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TOP LAWYERS

COREY JACK. Business consultant and founder of the nonprofit Legacy Institute for Economic Attainment

ZACHARY RICHARD. Renowned musician and French Cajun culture ambassador from Scott

PG 43

BREE SARGENT. Education director at the Acadiana Center for the Arts working to integrate the arts into local grammar schools

TRAILBLAZERS

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APRIL/MAY 2020

ACADIANIANS WHO ARE DEFINING AND REDEFINING THE REGION


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april/may VO LUM E 39 NUM B E R 02

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L AGNIAPPE......................................... 06

A Little Extra

features

NOTE DE L’EDITEUR............................10

Editor’s Note NOUVELLES DE VILLES....................... 12

News Briefs

home+style L A MAISO N.. ......................................... 16

Art House A home in the heart of Lafayette provides a fresh start, while preserving precious memories L’ART................................................... 20

Worth a Thousand Words Lake Charles photographer Tim Fontenot focuses his lens on South Louisiana’s landscape of visual poetry

culture LETTRES D’AMOUR . . ........................... 58

food+drink

Lost and Found Learning and reviving the Kréyòl language

SUR LE MENU . . .................................... 2 4

PLUS Ç A CHANGE . . ............................. 60

Spicy Adventure Springtime at Avery Island and Restaurant 1868

Power Couple Louis and Ashlee Michot create and promote Cajun culture with an artistic, modern, multimedia and multidiciplinary approach

DE L A CUISINE.. .................................. 26

Crazy for Crawfish The ideal menu for a surplus of tasty tails

LES PERSONNES.. ............................... 62

Of Blazing Berries and Bourbon Vestals’ live-fire hearth adds char and a kiss of smoke to original craft cocktails infused with flaming flavors

A Collective Effort For George Marks, an unexpected detour back home to Arnaudville turned into a permanent homecoming that spawned a canvas-free, non-profit masterpiece thanks to hundreds of volunteers who continue to make NUNU a “Living Piece of Art”

VOYAGES............................................ 30

EN FRANÇ AIS, S ’IL VOUS PL AÎT........ 6 4

Beach Bound Ocean Springs and Biloxi, Mississippi brim with beachy fun

Le Mississipi français La Louisiane est née sur la côte du golfe

RECETTES DE COCKTAILS................. 28

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Trailblazers

Top Lawyers

Acadianians who are defining and redefining the region

324 lawyers in 40 specialties


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What’s your favorite place to go on the Gulf Coast? LAGNIAPPE

A LITTLE EXTRA

M A N AG I N G E D I TO R

LEARN FRENCH

Errol Laborde

CO PY E D I TO R

(n) lawyer. Also, avocado.

Sarah George

L E A D P H OTO G RA P H E R W E B E D I TO R STY L E E D I TO R

Winner Magazine of the Year

Ashley McLellan

Liz Clearman

A RT D I R EC TO R

“I love a quick weekend trip to Biloxi or Gulf Shores. Both are pretty, easy to get to and perfect for family trips or a weekend with your friends.” Kelly Massicot

2019

Melanie Warner Spencer

A S S O C IAT E E D I TO R

Avocat

translation: After leaving court, the lawyer ate a lunch of a salad with sliced avocados.

Danley Romero

Kelly Massicot

Marie Elizabeth Oliver

E D I TO R IA L I N T E R N

Alice Phillips

ADVERTI SI NG VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES

Colleen Monaghan

“I like to go to Bay St. Louis for a fun day trip. It’s a great place to shop for antiques, enjoy the beach and then have lunch and cocktails at Trapani’s Eatery downtown.” Ashley McLellan

(504) 830-7215 / Colleen@acadianaprofile.com S A L ES M A NAG E R

Olivia Fontaine

Gold Food Feature

Silver Hed & Dek

Emily Andras

Fun facts: Every year, over 150 musicians eat crawfish for the first time at the festival. festivalinternational.org

Silver Photo Series Bronze Portrait Series

P RO D U C T I O N D ES I G N E R S

Rosa Balaguer Meghan Rooney

Inaugurated in 1987, the Cajun-andFrancophone-focused Festival International and has grown by at least 600 percent.

Silver Magazine Writer of the Year

Sarah Duckert

PRODU C TION

T RA F F I C CO O R D I NATO R T RA F F I C A S S I STA N T

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ADM I N I STRATION D I ST R I B U T I O N M A NAG E R O F F I C E M A NAG E R

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AU D I E N C E D E V E LO PM E N T

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For subscriptions call (504) 830-7231 C H I E F E X EC U T I V E O F F I C E R P R ES I D E N T

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Gold Department

D I G I TA L O P E RAT I O N S M A NAG E R

Festival International de Louisiane brings in 300,000 music-loving attendees annually, making it one of the country’s biggest international music and arts festivals. This year, the fest features over 62 bands from 25 countries on seven stages. Though festival entry remains free, it takes $1.7 million to put on the fest.

Bronze Magazine Writer of the Year

Gold Art Direction of a Single Story

Jeanel Luquette

Abbie Dugruise

P R O D U C T I O N M A NAG E R

Silver Photographer of the Year

Gold Magazine Photographer

DIG I TAL

FESTIVAL INTERNATIONAL DE LOUISIANE

Gold Photo Series

Gold Overall Art Direction

MAR KETI NG E V E N T CO O R D I NATO R

Gold Art Direction Single Story

2018

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D I R EC TO R O F M A R K ET I N G & E V E N TS

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DID YOU KNOW?

INTERNATIONAL AND REGIONAL MAGAZINE ASSOCIATION

EDI TOR IAL E D I TO R I N C H I E F

example: Apres être sorti du tribunal, l’avocat a déjeuné en mangeant une salade avec des avocats tranchés.

AWARDS

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E X EC U T I V E V I C E P R E S I D E N T

“Perdido Key Beach, Florida, for sure! It’s a walk away from the Flora-Bama Lounge, where they have the best Bushwacker cocktail, [which is] Kahlua, Bacardi rum and other top-secret ingredients in a frozen drink.” Rosa Balaguer Arostegui

Errol Laborde

Bronze Reader Service Article Bronze Travel Package 2017

Gold Overall Art Direction Gold Magazine Photographer of the Year Gold Art Direction of a Single Story Gold Food Feature Silver Cover Bronze Magazine Writer of the Year 2016

Gold Overall Art Direction

1 1 0 V E T E R A N S B LV D . / S U I T E 1 2 3 / M E TA I R I E , L A 7 0 0 0 5 / ( 5 0 4 ) 8 2 8 - 1 3 8 0 / ( 8 7 7 ) 2 2 1 - 3 5 1 2 1 2 8 D E M A N A D E / S U I T E 1 0 4 / L A FAY E T T E , L A 7 0 5 0 3 / ( 3 3 7 ) 2 3 5 - 7 9 1 9 E X T. 2 3 0 Acadiana Profile (ISSN 0001-4397) is published bimonthly with a special issue in September by Renaissance Publishing LLC, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 (504) 828-1380 and 128 Demanade, Suite 104, Lafayette, LA 70503 (337) 235-7919 ext. 230. Subscription rate: One year $10; Foreign Subscriptions vary. Periodicals postage paid at Lafayette, LA, and additional mailing entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Acadiana Profile, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005. Copyright 2020 Renaissance Publishing LLC. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. The trademark Acadiana Profile is registered. Acadiana Profile is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork, even if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. The opinions expressed in Acadiana Profile are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the magazine or owner.

Gold Magazine Photographer of the Year Gold Art Direction of a Single Story Silver Photo Series Bronze Magazine Writer of the Year Bronze Portrait Series


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ÉQ U I P E D E V E N T E

Rebecca Taylor Sales Manager 337-298-4424 337-235-7919 Ext. 230 Rebecca@AcadianaProfile.com

Colleen Monaghan Vice President of Sales 504-830-7215 Colleen@AcadianaProfile.com

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NOTE DE L’EDI TEU R

In Other News BY LISA LEBLANC-BERRY

Follow Those Froittoirs

THE ISSUE YOU HOLD IN YOUR HANDS puts the “profile” in Acadiana Profile. In it, we have profiles of three lawyers who are so at the top of their game, they are literally part of the coveted “Top Lawyers” list. They share a little about themselves, along with the story of their toughest case. We are also back with a feature we launched last year, Acadiana Profile’s Trailblazers. These profiles shine a spotlight on Acadianians who are making an impact on the region either through the work they do in their respective careers, via philanthropic endeavors or both. To say these Trailblazers are an inspiration is an understatement. They are enacting change in the community, changing the game in their field and, in many cases, changing people’s lives for the better. We held an event to honor our inaugural Trailblazers (more on this year’s honoree party below) and to hear them tell their own stories was humbling to say the least. At the time, I said something that bears repeating: Often, we look to famous sports figures, actors, activists, scientists, artists, entrepreneurs and so forth as role models. Of course, there is nothing wrong with that and we should look for inspiration from people who have achieved national and international success. But many times, there are heroes right in our backyard. This issue celebrates those individuals who are true, Acadiana Trailblazers. Please join us May 20 at the Grouse Room. Help us applaud our Trailblazers in person during our party. I guarantee you’ll be inspired. (As of press time, there were a number of coronavirus-related cancellations, so please subscribe to our newsletter, follow us on social media and visit the website for up-to-date information on the Trailblazers event, and most importantly, stay healthy.) Cheers!

Melanie Warner Spencer, Managing Editor 504-830-1380 • Melanie@AcadianaProfile.com

Get more Acadiana Profile at acadianaprofile.com and by following us on Instagram and Facebook.

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NEW ORLEANS Want to bring your Cajun moves to the New Orleans Jazz Fest? Head to the Fairgrounds (April 23-May 3) where you can twirl away to Chubby Carrier & the Bayou Swamp Band, BeauSoleil avec Michael Doucet, Zachary Richard, Terrance Simien & the Zydeco Experience, Lil’ Nathan, Dwayne Dopsie and the Zydeco Hellraisers, Lost Bayou Ramblers and Jo-El Sonnier among others (nojazzfest.com).

SCOTT, BREAUX BRIDGE, LAFAYETTE, ARNAUDVILLE, ST. MARTINVILLE

Allons Cycle Zydeco! Hop on your bike for the 2020 Cycle Zydeco (April 15-19), which coincides with the Scott Boudin Festival (included in the cycling itinerary). Routes take bikers to Acadiana towns for live concerts, Cajun cuisine and scavenger hunts. Shuttles are available to and from hotels and events. Participants receive Zydeco Bucks as lagniappe during check-in (cyclezydeco. org/scott-boudinfestival-2020).


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NO UVEL L ES DE VI L L ES

BY L I S A L E B L A N C- B E R R Y

Bravo to Robichaux RAYNE Mayor Chuck Robichaux of Rayne has been elected vice-chairman of the Louisiana Energy and Power Authority board of directors for 2020. LEPA is a joint-action agency comprised of 17 member municipalities, each owning their own municipal electrical systems.

BREAUX BRIDGE

Prêt, Feu, Partez! Owners are lining up their pet crawfish for a nail-biting, 8-foot crawfish race at the annual Breaux Bridge Crawfish Festival (May 1-3) featuring dance lessons and competitions, crawfish eating contests, a crawfish etouffée cook-off (free samples) and abundant crawfish creations. Three stages of Cajun and zydeco headliners include Chubby Carrier, Wayne Toups, Corey Ledet, Geno Delafose and Steve Riley & the Mamou Playboys (bbcrawfest.com).

MUSIC

Michael’s Makeover

Going Wild LAFAYETTE Wildcat Brothers Distillery, operated by David Meaux and Tait Martin (Rank Wildcat Spirits), has acquired the Gator Cove Restaurant property after the owners, Peggy and Jay Voorhies, ended their 40 years in business. Plans include reviving the building into a larger “craft culture concept” with a modern twist. Chef Paul Ayo, who closed his Avec Bacon Café Feb. 2, has been appointed Chief Culinary Officer of Wildcat Brothers (wildcatbrothers.com).

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MAURICE

Trill Chill A 1,500-square-foot frozen yogurt venue, Chill-House, opens in May (9611 Maurice Ave. in Maurice) with ample seating designed to accommodate patrons gathering for sweet treats while listening to live bands performing. Chill-House is partnering with local vendors to offer special native flavors CHILL-HOUSE / FACEBOOK.COM /CHILLHOUSEFROYO

AC ADIANA PROFILE APRIL/M AY 2020

BeauSoleil’s leader, Michael Doucet (recipient of Folk Alliance International’s 2020 Living Artist Lifetime Achievement Award) has dropped a transformative new solo album, Lâcher Prise (“Let Go”), with his new ancillary band, Michael Doucet avec Lâcher Prise. The Grammyaward-winning Cajun fiddler recorded an eclectic mix of 10 songs in just three days at Dockside Studio in Maurice. His new “Southwest Louisiana music” fuses energetic swamp-soul with New Orleans R&B and French Caribbean vibes (Compass Records).


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D OW N S I Z I N G I N ST Y L E I N L A FAY ET T E


HOME+STYL E / L A M A ISO N

Art House A home in the heart of Lafayette provides a fresh start, while preserving precious memories BY M A R I E E L I Z A B E T H O L I V E R P H OTO S BY H AY L E I S M I T H

D OW N S I Z I N G I S DAU NTI N G, E S PE C I A LLY A F TE R

living in the same home for 30 years. Combine that with a homeowner whose lifelong passion includes art and collectibles, and the last thing you might expect is for her to describe the entire process as “quite easy.” “I asked myself, ‘What would you do if you could start from scratch, right now? What would you choose?’” says the homeowner. She says this gem tucked inside Lafayette’s River Ranch neighborhood represented a

fresh start and an opportunity to focus on the important things in life. To lead the renovation, she brought in Clare Broussard, of M. Clare Designs, with the goal of moving outside her comfort zone, while still having the comfort of her favorite things. “I wanted to preserve the light and open feeling of the house, as well as have a bit of fun with color and fabric,” the homeowner says. Inspired by the homeowner’s collections, Broussard says item No. 1 on her agenda was

M. CLARE DESIGNS, LLC / M.CLAREDESIGNS@YAHOO.COM / HOUSE OF BROUSSARD / SHOPHOUSEOFBROUSSARD.COM

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Broussard incorporated custom drapery and textiles throughout the space to complement the homeowner’s rich tapestry of art and antiques. The white walls and ample natural light give the home a more contemporary feel, while allowing treasures — such as this jade chess set inherited from her mother-in-law’s family — to shine.


ABOUT THE DESIGNER:

Clare Broussard is the owner and principal designer of Acadiana-based M. Clare Designs and House of Broussard, a home interiors and gift shop in Broussard.


painting the home’s entire interior Benjamin Moore’s White Dove. The designer recommends a balanced white wall color to reflect the vibrancy of bold art and textiles. Broussard says she started fresh with custom furniture to fit the space and curate the homeowner’s collections. “Clare helped me realize that the things I was most attached to were not furnishings, but my art and accessories — my memories,” says the homeowner. “She made sure these special items were incorporated into my spaces in new ways.” Broussard designed a custom cabinet for the breakfast room to display collectibles, and hung paintings strategically throughout the home, creating a gallery effect in the main hallway. The homeowner says her favorite pieces reflect her and her late husband’s travels through Europe and Asia. She is especially fond of outdoor statues they discovered in a Bangkok antique shop.

