Issuu on Google+

Academic Catalogue 2011-2012

Show me your ways, Lord, teach me your paths.

Academic Catalogue 2011-2012

5800 University Boulevard Vancouver, BC Canada V6T 2E4 Phone: 604.224.3245 Fax: 604.224.3097 Toll-free: 1.800.663.8664 Website: regent-college.edu Admissions e-mail: admissions@regent-college.edu


Email Addresses Academic Dean’s Office deansoffice@regent-college.edu Admissions admissions@regent-college.edu (questions about application process, programs, campus visits; requests for information, catalogues, forms) Alumni/ae Relations alumni@regent-college.edu Bookstore bookstore@regent-college.edu Chinese Studies Department chinese.studies@regent-college.edu Conferences conferences@regent-college.edu Crux Editor crux@regent-college.edu Crux Subscriptions cruxsubs@regent-college.edu Dean of Students Office deanofstudentsoffice@regent-college.edu Development (mailing list, donor relations) development@regent-college.edu Distance Education distance.education@regent-college.edu. Financial Aid financial.aid@regent-college.edu Housing Assistant housing@regent-college.edu International Student Services international@regent-college.edu Library Information reference@regent-college.edu Human Resources hr@regent-college.edu President’s Office presidentsoffice@regent-college.edu Privacy Officer privacyofficer@regent-college.edu Registrar registrar@regent-college.edu Registration registration@regent-college.edu Student Accounts Officer financial.aid@regent-college.edu Student Academic Advising academic.advising@regent-college.edu Student Services student.services@regent-college.edu Transcripts records@regent-college.edu Show me your ways, Lord, teach me your paths. The labyrinth is an ancient symbol for the spiritual journey. It presents one continuous path, with a clearly defined entrance and a clearly defined centre. The journey may be meandering, but it remains intentional: to grow ever closer to God and to discern and fulfill our purpose in the world. We only need to make one choice: to walk the path or not. Your path at Regent College is a microcosm of the greater path of life and faith. Like the labyrinth, the Regent path—however challenging or winding— always leads you towards the centre that is Christ. And as you walk this path, you are supported by a diverse community that strengthens your resolve and aids your discernment. This labyrinthine path leads you through three distinct stages. Formation. As you move from the entrance to the centre, you ask questions, seek discernment, and shed any acquired perspectives of God and your life’s purpose that no longer hold true. You acquire new knowledge, new relationships, and new perspectives. And you become formed more and more closely to the person of Christ. Transformation. At the centre, the process of shedding old ways of thinking and acquiring new perspectives leads to clarity and focus. You experience a massive shift in how you see God and your life’s purpose. You become transformed. Integration. As you move from the centre back out into the world, you begin to integrate your new insights with new directions in your life and work. You have become grounded in your faith, and you share that faith with the world by pursuing a vocation that makes a difference. Regent College: leading you on the path of faith and life.


A N I N T E R N AT I O N A L G R A D U AT E S C H O O L OF CHRISTIAN STUDIES

ACADEMIC CATALOGUE 2011-2012


Table of Contents Email Addresses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . inside front cover Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 From the Dean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Global Mission. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Educational Mission. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Core Values. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Theological Position. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Ethos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Accreditation & Affiliation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Calendar of Important Dates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Faculty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Retired, Emeritus & Board of Governors’ Professors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Teaching Fellows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Carey Theological College Faculty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Academic Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 The Diploma in Christian Studies Program (DipCS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Master of Christian Studies Program (MCS). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Master of Divinity Program (MDiv). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Master of Theology Program (ThM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Distance Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Course Offerings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 General Non-Credit Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Applied Theology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Biblical Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Church History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Interdisciplinary Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Biblical Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Spiritual Theology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Systematic & Historical Theology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Academic Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Program Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Academic Policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Grading Schedule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Fees & Expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Payment, Accounts & Refunds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Regular Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Other Fees & Expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Summary of Fees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Board of Governors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Senate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Privacy Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this Academic Catalogue at the time of printing, the information and policies contained herein are subject to change without notice.


Introduction From the Dean Welcome to Regent College! I hope that in coming to Regent, you are prepared for the possibility of your life being transformed . Being a Regent student involves a process that will test and stretch you . At the heart of Regent’s mission is the challenge to think seriously about the Christian faith . The intellectual dynamic created by having students and faculty from different national, vocational, and denominational backgrounds makes for a stimulating learning environment . We treasure the rich diversity of our community . Within the same class there will be Canadians, Americans, Chinese, Koreans, Australians, and Africans; engineers, nurses, teachers, business people, homemakers, ministers and missionaries; Baptists, Presbyterians, Anglicans and Pentecostals along with many others whom God draws to this school . And we are all engaged in theological education for the whole people of God . You will find your convictions examined and I hope, deepened, and you will be challenged to “think outside the box .” But our mission to think Christianly should be seen as part of a more comprehensive task involving the transformation and integration of our whole lives–mind, heart and will . This is the perspective from which we approach education . However, the non-academic events at Regent are also important for our mission . In our weekly chapel services together we reflect on the significance of God’s Word to us today and respond in a variety of worship styles and liturgies; the artistic displays and performances taking place around the College throughout the year point us to the importance of creativity and aesthetics; the weekly Community Groups provide an opportunity for students, faculty and staff to develop relationships and to care for one another . And the goal is that we become whole people, people who display, as our Global Mission Statement puts it, an “intelligent, vigorous, and joyful commitment to Jesus Christ, His Church, and His World .” Bernard of Clairvaux once observed that while some seek to learn for learning’s sake, or out of curiosity, or others out of a desire for mastery and self-promotion, none of these motives are worthy of the Christian . But, he writes, “there are some who desire to know that they may edify others, and that is praiseworthy; and there are some who desire to know that they themselves may be edified, and that is wise .” My prayer for you is that in coming to Regent you will be edified and as a result you will be able to edify others . Paul S . Williams Again, may I welcome you to Regent College, to what I trust will be a lifeAcademic Dean transforming experience that will serve to the glory of God in your life . 1


Global Mission

Regent College cultivates intelligent, vigorous, and joyful commitment to Jesus Christ, His church, and His world.

