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Inspiring & empowering kids with the tools to make better life choices . . .

RELEASE THE FEAR, INC


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2013 Board and Advisory Directors

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HONORARY CHAIR Greg Stanton, Mayor, City of Phoenix BOARD OF DIRECTORS Rossana Gatlin -Chairperson Blair Coe Schweiger – Secretary Cookie Serrano – Treasurer Miguel Berastegui Maureen Feeney Matthew Mapes David Fraley Bill LaBrie Hank Marshall

Rebecca Villicana - Advisory Chair NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE Dino De Concini Sandy Gibson David Gonzales, U S Marshal Nancy Hendrich Rev. Rebecca McClain Kellianne P. Miley, M. Ed. Joni Sledge

ADVISORY COMMITTEE Francisco J. Alatorre, PhD Crim Justice Rich Bauer - United Phx. Fire Kirk Baxter Peggy Bilsten Steve Church, President, Avnet ,Inc. Gina Clark Jim Colletti Heidi Fogelsong Terry Goddard, former AZ Atty. Gen. Phil Gordon, former Phx. Mayor David Howell Billie Jo Herberger Gail L. Jacobs, PhD Edu Scott Jacobson Paul Johnson JoEllen Lynn Matthew Mapes Tony Mc Lain Rose Mofford, former AZ Gov. Kathy Munson Bridget Pettis, WMBA Star Derrick Platt, PhD, Psyc /Juv. Justice RJ Shannon Tom Simplot, Phx. City Council Brenda Sperduti Meredithe Stefanowitz, M. Ed. Kim Sterling-Heflin Thelda Williams, Phx. City Council Paul Winslow Gerald Richards, III Daniel Valenzuela, Phx. City Council EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Robert J. Miley, CEO / Founder


E

very morning when you look in the mirror, please see how blessed your life is and what a gift you

have been given to be a part of helping kids release their fear. As our CEO said at the US Conference of Mayors, all any of us want in life is to matter. We do not believe there is such a thing as a bad kid; we think they just haven't found their gifts...Yet! For many of these kids, what they experience in the Release the Fear programs is the first time in their lives they feel that they matter. There is nothing better than witnessing the transformation that happens in kids who think they're just bad—who think they don't matter. They walk into the workshop on the first day, arms crossed, acting uninterested. By the second day, they start opening up. By the third day, they get a glimpse that they do have something to offer, they do have a gift! For nearly eighteen years, Release the Fear has had the opportunity to interact with over 7,000 troubled youth; these youth now know they have a life purpose. They know their wishes and dreams can come true, and they know they are worth it. Our evidence-based curriculum has helped troubled kids in schools, jails, detention, and treatment centers. Through the creative processes of art, music, and communication, we teach kids cognitive behavioral skills to build self-esteem. They learn tools to help them succeed in school, manage conflict resolution, and to address peer pressure, and bullying. From 2011 to 2013, we were able to increase the number of kids reached by 55.6 percent, and we expanded our preventative programming to the Tempe, Balsz, and Cartwright school districts. We were able to bring on four new highly qualified facilitators to helping us meet the demands of an underserved community, and to expand the reach of our mission. '

We have conclusive tracking of our pre and post quantitative survey, along with qualitative over the last seven years. Statistics from Maricopa County’s Juvenile Probation Department demonstrate that the recidivism of incarcerated youth (which is around 30 percent) is reduced in participants of our Inside Out, Bridging Possibilities workshop, and for those participating in multiple IOBP workshops, the recidivism rate is reduced by nearly half. These findings inspired the Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections to conduct a three-year longitudinal study on the effectiveness of the Release the Fear programs, and its effects on recidivism. By spring 2014, the mid-report has shown promising results. In addition the New Mexico State University just released a two-year in-depth study of Release the Fear's Discover U Summer Camp Program, with results showing the positive effects of our programs on Arizona youth and communities Our 2013 Spring celebration brought many cross cultural groups of all ages from Japanese to Hispanics together, creating magic for a “Night of 1000 Cranes”. In 2013, Release the Fear achieved and surpassed many projected goals, yet there is much more work to be done. For each of the youth we are able to provide new tools, new hopes, and the possibility of new dreams, there are ten more that need our assistance. Please help us continue to bridge new-found possibilities for every child in our community. Thank you,