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Each room transports you to a different place and time. A walk through the home’s eclectic living spaces reveals everything from Venetian masks, western bronze sculptures and Japanese cordial glasses — but not a trace of clutter. Broussard attributes this curated effect to the homeowner’s artistic eye and investment in quality pieces.  “Always buy pieces you love,” advises Broussard. “They will move with you from home to home and from room to room.” n

Broussard’s selections for the breakfast room, including a custom chandelier and acrylic table, were chosen to showcase the natural beauty of the surrounding gardens. The homeowner says her favorite perch is sitting in her kitchen looking out into the breakfast area and the den. “It feels very spacious, yet very private,” she adds.


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HOM E+STYL E / L’A RT

Worth a Thousand Words Lake Charles photographer Tim Fontenot focuses his lens on South Louisiana’s landscape of visual poetry BY J O H N R . K E M P P O R T R A I T BY R O M E R O & R O M E R O

A S A 19TH - CE NTU RY E N G LI S H P O ET O N CE SA I D,

“Art is man’s nature; nature is God’s art.” To Lake Charles photographer Tim Fontenot, capturing the beauty of “God’s art” is a spiritual journey that has taken him from Southwest Louisiana’s bayous and swamps to abandoned TIM FONTENOT / TIM-FONTENOT.COM

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old farmlands that are slowly returning to their natural state. “Landscape photography is my passion,” says the 69-year-old Fontenot, who was born in Lake Charles and grew up in nearby Woodlawn and Moss Bluff where he now lives with

his wife Gerry. “I am an artist. Creating art is what I love to do.” Fontenot’s impressive photographs of the Louisiana landscape are about the natural beauty and visual poetry of the land. His images of a time-weathered barn decaying in a field near Bell City or a giant sunburst lotus floating on black water in Lake Martin or a stand of red cypress silhouetted by warm autumn sunlight are like sonnets to a poet. His images testify that few places outside Louisiana can compete with the beauty of a marsh glowing a radiant gold as blackened storm clouds approach or a brilliant sunset at Toledo Bend where blood-red clouds absorb that last burst of light as the burning waferlike sun descends below the horizon. To Fontenot, each moment in there is like a prayer. “I see God present in nature more than anywhere else on Earth,” Fontenot once said while reflecting upon that spiritual connection to the land. “His handiwork is all around me and sometimes I say out loud, ‘Lord, You are somethin’ else!’ I want to create images that make him smile.” To capture those reverent moments, Fontenot prefers the warm light of early mornings when the natural world awakens in a mist with songbirds and the freshness of a new day. He also likes to shoot in late afternoons when the retreating sun throws long, hard shadows across the land. “A new day,” Fontenot says, “brings new adventures and new opportunities. The qualities of the morning light are softer with more quiet surroundings. I like late afternoons and evenings as well. The angles of shadows and light chasing each other reveal objects previously unseen. The light seems to be harder and it reveals details more readily than morning light. Evening light seems to fade into darkness too quickly. The longer I stay, the longer the exposures, and the more mosquito bites I collect.” n


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ÇA C’EST BON

SHRIMP P O O R BOY F ROM AV E RY I S L A N D’ S R E STAU RA N T 1 868

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FO O D+DR I NK / S U R L A M E NU

Spicy Adventure Springtime at Avery Island and Restaurant 1868 BY J Y L B E N S O N P H OTO S BY J O S E P H V I D R I N E

LOC ATED 10 MILES SOUTH OF NE W IBERIA , AVERY

Island is a 2,200-acre salt dome packed hundreds of feet thick with the mineral and mined since the 18th century. It is also home to Tabasco hot pepper sauce, founded by Edmund McIlhenny in the 1860s. The island is lush with subtropical plants thriving adjacent to centuries-old live oaks, heavy with Spanish moss. A gardening enthusiast, E.A. McIlhenny, Edmund’s son, planted 176 acres of gardens, which he opened to the public in 1935 as Jungle Gardens.Today his collection of mature azaleas bursts into vibrant bloom at the height of spring, creating a brilliant environment for the wildlife — alligators, bears, bobcats

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(left) A souvenir glass is included when you order a build-your-own Tabasco Bloody Mary (above) The Cajun Pirogue Sampler includes red beans with sausage, crawfish étouffée and chicken and sausage gumbo (right) The Messy Mac sandwich is a BBQ smoked pulled pork sandwich infused with Tabasco Chipotle Pepper Sauce RESTAURANT 1868 / LA-329. AVERY ISLAND. 337-369-4226. TABASCO.COM


Bonus Bite Picturesque Arnaudville’s Étouffée Festival began as a fundraiser for the Little Flower School in 1985, and was initially established by the Knights of Columbus. Since that time, the school has closed, but the church parish continues the tradition of the festival to help offset the costs of insuring the school buildings, which are still used by the parish for other purposes. This year the annual spring festival will be held April 24-26. The Mayor’s Cook-off features a variety of étouffées, including crawfish, seafood, vegetable, and wild game. The cook-off will take place on Saturday and judging begins at 11:30 a.m. Festival activities also include carnival rides, live music, dancing, bingo, shopping at the St. Therese Boutique and an auto show. The boutique will be open from 1-5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday with antique and vintage items for sale. The auto show will be held Sunday, from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Arnaudville Étouffée Festival. 370 Main St. Arnaudville. cajuntravel.com/event/etouffee-festival

MENU

TRY THIS

❶ PEPPER JELLY BOUDIN

A hunk of the familiar pork and rice “sausage” the size of a baby’s leg arrives drizzled with a mildly spicy pepper jelly. This alone should be enough to fill most people up. It will set you back $3.50.

❷ CAJUN CRAWFISH NACHOS

Tortilla chips topped with Pepper Barrel Crawfish Étouffée and garnished with a choice of nacho cheese, shredded cheddar cheese, jalapeños and sour cream. $9

❸ and deer — guests may happen upon while walking or driving along the lagoons that trail Bayou Petite Anse. A prominent statue of Buddha, reported to be over 900 years old, is visible in a temple within a habitat that is home to thousands of birds, egrets and herons among them. Also open to the public, exhibits throughout the Tabasco factory reveal the lengthy process through which the capsicum frutescens peppers travel from the bushes upon which they grow to become the sauce — now available in eight different varieties — that sits atop dinner tables worldwide. Tabasco sauce is featured prominently on the menu at the complex’s Restaurant 1868, a casual, rustic space with a deep wrap-around porch that beckons when the weather is fine. Leave any pretense for fine dining at the door when you enter this cafeteria-style joint, complete with disposable serveware. There is not a frill to be found but it is a solid backdrop for hearty Louisiana flavors at bargain prices and the Bloody Mary bar is stocked with everything you could want to adorn your booze-infused salad in a keepsake glass for $10. n

CAJUN PIROGUE SAMPLER

A trio of generous samples of red beans and sausage, crawfish étouffée and a sausage gumbo made with a sturdy roux. $13.50

❹ MESSY MAC

Smoked pulled pork sandwich infused with Tabasco Chipotle Pepper Sauce served with coleslaw and a side of chips. $8.50

❺ TABASCO CAKE SLICE

Ooey gooey-style cake infused with classic Tabasco sauce. $4.25

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FO O D+DR I NK / D E L A C U I S I N E

Crazy for Crawfish The ideal menu for a surplus of tasty tails BY M A R C E L L E B I E N V E N U P H OTO & S T Y L I N G BY E U G E N I A U H L

ON ANY GIVEN SPRING AFTERNOON OR

evening, the fragrance of crawfish boiling from backyards wafts through my neighborhood. A friend calls it “eau de printemps.” There’s nothing more mouthwatering in my book. If I’m not invited to join my neighbors, I crash their gathering, bringing along dip and chips or maybe a quickly put-together dessert. My crawfish-farming friends and a friend who plies the waters of the Atchafalaya Basin for our freshwater crustaceans are hoping for a bountiful season this year. Many moons ago, before we had ponds, crawfish primarily came from the Basin and the season was usually from January to June, but now we sometimes see pond crawfish arriving on the market before Christmas and the season most likely will last until around Mother’s Day. According to the Louisiana Crawfish Promotion and Research Board, “Louisiana leads the nation, producing more than 90 percent of the domestic crop. More than 1,600 farmers produce crawfish in some 111,000 acres of ponds ... The total economic impact on the Louisiana economy exceeds $300 million annually, and more than 7,000 people depend directly or indirectly on the crawfish industry.” Like many other crawfish fans, I can’t get enough of them and there are times I offer two or three courses featuring them at one gathering. I have yet to come up with a dessert with crawfish, but I’m sure someone has. Here is a menu that is ideal for a casual supper while watching the sun dip into the western sky. n

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STARTER

Crawfish Spring Rolls with Vegetables These can be served as a first course. Offer hot mustard or Creole mustard as a condiment to accompany the rolls. M A K E S A B O U T 1 0 S ER V I N G S (2 E AC H)

¼ cup olive oil

My father was of the opinion that any seafood meal was to be followed by a lemony dessert. Make the pie ahead of time and store it, lightly covered, in the refrigerator.

1 cup finely chopped or shredded green cabbage 1 carrot, thinly cut into matchstick strips ¼ cup matchstick strips celery root ½ cup matchstick strips red bell pepper ½ cup matchstick strips yellow bell pepper 2 tablespoons very thinly sliced scallion ½ teaspoon minced fresh ginger ½ teaspoon minced lime zest 1 teaspoon minced garlic ¼ teaspoon finely chopped cilantro 1 teaspoon soy sauce ½ teaspoon rice vinegar ⅛ teaspoon ground coriander

Salt and white pepper to taste

5-6 dashes Tabasco sauce 1 pound peeled crawfish tails

egg roll or spring roll wrappers

egg wash (whisk together 1 egg and 1 tablespoon water)

vegetable or peanut oil for deep frying

1

Heat olive oil in a very large skillet over medium-high heat. Add cabbage, carrots, celery root, bell peppers and scallions and cook, stirring, for 1 to 2 minutes, or until just wilted.

2

Remove from heat and add ginger, lime zest, garlic, cilantro, soy, vinegar, coriander, salt, pepper, Tabasco and crawfish tails. Toss to mix well. Roll about one tablespoon of mixture in each wrapper, sealing edges with egg wash. (The rolls can be stored in the freezer at this point.)

MAIN COURSE

Crawfish Pie FOR DESSERT

Lemon Chess Pie

Preheat the oven to 350 F.

Beat 3 eggs and 1 cup sugar in a mixing bowl. Add ½ cup light corn syrup, 5⅓ tablespoons butter or margarine (melted), ⅓ cup sour cream, 1 tablespoon cornmeal, 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice, and ½ teaspoon pure vanilla extract. Mix thoroughly.

Pour mixture into 1 unbaked, 9-inch pie shell. Bake for 45 to 50 minutes or until mixture just sets. Cool slightly before serving. MAKES 1 PIE (SERVES 6 TO 8)

For the entrée, a wedge of crawfish pie and a salad is all you’ll need. I suggest a cool fruit salad. Seasonal berries and arugula tossed in a balsamic dressing and garnished with crumbled goat cheese or blue cheese is a good bet.

M A K E S 6 S ER V I N G S

½ stick (4 tablespoons) butter 1 cup chopped onions ½ cup chopped bell peppers ¼ cup chopped celery 1½ teaspoons salt ½ teaspoon cayenne ½ cup chopped canned tomatoes 1 pound crawfish tails 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour ½ cup water 2 tablespoons chopped green onions 1 tablespoon chopped parsley 1 (9-inch) pie crust

1 2

Preheat the oven to 375 F.

Melt butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onions, bell peppers and celery and cook, stirring until the vegetables are soft and golden, 6 to 8 minutes. Add salt, cayenne and tomatoes and cook, stirring occasionally, for about five minutes. Add crawfish tails and cook for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

3

Dissolve flour in water and add to pan. Stir for about 2 to 3 minutes, or until mixture thickens. Add green onions and parsley and stir to mix. Remove from heat and cool for about 30 minutes.

4

Pour crawfish mixture into pie crust. Place the pie on a baking sheet and bake for about 45 minutes, or until the edges of pie crust are golden. Cool for several minutes before cutting into wedges to serve.

3

Deep fry in hot oil until golden brown. Transfer to paper towels to drain. Serve warm.

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FO O D+D RIN K / R EC ET T ES D E CO C KTA ILS

MAKE AT HOME (IF YOU DARE)

Girls and Cigars

❶ BLACKBERRY SHRUB

Of Blazing Berries and Bourbon Vestal’s live-fire hearth adds char and a kiss of smoke to original craft cocktails infused with flaming flavors

Place 4 cups blackberries and 1 cup sugar in a small pot over (flamed) hot coals. Stir occasionally and let blackberry juices start to come out like a fruit compote. Once fruit has become liquid with small amount of blackberry chunks, take off fire and add more sugar, 1 cup apple cider vinegar and ½ cup Steen’s vinegar. Stir and let shrub sit for 3-5 days until desired taste. Add 1 teaspoon orange blossom water and strain mixture. Store in refrigerator up to 3 months.

BY L I S A L E B L A N C- B E R R Y P H OTO BY R O M E R O & R O M E R O

BASIL SYRUP W I T H T H E A P R I L O P E N I N G O F V E S TA L ,

Chef-owner Ryan Trahan’s new dining concept in downtown Lafayette, Paige Hanson is embellishing the award-winning King of American Seafood’s open-hearth theme with a craft cocktail program distinguished by live-fire elements. As bar director, she infuses flamed syrups and smoked shrubs, pork fat-washed vodkas and charred fruit garnishes to complement Vestal’s New American offerings, from grilled whole fish to small plates, ceviches, tartares and a raw bar with assorted half-shell oysters. A 15-foot open hearth commands center stage in the artfully renovated, 135-seat dining room with a patio attracting the weekend brunch bunch. “Aside from live-fire offerings, the menu is around 45 percent raw,” says Ryan, Executive Chef of Blue Dog until June, 2019. “I started working on this project in December 2018 after traveling for the Seafood Board. It’s a total departure from Blue Dog.

We’re using less oil, less cream-based sauces, more curry blends and California influences. It’s designed as an interactive experience, with an island built around the hearth so that diners can visit with chefs.” Among Vestal’s 10 new original cocktails is Girls and Cigars, an herbaceous libation flavored with an infusion of charcoal-grilled blackberries, finished with flamed lemon and served in Trahan’s antique coupe glassware. “It appeals to both sexes,” says Hanson. “Men go for bourbon and women enjoy the fruity component. Since I have a biology degree, I love the science of creating each cocktail utilizing elements of fire.” Sweet, tart and tantalizing, Girls and Cigars is undeniably bold, jazzed up with bourbon, basil, berries, orange blossom water and a citrusy finish. It has enough visual allure, heft and complexity for those night people making the scene at Vestal’s chic 25-seat cocktail bar. n

VESTAL RESTAURANT / 555 JEFFERSON ST. LAFAYETTE. CHECK THEM OUT ON FACEBOOK .