Educational Mission

Our hope for students is that through their time at Regent College their lives will become more fully integrated in Christ, so that their minds are filled with the truth of Christ, their imaginations captivated by the glory of Christ, and their characters formed according to the virtues of Christ. We understand our educational mission to be what the New Testament calls paradosis (transmission), the handing on of living faith from one generation to another. In service of the Church we engage in graduate education through a kind of higher catechism or paideia (formation) that enables Christians to live more thoughtfully in varied vocations in the church and the world. By our formal classroom interaction, and by the culture we foster more generally at Regent College, we aim to help students to see all of life—and all aspects of our own lives—as spheres of God’s creative and redemptive work. As students leave Regent College, they should be prepared to pass this vision on to another generation. Regent College does not aim principally to prepare students for thoughtful and virtuous citizenship, or to prepare them with the necessary skills to succeed in the workplace. These aims of higher education have their place at Regent only within the larger educational aim of preparing students to engage with their culture as thoughtful and prayerful Christians, sharing in Christ’s creative and redemptive mission to the world. Since our ideals are as high as those of the apostle Paul who aimed to “present everyone perfect in Christ,” we will never be able either to see our educational mission fully achieved, nor will we ever be able to take much credit for the lives of our graduates when they demonstrate the sorts of qualities we desire for them. Yet we will rejoice with our graduates ■ when we see that they are passionately devoted to Christ, seeking after holiness, their lives shaped at the deepest level by prayer and Scripture, sharing in the suffering of Christ in order to bring life to others. ■ when we see that their domestic and intimate lives are rich with family and friendship, celebration, service, and a joyful stewardship of the gifts of creation. ■ when we see them participating fully in the life of the church, leading in ministries of evangelism, discipleship, teaching, worship, and healing, and exercising their gifts to further the work of the kingdom in all its forms. ■ when we see that they are able to discern their work in the world as God’s work and to grasp how their Christian faith calls them to live creatively, thoughtfully and redemptively as artists, teachers, politicians and public servants; doctors, lawyers and business executives; engineers, carpenters and social workers; pastors, missionaries, and youth workers; and in every other worthy vocation, paid and unpaid.

Core Values

1. A Graduate School of Christian Studies. Regent College is a graduate school of Christian Studies grounded in the love of God, the grace of Jesus Christ, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit. As a community of Christian scholars, we believe that rigorous academic study is an expression of our love for God and that it is vital to the health and mission of the church. We invite students into our community in the hope that our curriculum will establish them in the evangelical tradition, that it will deepen their faith and theological understanding, that it will introduce them to the discipline of Christian scholarship, and that it will prepare them for ministry both within and outside the institutional church. As a community we aim not simply to be informed by study but also to be transformed by the Holy Spirit through study, to the end that we might become more Christ-like and therefore more fully human. By being conformed to Christ-both to his life and to his suffering-we come to know and love our creator, the Triune God. Loving God, we desire also to love our neighbour and to learn to take our responsibilities in creation seriously. We are committed to a Christian vision of the human person, and this is reflected both in our curriculum and in our life together as students, faculty, staff, and governors. The Gospel of Jesus Christ, we believe, applies to every aspect and to every arena of life. 2. What We Believe: Historical Evangelicalism. As an evangelical institution, we confess a statement of faith modeled on that of the World Evangelical Fellowship, and we seek to stand robustly in the evangelical tradition. To this end we affirm the unique authority and trustworthiness of the Holy Scriptures, the supremacy of Christ, the necessity of personal repentance and faith, and the importance of bearing witness to Christ in word and deed. At the same time, we recognize the importance of holding and defending evangelical convictions graciously and reasonably. We are indebted to many of the insights of non-Christian scholarship. And we are

2 •  Introduction


profoundly grateful for how much we have been, and continue to be, blessed by the entire Christian traditionOrthodox, Roman Catholic, and Protestant, worldwide. We endeavour also to model love for the church. We emphasize the importance for the Christian life of participation in the local church, while continually framing local participation within the context of the church universal. 3. Whom We Serve: The Church, the Marketplace and the Academy. Regent College was founded for the purpose of providing graduate level theological education to lay believers. Through our core curriculum, we continue to strive to provide a fully integrated theological education to students from all backgrounds, including those arriving from careers in the church, the marketplace and the academy. The College’s original vision has subsequently expanded to include educating and training pastors and other leaders in mission organizations and parachurch ministries. We also aim to prepare students for research and study at the doctoral level. In all our educational programs we seek first to reflect Christianly on the whole of human life and only secondarily do we focus on professional training. 4. What We Look Like: People and Space. Our faculty places high value on collegiality, and we have resisted growing so large that we must divide into departments. We believe that students and staff, as well as faculty, benefit from our intentionally small size. The College is also intentionally diverse. We value the energy and insight that come from bringing together women and men of different denominational traditions, from different ethnic and national backgrounds, and with very different vocational goals in view. We view the tensions such diversity creates as healthy and positive, for they provide us with the opportunity to learn courtesy and to experience something of the breadth and depth of God’s kingdom. Our diversity also encourages us to celebrate our oneness in Christ and to seek to manifest an allegiance to Christ that transcends our membership in and loyalty to human communities. The particular place and space that the college occupies is not incidental to the College’s mission. Our relatively small, light-filled facility fosters personal interaction and face-to-face learning. And our location on the campus of a major university encourages us to work and think in the larger context of contemporary society and culture. 5. Prayer. Regent College’s core vision is not so much something that we have determined ourselves as it is the gift of God, entrusted to us for the sake of the church and the world. By God’s grace the College has made a significant difference in the lives of a great many women and men around the world. We are amazed by this and deeply grateful for it. And we look forward to serving all those who come to us, knowing that everything we undertake depends entirely upon God’s gracious provision. “May the favour of the Lord our God rest on us; establish the work of our hands for us-yes, establish the work of our hands.” (Psalm 90:17)

