examples. Many leading Italian artists in other genre, also produced some still-life paintings. In particular, Caravaggio applied his influential form of naturalism to still life. His Basket of Fruit (c. 1595–1600) is one of the first examples of pure still life, precisely rendered and set at eye level. Though not overtly symbolic, this painting was owned by Cardinal Federico Borromeo and may have been appreciated for both religious and aesthetic reasons. Jan Bruegel painted his Large Milan Bouquet (1606) for the cardinal, as well, claiming that he painted it ‘fatta tutti del natturel’ (made all from nature) and he charged extra for the extra effort. These were among many still-life paintings in the cardinal’s collection, in addition to his large collection of curios. Among other Italian still life, Bernardo Strozzi’s The Cook is a “kitchen scene” in the Dutch manner, which is both a detailed portrait of a cook and the game birds she is preparing. In a similar manner, one of Rembrandt’s rare still-life paintings, Little Girl with Dead Peacocks combines a similar sympathetic female portrait with images of game birds. In Catholic Italy and Spain, the pure vanitas painting was rare, and there were far fewer still-life specialists. In Southern Europe there is more employment of the soft naturalism of Caravaggio and less emphasis on hyper-realism in comparison with Northern European styles.In France, painters of still lifes (nature morte) were influenced by both the Northern and Southern schools, borrowing from the vanitas paintings of the Netherlands and the spare arrangements of Spain.

“Taking pictures is like tiptoeing into the kitchen late at night and stealing Oreo cookies.”— Diane Arbus KINFOLK

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Appaman is inspired by, and named after, the childhood companion of founder and designer Harald Husum. While growing up in Norway, Husum befriended a corduroy ape named Appaman. Together they traveled the fields and fjords of their native land, sharing many fantastic adventures. Appaman reflects the whimsical spirit of those youthful times and celebrates the unbreakable bond between a boy and his ape. Appaman has a unique Scandinavian perspective on Ameripop iconic imagery. Husum finds inspiration everyday on the mean streets of Brooklyn and translates it into his ever changing palette of vibrant garments. Every season new pieces are created, and tried and true favorites are updated. Launched in the Summer of 2003. Appaman has grown at a steady pace, adding to the collection every season, expanding with fun pieces and exploring new lines. Although Appaman is growing we never forget our commitment to customer service and garment quality. So far, so good, and the fantastic adventures keep on coming. Give your kid some street cred, wear Appaman.


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The Beach


The ‘I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.’ - Joseph Spence

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Look up at the cerulean blue sky. Feel the warm sugar sand between your toes. Find inner peace with all of the Gulf Coast beauty that surrounds you. It’s so easy to be relaxed here.

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Change is constant. Good or bad, sometimes you have to just ride the waves of life until the tide turns—and it always does. 48

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‘Driven by style’


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Credits


B E R L I N “An idea is salvation by imagination.” – Frank Lloyd Wright

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The German capital, Berlin, is in the middle of a makeover. After decades of being split between East and West, it was united when the Berlin Wall fell 17 years ago. The East is being renovated or rebuilt. Berliners say that’s not just a physical change, but a political and emotional one, too