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Make a simple syrup with one- to-one ratio of cane sugar and water. Once sugar is dissolved, add fresh basil and fully blend. Strain syrup and store in refrigerator up to 2 months or freeze.

❸ FLAMING LEMON GARNISH

Peel or cut lemon peel. Put flame from lighter on edge of glass and squeeze peel side towards flame. Lemon oil sprays over cocktail giving fresh lemon flavor and aroma.

❹ COCKTAIL BUILD:

Add 2 ounces bourbon, blackberry shrub, basil syrup and ½ ounce fresh lemon juice into shaker. Add ice. Shake vigorously for 5 seconds and strain into coupe glass. Do lemon flame garnish and drop into glass. Enjoy.


FO O D+DR I NK / VOYAG ES

Beach Bound Ocean Springs and Biloxi, Mississippi brim with beachy fun BY C H E R É C O E N

THERE’S A BUZZ HAPPENING ON THE MISSISSIPPI

Gulf Coast, with new attractions and developments opening this year in Ocean Springs and Biloxi. From new hotels, resorts and breweries to urban axe throwing and golf cart rentals, there’s something for everyone. Just down the street from The Roost boutique hotel in Ocean Springs, owners Roxy and Ted Condrey are developing The Hotel Beatnik, inspired by the counterculture of the 1950s and ‘60s and the motor courts of the early 20th century. The four cabins and two Airstream trailers will open in June, retro in thought but including modern, albeit simple, styling. Just outside the accommodations will be a public area with fire pit, plunge pool and outdoor seating, a place to disconnect and relax. In addition, there will be special events offered, such as creating permeable artwork. “The concept is to do things here that you can’t do at home,” said Ted Condrey. “It’ll be unique,” he added. “We think people are looking for experiences instead of consistency.” The Beatnik on Porter Avenue will be part of The Collective, a space for creative enterprises such as The Book Porter bookstore, a brewery with pollinator garden where almost everything will be edible and a restaurant helmed by Chef Alex Perry, a James Beard semifinalist who runs the acclaimed Vestige restaurant in Ocean Springs. Porter has morphed into an innovative district, producing the eclectic Greenhouse with its menu of biscuits and The Roost hotel that contains The Wilbur speakeasy bar and Eat Drink Love market and café. “We like to coin it as the ‘Creative District,’” Condrey said. “I love Porter. It’s a great feel when you drive through this end of town.” Phase two of the development should open in a year, Condrey said. He suspects more creative businesses may open on Porter after The Collective is completed. “We don’t know what all of this becomes over time,” he said of the evolving street. “We’re hoping to be a little part of a community with a cool little vibe.” Downtown Ocean Springs is a short walk away and the quaint town offers delightful boutiques, art galleries and restaurants. In the other direction are Gulf beaches and one of the best places to watch the sunset on the coast.

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If you prefer to get off your feet, grab a golf cart at the new Downtown Cart Rentals. Be sure to stop at the hip Rooftop Taco & Tequila Bar, where carnitas tacos with peppers and feta cheese have names like “Taco Dirty to Me.” Coming up later this spring, also on the busy Government Street strip of clubs and restaurants, will be Craft Advisory Brewing. Biloxi sits as the queen of the coast, containing a varied and colorful history dating back to the founding of Louisiana. Casinos took much of her attention away, but developments along Howard Avenue are bringing the shine back to downtown. The Coastal Mississippi Mardi Gras Museum opened on Howard recently, showing off costumes and crowns of the Gulf Coast Carnival Association that dates back to 1908. The District on Howard Avenue is working to preserve and develop several historic buildings on the street, once a road filled with oyster shells for horse-drawn carriages and a Native American trail that stretched to Bay St. Louis. Plans by The District include turning the old Barq’s headquarters into loft apartments and mixed-use retail. Already up and running is the Kress building, now an event space, and Skal Axe Throwing on the ground floor of another District historic building.

Skal may be one of the newest attractions on the Gulf Coast but it dates back to our primal ancestors. Plus, it burns off that stress gathered from a week of work. Visitors pay to grab an axe and throw cold steel into wood 12 feet away but there’s also a bar and other games, some for kids, too. Biloxi’s culinary scene keeps evolving, as well. Charred, an Ocean Springs establishment, has moved into the old Magnolia Hotel in Biloxi, an historic site that used to house the Mardi Gras Museum, said Anna Roy, public and media relations manager to Coastal Mississippi. “It’s a beautiful historic building with two floors, right next to Mary Mahoney’s,” she said. Close to the Gulfport line, Chef Austin Sumrall creates innovative dishes with Gulf seafood, southern favorites and fresh Gulf oysters at White Pillars, another historic building lovingly renovated. The casino and hotel scene continues to increase, with Margaritaville moving Gulfside and expanding and Legends all-suites hotel opening across Beach Boulevard. For more information on the twin cities of the Mississippi Gulf Coast, visit coastalmississippi.com. n


AC ADIANAPROFILE.COM 31


BY FRITZ ESKER JONATHAN OLIVIER CHERÉ COEN PHOTOS BY ROMERO + ROMERO

ACADIANIANS WHO ARE DEFINING AND REDEFINING THE REGION

TRAILBLAZE 32

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ERS

A

cadiana is a region steeped in history, culture and tradition and its people are known for their irrepressible and entrepreneurial spirit. It is with this idea in mind that we created the Acadiana Profile Trailblazers. Some of the honorees are people you’ve come to know for accomplishments in their industry or in the community. Others are either newer to their professions or have struck out on a new path — in either case, they are making waves. Acadiana Profile is thrilled to honor these trailblazing Acadianians and highlight the work they are doing in this one-of-a-kind place. AC ADIANAPROFILE.COM 33


On the first day of school as a teacher, I played a song and it was Alicia Keys’ “If I Ain’t Got You.” My first sounds made in a classroom [were] by the artist who recognized me at the Grammys 15 years later. MICKEY SMITH JR.

COURTNEY PITRE

PHILANTRHOPY

Around three years ago, Courtney Pitre worked at the pharmacy she still

owns in Arnaudville. Her customers would often talk to her about their problems, frustrations and needs. Pitre decided to do something about that, and Le Bon Voisin was born. “I’ve always had a talent for listening to others’ problems, finding out what they need and thinking of practical solutions,” Pitre said. One frustration the 34-year-old Pitre and her customers had was the way national charities distribute their funds. The people in Pitre’s community wanted to ensure that their dollars and donations were going directly to their community. But national charities would not make any such guarantees. So, Pitre started Le Bon Voisin with the specific purpose of helping families and individuals in her area. Every dollar and item donated goes directly to local citizens. A slogan Pitre likes to use is “neighbors helping neighbors.” “The people in this area are really generous,” Pitre said. The work Le Bon Voisin does is diverse. In a small town like Arnaudville, there are not a lot of organized activities for children, so Pitre helped arrange outdoor movies nights for kids. Le Bon Voisin also brings Christmas gifts to nursing home residents during the holiday season. Lately, the organization has done a lot of work with its food pantry and school needs closets. A needs closet is something schools have where students lacking school supplies or clothing items can get what they need for free. The assistance goes beyond the physical items. Pitre said when someone is need is helped by others, it gives them a feeling of empowerment. It makes them feel like they can achieve their goals and that they are part of a community that has their back when times get tough. When she is not running her pharmacy or working with Le Bon Voisin, Pitre likes to travel in her Winnebago. Recently, she drove to South Padre Island in it and has plans for bigger trips in the future. Pitre believes work like hers is contagious. When one person sees another doing good deeds in the community, it makes that person want to get involved, too. “The more I work with the public, the more I realize we’re all doing the best we can … If you have any talent you can use to help others, you have to use it,” Pitre said. - by Fritz Esker

EVEN THOUGH SHE IS AN ACADIANA NATIVE, Pitre has played ice hockey for 25 years. She is a goalie for two women’s travel hockey teams and has played on the legendary rink in Lake Placid, NY where the U.S. defeated the Soviet Union in the 1980 “Miracle on Ice” game.

MUSIC

MICKEY SMITH JR.

W

hen Alicia Keys recognized Mickey Smith Jr. at the 62nd Annual Grammy Awards in January as the winner of the music educator award, the moment embodied years of dedication to his community and the fulfillment of a long-awaited dream. “For me, it’s beyond belief,” said Smith, 39, who for the last 15 years has been the director of bands at Maplewood Middle School in Sulphur. He’s thrown his name in the hat four other times, making it to finals twice only to fall short. “I almost didn’t put my name in this year,” he said. “There is a lot you have to do to be recognized — a lot of work. I didn’t want it to take a toll on my family.” As he was considering whether he would apply for the 2020 awards, he thought back to his childhood, as he often does, to offer some inspiration. “When I first picked up music, I was so terrible that my mom said get out the house and keep on going until we can’t hear you,” he said. Back then, Smith took that as a motivation to improve, and to this day he uses that experience to push himself to progress. Smith has shared that story with countless students over the years to motivate them, too. “Everybody loves band the first week until they realize they have to practice,” he said. “Few people at that age consider the amount of work that goes into perfecting that skill. I’m transparent with them and use my personal story to help shape and guide them.” The bit of advice resonated so much that in 2018 Smith published a book called “The Adventures of Little Mickey: Keep On Going.” He wrote and illustrated the tale, which is autobiographical and recounts his rocky beginning with playing music. This year, Smith will take his message on the road, called the Keep On Going Tour, to schools across Louisiana, Texas and Iowa to offer teachers a day of professional and personal development, focusing on skills like classroom and behavior management. “This is for all teachers,” he said. “We’ll encourage and equip educators by telling them they are loved, valued and wanted. In turn they can be the same thing for their students.” BY JONATHAN OLIVIER

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BREE SARGENT PERFORMING ARTS WHILE STAND-ALONE arts

electives in schools are worthwhile and important, there is also a push to integrate arts education with more traditional subjects. As education director for the Acadiana Center for the Arts, Bree Sargent helps organize the PACE (Primary Academic Creative Experiences) program, which integrates the arts into local grammar schools. The program works with children in Acadiana elementary schools every week for the entire school year. A teaching artist comes to classrooms and merges the arts with other learning areas. For example, a math class can learn about symmetry and shape by studying cultural masks. A science class can learn about water cycles through dance. In each case, the teaching artist speaks with the classroom teacher ahead of time. They discuss what the students will be studying for the next six weeks and come up with a balanced lesson plan involving the arts. Sargent said the PACE program makes learning more exciting for children. “Learning through the arts brings everything to life,” Sargent said. “It gives kids that zest for wanting to learn more.” The 43-year-old Sargent has worked with the Acadiana Center for the Arts for 20 years. The center has been working with Lafayette Parish schools for over 40 years. In fact, one of the current PACE teachers was a former PACE student. Recently, they have expanded the PACE program to schools in St. Landry Parish, too. On top of employing teaching artists through the PACE program, the

Acadiana Center for the Arts trains classroom teachers in ways they can use the arts more in their daily lessons. “If teachers are trained to do that work, it will grow exponentially,” Sargent said. The work is not just an education for the students; it’s an education for Sargent, too. “It’s different every day,” Sargent said. “I’m continuing to learn.” The center’s work is by no means limited to the PACE program. Founded in 1975, it also supports the creation of new works of art, exhibits, festivals and performance art over an eight-parish region (Acadia, Evangeline, Iberia, Lafayette, St. Landry, St. Martin, St. Mary, and Vermilion). “Equity and access is very important to us,” Sargent said. “We want everyone to have access to our programs.” By Fritz Esker

SARGENT IS AN AVID BAKER. She said her colleagues at the Acadiana Center for the Arts often serve as “guinea pigs” to test her latest baking creations. “It’s become my art form,” Sargent said.

AC ADIANAPROFILE.COM 35


ZACHARY RICHARD FRENCH CAJUN CULTURE WORLD-RENOWNED SCOTT

musician, with more than 20 albums, Zachary Richard has always worn many hats. In addition to his constant songwriting and performances, which has taken him around the world, he founded Action Cadienne, a volunteer organization that promotes the French language and the Cajun culture of Louisiana. He has co-produced and starred in documentaries about Acadian history and culture, including the award-winning “Against the Tide” and “Cajun Heat,” the latter of which explored the land of his ancestors and his attachment to his Cajun identity. He’s also written numerous books, many in French. Richard was decorated France’s Officier de l’Ordre des Arts et Lettres de la République Française and initiated into the Ordre des Francophones d’Amérique by the government of Québec. He has three honorary doctorates, from the University of Moncton, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and Ste. Anne’s University in Nova Scotia. Last year, Richard was promoted to the rank of Officer in the French Academic Palms. In 2015, Richard was named Humanist of the Year by the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities. And the list goes on. To label Richard a Louisiana ambassador and culture preservationist would be an understatement. “Last year I spent most of the year on the road, almost 80 dates, including Congrés Mondial Acadien in Canada,” Richard said.

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This year, Richard is staying closer to home to be with his 98-year-old mother. Spending more time in Louisiana allows him to develop poetry to incorporate into live performances. Richard’s latest book is “Zuma 9,” a collection of French poetry based on “universal truths and protests” and inspired by Beat and Oriental poetry. He hopes to provide awareness and enlightenment through the spoken word, he said. “In a sense, being a French-speaking artist is an act of resistance.” Richard owns a list of literary accolades as well. For his previous collections of French poetry, he’s received the Prix Littéraire Champlain for “Faire Récolte” and the Prix Roland Gasparic from Rumania for “Feu.” He was named Louisiana’s first French Language Poet Laureate. “There’s a close relationship between poetry and song,” Richard explained. “It’s a whole new gig for me. It’s fun because I can wear another hat.” By Cheré Coen

ZACHARY RICHARD WAS RAISED IN A DEVOUT CATHOLIC HOUSEHOLD. When he was 14 he was sent to seminary to become a priest. “I lasted two weeks,” he said. “It didn’t take.” He has since learned the rosary in French so he can pray with his 98-year-old mother. “We hold hands and pray and we reminisce,” he said.