Release the Fear ,Inc. Board Chair


ADJC Director Charles Flanagan

Philadelphia Mayor Nutter / LasVegas Mayor Oscar Goodman / Phoenix. Mayor Greg Staton / Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson


D

ear Believers,:

As a result of your support, opportunities and acknowledgements appeared right and left in 2013, providing Release the Fear national and international attention. Thank you for believing in and contributing to us. Wow, what a year! Many opportunities were presented to Release the Fear in 2013, and I was honored to respond to them. Among them was speaking at the US Mayors Conference in Las Vegas; presenting to members of British Parliament, U.S. Congressmen, Representatives, and community leaders; being a guest speaker at the Shades of Violence Summit for Women of Color; and, on Valley of the Sun United Way’s requested I paint a mural for the NFL, Arizona Cardinals with students from Balsz Elementary School for the NFL Hometown Huddle. For those who know how much I know about sports, you know this is rather ironic. Release the Fear was privileged to be a part of these great things, yet much work remains. We receive more requests than we are able to fulfill. In 2013, we were able to reach 816 youth, and our 2014 goal is to reach over 1,000 vulnerable youth, and ultimately have enough facilitators to reach 3,000 youth each year. Many of these kids have never had positive influences in their lives. They need to know they have value and they matter! In June 2013, I addressed the US Mayors conference on Solutions to Youth Violence. After America's for the Arts introduction of me, I began by saying, "As you just heard, my life has been incredibly blessed, winning major awards in advertising, to selling my art around the world to British and Austrian Royal families, and major corporations. Yet, when I was 13, I did not think I mattered. Had it not been for my ninth grade English teacher, Mrs. Laszek, and my art teacher, Mr. Thompson insisting people look at my gifts rather than my test scores, I would not be standing in front of you today.” I continued, “I don't believe there is such a thing as a bad kid -they just haven't found their gifts yet; through the creative processes of art, music, and communication, we teach cognitive behavioral skills -- the crucial life skills to help them realize anything is possible.” I asked the audience to raise their hands if they want to find purpose in their lives. As all their hands were in the air, I asked them how many of them know they matter, and surprisingly, a few hands went down. Then I stated, that's all each and every one of these troubled kids want to know, is that they matter, and they have a purpose in their life. Until we help each one of these troubled and vulnerable youth find their gifts, you're fighting an uphill battle to finding a solution to youth violence. In the middle of Central Avenue in downtown Phoenix, stands a sculpture as a reminder that we can overcome anything. At its base, hundreds of names reflect the village it took to build it, accompanied by a quote of mine, “Reality is a projected thought.” What we project is our reality. The ten years it took to bring my idea to fruition were daunting, but my gut, and words my dad said to me years before, “work your way through it, and never give up,” kept me going. What an incredible journey. We have worked with over 7,000 troubled youth in juvenile detention, treatment facilities, and schools. The young people we work with learn tools to help them in school and to help them with peer pressure, bullying, and conflict resolution, while building self-esteem. Thank you for believing in our vision and supporting our life changing programs in 2013. Please help us continue to enrich the lives of youth, their families and their communities. With your support, these kids will learn they have worth and that they matter! Thanks for Believing,,