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One of the newest construction sites of the new Berlin is Alexanderplatz -- Alexander Square. It was a central meeting place during communist rule in East Germany. It’s not very pretty right now -- all concrete and people in a hurry. Trains and subways from all directions stop here. Trolleys glide right through crowds of pedestrians. The plan for Alexanderplatz is to surround it with eight high-rise office buildings. It’s a plan East Berlin architect Bruno Flierl hates. “This is, from the point of view of German unification, stupid and dangerous,” he says. “It’s occupation and not unification.” What Flierl really can’t stand is that the high buildings will block the view of East Berlin’s distinctive television tower -- a concrete stick with a big silver ball and an antenna on top. It was built as a symbol of East Germany’s power. In Flierl’s view, Berlin is being rebuilt by the perceived victors -- the winners from the West. Like architect Hans Kollhoff, who designed the plan for a new Alexanderplatz from his offices across town. “Now look, let’s face it,” Kollhoff says. The TV tower can be respected as a DDR (former East Germany) monument in East Berlin, but it cannot be respected by any means as a great piece of architecture.” Berlin’s most contested redevelopment is Palace Square, which, for 500 years was home to a fortress turned royal residence. The East German government blew up the royal palace after World War II and built a new one -- the Palace of the Republic -- where the Communist Party held conferences, and ordinary people enjoyed subsidized entertainment. Some Berliners want the whole royal palace back. But, so far, the plan is just to rebuild its walls, with modern buildings for arts and culture inside. Flierl says that bringing the palace back would further erase East Berlin while blindly honoring earlier times. City planners say Berlin, where the two sides of the Cold War rubbed up against each other, is hard to knit together precisely because of history and emotions. But despite the fights and feelings, architect Kollhoff says the new mix of buildings is much more thoughtful than it could have been. “It is still Berlin,” Kollhoff says. “There’s enough left of the East Berlin time, which you can recognize and locate. But, at the same time, there have been a lot of modern buildings going up to accomplish the needs of those people who live and work there, and who want to be in this place.”

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from the Berlin wall’s collapse to German reunification—with a gentle euphemism, “die Wende,” or “the changeover.”

More than 50 years have passed since 1961, when the Berlin wall was built, and 23 have passed since it was torn down. The plaques and crosses are just the overt reminders of the desperation felt by many living behind the wall in the formerly Communist German Democratic Republic (GDR)—a desperation that spurred some to find any way possible to escape repression, at great risk to their own life and that of their families. Scientists were not immune to the spying and harassment suffered by ordinary citizens of the GDR. They too were under surveillance by the Ministry of State Security, or Stasi for short, and were prodded to show loyalty to the regime, which sometimes meant reporting on the activities of coworkers. But on November 9, 1989, everything changed. Against the backdrop of months of protests that had begun in Leipzig and then spread across the GDR, Communist Party officials met for a rather mundane General Assembly. The group decided to relax travel restrictions to the West in order to appease protestors— but critically, the decision did not include a detailed plan for implementation. After the assembly Günter Schabowski, a Communist Party official who had missed the travel-relaxation discussions, gave a press conference. As he read out a rather lackluster list of the day’s achievements—in which was buried the plan to ease travel restrictions—journalists asked when the new travel rules would be enacted. In the now quintessential example of how an improvised answer can change the course of history, Schabowski waffled and then answered “sofort”—“im62

DIRECTORY

mediately.” As West Berlin radio and television announced the new freedom to travel, people on the East side of the wall who had tuned into the German news flocked to several border-crossing stations. The station guards were quickly overwhelmed; they had heard the same news reports and failed to reach any authorities who might have clarified the situation. Succumbing to the pressure of the crowds, the guards opened up barriers that were never to close again. The flood of people that spread to the West and the subsequent reunification of Germany also had a massive impact on scientists in the former GDR. As teams of West German scientists traveled to the East to evaluate which institutes would remain open and which would be closed, thousands of former GDR scientists lost their jobs. Money flooded into the East, meant to build dozens of shiny new institutes indistinguishable from their Western counterparts. Some of these new institutes hosted researchers who worked in the former GDR, but many were led by West German or international scientists. Germans refer to the entire transformation—from the Berlin wall’s collapse to German reunification—with a gentle euphemism, “die Wende,” or “the changeover.” This simple word embodies the massive changes that occurred after the wall came down, including opening the Stasi’s huge archives to the public. Since 1989 many scientists who suffered behind the wall have taken stock of this past


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Complete starred clues by getting your “house” in order 1

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1. Epic tale 5. part of a bikini or a purse 10. *cowardly lad on “ The Simpsons” 13. Words exchanged at a wedding 14. Get up 15. L essen 16. *V irginia Woolf modernist masterpiece 18. Signs (or tattoos) 19. Unit of pointillism 20. Relaxed 22. El Al and Q uantas, to name two 27. 71% of the earth’s surface 30. Unrestrained 31. “Blue Velvet ” actress Rossellini 34. Main Character in Daniel Clowes’ “Ghost World ” 35. Kind of cabbage 36. Donkey 37. *David Mamet heist film (1987) 40. Shagg y animal whose Latin name is Bos mutus (“mute ox”) 43. ____ grrrl (feminist punk movement of the 1990s) 64