BUSINESS

COREY JACK

Although I love speaking in front of large crowds, serving on various panels in front of audiences, and conducting workshops, I’m still quite the introvert. COREY JACK

C

orey Jack has committed most of his adult life to the service of the underprivileged, particularly youth throughout Acadiana that deserve more opportunities. “If there is no one to encourage them, then they just get lost and don’t reach their full potential,” said Jack, 33, who lives in Lafayette. In the past, Jack has helped kids stay on the right track through his nonprofit he created in 2015 called the Youth Literacy Foundation of Acadiana. It began as a literacy program that exposed children in underserved communities to books, what Jack saw as a path to success based on his own experience. “I began reading at about five years old,” he said. “It enhanced my vocabulary, as well as my social and emotional intelligence.” This year, he’s relaunching the nonprofit under a new name, the Legacy Institute for Economic Attainment, which will focus more on entrepreneurial training, financial literacy and workforce placement that also extends to young adults. “The goal is to increase the intergenerational mobility of families living in underserved communities,” he said. “We want to introduce opportunities early on so that by the time they are in their early 20s, they’re making more than their parents ever did.” Jack knows how these kids feel. He’s from Mamou, a small town with few economic opportunities, and he grew up in a single-parent household. When peers around him were engaging in activities he saw as negative, he decided instead he would read and study. He truly believed that he’d make something of himself if he worked hard. Always, his grandmother’s words were in the back of his mind. “She told me I would be this great man and to always remember where I came from, and to remember to keep God first,” he said. “She encouraged me and always saw something in me.” Jack’s commitment to helping the community doesn’t stop with children. Through his consulting business, Jack & Associates LLC, he assists people as they start a business or nonprofit, and aids in creating business plans. He’s also the manager of Lafayette Chamber Affairs at One Acadiana, an economic development organization. “I’m in a good place right now in life because everything I do is connected,” he said. “It’s all about entrepreneurship, financial literacy and exposing families to economic growth. Every time I do something, I’m advancing my purpose.” - BY

CHEF JOHN FOLSE

CULINARY

Chef John Folse grew up in St. James Parish along the bayou, learning early

JOHN FOLSE CREATES THE SPIRITED RECIPES FOR HIS JONES CREEK DISTILLERY LOCATED AT HIS SPRAWLING, HISTORIC WHITE OAK ESTATE AND GARDENS. He uses the clear water off Jones Creek in Baton Rouge and develops the rum and bourbon products through smell “and a little tasting on the tongue.” For the most part, however, Folse doesn’t drink alcohol. “I have a distillery but I don’t drink,” he said with a laugh.

the basics of Louisiana cooking and culture. The knowledge he acquired growing up in a culinary mecca, coupled with a lifetime of experiences, have taken him around the world. He has been an acclaimed restaurateur, spokesman, and has appeared at the 1988 Presidential Summit and the 1989 Vatican State dinner, among other accomplishments. The Louisiana Legislature called him “Louisiana’s Culinary Ambassador to the World.” Folse has hosted the international “Taste of Louisiana” TV series produced by Louisiana Public Broadcasting and created one of the largest food manufacturing facilities in the United States. He published cookbooks, a novel and two children’s books but is best known for his encyclopedic tomes detailing the history of Louisiana cuisine with hundreds of recipes. Folse also operates White Oak Estate and Gardens in Baton Rouge, an event space that doubles as a working plantation where visiting chefs from around the world immerse themselves into Louisiana cuisine and history. These days, Folse’s focus is on the expansion of the Chef John Folse Culinary Institute at Nicholls State University in Thibodaux, the only bachelor of science degree in culinary arts in Louisiana. He helped the Louisiana Board of Regents start the pilot program 20 years ago. “There were no chefs back then with master's degrees so we had to create people who could teach at that level,” Folse explained. Folse instructs seniors with a class on “History and Culture of Louisiana’s Seven Nations.” He describes the state’s iconic foods, explains where they originated, how they came to be and why it’s important. Folse’s four oversized cookbooks — more like coffee table art pieces — examined Louisiana cuisine from several angles. The series began with “The Encyclopedia of Cajun and Creole Cuisine,” followed by “Hooks, Lies, & Alibis: Louisiana’s Authoritative Collection of Game Fish & Seafood Cookery,” “After the Hunt Louisiana’s Authoritative Collection of Wild Game and Game Fish Cookery” and “Can You Dig It: Louisiana’s Authoritative Collection of Vegetable Cookery.” Like his other books that delve into the history and culture of everything we eat in the Bayou State, — Folse hopes his fifth and final book on desserts will be the definitive guide on Louisiana sweets. “We hope it will be like the 'Times-Picayune Creole Cookbook' and always be on the shelf,” he said. - by Cheré Coen

JONATHAN OLIVIER

AC ADIANAPROFILE.COM 37


As much as I love the outdoors, I’m actually terrified of snakes and spiders. I respect their existence but want nothing to do with them.”

CONSERVATION

EMILE ANCELET

EMILE ANCELET

TIM REBOWE

When Tim Rebowe took over as head coach of the Nicholls State University football team to start the 2015 season, the squad was coming off a 0-12 campaign in 2014. They had also lost the last six games of the 2013 season. They would lose the first five games of Rebowe’s debut season. But the team quickly turned things around and made an FCS (NCAA Football Championship Subdivision) playoff appearance in Rebowe’s third season. They would follow that effort with two Southland Conference championships. Rebowe had applied for the head coaching position at Nicholls multiple times. Even though he had been passed over in every previous attempt, he told himself he would give it one more try in 2014. That last try landed him the job. He knew it would be a tremendous challenge, but he believed in himself, his staff, and his players. “We knew if we stuck to the process, we could have success eventually,” Rebowe said. “But we didn’t put a timetable on it.” The 56-year-old Rebowe has been coaching football since he graduated from LSU in 1987. A graduate of Destrehan High School, he said he figured out that he wanted to stay around the game even though he was not a great player. His former Destrehan coach, Chipper Simon, gave him a job as a scout, and that started him on the path to coaching. Players are obviously important to any program’s success. Rebowe said the relationships he cultivated over decades of coaching high school and college football in Louisiana served him well in the recruiting process (he was previously an assistant at Nicholls, Louisiana-Monroe, and Louisiana-Lafayette). “If the coaches trust you, they’ll trust you with their players,” Rebowe said. Once the players are in the program, Rebowe said the challenge is finding the way to motivate each player as an individual. “You don’t treat them all the same because no two people are the same,” Rebowe said. Players today don’t respond to a drill sergeant approach the way older players did, and Rebowe said it’s a coach’s job to adjust to this. A coach must find the balance between tough love and friendly support. Rebowe stated that being a good coach involves constant learning. It’s about remembering what worked and what didn’t work from every season in every job. A willingness to be flexible is also important. “Nobody is a finished product,” Rebowe said. “What worked last year might not work this year." - by Fritz Esker

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F

SPORTS

COACH REBOWE IS AN AVID RUNNER who participates in 5Ks, 10Ks and half marathons in his spare time.

rom a young age, Emile Ancelet learned to appreciate the grandeur of nature as a hunter and angler. Many mornings were spent gawking at swarms of ducks circling overhead or reeling in speckled trout from the bow of a boat. “That was always a part of me — it’s in my veins,” said Ancelet, 31. “My dad was passionate about it and that really instilled in me a passion.” As a teenager, Ancelet carried with him that thirst for the outdoors, spending summers away in a program called Adventure Treks, living out of a tent while rock climbing, backpacking and sea kayaking in the Pacific Northwest. Over three high school summers, he learned outdoor survival skills, Leave No Trace principals and obtained a Wilderness First Aid certification. He also was involved in a leadership summit for a month in Alaska, taking away an appreciation for wild places and an awareness of the bond that humans form in close-knit groups in the wilderness. It made sense that Ancelet would pursue related areas in college earning a bachelor’s degree in anthropology and a master's in environmental science. Everything seemed to coalesce — French, his affinity for nature and people — when he landed his first gig for the Bayou Vermilion District (BVD) at Vermilionville in 2012 leading watershed tours, and then later on the bayou crew cleaning trash and debris from the Vermilion River. After working at the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries near the Vermilion Bay as a marine biologist, Ancelet returned to the BVD and is now the director of water quality. “My job is to coordinate the efforts of federal, state and local agencies to work toward improving the water quality of the Vermilion River,” he said. The river, which snakes through Lafayette, was at one time heavily contaminated with fecal bacteria. Ancelet and his team identified the source of much of the problem — faulty sewer systems draining into a coulee feeding into the river. After leading a door-to-door campaign to inform residents, Ancelet declared the problem much improved, saying, “While some people see the river as a negative, dirty resource, we want to change that perception. It’s a beautiful natural resource.” - BY JONATHAN OLIVIER


HOLLY HOWAT HEALTHCARE WHEN YOU’RE GOING

through a crisis, whether it’s a physical or mental health one, it can be hard to know what to do. You’re stressed out, so you’re not thinking clearly. The steps to get what you need can seem insurmountable even in a city with as many resources as Lafayette. At Beacon Community Connections, executive director Holly Howat helps people in need receive assistance for a wide variety of issues. Howat’s journey to Beacon started in 2015 when she was the executive director for the Lafayette Parish Criminal Justice Coordinating Committee. Initially, she focused on the over-incarceration of mentally ill people. But she realized the work she was doing could be expanded to the community at large and focus on more holistic health and wellness issues. In 2018, Beacon Community Connections was born. How does the program work? Beacon receives a referral for someone in need navigating the healthcare system (physical or mental) or criminal justice system, then contacts the person. They find out what they need, then connect them with the appropriate resources. They make sure to actively listen to what’s important for the person instead of telling them what’s important. Beacon’s services vary. Howat said they were able to help a recently divorced woman who was living alone and suffered a broken ankle. Since she lived alone, she had

no one to drive her to doctor’s appointments. Beacon was able to arrange rides to the hospital for her. In addition to this, Beacon’s navigator (the liaison who helps individuals get what they need) noticed the woman seemed depressed, too. The navigator arranged for the woman to speak with a mental health counselor. Howat also pointed to a case where Beacon was able to help a man recently discharged from a mental health facility. He had been homeless for a long time. Beacon contacted the man’s sister and helped set him up there temporarily while assisting him in finding work and an apartment of his own. “We helped him every step of the way to get his life back on track,” Howat said. While Howat is proud of her own work with Beacon, she said Beacon’s mission is consistent with the values of the people of Acadiana. “One of the reasons Beacon has been so successful is because of the principles of Acadian culture,” Howat said. “If a neighbor is in need, you help them…This is what can happen when we work together.” By Fritz Esker

WHILE HOWAT ATTENDED CLASSES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN, one of her classmates was future movie star Matthew McConaughey.

AC ADIANAPROFILE.COM 39


DR. TANIECEA ARCENEAUX MALLERY EDUCATION

YOU MIGHT NOT EXPECT

to find someone with a Ph.D. in applied and computational mathematics in an Office for Campus Diversity — but throughout her higher-education experience at Princeton University, Dr. Taniecea Mallery learned what it was like to navigate a male-dominated field as an African American woman. “When I went to graduate school, it was a culture shock in so many ways,” Dr. Mallery said. “I still say to this day that I wouldn't have made it out of graduate school without the diversity office at Princeton. I got a very personal look at what diversity officers do, and I really developed a passion for it.” Dr. Mallery felt called to provide the same resources she’d received to other students who may not support. A position became available in her hometown at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, enabling her to return to Acadiana as the Executive Director of Strategic Initiatives & Chief Diversity Officer. “A diversity officer really does touch every aspect of the college campus,” Dr. Mallery said. “The work that I do interfaces with students, whether it's helping to educate them about the importance of intercultural understanding or how to engage across our differences. We even push it a bit further and educate our faculty and staff about how to be more effective at being culturally responsive and inclusive in the classroom.” 40

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Dr. Mallery also pushes students and faculty to challenge notions of what professionals in certain fields look like; dismantling these stereotypes, she said, plays an important role in empowering students to pursue careers that align with their passions. “We were all raised in a world where television and programming influence our perception of the world,” she said. “Those messages influence our students, and they even influence the idea of what a professor looks like. Diversifying faculty is a challenge across the country. At UL Lafayette, we're really trying to shift the culture to think more inclusively and to redefine our notions of what a successful student looks like — or what a successful faculty member looks like.” “The university is very tied to our community, and it's often seen as a resource to the community,” Dr. Mallery said. “So, we’re taking a lot the same principles that we talk about on campus and are making sure that all voices are at the table and feel included at the community level.” By Topher Balfer

DR. MALLERY PLAYED THE CLARINET THROUGHOUT MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL. When she was a student at Lafayette High, she and the rest of the school band achieved one of the highest honors for musicians when they played a concert at the prestigious Carnegie Hall.


LITERARY

JOSH CAFFREY

I love music from old Paris and Latin America, as well as the Grateful Dead. I play a variety of such tunes alone on accordion, as well as occasionally in my group Rio Luminoso. PHILIP GOULD

L

ife sometimes takes us in circles. For Joshua Clegg Caffery, director of the Center for Louisiana Studies at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette as well as a musician, folklorist and author, he’s spun many circuitous routes. The Franklin native worked as a journalist for the Times of Acadiana but delved into French folksongs and South Louisiana culture performing with the Red Stick Ramblers and Feufollet. When he decided to return to college for an advanced degree, he naturally choose English with a focus in folklore. “I knew that what I wanted to study had to do with Louisiana,” he said. After receiving a master’s and Ph.D. at ULL, and serving an Alan Lomax Fellowship in Folklife Studies at the Library of Congress, Caffery headed up the English department at Episcopal High School of Lafayette. Later, a folklore fellowship year at Indiana University lured him away. The winter in Indiana was exceptionally brutal and the Cafferys had no extended family to help with their two young children. They decided to head back south. Caffery worked in marketing at Stuller jewelry company for a spell, performing research and developing strategy, a job not as far off his career path as one may think. “Folklorists interview people as to why they create so in many ways it prepared me for my job today because jewelers are artists, create decorative art,” he explained. Caffery authored two books with LSU Press, “Traditional Music in Coastal Louisiana: The 1934 Lomax Collection,” which included a Grammy-nominated CD compilation, and “In the Creole Twilight: Poems and Songs from Louisiana Folklore,” a collection of poems inspired by Louisiana myth, legend and oral history. He also received a 2010 Grammy nomination for his performance and songwriting on the “En Couleurs” album by Feufollet. When the job at UL’s Center for Louisiana Studies opened in 2018, all of Caffery’s experiences made him the perfect candidate, he said. On any given day, Caffery works in marketing, editing books, sales and archival projects. “The way my career worked out, it made me perfect for the Center,” he said. “It’s been a long and winding road. What I’m doing now seems to make a lot of sense.” - BY CHERÉ COEN

PHILIP GOULD

JOSHUA CAFFERY IS A CHAMPION PING PONG PLAYER. He played extensively throughout his youth and competed abroad when he studied at the University of East Anglia in England. He still plays ping pong and competed in a David Eagan Ping Pong Tournament in Lafayette, named for Grammy-winning musician and songwriter who was also a lover of table tennis. Unfortunately, Caffery came in second.