Robert J. Miley CEO and Founder


2013 Supporters - Corporate, Foundation & Government Entities Guardian Angel 10,000 to100,000 Herberger Foundation -$100,000 over 4 years -since 2012 Paul Shoen Foundation -since 2011 J.W. Kieckhefer Foundation -since 2005 Community Action Bureau–Maricopa County Attorney's office R.I.C.O -since 2005 Believers 5,000 the 10,000 Summer Youth Program Fund/ACF/Pullman - since 2012 John F. Long Foundation -since 2013 Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections -Safe Schools - since 2005 Kroger – Fry's Food Stores -since 2012 Maricopa County Sheriff Office -since 2012 Thunderbird Charities -since 2012 Margaret T. Morris Foundation -since 2008 Believers 1000 to 5000 BOEING Employees Community Fund -since 2010 Cardinals Charities CoBiz Cares Foundation Safeway, Inc. Phoenix Division Shelly & Shelley Hannah Forstrom A New Leaf Phoenix Office Art Culture Sundt Executive Council Charities, Firefighters Charities – United Phx Firefighters Assn, Inc Elementary School District Armstrong Foundation Friends of 200 to 1000 Elizabeth Ann Bitters Lori B. Bruggeman Gina Clark Francis J. duAimè Ardie & Steve Evans Jack Fields LaBelle B. Forstrom Sheryl & Ira Gaines Rossana Gatlin Rex and Beverly Gulbranson Roxanne S. Hamilton Roberta Hancock Janet Hayes Nancy and William M Hendrich Jane Hill Bobbi and Robert Kiese Bill LaBrie Edward Guy Lebow

BALSZ Armstrong Ashley and Mathew Mapes Sue and Arthur J. Martori Georgana and David Meiner Robert J. Miley Debra Miller Kathy and Chuck Munson Richard and Dana Naimark Johnny and Sonia Palacio Zavier Raines Mary Ann and Calvin Rezzonico Dr. Nelo Rossie Byron W. Sampson Blaire Coe Schweiger Cookie Serrano Colleen and Rudy Serrano Heidi and John E. Serrano Steven Serrano Thomas M Simplot Vivian Rae Spiegelman Anne M. Steinmetz Diana and Delwyn Worthington

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400, (2007)

816, (2013)

488, (2008)

For nearly seventeen years, Release the Fear has

790, (2012)

had the opportunity to interact with over 6,500 troubled youth; these youth now know they have a life purpose. They know their wishes and dreams can come true. They know they are worth it and that they matter!

Our evidence-based curriculum has helped 615, (2009)

583, (2011)

50.00% 45.00% 40.00% 35.00% 30.00% 25.00% 20.00% 15.00% 10.00% 5.00% 0.00%

Between the years 2007 and 2013, Release

Realized Not Alone In Fears (Pre/Post) ?:

Realized CAN Make Dream/s Into Reality (Pre/Post) ?:

(Post%)

6.69%

23.02%

(Pre%)

18.59%

23.80%

the Fear has shown constant improvement upon youth’s pre- and post-reporting’s learned about perceptions of themselves. Discovered Something New re Self?:

Discovered Something New re Peers?:

6.82%

9.67%

RTF -Aggregate % New Survey Questions: 2012-2013 Growth of Learning

Growth of Learning

540, (2010)

troubled kids in schools, jails, detention, and treatment centers. Through the creative processes of art, music, and communication, we teach kids cognitive behavioral skills to build self-esteem. They learn tools to help them succeed in school, conflict resolution, and to address peer pressure, and bullying.

2.00% 1.00% 0.00% -1.00% -2.00% -3.00% -4.00% -5.00% -6.00%

Overall %

Learned Something to Help Self re Bullying?:

Stated WOULD Do Something If Witnessed Bullying?:

-5.18%

1.21%

In addition, during the years of 2012 and 2013, Release the Fear has contributed to an overall improvement of youth’s self-reported willingness to assist another if bullied. Despite a decline of reported learning’s about proactive options to prevent being bullied, their learning consistently remained over 78 percent.