Theological Position

We accept wholeheartedly the revelation of God given in the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments and confess the faith therein set forth and summarized in such historic statements of the Christian church as the Apostles’ Creed and the Nicene Creed. We here explicitly assert doctrines that are regarded as crucial to the understanding and proclamation of the gospel and to practical Christian living. 1. The sovereignty and grace of God the Father, Son and Holy Spirit in creation, providence, revelation, redemption and final judgment. 2. The divine inspiration of Holy Scripture and its consequent entire trustworthiness and supreme authority in all matters of faith and conduct. 3. The universal sinfulness and guilt of human nature since the fall, bringing everyone under God’s wrath and condemnation. 4. The substitutionary sacrifice of the incarnate Son of God as the sole ground of redemption from the guilt, penalty and power of sin. 5. The justification of the sinner by the grace of God through faith alone in Christ crucified and risen from the dead. 6. The illuminating, regenerating, indwelling and sanctifying work of God the Holy Spirit in the believer. 7. The unity and common priesthood of all true believers, who together form the one universal Church, the Body of which Christ is the Head. 8. The expectation of the personal, visible return of the Lord Jesus Christ. Each year all faculty (both full-time and sessionals), senior administrators and members of the Board of Governors subscribe in writing, and without reservation, to the College’s Theological position.

Introduction •  3


Ethos

Regent College, as a Christian academic community, takes relationships seriously, seeking to understand and live them in light of our biblical and theological commitments. We want to embrace the vast implications of being the “new humanity in Christ,” including how we treat gender, ethnic, racial, denominational and theological differences (cf. Galatians 3:28). Regent College welcomes students as varied as the whole people of God and seeks to create an environment in which all students feel safe to engage in courteous and respectful conversation in the pursuit of truth, as we seek to be formed and reformed by the Scriptures. The College welcomes and actively pursues qualified faculty reflective of this commitment.

Accreditation & Affiliation

Regent College has been accredited by the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada since 1985 (10 Summit Park Drive, Pittsburgh, PA, 15275-1103; phone: (412) 788-6505; website: <www.ats.edu>). Regent College is also affiliated with the University of British Columbia (UBC). Although Regent remains independent in terms of its own curriculum, and although programs are not jointly offered by UBC and Regent, affiliation status with the university makes available a wide range of educational and student services to Regent College students. Furthermore, the location of Regent College on the campus of a major university is strategic in terms of the College’s mission.

Calendar of Important Dates 2011–2012 Academic Year (Note: dates subject to change; deadlines are 4:30 pm)

Summer Term 2011 May 3–6 May 6

May 9–June 10 May 23 June 1 June 23 June 27–August 12 July 1 July 2 July 31 August 1

August 1 August 19

Fall Term 2011 September 2 September 5

4 •  Calendar

Pastors’ Conference Thesis & IPIAT Registration Deadline Last day to register for a thesis or integrative project in the arts and theology for the Summer 2011 term. Spring Session Courses Victoria Day: College open for registration, classes & Library; Offices closed Admissions Confirmation Deadline (for Summer & Fall 2011) See the Prospectus for further information. New Student Orientation All newly admitted students starting in Summer Term are encouraged to attend. Summer Session Courses Canada Day: College open for classes & Library; Offices closed Admissions Application Completion Deadline (for Winter 2012) See the Prospectus for further information. Distance Education Registration Deadline Last day to register for a distance education course for the Summer 2011 term. Financial Aid Application Deadline (for Winter 2012) Last day to submit applications for bursaries or scholarships for Winter 2012. Students may submit financial aid applications before being admitted; however, they must be admitted to be eligible for an award. See the Prospectus for further information. BC Day: College CLOSED Early Registration Deadline (for Fall 2011) All Fall students are strongly advised to register by this date. Last day to register in order to be given priority in priority enrollment courses that are required for a program (e.g., seminars). International Student Orientation Labour Day: College CLOSED


September 6–8 September 9

September 12 September 23–25

September 26

October 10 October 10–14 October 14

October 14 October 29

November 1 November 11 November 21–25 Nov. 28–Dec. 9 November 30 December 9 December 16 December 16

December 22 Dec. 24–Jan. 2

Winter Term 2012 January 1

January 3-5 January 6

New Student Orientation Attendance is expected of all new students. Fall Term Registration Deadline Last day to register and pay for Fall courses without incurring a late fee. Fees for courses registered on or after this date are due in full at the time of registration. Fall Term classes begin Annual Retreat All students, faculty and staff are welcome at Warm Beach, WA (USA visitor visa required for international students). Course Change & 100% Refund Deadline Last day to add a course, change a course from audit to credit, increase the number of credit hours in a variable credit course, or change courses. Last day to receive 100% refund for dropping a course, changing a course from credit to audit, changing courses, or reducing the number of credit hours in a variable credit course. Thanksgiving Day: College CLOSED Reading Week: No Classes 75% Refund Deadline Last day to receive a 75% refund for dropping a course, changing a course from credit to audit, or reducing the number of credit hours in a variable credit course. No refunds for any changes will be granted after this date. Comprehensive Exam/Paper Registration Deadline Last day to add a comprehensive exam/paper for Fall 2011 Course Drop Deadline Last day to drop a course, change a course from credit to audit, or reduce the number of credit hours in a variable credit course (no refunds). Admissions Confirmation Deadline (for Winter 2012) See Prospectus for further information. Remembrance Day: College open for classes & Library; Offices closed Reading Week: No Classes Comprehensive Exams Distance Education Registration Deadline Last day to add a Distance Education course for Fall 2011 Thesis & IPIAT Registration Deadline Last day to add a thesis or integrative project in the arts & theology for Fall 2011. Last day of classes Early Registration Deadline (for Winter 2012) All Winter students are strongly advised to register for Winter Term by this date. Last day to register in order to be given priority in priority enrollment courses that are required for a program (e.g., seminars). Extension Application Deadline Last day to apply through the Registrar’s Office for an extension to Fall 2011 courses. College CLOSED