VISUAL ART

Philip Gould got his first glimpse of Louisiana in 1974 as a photojournalist in New Iberia. He spent much of his time cruising the backroads snaking around cane fields on the hunt for a story. It’s there that he discovered his love for the Bayou State and its people. “I considered my time at the Daily Iberian to be the equivalent of a master's degree in photography because there was hardly any news in New Iberia and I had to produce pictures every single day,” said Gould, 68. “I learned to beat the bushes and see opportunities where they weren’t apparent.” Gould began working as a documentary photographer in 1978, shooting much of the same subjects as he had a few years before — people living their small town lives in southwest Louisiana. His photographs were in black and white, representing what he calls “Cajun culture that was balanced — not too caught up with exotica but still had a sense of empathy for who these people were.” A collection was published two years later called “Les Cadiens d’Asteur.” Gould, originally from Massachusetts and spending most of his young life in California, resides in Lafayette and has made a living as a photographer in the state, as well as traveling the country. But Louisiana and its residents have remained his favorite subject, his work appearing in more than a dozen books. His collection is one of the largest privately held photographic archives of the state in existence. His latest work, which will be published by LSU Press this spring, captures many of the various bridges spanning the Mississippi River from New Orleans to its headwaters, titled “Bridging the Mississippi: Spans Across the Father of Waters.” “There are roughly 75 bridges portrayed in the book and 135 in total on the river,” he said. What he found was much more than architecture, but the lives that are intertwined with the bridges. He witnessed a devoted man praying, a wedding, anglers reeling in trophy fish — unexpected moments he would’ve missed only a few minutes later. “The book speaks to the serendipitous nature of photography, that you never know what is going to happen,” he said. “Documenting life, you have to keep your camera loaded and your eyes wide open to see things clearly.” - By Jonathan Olivier

AC ADIANAPROFILE.COM 41


TOP LAWYERS 324 Lawyers in 40 Specialties Plus, 3 Lawyers Share Their Toughest Cases

P R OF I L ES BY FRITZ ESKER WI TH PORTR AI TS BY ROMERO & ROMERO

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TOP LAWYERS MY TOUGHEST CASE

ADMINISTRATIVE/ REGULATORY LAW Michael D. Hebert Becker & Hebert, L.L.C. 201 Rue Beauregard Lafayette 337-233-1987 Jeff D. Lieberman Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2349 Leslie J. Schiff Schiff, Scheckman & White LLP 117 W. Landry St. Opelousas 337-942-9771

ADMIRALTY & MARITIME LAW M. Benjamin Alexander Laborde Earles Law Firm 1901 Kaliste Saloom Rd. Lafayette 337-242-1753 Bennett B. Anderson Jr. Anderson, Dozier, Blanda & Saltzman 2010 W. Pinhook Rd. Lafayette 337-233-3366 Alan K Breaud Breaud & Meyers, APLC 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1101 Lafayette 337-266-2200 Larry Curtis Larry Curtis Personal Injury Attorney 300 Rue Beauregard Bldg. C Lafayette 337-366-8317 Blake R. David Sr. Broussard & David 557 Jefferson St. Lafayette 337-233-2323

Patrick A. Juneau Juneau David, APLC 1018 Harding St. Suite 202 Lafayette 337-269-0052 Robert M. Kallam Kean Miller LLP 2020 W. Pinhook Rd. Suite 303 Lafayette 337-235-2232 Cliffe E. Laborde III Mahtook & LaFleur 600 Jefferson St. Floor 10 Lafayette 337-266-2189 Michael G. Lemoine Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7624 Matthew E. Lundy Lundy Lundy Soileau & South, LLP 501 Broad St. Lake Charles 337-439-0707 Alan J. Meche Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd., Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1000 Jerome H. Moroux Broussard & David 557 Jefferson St. Lafayette 337-233-2323 Francis X. Neuner Jr. NeunerPate 1001 W. Pinhook Rd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-237-7000 D'Ann R. Penner Larry Curtis Personal Injury Attorney 300 Rue Beauregard Bldg. C Lafayette 337-366-8317

S. Brian Perry Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd., Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1410 Edwin G. Preis Jr. Preis PLC 102 Versailles Blvd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-237-6062 James P. Roy Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, LLC 556 Jefferson St. Suite 500 Lafayette 337-291-4878 John P. Roy Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, LLC 556 Jefferson St. Suite 500 Lafayette 337-291-4878 Randall K. Theunissen Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd., Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1000 Douglas W. Truxillo Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660 Jason M. Welborn Gaar Law Firm 617 S. Buchanan St. PO Box 2053 Lafayette 337-366-0982 Jonathan L. Woods Randazzo Giglio & Bailey LLC 900 E. St. Mary Boulevard Suite 200 Lafayette 337-291-4900 Bob F. Wright Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, LLC 556 Jefferson St. Suite 500 Lafayette 337-291-4878

METHODOLOGY Each year, Acadiana Profile publishes its Top Lawyers list, along with the stories of compelling cases fought by three of the year’s qualifying lawyers. In determining the Top Lawyers of Acadiana we use Professional Research Services, a Detroit-based survey company. The voting for the PRS survey to determine the 2017 top attorneys for Acadiana Profile magazine was open to all licensed attorneys in the Acadiana, Louisiana market area. Each attorney was asked which attorney, other than himself or herself, he or she would recommend in the Acadiana area. Each attorney was allowed to recommend up to three colleagues in each given legal specialty. Once the online nominations were complete, each nominee was carefully evaluated on the basis of the survey results, the legitimacy of their license and their current standing with the State Bar Association of Louisiana. Attorneys who received the highest number of votes in each category are reflected in the list by legal specialty.

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Michael Lemoine Oil and gas litigation is a complex field of immense challenge and constant learning for attorney Michael Lemoine, who successfully represented a company in the Deepwater Horizon lawsuit.

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ichael Lemoine grew up in the small town of Plaucheville, Louisiana (his high school graduating class totaled 13). When he went to LSU with the hopes of becoming the first member of his family to graduate from college, he was not sure what he wanted to do. But after taking a speech class, he realized he had a talent for public speaking. His professor was so impressed he advised Lemoine to pursue a career where he could put those talents to use and mentioned the law as an option. Lemoine took that advice and went straight to law school at LSU after getting his undergraduate degree. Now, at age 64, he is still going strong as a partner at Jones Walker in Lafayette. Lemoine specializes in oil and gas litigation. He was a defense attorney representing an international service company in the Deepwater Horizon lawsuit. His company had a tool that was downhole when the explosion happened. He commanded a team of over 30 lawyers and paralegals working seven days a week for about two and a half years. Before the trial began, the judge dismissed the case against Lemoine’s client in a summary judgment (a summary judgment means the judge dismissed the case based on evidence presented to them). The work is rewarding and exciting to Lemoine not just because of victories like the one he earned in the Deepwater Horizon case. He said working in oil and gas litigation requires constant learning. Often, a different piece of equipment or a different procedure is at the center of the litigation, so he has to be willing and eager to learn new things and listen to new people on every case. As a result, the job is never boring. “It’s an incredibly complex field because of the engineering and science behind it,” Lemoine said. “You can’t take a deposition without knowing exactly what type of operation was being conducted.” While Lemoine is proud of his work, he is quick to praise the community of Lafayette lawyers in the oil/gas/maritime/ admiralty law field. Even though Lafayette is not a big city, its proximity to the Gulf of Mexico means there are lots of top-notch attorneys in the oil/gas/maritime/admiralty area. He said their expertise is respected around the world and their reputation precedes them wherever they go. “I am extremely proud to be a part of this group,” Lemoine said.


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MY TOUGHEST CASE

Rachel Godley Whether it's adoptions, divorce, or custody battles, lawyer Rachel Godley navigates the sensitive waters of family law with empathy and care.

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hether it’s divorce, custody, adoption, or something else, family law matters are always intensely personal cases. Lafayette attorney Rachel Godley steers her clients through these challenging, emotional times with compassion and tenacity. When Godley graduated from LSU in 2002, she moved to Nashville with hopes of working in the music industry. However, she quickly became disillusioned because of sexual harassment. She decided to become a lawyer who would help people fight back against such harassment. However, her career did not follow that path. After law school, she worked at a Lafayette firm on a variety of cases, including family law. But once she had children, she needed a job that allowed her more autonomy when it came to setting her schedule. She started her own firm specializing in family law. In her six plus years of running her firm, she has met many memorable clients. She said her favorite cases to work are adoptions. Whether it’s a stepparent, a grandparent, or an aunt or uncle choosing to adopt a child, it’s a joyous moment. Other types of family law can be tense and emotionally fraught. But with adoptions, the children are always thrilled that someone wants to add them to their family. Godley’s husband was adopted as a child and he has told her it was the happiest day of his life. “It’s amazing to see how excited the kids are,” Godley said. “It’s overall a really, really happy occasion.” Godley still finds meaning and reward in the more difficult cases, too. In divorce or custody battles, her clients are often suffering through one of the most stressful times in their lives. However, Godley said it is always nice to see them move from these crises to a better place. She is grateful to have met and helped these people, many of whom still keep in touch. “I have incredible clients who take the time to tell me thank you, send Christmas cards …” Godley said. While Godley represents many clients in the Acadiana area, she also does online legal work for people she has never met in person. She will assist out-of-state and out-of-country clients with legal documents (divorce, custody, and other forms). Instead of paying upwards of $10-15,000 for full legal representation, these clients can have a lawyer’s help with basic forms for approximately $800. When Godley is not practicing law, she spends time with her husband and two children (a 9-year-old daughter and a 6-year-old son). Her main hobby is exercising. She enjoys yoga and running every day after work. “It clears my mind so I can focus on my husband and kids at home,” Godley said.

ALTERNATE DISPUTE RESOLUTION David S. Cook David S. Cook, APLC 313 Beverly Dr. Lafayette 337-234-4155 David A. Fraser Fraser Wheeler & Courtney LLP 4350 Nelson Rd. Lake Charles 337-478-8595 Patrick A. Juneau Juneau David, APLC 1018 Harding St. Suite 202 Lafayette 337-269-0052 Thomas R. Juneau Sr. Juneau David, APLC 1018 Harding St. Suite 202 Lafayette 337-269-0052 Andrew D. McGlathery III Stockwell, Sievert, Viccellio, Clements & Shaddock, LLP One Lakeside Plz. 127 West Broad Street Floor 4 Lake Charles 337-436-7226 Matthew J. Randazzo III Randazzo Giglio & Bailey LLC 900 E. Saint Mary Blvd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-291-4900 E. Gregory Voorhies Attorney at Law 224 Saint Landry St. Suite 3A Lafayette 337-237-9708 Marc T. Amy Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7662

Julie S. Chauvin Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2307 Billy J. Domingue Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2342 Steven G. "Buzz" Durio Durio, McGoffin, Stagg & Ackermann, P.C. 220 Heymann Blvd. Lafayette 337-233-0300

BET-THE-COMPANY LITIGATIONS Michael G. Lemoine Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7624

Joseph P. "J.P." Hebert Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2348

Gary J. Russo Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7610

Cody J. "C.J." Miller Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2346

COMMERCIAL LITIGATION

Steven Travis Ramos Andrus Boudreaux 1301 Camellia Blvd. Suite 401 Lafayette 337-984-9480 ext. 3014 Craig A. Ryan Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660

BANKRUPTCY AND CREDITOR DEBTOR RIGHTS/ INSOLVENCY AND REORGANIZATION LAW

APPELLATE PRACTICE

Harold L. Domingue Jr. Harold L. Domingue Jr. 711 W. Pinhook Rd. Lafayette 337-234-6003

James H. Gibson Gibson Law Partners, LLC 2448 Johnston St. Lafayette 337-761-6023

Joseph P. "J.P." Hebert Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2348

Lawrence P. "Larry" Simon Jr. Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2323

Craig A. Ryan Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660

BANKING AND FINANCE LAW

Gerald H. Schiff Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd., Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132

Kyle M. Bacon Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7706

Scott J. Scofield Scofield, Gerard, Pohorelsky, Gallaugher & Landry 901 Lakeshore Dr. Suite 900 Lake Charles 337-433-9436

Joel P. Babineaux Babineaux, Poche, Anthony & Slavich, L.L.C. 1201 Camellia Blvd. Floor 3 Lafayette 337-984-2505 James D. Cain Jr. Loftin, Cain & LeBlanc, LLC 113 Dr. Michael DeBakey Dr. Lake Charles 337-310-4300 Brian W. Capell Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2368 James J. Davidson III Davidson Meaux Sonnier & McElligott LLP 810 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-237-1660 James P. Doherty III Becker & Hebert, L.L.C. 201 Rue Beauregard Lafayette 337-233-1987 James H. Gibson Gibson Law Partners, LLC 2448 Johnston St. Lafayette 337-761-6023 Joseph C. Giglio Jr. Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2311 Emile Joseph Jr. Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd., Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1310

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TOP LAWYERS MY TOUGHEST CASE Steven C. Lanza Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660

Emile Joseph Jr. Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd., Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1310

Seth T. Mansfield Becker & Hebert, L.L.C. 201 Rue Beauregard Lafayette 337-233-1987

James T. Rivera Scofield & Rivera, LLC 100 E. Vermilion Suite 301 Lafayette 337-235-5353

Gary J. Russo Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7610

Emmett C. Sole Stockwell, Sievert, Viccellio, Clements & Shaddock, LLP One Lakeside Plz. 127 West Broad Street Floor 4 Lake Charles 337-493-7222

Andy Veazey Veazey Felder & Renegar LLC 2 Flagg Pl. Lafayette 337-446-2709

COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS LAW Kyle M. Bacon Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7706 Julie S. Chauvin Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2307 Billy J. Domingue Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2342 Jeremy A. Hebert Becker & Hebert, L.L.C. 201 Rue Beauregard Lafayette 337-233-1987 Cody J. "C.J." Miller Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2346

CONSTRUCTION LAW Richard D. Chappuis Jr. Voorhies & Labbé 700 St. John St. Floor 5 Lafayette 337-232-9700 James P. Doherty III Becker & Hebert, L.L.C. 201 Rue Beauregard Lafayette 337-233-1987 Bob J. Duplantis Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd., Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132

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Kenneth D St. Pé Kenneth D. St. Pé, Professional Law Corporation 311 W. University Ave. Suite A Lafayette 337-534-4043

CORPORATE LAW M. Benjamin Alexander Laborde Earles Law Firm 1901 Kaliste Saloom Rd. Lafayette 337-242-1753 Kyle M. Bacon Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7706 Billy J. Domingue Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2342 Steven G. "Buzz" Durio Durio, McGoffin, Stagg & Ackermann, P.C. 220 Heymann Blvd. Lafayette 337-233-0300 Joseph C. Giglio Jr. Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2311 Steven C. Lanza Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660

CRIMINAL DEFENSE NON WHITECOLLAR Alfred F. Boustany II Boustany Law Firm 421 W. Vermilion St. Lafayette 337-261-0225 Todd S. Clemons Todd Clemons & Associates, APLC 1740 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-477-0000 Evan Edwards Brazee, Edwards & Durio 2901 Johnston St. Suite 206 Lafayette 337-237-0492 Tony Carlo Fazzio The Sanchez Law Firm, LLC 1200 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-433-4405 Patricia C. Manetsch The Sanchez Law Firm, LLC 1200 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-433-4405 Jack Miller Miller, Mitchell & Long, LTD 415 N. Parkerson Ave. Crowley 337-788-0768 Parker Mitchell Miller, Mitchell & Long, LTD 415 N. Parkerson Ave. Crowley 337-788-0768 Kevin Stockstill Stockstill White Collar Criminal Defense 300 Stewart St. Lafayette 337-262-0203 James E. Sudduth III Sudduth & Associates, LLC 1109 Pithon St. Lake Charles 833-783-3884

CRIMINAL DEFENSE WHITE COLLAR

Lawrence L. Lewis III Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660

Donald D. Cleveland Donald D. Cleveland, APLC 819 St. John St. Lafayette 337-205-0319

Seth T. Mansfield Becker & Hebert, L.L.C. 201 Rue Beauregard Lafayette 337-233-1987

Tony Carlo Fazzio The Sanchez Law Firm, LLC 1200 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-433-4405

AC ADIANA PROFILE APRIL/M AY 2020

Robert Kallam Robert Kallam has gained a wealth of knowledge of the Louisiana oil and gas industry over a 30-year career as a defense attorney for local companies.