Release the Fear(RTF) Collaboration with ADJC on Recidivism Research Mid report on a three-year longitudinal study of RTF programs effect on recidivism. Since September 2012, Release the Fear has participated in an Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections (ADJC) multi-year study of participant recidivism. Recidivism is defined as “a return to custody,” in either the ADJC or the Arizona Department of Corrections. Data from the first 18 months of the study is reported below. Twenty “Release the Fear” workshops were conducted between September 2012 and March 2014, serving 472 children, aged 14-17 years old. Ten workshops (323 participants) took place in secure care and ten (149 participants) occurred in the community (Release the Fear @ Grace Chapel and Parole office East and West Valley). Of the 323 youth who participated in a RTF workshop while in secure care, almost two thirds of the population (201 youth) have been released from custody. Only one third of this group, (63), have since returned to secure care as a result of subsequent violations. Of the 149 youth who participated in a RTF while on community supervision, approximately one third (48) have also returned to secure care due to violations of the terms of supervision. As of April 8, 2014, 68% of RTF community participants in this study have not been returned to custody. Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections Research & Development April 9, 2014 500 450 400 350 300 250

Total

200

Released from Secure Care

150

Returned to Secure Care

100 50 0 Total Participants

Participants in Secure Care

Participants in Community Workshop

60 50 40 12 months

30

24 Months 20

36 Months

10 0 2009 Release (N=675)

2010 Release (N=588)

2011 Release (N=523)

2012 Release (N=470)

Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections four year Recidivism Rates (%) research


Overall Percentages 2013 RELEASE THE FEAR 2013 RTF Pre/Post Survey Results OVERALL PERCENTAGES 816 Students (42 PB Workshops, 2 Discover U Summer Camps Male 68.6% Female 31.4% – Youth Ages 7-20 84.82% discovered something new about themselves 90.67% discovered something new about classmates and friends. Pre 63.49% compared to Post 76.69% realized that they are not alone in their fears. Pre 87.80% compared to Post 98.02% realized that they can make their dreams a reality. 78.38% learned something to help them deal with bullying. 88.16% stated that they would do something if they saw someone being bullied. Adobe Mountain – 148 Students Lower Buckeye – 123 students Heard Elementary School – 107 Students ADJC Transition Program – 70 Students New Leaf – 68 Students U-Turn – 54 Students Larry Kennedy Elementary – 53 Students Genesis Academy – 38 Students Excelencia Elementary School – 35 Students Starshine Academy – 22 Students Florence Crittenton – 19 Students Drugcourt Casa Grande – 16 Students Discover U Summer Camp – 63 Students Florence Crittenton – 35 Students Larry Kennedy – 28 Students


. 2013 Individual Workshop

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1. January 3-5 2013 U-Turn Workshop 18 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 13-17

13. March 25-27 2013 Adobe Mtn Juvenile Facility 20 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 15-17

2. January 3-5 2013 New Leaf Workshop 15 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 12-16

14. March 25-27 2013 Adobe Mtn Juvenile Facility 21 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 14-17

3. January 25-27 2013 Lower Buckeye Workshop 15 Students (2 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 15-17

15. April 16-18 2013 Genesis Workshop Results 20 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 50% Female 50% – Youth Ages 14-20

4. January 29-31 2013 Lower Buckeye Workshop 16 Students (2 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 15-17

16. April 24-26 2013 Larry Kennedy Workshop Results 28 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 54% Female 46% – Youth Ages 11-14

5. February 12-14 2013 Florence Crittenton Workshop 19 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 0% Female 100% – Youth Ages 14-17

17. April 25-27 2013 Adobe Mtn Juvenile Facility Workshop Results 20 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 15-17

6. February 13-15 2013 Heard Elementary Workshop 25 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 64% Female 36% – Youth Ages 12-14 7. February 23-24 2013 Transition East Workshop 11 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 91% Female 9% – Youth Ages 15-17 8. February 23-24 2013 Transition Workshop 12 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 14-17 9. February 26-28 2013 Drugcourt Casa Grande 16 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 75% Female 25% – Youth Ages 13-17 10. March 6-8 2013 Lower Buckeye Workshop 17 Students (2 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 15-17 11. March 16-17 2013 Transition East Workshop 10 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 90% Female 10% – Youth Ages 16-17 12. March 22-23 2013 Transition West Workshop 16 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 15-17 .