Early Admissions Application Completion Deadline for International Students (for Summer & Fall 2012) See Prospectus for further information. New Student Orientation Attendance is expected of all new students. Winter Term Registration Deadline Last day to register and pay for Winter courses without incurring a late fee. Fees for courses registered on or after this date are due in full at the time of registration.

Calendar •  5


January 9 January 20

January 31 January 31

February 1

February 1 February 6–10 February 10

February 10 February 24

March 1

March 12 March 16 March 19– 23 March 26–April 5 March 31 April 5

April 5 April 6 April 9 April 13 April 13 April 20 6 •  Calendar

Winter Term classes begin Course Change & 100% Refund Deadline Last day to add a course, change a course from audit to credit, increase the number of credit hours in a variable credit course, or change courses. Last day to receive 100% refund for dropping a course, changing a course from credit to audit, changing courses, or reducing the number of credit hours in a variable credit course. Thesis Deadline (for grading) Last day for graduating students to submit MCS/ThM theses to supervisors for grading. Graduation Application Deadline Last day to submit online or paper applications for graduation in April 2012 without incurring a late fee. No applications will be accepted after March 15, 2012. Admissions Application Completion Deadline (for Summer & Fall 2012) Applications for admission to the College must be complete by this date in order to be assured consideration for admission or for financial aid. Applications completed after this date will be considered only if space is available. See the Prospectus for further information. Geographic Scholarship Application Deadline (for Fall 2012) See the Prospectus for further information. Reading Week: No Classes 75% Refund Deadline Last day to receive a 75% refund for dropping a course, changing a course from credit to audit, or reducing the number of credit hours in a variable credit course. No refunds for any changes will be granted after this date. Comprehensive Exam/Paper Registration Deadline Last day to add a comprehensive exam/paper for Winter 2012 Course Drop Deadline Last day to drop a course, change a course from credit to audit, or reduce the number of credit hours in a variable credit course (no refunds). Financial Aid Application Deadline (for Fall 2012 & Winter 2013) Last day to submit applications for bursaries or scholarships for the 2012/2013 academic year. Students may submit financial aid applications before being admitted; however, they must be admitted to be eligible for an award. See the Prospectus for further information. Distance Education Assignment Deadline for Graduating Students Last day for graduating students to submit assignments for distance education courses. Thesis Deadline (for proof-reading) Last day for graduating students to submit MCS/ThM theses to the Registrar’s Office for proofreading. Reading Week: No Classes Comprehensive Exams Distance Education Registration Deadline Last day to register for a Distance Education course for Winter 2012. Integrative Project in the Arts and Theology Deadline (for grading) Last day for graduating students to present their integrative project in the arts and theology. The academic/reflective paper must be submitted to the supervisor/second reader prior to the presentation. Thesis & IPIAT Registration Deadline Last day to add a thesis or integrative project in the arts & theology for Winter 2012. Good Friday: College Closed Easter Monday: College open for classes & Library; Offices closed Last day of classes Graduand Payment Deadline Last day for graduating students to settle financial accounts. Extension Application Deadline Last day to apply through the Registrar’s Office for an extension to Winter 2012 courses.


April 23

April 25

April 27

Summer Term 2012 May 1–4 May 4

May 7–June 8 May 21 June 1 June 21 June 25–August 10 July 2 July 2

July 31 August 1

August 6 August 17

Integrative Project in the Arts and Theology Deadline (final copy) Last day for graduating students to submit the final copy of their academic/reflective paper and record of their integrative project in the arts and theology presentation to the Arts Administrator. Thesis Deadline (for binding) Last day for graduating students to submit MCS/ThM theses to the Registrar’s Office for binding. Convocation

Pastors’ Conference Thesis & IPIAT Registration Deadline Last day to register for a thesis or integrative project in the arts & theology for the Summer 2012 term. Spring Session Courses Victoria Day: College open for registration, classes & Library; Offices closed Admissions Confirmation Deadline (for Summer & Fall 2012) See Prospectus for further information. New Student Orientation All newly admitted students starting in Summer Term are encouraged to attend. Summer Session Courses Canada Day Observed: College open for classes & Library; Offices closed Admissions Application Completion Deadline (for Winter 2013) Applications for admission to the College must be complete by this date in order to be assured consideration for admission or for financial aid. Applications completed after this date will be considered for admission only if space is available. See the Prospectus for further information. Distance Education Registration Deadline. Last day to register for a distance education course for the Summer 2012 term. Financial Aid Application Deadline (for Winter 2013) Last day to submit applications for bursaries or scholarships for Winter 2013. Students may submit financial aid applications before being admitted; however, they must be admitted to be eligible for an award. See the Prospectus for further information. BC Day: College CLOSED Early Registration Deadline (for Fall 2012) All Fall students are strongly advised to register by this date. Last day to register in order to be given priority in priority enrollment courses that are required for a program (e.g., seminars).