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44. Dirty books and magazines 48. P lace to hear Muzak 50. Word that must be added to all starred clues, in keeping with this issue’s theme 51. Frozen rain 52. Added on 55. Iron 58. Web address 59. Soul singer Redding 61. Nourishing winter meal ser ved in a bowl 67. *Ever yday, nothing special beverage ser ved by restaurants 68. Screenwriter Sorkin 69. Cat also known as a mountain lion, cougar, or panther 70. Part of a Chicken (or a Piano) 71. *The fiddle leaf fig you keep forgetting to water 72. W hat jeans do if you cut them into shorts  

3. “ W hat ’s L ove ___To Do W ith It ” (Tina Turner Jam) 4. Campfire byproduct 5. Social event famously hosted by Gertrude stein 6. Cliché 7. 18-wheel truck 8. Arthur of 1970s tennis 9. Animal rights org. 10. Anti-apartheid revolutionar y 11. Annoy 12. “___ Liaisons Dangereuses” 15. Work of art 17. Either of the two subjects of “Grey Gardens” 21. Buckwheat noodle varieties 22. *Tavern 23. Tiny charged particle 24. King in French 25. Topic in Michael Pollan book “How to Change Your Mind ” 26. Singer married to Ava Gardner and Mia Farrow 28. “ The New Yorker” critic Hilton ___ 29. “Illmatic” Rapper 32. Actor Shepard of “Paris, Texas” 33. Mimic 37. Give a speech

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38. In good physical shape 39. Sticky ooze-y stuff 40. Seminal UK prog rock band 41. Ever ything 42. *Marilynne Robinson novel 44. Prodigal 45. Slang for coffee (or some thing that might get on your boots) 46. Function 47. Poet Hughes who was married to Sylvia P lath 49. stanza in hip hop 50. “Inferno” is the Italian word for it 53. Wear 54. Type of shirt or dress fabric 56. Smack 57. F lippered marine mammals with whiskers 59. A group of this nocturnal animal is called a “parliament ” 60. Ascot or bolo, for example 62. American pro-gun org. 63. Number on a bottle in your beach bag 64. *1982 hit Madness song 65. Mia in “Pulp Fiction” 66. Compensate


THE LAST WORD Is it possible to anticipate the life span of a trend? To close the Architectue Issue, Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen founding partner of Copenhagen-based Norm Architects and Kinfolk contributing editor - shares his tips for making design decisions that will stand the test of time.

You will always be a product of your time, whether you try to fight it or not. However, if I see something suddenly turn into a trend, I tend to be cautious of going down that route. I advise clients to invest in durable, simple, natural and timeless solutions when it comes to the main elements of interior architecture – walls, floors, ceilings and windows. The same goes for more expensive built-in elements like kitchens. Then you can always play around with the framework; looks fittings, furniture, textiles and artworks, in order to make your space feel contemporary. After the global financial crisis in 2008, there has been a clear tendency to stray away from postmodernism in design and architecture, and a renaissan-

ce of natural and more minimal projects. In cultures of poverty, the artifacts seem to be simple, durable, natural and long lasting. A timeless icon is something so simple that it makes very little noise in a space but has a design language that stands out. That very notion is reflected in our approach to architecture and design, where the main idea is to have spaces and furniture serve its user rather than be a means of artistic expression. We don’t consider it a revolutionizing movement, but a subtle rebellion against the trend-driven. While aesthetics and technology have changed, basic tools of everyday life remain the same: A chair is still a chair, a glass is still a glass. KINFOLK