18. April 25-27 2013 Adobe Mtn Juvenile Facility Workshop 21 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 14-17 19. April 24-26 2013 Heard Workshop 29 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 68% Female 32% – Youth Ages 12-14 20. April 30-May 2 2013 Lower Buckeye & Estrella Jail Workshop 16 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 62% Female 38% – Youth Ages 15-17 21. May 20-22, 2013 Excelencia Elementary School 18 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 50% Female 50% – Youth Ages 11-13 22. May 20 - 22 2013 Starshine Workshop 22 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 41% Female 59% – Youth Ages 12-16 23. May 26-28 2013 Lower Buckeye Jail Workshop 15 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 15-17


24. June 11-14 2013 New Leaf Summer Program 28 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 25% Female 75% – Youth Ages 12-17 25. June 18-20 2013 Adobe Mtn Juvenile Facility Results Unit: Crossroads 14 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 15-17

33. October 2-4 2013 Heard Elementary School 27 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 59% Female 41% – Youth Ages 12-13 .

26. June 18-20 2013 Adobe Mtn Juvenile Facility Workshop Results Unit: Kachina 18 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 14-17 27. June 25-27 2013 Lower Buckeye Jail Workshop Results 17 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 15-17 28. August 13-15 2013 Adobe Mtn Juvenile Facility Workshop Results Unit: Hope 11 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 15-17

34. October 10-12 2013 U-Turn Facility 20 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 13-17 35. October 18-19 2013 Westside Parole 11 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 14-17 36. October 29-31 2013 Lower Buckeye Jail 14 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 15-17 37. November 5-7 2013 Adobe Mountain: Unit Isis 17 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 0% Female 100% – Youth Ages 15-17 38. November 5-7 2013 Adobe :Unit Challenger 11 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 13-17

29. August 13-15 2013 Adobe Mtn Juvenile Facility Workshop Unit: Freedom 9 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 14-17

39. November 19-22 2013 Lower Buckeye Jail 13 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 15-17

30. September 4-6 2013 Heard Elementary School 26 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 38% Female 62% – Youth Ages 11-13

40. November 22-23 2013 Eastside Parole 9 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 16-17

31. September 3-5 2013 Genesis Academy 18 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 44% Female 56% – Youth Ages 14-19

41. December 3-5 2013 Excelencia Elementary School 17 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 53% Female 47% – Youth Ages 11-12

32. September 24-26 2013 Adobe Mtn Juvenile Facility Workshop Unit: Challenger 27 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 100% Female 0% – Youth Ages 14-17

42. December 17-19 2013 New Leaf 13 Students (1 IO-PB Workshops) Male 38% Female 62% – Youth Ages 15-17


Discover U Summer Camp July 2013 RELEASE THE FEAR Discover U Summer Camp 2013 RTF Pre/Post Survey Results OVERALL PERCENTAGES 63 Students (2 Summer Camps) Male 11% Female 89% – Youth Ages 7-17 92% discovered something new about themselves 92% discovered something new about classmates and friends. Pre 51% compared to Post 84% realized that they are not alone in their fears. Pre 80% compared to Post 98% realized that they can make their dreams a reality. 84% learned something to help them deal with bullying. 92% stated that they would do something if they saw someone being bullied. Pre 30% compared to Post 56% feel that they can Relax and Breathe All the Time. Pre 46% compared to Post 30% eat fruits and vegetables and drink water daily. Pre 72% compared to Post 76% like how they feel after exercise. Larry Kennedy School – 28 Students Florence Crittenton – 35 Students July 15-18 2013 Larry Kennedy School Workshop Results 28 Students (1 Summer Camp) Male 28% Female 72% – Youth Ages 7-14 92% discovered something new about themselves 96% discovered something new about classmates and friends. Pre 46% compared to Post 84% realized that they are not alone in their fears. Pre 64% compared to Post 100% realized that they can make their dreams a reality. 80% learned something to help them deal with bullying. 84% stated that they would do something if they saw someone being bullied. Pre 40% compared to Post 52% feel that they can Relax and Breathe All the Time. Pre 52% compared to Post 32% eat fruits and vegetables and drink water daily. Pre 76% compared to Post 72% like how they feel after exercise. July 22-July 25 2013 Florence Crittenton Workshop Results 35 Students (1 Summer Camp) Male 0% Female 100% – Youth Ages 13-17 92% discovered something new about themselves 88% discovered something new about classmates and friends. Pre 56% compared to Post 84% realized that they are not alone in their fears. Pre 96% compared to Post 96% realized that they can make their dreams a reality. 88% learned something to help them deal with bullying. 100% stated that they would do something if they saw someone being bullied. Pre 20% compared to Post 60% feel that they can Relax and Breathe All the Time. Pre 40% compared to Post 28% eat fruits and vegetables and drink water daily. Pre 68% compared to Post 80% like how they feel after exercise.


