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on on i t ti ra a a c p e r du Cho p E y y ice r d An Gym a u Ele aly nasiu St nd o m cti tic ec Active participation S al ve er p s an ng i n r a e d c Uph stx ed L e s a B rit f m m e l b m ica Pro a r g lt o r hin p y kin tud s g ed s i al i c e Sp

THE “GYMNASIUM” – A DANISH UPPER SECONDARY EDUCATION A guide to the Danish education system with a focus on Upper Secondary Education, in particular the stx programme


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Contents Education with a Global Perspective.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 The Danish Education System – an outline.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Primary Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Vocational Education and Training. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 General Upper Secondary Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Gymnasium (stx). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Teaching Style in Denmark. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 The Grading System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Facts about gymnasium. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18


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Education with a Global Perspective Students, researchers, business leaders and employees increasingly travel abroad and work in collaboration with people from other countries. This places strong demands on our ability to interact effectively at an international level and on our understanding of other cultures. Education and training programmes must therefore furnish young people with strong academic and professional competences as well as a global outlook. It is important for all education programmes to have a global perspective so that young people develop an understanding of other cultures and acquire the qualifications and competences to participate in a globalised world. Danish education institutions – including upper secondary schools - and their students already today participate in numerous international activities. To facilitate our schools and help them to participate in further cooperation with foreign education institutions, the “Gymnasieskolernes Rektorforening” –The Danish Association of Upper Secondary Schools - has issued the publication “The Gymnasium – A Danish Upper Secondary Education”. The Association organises the education institutions that offer the stx and hf qualifications. The publication presents the entire Danish education system, with an emphasis on general upper secondary education, and provides insight into student life in Denmark.


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programmes, can be divided into: •  Vocational upper secondary education and training programmes, which primarily prepare trainees for a career in a specific trade or industry •  General upper secondary education programmes, which prepare students for higher education Higher education in Denmark is offered at three levels: short-cycle higher education, mediumcycle higher education and long-cycle higher education. The short-cycle and medium-cycle programmes are the academy profession programmes offered at the Academies of Professional Higher Education (Erhvervsakademier) and the professional bachelor programmes offered at the University Colleges (Professionshøjskoler).

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The Danish upper secondary education programmes, also referred to as youth education

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Education is compulsory between the age of six and sixteen. Compulsory education consists of ten years of primary and lower secondary education, including one pre-school year (grade 0) plus nine years (grades 1 – 9). Public school education also offers the pupils an optional year (grade 10).

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er p g n i nd Up stx n r a Le d e e s cri hf a B m m e tic bl m o r P a r al g o th r p ink y ingoutline stud The Danish Education System – an d sece The Danish education system consists of “grundskole” (combining primary andslower li upper secondary education), “ungdomsuddannelser” (youth education programmes,ai.e. i c well as a system ondary education) and “videregående uddannelser” (higher education),eas p of adult education. S es


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The long-cycle programmes such as the bachelor, master and PhD programmes are offered at the universities. The model below shows a complete outline of the Danish education system. 0

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UNIVERSITET

FOLKESKOLE / GRUNDSKOLE

ALDERSINTEGREREDE INSTITUTIONER GYMNASIUM

PROFESSIONSHØJSKOLE

HANDELSSKOLE/TEKNISK SKOLE

ERHVERVSAKADEMI

ERHVERVSSKOLE

Early childhood education and care (for which the Ministry of Education is not responsible)

Secondary vocational education

Early childhood education and care (for which the Ministry of Education is responsible)

Post-secondary non-tertiary education

Primary education

Tertiary education (full-time)

Allocation to the ISCED levels:

Single structure ISCED 0

ISCED 1

Compulsory full-time education Compulsory part-time education

Source: Eurydice

Secondary general education ISCED 2

Additional year

>>

ISCED 3

ISCED 4

ISCED 5A

Combined school and workplace courses

Study abroad -/n/- Compulsory work experience + its duration

ISCED 5B

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Education is compulsory in Denmark for everyone between the ages of 6-7 and 16. Prior to this, most children attend some kind of day nursery from the age of 1-2, however this is not mandatory.