A

s a partner at Kean Miller, Robert Kallam has defended clients in the offshore energy and maritime industries from lawsuits in a career spanning 30 years. When Kallam graduated from LSU Law School in 1990, he did not initially plan to end up in this branch of the law. But that was where the need was, and he grew to enjoy the work very much. Growing up in Lafayette, Kallam, like most locals, was aware of how many people in the state worked for oil and gas companies. Kallam’s work allowed him a glimpse at the inner workings of one of the state’s biggest industries. “It’s been fascinating to see an industry change over 30 years,” Kallam said. While there have been many challenging cases over Kallam’s career, his work defending Transocean in the Deepwater Horizon lawsuit stands out. For two years, his work focused entirely on that case. The magnitude was unlike any other case he’d worked on, with depositions taking place not just in different cities, but different continents. Parts of the suit were dismissed, and others were settled. As a defense attorney, Kallam is aware that the plaintiffs are often people who have suffered terribly. But just because a person has been hurt does not mean Kallam’s client is at fault for the injury. In one case, a man fell through a hole in an offshore platform. The man tragically became a paraplegic, but he sued Kallam’s client for money beyond workman’s compensation. Kallam was able to prove the plaintiff was at fault for the accident. In a rewarding, personal case for Kallam, he stepped across the aisle and worked as a plaintiff ’s attorney for his brotherin-law’s nephew, who had his disability benefits wrongfully terminated by the government. Kallam, who worked on the case pro bono, was able to get the benefits reinstated. He added that he hopes to do more pro bono work in the future. Kallam said the law can be a demanding profession. It’s not uncommon for lawyers to work long hours not just on weekdays, but on weekends, too. He has always strived to maintain a healthy life outside of his job. He is married to a fellow lawyer, Michelle Kallam, who works as a judicial law clerk for U.S. District Judge Michael Juneau. They have four children (ages ranging from 19-25). When he is not practicing the law, Kallam enjoys traveling with his family to national parks like Yellowstone and Glacier, as well as hunting and boating. “You have to find that balance between work and life, otherwise you’ll feel a void one day,” Kallam said.


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TOP LAWYERS Michael D. Skinner Skinner Law Firm, L.L.C. 600 Jefferson St. Suite 810 Lafayette 337-354-3030 Kevin Stockstill Stockstill White Collar Criminal Defense 300 Stewart St. Lafayette 337-262-0203

ELDER LAW Steven M. Jankower Jankower Law Firm, LLC 110 Exchange Pl. Suite 101 Lafayette 337-289-1745

EMINENT DOMAIN AND CONDEMNATION LAW James J. Davidson III Davidson Meaux Sonnier & McElligott LLP 810 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-237-1660

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS LAW Joel P. Babineaux Babineaux, Poche, Anthony & Slavich, L.L.C. 1201 Camellia Blvd. Floor 3 Lafayette 337-984-2505 Robert E. Rowe Rowe Law Corporation 113 Oil Center Dr. Lafayette 337-266-9626

ENERGY LAW George Arceneaux III Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2332

Bob J. Duplantis Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd., Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

James N. "Jim" Mansfield III Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2340

George Arceneaux III Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2332

Samuel E. Masur Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd., Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132 Thomas M. McNamara Johnson Gray McNamara, LLC 200 W. Congress St. Suite 900 Lafayette 337-412-6003 Jennifer E. Michel Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP 100 E. Vermilion St. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-205-4739 Patrick S. Ottinger Ottinger Hebert 1313 W. Pinhook Rd. Lafayette 337-232-2606 S. Brian Perry Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd., Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1410 Matthew J. Randazzo III Randazzo Giglio & Bailey LLC 900 E. Saint Mary Blvd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-291-4900 Jamie D. Rhymes Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2360

Randall C. Songy Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660

Emily C. Borgen Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2353 Hunter A. Chauvin Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2354 Patrick W. Gray Johnson Gray McNamara, LLC 200 W. Congress St. Suite 900 Lafayette 337-412-6003 Paul J. Hebert Ottinger Hebert 1313 W. Pinhook Rd. Lafayette 337-232-2606 Amy Allums Lee Johnson Gray McNamara, LLC 200 W. Congress St. Suite 900 Lafayette 337-412-6003 Penny Leonard Malbrew Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2364 Thomas M. McNamara Johnson Gray McNamara, LLC 200 W. Congress St. Suite 900 Lafayette 337-412-6003

April L. Rolen-Ogden Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2330

William B. Monk Stockwell, Sievert, Viccellio, Clements & Shaddock, LLP One Lakeside Plz. 127 West Broad Street Floor 4 Lake Charles 337-493-7232

Brian W. Capell Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2368

Gary J. Russo Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7610

J. Rock Palermo III Veron, Bice, Palermo & Wilson, LLC 721 Kirby St. Lake Charles 337-202-2922

Susan A. Daigle Daigle Rayburn LLC 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1200 Lafayette 337-234-7000

Bryan D. Scofield Scofield & Rivera, LLC 100 E. Vermilion Suite 301 Lafayette 337-235-5353

Alex P. Prochaska Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7616

Robert L. Cabes Milling Benson Woodward L.L.P. 101 La Rue France Suite 200 Lafayette 337-232-3929

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Matthew J. Randazzo III Randazzo Giglio & Bailey LLC 900 E. Saint Mary Blvd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-291-4900 Jamie D. Rhymes Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2360

FAMILY LAW Claire Bergeron Edwards Claire Bergeron Edwards, Attorney at Law, LLC 321 W. Main St. Suite 1-A Lafayette 337-233-3616 Alfred F. Boustany II Boustany Law Firm 421 W. Vermilion St. Lafayette 337-261-0225 Jeffrey A. Carrier Fuerst, Carrier & Ogden 130 W. Kirby St. Lake Charles 337-436-3332 Dean Doherty Law Office of Dean Doherty 405 W. Convent St. Lafayette 337-232-7747 Bradford H. Felder Veazey Felder & Renegar LLC 2 Flagg Pl. Lafayette 337-446-2709 Valerie Gotch Garrett Valerie Gotch Garrett, APLC 701 N Pierce St. Suite B Lafayette 337-232-1600 Rachel B. Godley Rachel B. Godley, Attorney at Law, LLC 511 Shore Dr. Suite 2 Youngsville 337-456-3457 Steven W. Hale Hale Law Firm 1735 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-426-1071 Alexander Lee Harkins Reed The Sanchez Law Firm, LLC 1200 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-433-4405 Helen Popich Harris Helen Popich Harris APLC 321 W. Main St. Suite 2-D Lafayette 337-291-6092

Rebecca J. Hunter The Sanchez Law Firm, LLC 1200 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-433-4405 Philip C. Kobetz Philip C. Kobetz, LTD APLC 120 Representative Row Lafayette 337-291-1990 Jack Miller Miller, Mitchell & Long, LTD 415 N. Parkerson Ave. Crowley 337-788-0768 Parker Mitchell Miller, Mitchell & Long, LTD 415 N. Parkerson Ave. Crowley 337-788-0768 Bhyllie J. Mouton Mouton and Mouton, LLC 905 The Blvd. Rayne 337-334-8600 M. Scott Ogden Jr. Fuerst, Carrier & Ogden 130 W. Kirby St. Lake Charles 337-436-3332 Dona K. Renegar Veazey Felder & Renegar LLC 2 Flagg Pl. Lafayette 337-446-2709 Diane A. Sorola Law Office of Diane A. Sorola 402 W. Convent St. Lafayette 337-234-2355 D. Reardon Stanford Hoyt, Stanford, & Wynne Family Law Attorneys 315 S. College Rd. Suite 165 Lafayette 337-234-1012 Julie Vaughn Felder Julie Koren Vaughn Felder, APLC 2 Flagg PI. Lafayette 337-856-3444 Chris Villemarette Chris Villemarette, Trial Lawyer 3404 Moss St. Lafayette 337-232-3100

GAMING LAW Deborah Duplechin Harkins Deborah Duplechin Harkins PLLC 139B James Comeaux Rd. Suite 810 Lafayette 337-280-0814

HEALTH CARE LAW Charles J. Boudreaux Jr. Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7600 Nadia de la Houssaye Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7634 Nicholas Gachassin III Gachassin Law Firm 200 Corporate Blvd. Suite 103 Lafayette 337-235-4576 Michael D. Skinner Skinner Law Firm, L.L.C. 600 Jefferson St. Suite 810 Lafayette 337-354-3030

John E. McElligott Jr. Davidson Meaux Sonnier & McElligott LLP 810 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-237-1660 Jennifer E. Michel Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP 100 E. Vermilion St. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-205-4739 Francis X. Neuner Jr. NeunerPate 1001 W. Pinhook Rd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-237-7000 Steven B. Rabalais Rabalais & Hebert, LLC 701 Robley Dr. Suite 210 Lafayette 337-981-0309 ext. 2

IMMIGRATION LAW

Gary J. Russo Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7610

Anna M. Grand Pecoraro Law 95 Woods Crossing Suite 100 Lafayette 337-266-2233

Patrick M. Wartelle Leake & Andersson LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 603 Lafayette 337-233-7430

Elena Arcos Pecoraro Pecoraro Law 95 Woods Crossing Suite 100 Lafayette 337-266-2233

David O. Way Oliver & Way, LLC 100 Rue Bastille Lafayette 337-988-3500

INSURANCE LAW Robert J. David Jr. Juneau David, APLC 1018 Harding St. Suite 202 Lafayette 337-269-0052 Tabitha R. Durbin Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP 100 E. Vermilion St. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-205-4740 Charles J. Foret Briney Foret Corry, LLP 413 Travis St. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-237-4070 John A. Jeansonne Jr. Jeansonne & Remondet, LLC 200 W. Congress St. Suite 1100 Lafayette 337-237-4370 Ian A. MacDonald Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7617

Jonathan L. Woods Randazzo Giglio & Bailey LLC 900 E. St. Mary Boulevard Suite 200 Lafayette 337-291-4900

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW Jesse D. Lambert Law Office of Jesse D. Lambert, LLC 1018 Harding St. Suite 102B Lafayette 337-232-5006 William W. Stagg Durio, McGoffin, Stagg & Ackermann, P.C. 220 Heymann Blvd. Lafayette 337-233-0300 Blair B. Suire Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7648 Robert L. Waddell Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7623


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TOP LAWYERS LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW Joel P. Babineaux Babineaux, Poche, Anthony & Slavich, L.L.C. 1201 Camellia Blvd. Floor 3 Lafayette 337-984-2505 Troy A. Broussard Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd., Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1370 Robert J. David Jr. Juneau David, APLC 1018 Harding St. Suite 202 Lafayette 337-269-0052 Greg Guidry Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. 325 Settlers Trace Blvd., Suite 201 Lafayette 337-769-6583 Laura P. Johnson Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1000 Jeffrey A. Riggs Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP 100 E. Vermilion St. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-205-4532 James E. Sudduth III Sudduth & Associates, LLC 1109 Pithon St. Lake Charles 833-783-3884

LEGAL MALPRACTICE LAW Paul J. Hebert Ottinger Hebert 1313 W. Pinhook Rd. Lafayette 337-232-2606 Alan W. Stewart Gibson Law Partners, LLC 2448 Johnston St. Lafayette 337-761-6250 Scott Webre Webre & Associates 2901 Johnston St. Suite 307 Lafayette 337-237-5051

Kristie M. Hightower Lundy Lundy Soileau & South, LLP 501 Broad St. Lake Charles 337-439-0707 Christopher P. Ieyoub Plauché, Smith & Nieset, LLC 1123 Pithon St. Post Office Drawer 1705 Lake Charles 337-436-0522 Amy Allums Lee Johnson Gray McNamara, LLC 200 W. Congress St. Suite 900 Lafayette 337-412-6003 Matthew E. Lundy Lundy Lundy Soileau & South, LLP 501 Broad St. Lake Charles 337-439-0707 Derriel McCorvey McCorvey Law, LLC 102 Versailles Blvd. Suite 620 Lafayette 337-291-2431 Patrick C. Morrow Morrow, Morrow, Ryan, Bassett & Haik 324 W. Landry St. Opelousas 337-948-4483 Elena Arcos Pecoraro Pecoraro Law 95 Woods Crossing Suite 100 Lafayette 337-266-2233 Edwin G. Preis Jr. Preis PLC 102 Versailles Blvd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-237-6062 James P. Roy Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, LLC 556 Jefferson St. Suite 500 Lafayette 337-291-4878 James P. Ryan Morrow, Morrow, Ryan, Bassett & Haik 324 W. Landry St. Opelousas 337-948-4483

MASS TORT LITIGATION/CLASS ACTIONS

Elwood C. Stevens Jr. Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, LLC 556 Jefferson St. Suite 500 Lafayette 337-291-4878

Kyle L. Gideon Davidson Meaux Sonnier & McElligott LLP 810 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-237-1660

Bob F. Wright Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, LLC 556 Jefferson St. Suite 500 Lafayette 337-291-4878

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MEDICAL MALPRACTICE LAW Michael W. Adley Judice & Adley 926 Coolidge Blvd. Lafayette 337-235-2405 Charles J. Boudreaux Jr. Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7600 Alan K. Breaud Breaud & Meyers, APLC 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1101 Lafayette 337-266-2200 Roger G. Burgess Baggett, McCall Injury Attorneys 3006 Country Club Rd. Lake Charles 337-478-8888 Philip C. Kobetz Philip C. Kobetz, LTD APLC 120 Representative Row Lafayette 337-291-1990 Derriel McCorvey McCorvey Law, LLC 102 Versailles Blvd. Suite 620 Lafayette 337-291-2431 William H. Parker III Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd., Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1270 Sera H. Russell III The Law Office of Sera H. Russell, III 111 Mercury St. Lafayette 337-205-9786 Kenneth D St. Pé Kenneth D. St. Pé, Professional Law Corporation 311 W. University Ave. Suite A Lafayette 337-534-4043 Todd A. Townsley The Townsley Law Firm 3102 Enterprise Blvd. Lake Charles 337-377-0584 Scott Webre Webre & Associates 2901 Johnston St. Suite 307 Lafayette 337-237-5051

MORTGAGE BANKING FORECLOSURE LAW Joseph P. "J.P." Hebert Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2348