Release The Fear, Inc. Profit and Loss Jan - Dec '13 Ordinary Income/Expense Income

2013 Cash Inflows

Contributions Income

81,460

Grants

26,485

Other Income

Reimbursed Expenses, $9,040.00

Total Income Gross Profit

In-Kind, $24,400.00

117,610 117,610

Expense Automobile Expense Bank Service Charges Contract Labor Credit Card Fees

Grants, $26,485.00

9,665

Fund Raising Expenses

Contribution s Income, $81,264.30

Grant Expenses Insurance Interest Expense Licenses and Permits Marketing

Membership Dues, $625.00

445 73 1,736 78 733 173 1,491 12 382 442

Miscellaneous

1,210

Office Supplies

3,258

Postage and Delivery

301

Printing and Reproduction

441

Professional Fees Accounting

6,614

Grant Writing

3,750

Website Development

Travel & Bank Ent, Service Telephone, $175.00 Rent, Charges, $600.00 $525.00 225.00 Insurance, $1,080.00

Total Professional Fees Rent Computer Repairs Telephone

Profession al Fees, $18,974.04

Office Supplies, $2,550.00

1,250 12,424 600 45 416

Travel & Ent Meals

Licenses and Permits, $10.00

810

Artist Director Fees

Travel Travel & Ent - Other Total Travel & Ent Website

689 14 731 1,434 25

Workshop-Contract Labor

13,961

Workshop-Facilitator

73,146

Workshop-Supplies/Materials Total Expense Net Ordinary Income

5,936 118,762 -1,152

Other Income/Expense Other Income In Kind Donations Total Other Income

2013 Administrative Expenses

33,200 33,200

Other Expense In Kind Expense Accounting

1,200

Consulting/Grants

20,000

Rent

12,000

Total In Kind Expense Other Expenses Total Other Expense Net Other Income Net Income

33,200 0 33,200 0 -1,152


Release The Fear, Inc. Balance Sheet

2013 Program Expenses

Dec 31, '13

$75.00 $2,756.67

ASSETS

$4,743.51

Current Assets

$2,900.00

$13,400.00

Checking/Savings Wells Fargo Checking

Automobile Expense $38,640.00 $54,620.00

Professional Fees Program Development WorkshopContract Labor WorkshopFacilitator WorkshopSupplies/Materials