2012–2013 ACADEMIC YEAR (Note: dates subject to change; deadlines are 4:30 pm)

Fall Term 2012 August 31 September 3 September 4–6 September 7 September 10 September 21–23

International Student Orientation Labour Day: College CLOSED New Student Orientation Fall Term Registration Deadline Fall Term classes begin Annual Retreat

Calendar •  7


September 24 Course Change & 100% Refund Deadline October 8 Thanksgiving Day: College CLOSED October 8–12 Reading Week: No Classes October 12 75% Refund Deadline October 26 Course Drop Deadline November 1 Admissions Confirmation Deadline (for Winter 2013) November 12 Remembrance Day Observed: College open for classes & Library; Offices closed November 19–23 Reading Week: No Classes November 30 Distance Education Registration Deadline (for Fall 2012) December 7 Thesis & IPIAT Registration Deadline December 14 Last day of classes December 14 Early Registration Deadline (for Winter 2013) Dec. 24–Jan. 1 College CLOSED

Winter Term 2013 January 1

January 8–10 January 11 January 14 January 25 January 31 January 31 February 1 February 1 February 11–15 February 15 March 1 March 1 March 18 March 18–22 March 22 March 29 March 31 April 1 April 12 April 12 April 19 April 29 May 1 May 3

8 •  Calendar

Early Admissions Application Deadline for International Students (for Summer and Fall 2013) New Student Orientation Winter Term Registration Deadline Winter Term classes begin Course Change & 100% Refund Deadline Thesis Deadline (for grading) Graduation Application Deadline Admissions Application Completion Deadline (for Summer & Fall 2013) Geographic Scholarship Application Deadline (for Fall 2013) Reading Week: No Classes 75% Refund Deadline Course Drop Deadline Financial Aid Application Deadline (for Fall 2013 & Winter 2014) Distance Education Assignment Deadline for Graduating Students Reading Week: No Classes Thesis Deadline (for proof-reading) Good Friday: College CLOSED Distance Education Registration Deadline (for Winter 2013) Easter Monday: College open for classes & Library; Offices closed Integrative Project in the Arts and Theology Deadline (for grading) Thesis & IPIAT Registration Deadline (for Winter 2013) Last day of classes Integrative Project in the Arts and Theology Deadline (final copy) Thesis Deadline (for binding) Convocation


Faculty Faculty

hans BoErsma

BrucE hindmarsh

J.I.Packer Professor of Theology

James M. Houston Professor of Spiritual Theology

BEd (Christelijke Academic “Felua,” Netherlands), BA (Lethbridge), MDiv (Theological College of the Christian Reformed Church), MTh, ThD (Utrecht)

BRE (Briercrest Bible College), MCS (Regent College), DPhil (Oxford)

david clEmEns

EdWin hui

Adjunct Professor, Biblical Languages

Professor, Bioethics and Christianity & Chinese Culture, Dean of Chinese Studies Program

BA (Cambridge), MCS (Regent College), MA (University of British Columbia), PhD (Chicago)

AB (UCLA), MD, PhD (British Columbia), DipCS, MTS (Regent College)

craig m. gay

mariam kamEll

Associate Academic Dean, Professor, Interdisciplinary Studies, Interim Director, John Richard Allison Library

Post Doctoral Fellow, New Testament

BS (Stanford), DipCS, MTS (Regent College), PhD (Boston University)

BA (Davidson College), MA (Denver Seminary), PhD (St. Andrews)

ross hastings

donald m. lEWis

Associate Professor, Mission Studies

Professor, Church History

BSc (South Africa), PhD (Queen’s, Kingston), MCS (Regent College), PhD (St. Andrews, Scotland)

BA, DipEd (Bishop’s University), MCS (Regent College), DPhil (Oxford) On Sabbatical, Winter Term 2012 9


V. Philips Long

Diane Stinton

Professor, Old Testament

Associate Professor, Mission Studies

BA (Wheaton), MDiv (Gordon-Conwell), PhD (Cambridge)

BA (University of Calgary), BEd (University of Calgary), MTS (Regent College), ThM (Regent College), and PhD (University of Edinburgh)

Iain W. Provan

Rikk E. Watts

Marshall Sheppard Professor of Biblical Studies

Professor, New Testament

MA (Glasgow), BA (London Bible College), PhD (Cambridge)

BSc (Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology), MA, MDiv (Gordon-Conwell), PhD (Cambridge)

On Sabbatical, Winter Term 2012

Iwan Russell-Jones

Loren E. Wilkinson

Associate Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies and Head of Christianity and the Arts Program

Professor, Interdisciplinary Studies & Philosophy

BA (London School of Theology), MTh (Aberdeen), DPhil (Oxford)

BA (Wheaton), MA (Johns Hopkins), MA (Trinity Evangelical Divinity School), PhD (Syracuse) On Sabbatical, Fall Term 2011

Dal W. Schindell

Paul S. Williams

Director of Publications, Director of the Lookout Art Gallery, Instructor in Christianity and Art

Academic Dean, David J. Brown Family Associate Professor of Marketplace Theology and Leadership.

Diploma in Art and Design (Vancouver), DipCS (Regent College), further studies at Sheffield Polytechnic Art College

MA, MSc (Oxford), MCS (Regent College)

John G. Stackhouse, Jr.

Sarah C. Williams

Sangwoo Youtong Chee Professor of Theology

Associate Professor, Church History

BA (Queen’s, Kingston), MA (Wheaton), PhD (Chicago) On Sabbatical 2011–2012

MA, DPhil (Oxford)

Rod J.K. Wilson President, Professor, Counselling and Psychology BSc (Toronto), MA, PhD (York), MTS (Conrad Grebel College, University of Waterloo), DD (Hons.) (Trinity Western) 10 •  Faculty


Retired, Emeritus and Board of Governors’ Professors

The following faculty have retired from full-time teaching at Regent College, but may offer occasional courses or conferences.