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dL i a lisprivate e Whether the education is received in a public school, or through homeschooling It is education itself ed school is a matter of individual choice, as long as accepted standards saretumet.dIt is education itself thatarn that is compulsory ing is compulsory - not school - however most children attend public school. y pro gra Edunot school The accepted standards are centrally defined standards stipulated by the Ministry of m m e cation. National legislation covers the aims and framework of education, funding and in some cases curricula, examinations and staffing. The Ministry of Education is responsible for setting nsciofotheus lly ctheocontent up the framework for curricula at primary and secondary ciaHowever, Solevel.

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The Danish public school – “Folkeskole” - is a comprehensive school covering both primary and lower secondary education, i.e. first (grades 1 to 6) and second (grades 7-9/10) stage basic education. In other words, it caters for the 6/7 to 16/17 year olds. The “Folkeskole” consists of one year of pre-school class, nine years of primary and lower secondary education and a oneyear 10th grade, which is optional.

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courses is finalised by the teachers themselves, with their pupils. The Ministry of Education oversees the public schools in collaboration with the municipal councils.


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Vocational Education and Training Vocational education and training in Denmark (VET) includes a vast range of programmes. The duration of these programmes varies from between 1 ½ to 5 ½ years, the most typical length being 3 ½ to 4 years. VET programmes are sandwich-type programmes in which theoretical and practical education at a vocational college alternates with practical training in an approved company or organisation. The dual training principle ensures that the trainees acquire the theoretical, practical, general and personal skills which are in demand on the labour market. The VET programmes qualify primarily for access to the labour market.


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There are four academically oriented general upper secondary programmes:

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• The 3-year Upper Secondary School Leaving Examination (stx) • The 3-year Higher Commercial Examination (hhx) • The 3-year Higher Technical Examination (htx) • The 2-year Higher Preparatory Examination (hf)

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With regards to the stx, hhx and htx programmes, every school also offers a number of different specialised study programmes and elective subjects for students to choose from. The specialised study programme is of a longer duration than the basic programme.

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With regards to the hf programme, students choose from among the elective subjects offered by the school. The curricula of the hhx and htx differ from those of stx and the hf in the sense that the hhx, in addition to a number of general upper secondary subjects, includes financial and business subjects, and the htx includes technical subjects.

further studies and develop their personal and general academic competences

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All four programmes prepare pupils for further studies and develop their personal and general academic competences. The programmes aim to enhance the students’ independent analytical skills as well as prepare them to become democratic and socially conscious citizens with a global outlook. Each of the education programmes has its own specific range of common compulsory subjects for all students.

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The stx and hf programmes consist of a broad range of subjects in the fields of humanities, natural sciences and social sciences. The hhx programme focuses on socio-economic disciplines in combination with foreign languages and other general subjects. The htx programme has its focus on technological and scientific subjects in combination with general subjects. The stx and hf programmes are offered by general upper secondary schools. This type of school is called a “gymnasium�. Business and technical colleges offer the hhx and htx programmes respectively. Some schools are mixed institutions and offer various types of programmes.


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Gymnasium (stx) Even though all four of the upper secondary education programmes come under the category “gymnasium”, it is primarily the stx qualification that is strictly speaking a “gymnasium” qualification. What sometimes causes confusion is that the gymnasium is both the institution and the education. This means that a student typically goes to a certain gymnasium in the country, however also attends the gymnasium – meaning the stx education programme. Of all four upper secondary school programmes, student intake into general upper secondary education is the highest for the stx programme. In 2013, 48 per cent of the pupils leaving grade 9 and 10 applied to the stx programme. And the programme is a success. The completion rate is high and the programme is the primary provider of academically proficient students to the higher education programmes. The focus in the stx is on general education and general preparation for higher education. The academic standard is closely linked to aspects of the academic subjects, and the aim is for the students to achieve general education and study competences in the humanities, natural sciences and social sciences with a view to completion of higher education. Students should, in the course of their academic progression, develop insight and study skills. They must become familiar with the application of various approaches and working methods and acquire the ability to function in a school environment that demands independence, cooperation and a keen sense of seeking out knowledge.