Total Checking/Savings Total Current Assets

Leasehold Improvements Office Equipment Total Fixed Assets TOTAL ASSETS

$525.00

$1,080.00

8,453 837 9,290 93,731

Liabilities Current Liabilities Credit Cards 1,060

Total Credit Cards

1,060

Total Current Liabilities

1,060 1,060

Equity

$325.00 $440.56

$2,500.00

Restricted Funds Construction - Office Remodel Non-liquid Assets

Bank Service Charges Fund Raising Expenses Insurance $18,974.04

84,441

LIABILITIES & EQUITY

Total Liabilities

225.00

84,441

Fixed Assets

Wells Fargo Credit Card

2013

84,441

Postage and Delivery Printing and Reproduction Professional Fees Rent

Program

264 9,291 15,522

Total Restricted Funds

25,077

Unrestricted Funds

67,596

YTD Net Income Allocation

1,151

Net Income

-1,151

Total Equity TOTAL LIABILITIES & EQUITY

92,673 93,733


-

20,000.00

10,000.00 Dues and Subscriptions

Repairs

Printing and Reproduction

Travel & Entertainment

Licenses and Permits

Telephone

Postage and Delivery

Office Supplies

Insurance

Fund Raising Expenses

Equipment Rental

Workshop-Supplies/Materials

Workshop-Facilitator

Workshop-Contract Labor

Automobile Expense Program Development

Rent

30,000.00

Professional Fees

40,000.00 Professional Fees

50,000.00

Rent

60,000.00 Marketing

2013 Budget Expenses

Marketing

Dues and…

Repairs

Printing and…

Licenses and Permits

Travel & Ent

Telephone

Postage and Delivery

Office Supplies

Insurance

Fund Raising Expenses

Equipment Rental

Workshop-…

Workshop-Facilitator

Workshop-Contract…

Program Development

Automobile Expense

2014 Budget Expenses

$50,000.00 $45,000.00 $40,000.00 $35,000.00 $30,000.00 $25,000.00 $20,000.00 $15,000.00 $10,000.00 $5,000.00 $-


2014 $180,000.00 $160,000.00 $140,000.00 $120,000.00 $100,000.00 $80,000.00 $60,000.00 $40,000.00 $20,000.00 $-

Total Program Expense: Total Admininstrative Expense: Total Fundraising Expense:

2014 Program Expenses $3,521.00 $19,199.25

$236.25 Automobile Expense

$24,922.75

Bank Service Charges Professional Fees

$43,362.00

$33,375.74

Program Development Workshop-Contract Labor Workshop-Facilitator

$45,808.00

Workshop-Supplies/Materials

2014 $630.00

$236.25

$2,625.00

$3,192.00

$1,210.00

$525.00 Fund Raising Expenses Insurance Postage and Delivery $24,922.75

Printing and Reproduction Professional Fees Rent


RELEASE THE FEAR'S INC. 2014 PROFIT & LOSS PROJECTED BUDGET Ordinary Income/Expense Contributions Cash Income 212,758 Total Income 212,758 Gross Profit 212,758 Expense Automobile Expense 3,529 Bank Service Charges 237 Credit Card Fees 32 Dues and Subscriptions 6 Equipment Rental 236 Fund Raising Expenses 237 Insurance 3,040 Licenses and Permits 11 2014 Budget Contributions Marketing 1,684 250,000.00 Office Supplies 2,684 Postage and Delivery 526 200,000.00 Printing and Reproduction 1,222 Professional Fees 24,974 150,000.00 Program Development 33,376 100,000.00 Rent 632 Repairs 158 50,000.00 Telephone 884 Travel & Entertainment 184 In-Kind Total Monetary Workshop-Contract Labor 45,923 Contributions Workshop-Facilitator 52,500 Workshop-Supplies/Materials 19,247 Total Expense 191,323 Net Ordinary Income 21,435 Professional Services Contributed (In-Kind) Internships 9,600 Accounting 1,200 Rent 12,000 Total Professional Services Contributed (In-Kind) 22,800 Total Contributions 258,358


Thank you all from our hearts and the hearts of those we serve for believing in our mission and vision, that each and every child is deserving to be inspired and empower with the tools to make better life choices today are able to find their gifts they have to share with the world around them. Most Sincerely,

All of us at RElease the FEar Office- 302 W. Monroe in Downtown Phoenix Mailing-332 W. Lynwood Phoenix, AZ 85003 info@release the fear.org www.releasethefear.org

Release the fear 2013 annual report 6 29 2014  
Release the fear 2013 annual report 6 29 2014  
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