Thena Ayres

Charles R. Ringma

Professor Emerita of Adult Education

Professor Emeritus of Missions and Evangelism

BA (British Columbia), MA (Covenant), MEd, EdD (University of Toronto)

BD (Reformed Theological College, Australia), BA, MLitSt, PhD (Queensland)

Gordon Fee

Sven K. Soderlund

Professor Emeritus of New Testament Studies

Professor Emeritus of Biblical Studies

BA, MA (Seattle Pacific University), PhD (Southern California)

BA (Toronto), MA (Central Bible College), MCS (Regent College), PhD (Glasgow)

Maxine Hancock

R. Paul Stevens

Professor Emerita, Interdisciplinary Studies and Spiritual Theology

Professor Emeritus of Marketplace Theology and Leadership

BEd, MA, PhD (Alberta) DHum (Hon.) (Trinity Western)

BA, BD, DD (McMaster), DMin (Fuller)

James M. Houston

John B. Toews

Board of Governors’ Professor, Spiritual Theology

Professor Emeritus of Church History and Anabaptist Studies

MA (Edinburgh), MA, BSc, DPhil (Oxford)

BA (Tabor College), MA, PhD (Colorado)

James I. Packer

Bruce Waltke

Board of Governors’ Professor, Theology

Professor Emeritus of Old Testament Studies; Professor of Old Testament, Reformed Theo­logical Seminary

MA, DPhil (Oxford)

AB (Houghton College), ThM, ThD (Dallas Theological Seminary), PhD (Harvard)

Eugene Peterson Professor Emeritus of Spiritual Theology BA (Seattle Pacific), STB (New York Theological Seminary), MA (Johns Hopkins), DHL (Hon.) (Seattle Pacific)

Faculty •  11


Teaching Fellows

Teaching fellows are senior, established scholars who normally teach one course each year.

Miriam Adeney

Michael Goheen

Teaching Fellow, Missions and Cross-Cultural Communication; Associate Professor of Religion, Seattle Pacific University

Teaching Fellow, Mission Studies

BA (Wheaton College), MA (Syracuse), PhD (Washington State)

BA (Florida Atlantic University), MA (Westminster Theological Seminary), PhD (Utrecht)

Paul Barnett

Paul Helm

Teaching Fellow, Biblical Studies

Teaching Fellow, Theology and Philosophy

THL (Moore Theological College), MA (Sydney), BDS, ThSchol, PhD (London)

BA, MA (Oxford)

Marva J. Dawn

Alister McGrath

Teaching Fellow, Spiritual Theology BA (Concordia), MA (Idaho), MDiv (Western Evangelical), ThM (Pacific Lutheran), PhD (Notre Dame)

Chair of Theology, Ministry and Education, King’s College, London BA, MA, DPhil, BA, BD & DD (Oxford)

Carey Theological College Faculty Carey Theological College is a partner college affiliated with the University of British Columbia, accredited by the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada and a ministry of the Baptist Union of Western Canada. Carey Theological College has had a long and close relationship with Regent College.

Barbara H. Mutch

Brian F. Stelck

Vice-President Academic; Charles Bentall Professor of Pastoral Studies; Director, Doctor of Ministry Program

President and Associate Professor of Applied Theology

BRE, MA (Briercrest Bible College & Seminary), DMin (Princeton)

12 •  Faculty

BEd, MEd (Alberta), MDiv (North American Baptist Seminary), PhD (Alberta)


Academic Programs The Diploma in Christian Studies Program (DipCS)

(24 credit hours) The Diploma in Christian Studies is a graduate theological program designed to give students a basic understanding of the Christian faith and provide them with the tools for an ongoing life of Christian study, meditation and practical service . Central to the DipCS is a vision for the integration of faith and life, that is, the need to bring the insights of faith to bear on personal, social and cultural issues . The DipCS is a highly flexible program . The large number of elective courses gives students the opportunity to take classes in line with their own interests . Since it can be completed in one year, the DipCS program is ideal for students taking a sabbatical leave to reflect on their vocation or ministry . Conversely, because there is no time limit for completing the program, the DipCS is also ideal for those who want to pursue a course of studies alongside their regular activities over an extended period . All credits taken towards the DipCS can be carried into one of the degree programs, should students decide to continue their studies in greater depth . The Diploma in Christian Studies will be awarded for the successful completion of 24 credit hours of study with a grade point average of 2 .7 (= B-) or better . The requirements of the DipCS program are as follows:

Required Foundations: (see note 1 below)

Credit Hours

Old Testament Foundations (BIBL 501) New Testament Foundations (BIBL 502) Christian Thought & Culture I (INDS 501) Christian Thought & Culture II (INDS 502) Electives:

3 3 3 3 12

Total

24

Notes: 1 . Foundations Courses: Old Testament Foundations (BIBL 501), New Testament Foundations (BIBL 502) and Christian Thought & Culture I & II (INDS 501 & 502) comprise the foundational core of the DipCS, MCS and MDiv programs . These four courses should be taken in the first year of study . DipCS students who are not able to take Christian Thought & Culture I & II (e .g ., for unavoidable scheduling reasons) may, upon approval of the Registrar, substitute History of Christianity I & II (HIST 501 & 502) plus any one of the following courses: The Christian Mind (INDS 510), Theology of Culture (INDS/THEO 515), Jesus in Literature (INDS 563) Christian Faith & Practice in a (Post)modern World (INDS 581) . (Similarly, students who take INDS 501 but who need to substitute for INDS 502 must take HIST 502 plus one of the above INDS courses; and those who take INDS 502 but who need to substitute for INDS 501 must take HIST 501 plus one of the above INDS courses .) Note that this substitution option will entail using 3 credits of electives . 2 . The DipCS requirements are also part of the MCS and MDiv programs . DipCS students who plan to continue with a masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree should carefully select their electives in light of the degree requirements . 13