What sometimes causes confusion is that the gymnasium is both the institution and the education.


• History A • Classical studies C • Physics C • Physical education (PE) C • Mathematics C • Religion C • Social science C

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• An artistic subject C

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ce An Gym u t d Ele aly nasiu S n o c m cti tic Se Active participation al ve r pestx s an ng i p n r a e dc U h L d e e s a B f rit m m e l m ob i r P c a r a Specialised study programmes at gymnasiums g lt o r h Since the reform of the gymnasium in 2005, the stx-programme provided a wide variety of p inhask means options allowing applicants to decide what direction to choose. This that the education dy instudent is tailored to the interests and wishes of the individual student. Each goes through tua s g basic programme (1/2 year) with a number of compulsory subjects and levels. ed s i l The focus in the a Compulsory subjects and levels i c e • Danish A stx is on general p S • English B education and general preparation for higher education.


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As a minimum, the student must choose 4 A level subjects, 3 B level subjects and 7 C level subjects. The student always has the option of choosing more A and B level subjects, but may not choose fewer subjects. In addition, at least two of the following subjects must be chosen: biology, chemistry and geography at C level. Most students must also complete mathematics biology, physics, chemistry or geography at A and B level. The compulsory artistic subject is chosen from visual arts, drama, media studies or music. The most popular choice of 2nd foreign language is: French continued level B and A, German continued level B and A, French beginner language A, Italian A, Russian A, Spanish A or German beginner language A, Chinese A, with possibilities for other languages in some schools. Some of the instruction is in the form of multi-subject courses within the framework of general study preparation, general lan-guage understanding and a natural science basic programme. Following this, the student must choose a specialisation or direction, which combines two or three subjects within natural sciences, social sciences or humanities and includes artistic subjects.

This broad variety of directions in the stx programme gives students the opportunity to adjust their upper secondary education to their envisaged future study course or job.


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Structure of the programme

Specialised study programme 2 ½ years Compulsory subjects

Danish A History A Religion C English B Physical education C Classics C

Mathematics C Physics C Social science C Natural science B

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This broad variety of directions in the stx programme gives students the opportunity to adjust their upper secondary education to their envisaged future study course or job. This choice of a specialised study programme and electives takes place in parallel with the compulsory subjects, and each student writes a specialised study project in the third year within two or three subjects of their choice and selects a number of elective subjects. The number varies according to the study field subjects taken by the student.

Two of the following subjects , depending on the school

Specialised study subjects

2nd foreign language

Electives

Biology C Chemistry C Natural science C

Normally three subjects constituting the specialised study programme

Continued level B or Beginner languageA

Two or three electives

Basic Programme ½ year In addition, there is multi-subject coursework, for example in a language and a natural science subject. History

Social science

A natural science subject

Mathematics

Danish

English

Physical education

Artistic subject

2 nd foreign language


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Each individual education institution that offers stx has a broad variety of directions, and therefore the choices and education profiles offers by each gymnasium varies from school to school.