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AGENT PROVOC ATEUR

DIOR

LOUIS VUITTON

agentprovocateur.com

dior.com

louisvuitton.com

AGNONA

EDIE PARKER

MAISON MARGIELA

agnona.com

edie-parker.com

maisonmargiela.com

ALLEN EDMONDS

FALKE

MAISON MICHEL

allenedmonds.com

falke.com

michel-paris.com

ANDERSON & SHEPPARD

FILIPPA K

MARC JACOBS

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f ilippa-k.com

marcjacobs.com

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FRAMA

MARK CROSS

apc.fr

framacph.com

markcross.com

ATELIER SWAROVSKI

GANNI

M A RQ U E S ’A L M E I DA

atelierswarovski.com

ganni.com

marquesalmeida.com

B I L LY R E I D

GENERAL EYEWEAR

MATICEVSKI

billyreid.com

generaleyewear.com

tonimaticevski.com

BRIONI

GIANVITO ROSSI

MERCEDES CASTILLO

brioni.com

gianvitorossi.com

mercedescastillo.com

B R O O K LY N T A I L O R S

HAKUI

M R P.

brooklyn-tailors.com

hakui-shop.com

mrporter.com

BROOKS BROTHERS

H AY

MULBERRY

brooksbrothers.com

hay.dk

mulberry.com

BUILDING BLOCK

HELMUT LANG

NEIL BARRET

building--block.com

helmutlang.com

neilbarret.com

CAUSSE

HERMES

PAUL SMITH

causse-gantier.fr

hermes.com

paulsmith.com

CHANEL

IRWIN GARDEN

RAPHAELE CANOT

chanel.com

irwingarden.com

raphaelecanot.com

CHARLIE ALLEN BESPOKE

ISOTONER

ROCHAS

charlieallen.vom

isotoner.com

rochas.com

C HARVET

JW ANDERSON

R YA N L O

charvet.com

j-w-anderson.com

ryanlo.co.uk

CORNELIANI

J.M. WESTON

SANDRO

corneliani.com

jmweston.com

sandro-paris.com

COS

K VA D R AT

SHUSHU/TONG

cosstores.com

kvadrat.com

shushutongstudio.com

DAKS

L ABOUR AND WAIT

THE ROW

daks.com

labourandwait.co.uk

therow.com

DE FURSAC

LAURENCE BOSSION

TODD SNYDER

defursac.fr

laurencebossion.com

toddsnyder.com

DEREK L AM 10 CROSBY

LOEWE

WALLPAPERSTORE*

dereklam.com

loewe.com

store.wallpaper.com KINFOLK

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Behomm

Community Home Exchange for Creatives and Design Lovers

Behomm.com


I S S U E 31

COVER

P. 6 6 - 7 9

Credits

Photographer Renate de Graaf Stylist Camille-Joséphine Teisseire Assistant Stylist Céline Gaulhiac Hair Taan Doan Makeup Cyril Laine Model Suzie Bird at Elite Paris Location Hotel Plaza Athénéé, Paris

Set Design Lianna Fowler Hair Rebecca Chang Makeup Liz Daxauer at Caren using Bobbi Brown Casting Sarah Bunter Model Bibi Abdulkadir at Storm Management Model Malik Al Jerrari at Supa Model Management Assistants Harry Serjan Benjamin Whitley

Suzie wears a dress by Dior, hat by Maison Michel, earrings by Raphaele Canot on White Brid and gloves by Isotoner. P. 2 8

Words Pip Usher P. 3 4

Hair & Makeup Lucy Gibson P. 37

Retouching Matilda Persson at La Machine P. 3 8 - 3 9

Images courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery

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Hair & Makeup Ashleigh B. Ciucci KINFOLK

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Assistant Stylist Céline Gaulhiac Hair Taan Doan Makeup Cyril Laine Model Alexis Petit at Elite Paris Model Suzie Bird at Elite Paris Location Hotel Plaza Athénéé, Paris P.16 6 - 17 5

Retouching Matilda Persson at La Machine Special Thanks : Hotel Plaza Athénéé Kenza Oweiss 69


ouur

ouurcollection.com


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