Master of Christian Studies Program (MCS)

(60 credit hours) The Master of Christian Studies program reflects Regent’s mission (see p. 2) by focusing on the education, nurture and equipping of Christians to live and work as servant leaders. The MCS provides graduate theological education for women and men who anticipate working in societal professions or in certain types of remunerated ministries. It is also the recommended degree for those anticipating further graduate studies in preparation for work in the academy. Opportunity is given to explore the integration of faith and life by developing skills for interpreting Scripture, by completing courses in several of the theological disciplines and by focusing in depth on a chosen area of concentration (see below). The MCS includes an introduction to biblical languages, with the possibility of further language study if desired or if needed for a chosen concentration. The program is typically completed with one of the following major projects in their area of concentration: comprehensive examination, thesis or integrative project in the arts and theology (see pp. 54–56 for further information). Students will require good research and writing skills and a high level of commitment to independent study. The flexibility of the MCS in allowing students to choose their own focus is well suited to those who bring with them specific life questions from previous work or education. The MCS program can be completed through full-time study in two to three years. Students who have other responsibilities may take up to six years to complete the program. Graduates of the MCS program go on to a wide variety of pursuits, including resuming previous careers or following newly-discovered interests. The MCS degree will be awarded for the successful completion of 60 credit hours of study with a grade point average of 3.0 (= B) or better. The requirements of the MCS program are as follows:

Required Foundations: (see note 1 below)

Credit Hours

Required Courses for all Concentrations: Biblical Languages (see note 2 below) Biblical Exegesis & Interpretation (BIBL 503) History of Christianity I or II (HIST 501 or 502) Systematic Theology A, B, C or Overview (THEO 605, 606, 607 or 500)

Credit Hours

Old Testament Foundations (BIBL 501) New Testament Foundations (BIBL 502) Christian Thought & Culture I (INDS 501) Christian Thought & Culture II (INDS 502)

3 3 3 3

3, 12 or 27 3 3 3

Concentration Requirements: MCS students choose one area of concentration (see note 3 below). Each of the concentrations outlined below involves (i) a 700-level seminar in the same discipline as the concentration (except in the Biblical Language concentration), (ii) a major project (see note 4 below), and (iii) free electives (courses taken from any discipline). Also, depending on the concentration and the major project chosen, there may be: (iv) additional required courses, and (v) concentration electives (see note 5 below). Note that some of the credits listed above are fulfilled in the concentrations below.

Applied Theology Concentration

MCS Field Education (see note 6 below) APPL Seminar One of the following: i) Comprehensive Examination (3) APPL Concentration Electives (9) ii) Thesis (12) Free Electives

Marketplace Theology Concentration

MCS Field Immersion (see note 6 below) Marketplace Seminar

One of the following:

Credit Hours 3 3 12

18

Credit Hours 3 3 15

i)  Comprehensive Exam (3) Marketplace Theology Concentration Electives (12) ii) Thesis (12) Marketplace Theology Concentration Electives (3)

Free Electives

14 • Academic Programs

15


Mission Studies Concentration

Credit Hours

Old Testament Concentration

Credit Hours

MCS Field Education (see note 6 below) Introduction to Mission & World Christianity (APPL 533) APPL Seminar Empowering the Church for Re-Evangelization (APPL 610) One of the following: i) Comprehensive Examination (3) Mission Studies Concentration Electives (9) ii) Thesis (12) Free Electives Biblical Hebrew Biblical Hermeneutics & Criticism (BIBL 600) Advanced Old Testament Exegesis (BIBL 701) Old Testament Seminar One of the following: i) OT Comprehensive Examination (3) OT Concentration Electives (see note 5 below) (9) ii) OT Thesis (12) Free Electives

New Testament Concentration

New Testament Greek Biblical Hermeneutics & Criticism (BIBL 600) Advanced New Testament Exegesis (BIBL 702) New Testament Seminar One of the following: i) NT Comprehensive Examination (3) NT Concentration Electives (see note 5 below) (9) ii) NT Thesis (12) Free Electives

3 3 3 3 12

12 12 3 3 3 12

6

Credit Hours 12 3 3 3 12

6

Biblical Studies Concentration

Credit Hours

Church History Concentration

Credit Hours

Biblical Hebrew New Testament Greek Biblical Hermeneutics and Criticism (BIBL 600) Advanced Old Testament Exegesis (BIBL 701) Advanced New Testament Exegesis (BIBL 702) Old Testament Seminar New Testament Seminar Old Testament Comprehensive Examination New Testament Comprehensive Examination Free Electives

6 6 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6

History of Christianity I (HIST 501) 3 History of Christianity II (HIST 502) 3 History Seminar 3 One of the following: 12 or 15 i) HIST Comprehensive Examination (3) HIST Concentration Electives (9) ii) HIST Thesis (12) HIST Concentration Electives (3) Free Electives 18 or 15

Academic Programs â&#x20AC;˘ 15


Interdisciplinary Studies Concentration

Interdisciplinary Studies Seminar One of the following: i) INDS Comprehensive Examination (3) INDS Concentration Electives (15) ii) INDS Thesis (12) INDS Concentration Electives (6) Free Electives

Credit Hours 3 18

15

Christianity & Culture Concentration

Credit Hours

Christianity & the Arts Concentration The Christian Imagination (INDS 560)

Credit Hours 3

Theology of Culture (INDS/THEO 515) 3 Interdisciplinary Studies Seminar 3 One of the following: 15 i) Christianity & Culture Comprehensive Exam (3) Christianity & Culture Concentration Electives (12) ii) Christianity & Culture Thesis (12) Christianity & Culture Concentration Electives (3) Free Electives 15