MUNICIPAL LAW Michael D. Hebert Becker & Hebert, L.L.C. 201 Rue Beauregard Lafayette 337-233-1987 Leslie J. Schiff Schiff, Scheckman & White LLP 117 W. Landry St. Opelousas 337-942-9771

NATURAL RESOURCES LAW Brittan J. "Britt" Bush Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2357 Robert L. Cabes Milling Benson Woodward L.L.P. 101 La Rue France Suite 200 Lafayette 337-232-3929 Patrick W. Gray Johnson Gray McNamara, LLC 200 W. Congress St. Suite 900 Lafayette 337-412-6003 Jeff D. Lieberman Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2349 Caleb J. Madere Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2326 Penny Leonard Malbrew Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2364 James N. "Jim" Mansfield III Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2340 Lawrence P. "Larry" Simon Jr. Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2323

OIL AND GAS LAW Vanessa Waguespack Anseman Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-232-7424 George Arceneaux III Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2332 William F. Bailey Randazzo Giglio & Bailey LLC 900 E. Saint Mary Blvd., Suite 200 Lafayette 337-291-4900 Bob J. Duplantis Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd., Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132 Gregory G. Duplantis Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd., Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132 J. Michael Fussell Jr. Ottinger Hebert 1313 W. Pinhook Rd. Lafayette 337-232-2606 Patrick W. Gray Johnson Gray McNamara, LLC 200 W. Congress St. Suite 900 Lafayette 337-412-6003 Jeff D. Lieberman Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2349 Caleb J. Madere Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2326 James N. "Jim" Mansfield III Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2340 Samuel E. Masur Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd., Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132

Matthew J. Randazzo III Randazzo Giglio & Bailey LLC 900 E. Saint Mary Blvd., Suite 200 Lafayette 337-291-4900 Jamie D. Rhymes Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2360 April L. Rolen-Ogden Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2330 Paul B. Simon Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd., Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132 Andy Veazey Veazey Felder & Renegar LLC 2 Flagg Pl. Lafayette 337-446-2709

PERSONAL INJURY LITIGATION Glenn W. Alexander Glenn W. Alexander, LLC 713 Kirby St. Lake Charles 337-794-8607 M. Benjamin Alexander Laborde Earles Law Firm 1901 Kaliste Saloom Rd. Lafayette 337-242-1753 Bennett B. Anderson Jr. Anderson, Dozier, Blanda & Saltzman 2010 W. Pinhook Rd. Lafayette 337-233-3366 Glenn Armentor The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation 300 Stewart St. Lafayette 337-233-1471 Taylor J. Bassett Morrow, Morrow, Ryan, Bassett & Haik 324 W. Landry St. Opelousas 337-948-4483 Jamie B. Bice Veron, Bice, Palermo & Wilson, LLC 721 Kirby St. Lake Charles 337-202-2922 Charles Brandt Brandt & Sherman, LLP 111 Mercury St. Lafayette 337-242-3098

Richard C. Broussard Broussard & David 557 Jefferson St. Lafayette 337-233-2323 Lucas S. Colligan Gaar Law Firm 617 S. Buchanan St. PO Box 2053 Lafayette 337-366-0982 Blake R. David Sr. Broussard & David 557 Jefferson St. Lafayette 337-233-2323 James Domengeaux Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, LLC 556 Jefferson St. Suite 500 Lafayette 337-291-4878 Digger Earles Laborde Earles Law Firm 1901 Kaliste Saloom Rd. Lafayette 337-514-1415 William Gee III William Gee Law Office 2014 W. Pinhook Rd. Suite 501 Lafayette 337-222-2222 William H. Goforth Goforth & Lilley 109 Stewart St. Lafayette 337-237-5777 Richard T. Haik Jr. Morrow, Morrow, Ryan, Bassett & Haik 324 W. Landry St. Opelousas 337-948-4483 W. Alan Lilley Goforth & Lilley 109 Stewart St. Lafayette 337-237-5777 Ian A. MacDonald Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7617 Matt McConnell McConnell Law Offices 1502 W. University Ave. Lafayette 337-347-6404 Jerome H. Moroux Broussard & David 557 Jefferson St. Lafayette 337-233-2323 P. Craig Morrow Jr. Morrow, Morrow, Ryan, Bassett & Haik 324 W. Landry St. Opelousas 337-948-4483


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TOP LAWYERS Brent J. Rhodes The Law Offices of Brent J. Rhodes 620 School St. Houma 985-262-7799

Patrick A. Juneau Juneau David, APLC 1018 Harding St. Suite 202 Lafayette 337-269-0052

Elisa Devall Davis Turnkey Title 91 Settlers Trace Blvd., Bldg. 1 Lafayette 337-326-4830

Chris A. Verret Law Office of Chris A. Verret 325 Audubon Blvd. Lafayette 337-237-4600

James P. Roy Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, LLC 556 Jefferson St. Suite 500 Lafayette 337-291-4878

P. Craig Morrow Jr. Morrow, Morrow, Ryan, Bassett & Haik 324 W. Landry St. Opelousas 337-948-4483

Jonathan R. Davis Turnkey Title 91 Settlers Trace Blvd., Bldg. 1 Lafayette 337-326-4830

Lester J. Zaunbrecher Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd., Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1380

Elwood C. Stevens Jr. Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, LLC 556 Jefferson St. Suite 500 Lafayette 337-291-4878

Patrick C. Morrow Morrow, Morrow, Ryan, Bassett & Haik 324 W. Landry St. Opelousas 337-948-4483

Billy J. Domingue Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2342

Scott Webre Webre & Associates 2901 Johnston St. Suite 307 Lafayette 337-237-5051

J. Rock Palermo III Veron, Bice, Palermo & Wilson, LLC 721 Kirby St. Lake Charles 337-202-2922

Jason M. Welborn Gaar Law Firm 617 S. Buchanan St. PO Box 2053 Lafayette 337-366-0982

Todd A. Townsley The Townsley Law Firm 3102 Enterprise Blvd. Lake Charles 337-377-0584

Richard E. Wilson Cox, Cox, Filo, Camel & Wilson L.L.C. 723 Broad St. Lake Charles 337-436-6611

RAILROAD LAW

Bob F. Wright Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, LLC 556 Jefferson St. Suite 500 Lafayette 337-291-4878

PRODUCT LIABILITY LITIGATION Nicholas Andrew Blanda Anderson, Dozier, Blanda & Saltzman 2010 W. Pinhook Rd. Lafayette 337-233-3366 Richard C. Broussard Broussard & David 557 Jefferson St. Lafayette 337-233-2323 Richard D. Chappuis Jr. Voorhies & Labbé 700 St. John St. Floor 5 Lafayette 337-232-9700 David R. Frohn Manning Gross + Massenburg LLP 2201 Lake St. Suite 106 Lake Charles 337-419-1929 Kristie M. Hightower Lundy Lundy Soileau & South, LLP 501 Broad St. Lake Charles 337-439-0707

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Kenneth W. DeJean Law Offices of Kenneth W. DeJean 417 W. University Ave. Lafayette 337-235-5294 Kevin M. Dills Davidson Meaux Sonnier & McElligott LLP 810 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-237-1660 Kyle L. Gideon Davidson Meaux Sonnier & McElligott LLP 810 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-237-1660 Robert E. Landry Scofield, Gerard, Pohorelsky, Gallaugher & Landry 901 Lakeshore Dr. Suite 900 Lake Charles 337-433-9436 John E. McElligott Jr. Davidson Meaux Sonnier & McElligott LLP 810 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-237-1660

REAL ESTATE LAW Michael D. Carleton Chaffe McCall, LLP One Lakeshore Dr. Suite 1750 Lake Charles 337-419-1825

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Thomas John Gayle Gayle Law Firm LLC 713 Kirby St. Lake Charles 337-494-1220 Joseph C. Giglio Jr. Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2311 John R. Pohorelsky Scofield, Gerard, Pohorelsky, Gallaugher & Landry 901 Lakeshore Dr. Suite 900 Lake Charles 337-433-9436 H.L. "Rye" Tuten III Tuten Title & Escrow LLC 326 Settlers Trace Suite 101A Lafayette 337-524-1703 Joan D. Wallace Turnkey Title 91 Settlers Trace Blvd., Bldg. 1 Lafayette 337-326-4830

TAX LAW Cary B. Bryson Bryson Law Firm, LLC 515 W. Convent St. Lafayette 337-233-4210 Ted W. Hoyt Hoyt, Stanford, & Wynne Family Law Attorneys 315 S. College Rd. Suite 165 Lafayette 337-234-1012 Robert E. Rowe Rowe Law Corporation 113 Oil Center Dr. Lafayette 337-266-9626 David L. Sigler Sigler, Arabie & Cannon 630 Kirby St. Lake Charles 337-439-2033

TRANSPORTATION LAW Jeffrey M. Bassett Morrow, Morrow, Ryan, Bassett & Haik 324 W. Landry St. Opelousas 337-948-4483 Kenneth W. DeJean Law Offices of Kenneth W. DeJean 417 W. University Ave. Lafayette 337-235-5294 James M. Dill The Dill Firm 825 Lafayette St. P.O. Box 3324 Lafayette 337-261-1408 Matthew S. Green The Dill Firm 825 Lafayette St. P.O. Box 3324 Lafayette 337-261-1408 Ped C. Kay III Broussard & Kay 909 Garber Rd. Broussard 337-232-1666 Kevin P. Merchant NeunerPate 1001 W. Pinhook Rd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-272-0322

TRUSTS AND ESTATES Paige Casselman Beyt Becker & Hebert, L.L.C. 201 Rue Beauregard Lafayette 337-233-1987 L. Milton Cancienne Jr. Cancienne Law Firm 515 Barrow St. Houma 985-876-5656

Julie S. Chauvin Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2307 Gregory J. Logan The Logan Law Firm, LLC 700 Jefferson St. Lafayette 337-406-9685 M. Scott Ogden Jr. Fuerst, Carrier & Ogden 130 W. Kirby St. Lake Charles 337-436-3332 Joseph M. Placer Jr. Placer Law Firm, L.L.C 100 E Vermilion St. Suite 202 Lafayette 337-237-2530 David L. Sigler Sigler, Arabie & Cannon 630 Kirby St. Lake Charles 337-439-2033 Chris A. Verret Law Office of Chris A. Verret 325 Audubon Blvd. Lafayette 337-237-4600 James A. Watson Roddy, Watson & Everett 400 E. College St. Lake Charles 337-474-4886 Jack G. Wheeler Fraser Wheeler & Courtney LLP 4350 Nelson Rd. Lake Charles 337-478-8595 Sara T. Zuschlag Andrus Boudreaux 1301 Camellia Blvd. Suite 401 Lafayette 337-984-9480 ext. 3023

WORKERS COMPENSATION LAW Glenn Armentor The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation 300 Stewart St. Lafayette 337-233-1471

Donald A. Capretz Donald A. Capretz, APLC 1011 Coolidge St. Lafayette 337-326-4738

Charmaine B. Borne Randazzo Giglio & Bailey LLC 900 E. St. Mary Boulevard Suite 200 Lafayette 337-291-4900

Michael D. Carleton Chaffe McCall, LLP One Lakeshore Dr. Suite 1750 Lake Charles 337-419-1825

Kevin L. Camel Cox, Cox, Filo, Camel & Wilson L.L.C. 723 Broad St. Lake Charles 337-436-6611

Shannon Dartez The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation 300 Stewart St. Lafayette 337-233-1471 Thomas A. Filo Cox, Cox, Filo, Camel & Wilson L.L.C. 723 Broad St. Lake Charles 337-436-6611 Rémy A.M. Jardell Law Office of Rémy A. M. Jardell 625 Saint John St. Lafayette 337-267-0985 Patrick A. Johnson Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1000 Michael E Parker Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1480 Dona K. Renegar Veazey Felder & Renegar LLC 2 Flagg Pl. Lafayette 337-446-2709 Rex D. Townsley The Townsley Law Firm 3102 Enterprise Blvd. Lake Charles 337-377-0584 Eric J. Waltner Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1400 Jonathan L. Woods Randazzo Giglio & Bailey LLC 900 E. St. Mary Boulevard Suite 200 Lafayette 337-291-4900


TICKETS ON SALE Mix and mingle with the 2020 class of Acadiana Profile’s Trailblazers!

Wednesday, May 20 6-8 PM THE GROUSE ROOM

Additional tickets can be purchased for $30 at MyNewOrleans.com/Trailblazers A RENAISSANCE FOUNDATION EVENT

2020 ACADIANA TRAILBLAZERS

Emile Ancelet • Josh Caffrey John Folse • Philip Gould Holly Howat • Cory Jack Dr. Taniecea Arceneaux Mallery Courtney Pitre • Tim Rebowe Zachary Richard • Bree Sargent Mickey Smith, Jr.

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JOIE DE VIVRE

A R NAU DV I L L E A RT I ST G EO RG E M A R K S ’ NU NU CO L L EC T I V E C R E AT ES A C RO SS - C U LT U RA L EXPERIENCE


CU LTU R E / L ET T R ES D’A MO U R

PENNED BY A DIF F E R E NT AUT HO R IN EVE RY ISS U E

Lost and Found Learning and reviving the Kréyòl language BY H E R B E R T J . W I LT Z I L LU S T R AT I O N BY C H R I S T I N A B R OW N

I WA S R E A R E D BY MY G R A N D PA R E NT S I N B R E AU X

Bridge in St. Martin Parish. It was there I heard, on a daily basis, the Kréyòl language spoken by all who came to visit. Throughout my childhood, the Kréyòl language was the form of oral communication used with family members, neighbors and peers. It was very natural to communicate using English and Kréyòl depending on the environment I would encounter. I recall, during my elementary school years, groups of student would communicate in Kréyòl prior to the start of school, at recess and immediately after the ringing of the bell for dismissal. I also recall listening to conversations by many women who came to my grandmother’s kitchen to have their hair done. I would listen as my grandmother and the ladies discussed the situations or topics of the day. I was in the next room where I heard clearly the oral Kréyòl language being spoken. It was an exciting time. I remember finding a French grammar text that belonged to my aunt. She attended Southern University and possibly studied French. I was intrigued by what I saw but was unable to read it. I never saw anything written in Kréyòl, but wondered what that might look like if it existed. It didn’t occur to me to document anything until I began working in the public school system when I began to teach Spanish. I was determined to create lessons based on what I heard while growing up in my community in Breaux Bridge. The problem that I encountered was how to represent the written Louisiana Kréyòl language. I focused my attention on using some of the vocabulary found in the Haitian Creole dictionary created by Dr. Albert Valdman, 1981. The Haitian Creole seemed to resemble the Louisiana Kréyòl used in the conversations I was accustomed to hearing by folks. This was quite an undertaking and very intriguing to me. I began to create written Louisiana Kréyòl lessons containing expressions for greeting and taking leave of, color, numbers and conversations. They were published in the monthly “Creole Magazine” created by Dr. Ruth Foote. The goal was to validate Louisiana Kréyòl as an oral and written language and to preserve its usage. To date, these lessons, with modifications, are found in a book entitled “Ti Liv Kréyòl.” This guide is the work of Adrien Guillory-Chatman, Oliver Mayeux, Nathan Wendte, and me, Herbert J.