Examples of choice of specialised study subjects and electives

Example 1

Example 2

Example 3

Example 4

Specialised study subjects: Mathematics A Physics B Chemistry B

Specialised study subjects: English A German A Psychology B

Specialised study subjects: Social Science A Mathematics A Business economics C

Specialised study subjects: Music A Mathematics B Psychology C

Electives: English A Astronomy C

Electives: Natural science subject B Social science B

Electives: Natural science subject

Electives: Natural science subject B English A


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At all levels of the education system, pupils and students attend classes; however, they also carry out project work, either on an individual basis or in small groups. Treating pupils and students as independent individuals with a right to form their own opinion and a duty to participate actively in discussions is a matter of course in Danish education. Pupils and students in Denmark are expected to play an active role in their own learning process. Apart from attending traditional lectures, they engage in project work and are encouraged to participate in open discussions with their teachers and fellow students. The education and school culture as a whole is designed to prepare pupils and students for active participation, joint responsibility, rights and duties in a society based on freedom and democracy. Teaching and the entire school day thus build on intellectual freedom, equality and democracy, allowing pupils and students to acquire the fundamentals for active participation in a democratic society and an understanding of the possibilities for individually and collectively contributing to development and change, and the understanding of the national, European and global perspective.

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cipa tion m Base m d Lear De ning e m m a r g o y pr Teaching Style in Denmark d u s t s d u e s i l o a i i c Speto ensure competitiveness in toProvision of high quality education at all levels is essential sc n day’s global society. Thus Danish education aims to ensure that all young people acquire the co knowledge and competences which will qualify them to play an active part in the knowledgelly society and contribute to its further development. Danish secondary education is characia c Problem Based Learning (PBL) o terised by innovative teaching methods and an informal learning environment designed to S is a key feature of education in promote creativity, self-expression, analytical and critical thinking. 16

Denmark. PBL promotes the student’s innovative abilities through problembased group projects with the teacher as a consultant, and sometimes in collaboration with a company to work on real-world problems.


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The Grading System The grading system in Denmark applies to all education institutions. The seven-point scale allows you to easily convert Danish grades into ECTS credits according to the EU European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System. The ongoing evaluation of the student’s progress is in the form of oral and written exams. The quality of Danish education is assured in many ways. It is mainly regulated and financed by the state under the Ministry of Education, and all public education institutions, grading systems etc. are approved and evaluated on an ongoing basis. Overview of the Danish seven-point scale

Grade

Description

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For an excellent performance displaying a high level of command of all aspects of the relevant material, with no or only a few minor weaknesses

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For a very good performance displaying a high level of command of most aspects of the relevant material, with only minor weaknesses

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For a good performance displaying good command of the relevant material but also some weaknesses

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For a fair performance displaying some command of the relevant material but also some weakness

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For a performance meeting only the minimum requirements for acceptance

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For a performance which does not meet the minimum requirements for acceptance

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For a performance which is unacceptable in all respects.

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In some cases, a simple pass or fail can be given instead of grades. Performance is assessed according to academic targets set for the specific subject or course.


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atio n o s ndar s •  There are a total of 168 education institutions offering the stx and hf qualifications. Of these, e c y Ed romembers of The Danish Association of 19 institutions are private and 148 of thempare g ucat Upper Secondary Schools n i n ion r P a the three year upper secondary education •  139 of these institutions eprovide ro programme, L stx, with some of them also providing the two year hf programme and the year IB blthree The completion em programme rate is high and the •  About 48 per cent of the pupils leaving grade 9 or 10 in 2013 applied for the stx proB gramme programme is the as Specwas 87 per cent ed primary provider •  In 2012, the completion rate of the stx programme ialisguaranteeing every young L •  These education institutions are scattered all over Denmark, ea of academically d stueducation person in the country the opportunity to participate in uppere secondary rproficient nin students to •  About 49 per cent of the stx students choose to take a university bachelord degree course y p rogto r theghigher education and at least 23 per cent a professional bachelor course. Furthermore, 5 per cent choose amm study further at an Academy of Professional Higher Education programmes. e Socially conscious

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Published by: Gymnasieskolernes Rektorforening Ny Vestergade 13 1471 Copenhagen K This publication has been put together using relevant information provided by The Ministry of Education and Eurydice. www.uvm.dk www.eacea.ec.europa.eu/education/eurydice The publication is available online at: www.rektorforeningen.dk November 2013


Published by: Gymnasieskolernes Rektorforening, Ny Vestergade 13, 1471 Copenhagen K


THE GYMNASIUM - A Danish Upper Secondary Education