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Wiltz, with illustrations by Jonathan Mayers and designed by Irina V. Wang. I use the guide to teach an eight week Kréyòl course in Lafayette to anyone interested in learning about the Kréyòl language. Portions of the guide have been utilized by students at North Lewis Elementary School in New Iberia, incorporating Louisiana Kréyòl into their French Immersion curriculum. I envision the creation of a Louisiana Kréyòl curriculum that will be used by various learning institutions as a vehicle to preserve the Louisiana Kréyòl language. n

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Herbert J. Wiltz is a retired educator who taught French and Spanish at various grade levels (4th-12th) and schools for 33 years. He is one of the founding members of C.R.E.O.L.E., Inc. (Cultural, Resourceful, Educational Opportunities towards Linguistic Enrichment) and currently serves as vice-president. One of the goals of the organization is to preserve language and culture as they exist in Louisiana. He is one of the moderators of La Tab Kréyòl, a Kréyòl language round table at NUNU Collective in Arnaudville (featured on page 62). He is attempting to preserve and develop the Louisiana Kréyòl language. He is presently teaching Louisiana Kréyòl.


CU LTU R E / P LUS Ç A C HA NG E

Power Couple Louis and Ashlee Michot create and promote Cajun culture with an artistic, modern, multimedia and multidiciplinary approach BY DAV I D C H E R A M I E P O R T R A I T BY R O M E R O & R O M E R O

TH E S TO RY O F I N D I V I D UA L CO NTRI B UTI O N S TO

the various French cultures of south Louisiana appears in numerous documentaries, articles and books, but rarely do we hear about the role of couples, which strikes me as odd given the importance of family. There were, of course, Cléoma Breaux and Joe Falcon; in more recent times there are Ann and Marc Savoy. As we explore the evolution of traditional Cajun culture in the 21st century and how a husband-and-wife team can make an impact both individually and as a couple, we must look to the multidisciplinary approach of Ashlee and Louis Michot to see where it is going. On the one hand, we have Louis (pronounced “Lou-EE”) who, with his brother André, co-founded the Grammy-winning Lost Bayou Ramblers; on the other, we have Ashlee — French teacher, multimedia artist and poet — who recently edited and contributed to the first French-language collection of women writers from Louisiana, “Ô Malheureuse!” Louis’ other projects include the film 60

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“On Va Continuer,” Michot’s Melody Makers, movie soundtracks and collaborations with the decidedly un-Cajun likes of The Pogues’ Spider Stacy and The Violent Femmes’ Gordon Gano. Together, they form, along with Corey Ledet, Soul Creole, a Cajun-Zydeco fusion jam band that sings in English and French. Their greatest creation together is that of a family with three young sons living in a traditional bousillage home on La Prairie des Femmes in Saint Landry parish. In addition to tending to her family, Ashlee documents in hand-decorated notebooks the Cajun French words and expressions heard on KVPI’s radio show, “La Tasse de Café.” You can find much of her work on her various Instagram accounts. Given the path they have followed, it is only fitting that it was the French language that first brought them together. They met at Festivals Acadiens et Créoles in September 2003 under a tent where CODOFIL was handing out pins that said “Oui, je parle.” According to Ashlee, they actually noticed

each other a few times over the festival weekend but never spoke. Under that tent, they were introduced to each other in French. They then went dancing to Lil Nate where someone asked her how long they had been dancing together, to which she replied, “Oh, about 15 minutes!” Soon thereafter, he took her to visit Ethel Mae Bourque who sang for them her “new old” songs: some traditional ballads, but also contemporary accounts of personal experience, like the trouble Hurricane Andrew caused her, sung in that style. Sixteen years later, they have been together ever since that day. In many ways, they have been doing the same thing with their art by taking up-to-date content and putting it into old forms filtered by new technology. The best way to preserve a culture is not by putting it in a can like it was figs or pears, but by pushing it forward with the tools of the 21st century. Who knows? Future generations may one day be nostalgic about old-time Cajun social media. n


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CU LTU R E / L ES P E RSO N N ES

A Collective Effort For George Marks, an unexpected detour back home to Arnaudville turned into a permanent homecoming that spawned a canvas-free, non-profit masterpiece thanks to hundreds of volunteers who continue to make NUNU a “Living Piece of Art” BY W I L L I A M K A L E C P O R T R A I T BY R O M E R O & R O M E R O

I N T H E S P I R I T O F C O M P L E T E T R A N S PA R E N C Y,

Arnaudville artist and social sculptor George Marks feels it’s prudent to point out that this — a shining example of creative placemaking done right — wasn’t exactly what he had in mind back in 2005, both in execution and intention. And frankly, thank goodness. Because if life followed script, the seedling of an idea and sweat equity Marks and his nephew Jeremy Rivette spilled into NUNU Collective — a before-its-time educational nonprofit where artists from various disciplines can collaborate and grow together on this unique figurative stage for creative living — likely would have been lost to personal aspirations. After a fairly distinguished decade-plus run as an artist based out of Baton Rouge, Marks pressed pause for a minute on his aspirations of making it in a larger art hub like New York City to temporarily move back to Arnaudville and take care of his ailing father, an old boat captain nicknamed Nunu. Considering Marks was always given carte blanche as the baby of the family, he felt assisting the man who raised him was the type of responsibility that was probably long overdue. So he did it. Again, nothing permanent. “Then, when I moved back, I started to realize a lot of the imagery that snuck up in my work — like power lines, for example — came from right here,” Marks says. “So when the inspiration for so much of my work is coming from this place, why wouldn’t I stay? The thing I was looking for out there in the world was actually right here in Arnaudville. “Initially, there was some denial. So there were multiple ‘ah-ha’ moments. But I realized, if I was going to live here, something needed to shift.” Despite forging an art career less than an hour from his hometown, Marks’ impromptu homecoming magnified time’s ability to fade away the familiar. Not that the Arnaudville of 62

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Marks’ youth was Pleasantville by any stretch, but this place was different. A lot of the town’s physical infrastructure, particularly old buildings, was knocked down in the name of progress. Beyond that, Marks sense a lost feeling of community. As he says, it seemed like “Arnaudville was on auto-pilot” — that people would go to work, go to school, come home and engage with TV instead of each other. So yeah, something needed to shift. But what … well, Marks wasn’t quite sure. Plus, he knew that change is a process. Early in 2005, Marks purchased an old, out-of-business gas station with the modest intention of transforming it into a shared workspace with other artists, and the springboard toward a semi-regular art market. When

the equally shabby old Western Auto building next door became available, Marks took it on, too — seizing opportunity to expand even if his overall plan wasn’t fully developed. “It was pretty disgusting, honestly,” Marks recalls of the new space next door. “And once we got it clean, the place was total piecemeal. Nothing really matched, although it kind of looked good — artsy. At that’s when we coined the concept that ‘We’re frayed and we’re flawed.’ And that’s what makes us authentic and that’s what we celebrate. “And that’s something, over time, the community picked up on.” The exodus of artists from New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina expedited the progression of NUNU, as Marks and crew developed raw areas of the building into makeshift stu-

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND FULL CALENDAR OF EVENTS / NUNUACCOLLECTIVE.HOMESTEADCLOUD.COM


dios for five displaced artists looking for a spot to create. As Arnaudville began to embrace Marks’ still-not-fully-defined vision, the reach of NUNU extended beyond traditional painting and sculpting, resulting in a cornucopia of programming. For instance, for a long time, NUNU featured “Fabric Fridays” because Marks’ third grade teacher came in and told her former student she’d like to learn how to quilt. Marks replied, “Well, let’s do it” — which is pretty much on-brand for most questions thrown his way. But it didn’t stop there. Fabric Fridays evolved into “Cloth Collaborators,” a weekly Friday program where artists not only make quilts, crochet clothes and make cloth jewelry, but also use brown cotton grown and ginned by NUNU volunteers. “What we try to do is layer programming,” Marks says. “And what I mean by that is the building right now is cut in half. We have a few sliding doors that can portion off sides. So we’ll have a French program going on one side, and a Chinese program going on on the other side. And then at some point, we’ll open the sliding doors and allow the cultures to merge. It allows them to experience each other’s language, each other’s food. “So there’s community development, yes, but there’s also bridge-building happening between cultures, which is great.” Over the 15 years NUNU has been around — and especially since the project moved into its current location (a former hardware store) after a fire knocked out the original NUNUs back in 2010 — Marks has ceded a lot of the creative control to the members and volunteers that make NUNU what it is.

Though never run as a tourist attraction, it’s undeniable that NUNU has breathed new life into the local economy as local sales tax has substantially increased since its founding. Speaking of money, NUNU does receive occasional donations, but the majority of the funds used to run the nonprofit’s 200 programs comes from the commission the collective takes from ideas sold at its fourdays-a-week Marketplace — the percentage of that commission lessened for artists who mainly work out of the nonprofit, since Marks wants to encourage creators to make this a destination, not just a pit stop. “I like to think of the community as kinetic sculpture — a social experiment, or social sculpture,” Marks says. “There wasn’t a manual and there weren’t instructions on how to do this. So we just did it — celebrate the accidental,” Marks says. “Like with my paintings, if I spill something, it’ll just remain in my work. NUNU is like that. It’s like throwing spaghetti at the wall and some of it sticks and some of it falls off and you don’t know what’s what, and the end result isn’t what you thought — but that makes it better. And that’s what makes what the community is doing with NUNU a living piece of art.” n

Three years after suffering severe damage to one of its auxiliary buildings, NUNU Arts and Culture Collective is renovating its main building to make up for the loss in space. Half of the $100,000 redesign was raised through an art raffle fundraiser.

CALENDAR

APRIL 2020

These are just some of the activities going on either at NUNU in Arnaudville or involving the collective this month. For full calendar and information, visit nunuaccollective. homesteadcloud.com.

EVERY THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY AND SUNDAY

NUNU Marketplace An art market that runs from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. featuring artists from various arenas and disciplines. Works include original local art, written works from local authors, quilts and crocheted clothing items, re-purposed vintage clothing, plus locally created jewelry and pottery. EVERY FRIDAY (APRIL 3, 10, 17, 24)

Cloth Collaborators This weekly gathering, which runs at the same time as the Marketplace on Fridays, explores the “warp and weave” of fabric as art. Current projects include fabric embellishment, encaustic wax printing on fabric, cloth re-purposing and fabric jewelry. Newcomers are encouraged to bring materials so that they can begin their own project of fabric art.

SATURDAY APRIL 11 (2 P.M. TO 4 P.M.)

La Table Creole La Table Atakapas-Ishak is one of four monthly DICI (Diversity Initiative for Cultural Inclusion) events planned for 2020. Each second Saturday of the month, invited cultural ambassadors host gatherings that share experiences and expertise, participate in language learning, and develop participants’ skills in a variety of cultural expressions. The public is invited to attend and meet neighbors they may not yet know. FRIDAY APRIL 17 (7 P.M. TO 11 P.M.)

Potluck Dinner A social event to discuss art, or simply kick back and relax over food. Entrance is free if you bring your favorite homemade dish. The Pot Luck Band will play music. Dancing is encouraged.


CU LTU RE / E N F RA NÇ A IS, S ’IL VO US P L A ÎT

Le Mississipi français La Louisiane est née sur la côte du golfe PA R DAV I D C H E R A M I E

QUAND PIERRE LE MOYNE D’IBERVILLE A

commencé à explorer la colonie française de la Louisiane au début janvier 1699, l’endroit exacte n’était pas dans ce qui est aujourd’hui l’état de Louisiane, mais dans le Mississipi. Le Fort Maurepas, à Ocean Springs près de Biloxi, était le premier avant-poste permanent de la colonie. Il était établi pour empêcher l’avancement des Espagnols qui étaient retournés s’établir à Pensacola l’année précédente. Iberville avait aussi jeté l’ancre à l’Île du Dauphin, aujourd’hui dans l’Alabama, nommée pour l’arrière-petit-fils et successeur de Louis XIV, et non pas pour le mammifère marin du même nom. Il l’a appelé aussi l’Île du Massacre à cause du grand nombre d’ossement parsemé un peu partout, ce qui était probablement les débris d’un tertre d’enterrement indien détruit par un ouragan. De cette base, il a pu enfin trouver début mars ce que lui et ses hommes sont partis chercher : l’embouchure 64

AC ADIANA PROFILE APRIL/M AY 2020

d’une rivière qu’il a baptisé le Fleuve SaintLouis. Fort Louis de la Louisiane, aujourd’hui la Vieille Mobile, fondé par Iberville peu de temps après, était un entrepôt majeur pour le commerce entre Saint-Domingue, le Mexique, le Cuba et la France. En 1720, Biloxi est déclaré la capitale de la Louisiane française. Sur ces faits, on peut baser l’argument que la côte du golfe, de la Mobile jusqu’à la Nouvelle-Orléans, est le berceau de la Louisiane. En 1763, avec le Traité de Paris qui met fin à la Guerre de Sept Ans, le territoire de la Louisiane est divisé entre l’Espagne et la Grande Bretagne. La Floride occidentale est cédée aux Anglais, jusqu’à ce qu’elle revienne sous contrôle espagnol à la Guerre d’Indépendance américaine. Cette zone était disputée entre les grandes puissances politiques du monde jusqu’à ce que la République de la Floride occidentale soit déclarée en 1810. Elle ne dure que quelques mois avant que les Américains

ne la saisissent et l’intègrent dans le nouvel état de Louisiane en 1812. Néanmoins, cette partie qu’on appelle aujourd’hui les paroisses floridiennes, n’est officiellement transférée de l’Espagne aux États-Unis qu’en 1821. Avec plus de vingt parades sur la côte du Mississippi et presque 70 dans l’Alabama, les célébrations du carnaval font preuve d’un héritage ancré dans une tradition ancienne. La Mobile ne manque jamais d’occasion de rappeler l’ancienneté de son Mardi Gras à cellui de la Nouvelle-Orléans avec la première fête dès 1703. Quand on regarde de près, les similarités entre nos régions sont frappantes. Chaque été, la côte attire des centaines de Louisianais en vacances qui font le lézard sur les plages de sable blanc entre Biloxi et Pensacola. De nos jours, on peut même trouver des créolophones et des francophones encore. Le meilleur gombo que j’aie jamais mangé à l’extérieur de la Louisiane était dans un petit restaurant littéralement sur le golfe à Biloxi. Malheureusement, Katrina l’a emporté. À dire la vérité, c’était le seul gombo que j’aie jamais osé manger à l’extérieur de la Louisiane, mais il avait le goût de chez nous. Mais, étant donné toutes ces connections, l’avais-je vraiment quittée? n ENGLISH TRANSLATION / AC ADIANAPROFILE.COM


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

Acadiana Profile April-May 2020  

Acadiana Profile April-May 2020  

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