One of the following: i) Arts related INDS Seminar (3) Christianity & the Arts Comprehensive Exam (3) Christianity & the Arts Concentration Electives (12) ii) The Vocation of the Artist Seminar (INDS 785) (3) Integrative Project in the Arts and Theology (6) Christianity & the Arts Concentration Electives (9) iii) The Vocation of the Artist Seminar (INDS 785) (3) Integrative Project in the Arts and Theology (12) Christianity & the Arts Concentration Electives (3) Free Electives

Biblical Languages Concentration (see note 7 below)

Biblical Hebrew New Testament Greek Advanced Greek or Hebrew Readings (LANG 720 or 721) One of the following: i) LANG Comprehensive Exam (3) ii) LANG Thesis (12) Free Electives

18

5

Credit Hours

12 12 3 3 or 12 9 or 0

Spiritual Theology Concentration History of Christianity I (HIST 501) History of Christianity II (HIST 502) Systematic Theology A (THEO 605) Systematic Theology B (THEO 606) Systematic Theology C (THEO 607) The Christian Spirit (SPIR 500) Spiritual Theology Seminar One of the following:

Credit Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 9 or 12

Free Electives Theology Concentration Biblical Hebrew New Testament Greek Systematic Theology A (THEO 605) Systematic Theology B (THEO 606) Systematic Theology C (THEO 607)

12 or 9 Credit Hours 6 6 3 3 3

i) SPIR Comprehensive Examination (3) Classics of Christian Spirituality (SPIR 670) (3) SPIR Concentration Electives (3) ii) SPIR Thesis (12)

16 â&#x20AC;˘ Academic Programs


Historical Theology (THEO 608) Theology Seminar

One of the following: i) THEO Comprehensive Examination (3) ii) THEO Thesis (12) Free Electives

3 3

3 or 12 12 or 3

Notes: 1. Foundations Courses: Old Testament Foundations (BIBL 501), New Testament Foundations (BIBL 502) and Christian Thought & Culture I & II (INDS 501 & 502) comprise the foundational core of the DipCS, MCS and MDiv programs. These four courses should be taken in the first year of study. MCS students who are not able to take Christian Thought & Culture I & II (e.g., for unavoidable scheduling reasons) may, upon approval of the Registrar, substitute the following: History of Christianity I & II (HIST 501 & 502) Plus any two of the following courses: • The Christian Mind (INDS 510) • Theology of Culture (INDS/THEO 515) • Jesus in Literature (INDS 563) • Christian Faith & Practice in a (Post)modern World (INDS 581) (Students who take one of INDS 501 or 502 and who need to substitute for the other will need to take HIST 501 & 502 plus one of the above INDS courses.) In the event that a concentration already requires one or more of the above courses, the student will take other courses from the list of INDS courses above. 2. Biblical Language Requirement: Most concentrations require 3 credit hours of Biblical Language (any of LANG 500, 510 or 550 will meet this requirement). However, concentrations in Old Testament, New Testament, Biblical Studies and Theology require 12 credit hours of Biblical Language; and the concentration in Biblical Languages requires a minimum of 27 credit hours of Biblical Language. For these latter concentrations, LANG 500 may not be taken as part of the Biblical Language requirement. Students pursuing a concentration that requires 12 or more credit hours of Biblical Language are encouraged to begin their language study in their first term; and, in order to be prepared for Biblical Exegesis and Interpretation (BIBL 503) in their second or third term, they are encouraged to become familiar with the rudiments of the other biblical language (i.e., the one they have not taken) by availing themselves of Hebrew or Greek Study Notes that are available from the Schedules & Forms page of the College website <www.regentcollege.edu>; they may also, if they wish, audit the relevant half of the LANG 500 course at a reduced audit rate. 3. Concentrations: Students are advised to select a concentration early in their studies so they can choose courses wisely. Students should notify the Registrar’s Office once they have decided on a concentration or if they wish to change concentrations. For further information concerning any of the concentrations, including upcoming concentration electives, see the concentration sheets available on the Schedules & Forms page of the College’s website <www. regent-college.edu>, or in the Student Services Office. 4. Major Project: Towards the end of their program, MCS students will complete a major project: a comprehensive exam, a thesis or, for students in the Christianity & the Arts concentration, the option of an integrative project in the arts and theology. With the approval of the supervisor, the comprehensive exam may take the form of a major paper. For the thesis and the integrative project in the arts and theology there is a non-credit orientation seminar offered in both Fall and Winter Terms. For further information see pp. 54–56. 5. Concentration Electives: Depending on the specific concentration and on the major project chosen, there may be additional elective courses to complete within the area of the concentration. For a list of upcoming electives in each concentration, see the concentration sheets available on the Schedules & Forms page of the College’s website <www.regent-college.edu or in the Student Services Office. Old Testament and New Testament concentration students, who choose the comprehensive exam option, must complete at least 6 of the 9 required credits of concentration electives at the 600 level or higher. 6. Field Education/Field Immersion: Students pursuing a concentration in Applied Theology, Mission Studies or Marketplace Theology are required to complete an 8-month field education experience, normally beginning in September and continuing through April. Students pursuing the Applied Theology or Mission Studies concentration should take MCS Field Education (APPL 691). Students pursuing the Marketplace Theology concentration should take MCS Marketplace Field Immersion (APPL 692). Students taking APPL 692 will arrange with the Marketplace Theology concentration coordinator as to how they will fulfil the field immersion and seminar requirements. 7. Biblical Languages Concentration: Students pursuing a Biblical Language concentration will choose one language to be their major focus and the other language to be their minor focus. They will take the Advanced Readings course in their major language (which will substitute for a seminar in this concentration) and will have additional readings in their major language in preparation for their comprehensive exam.

Academic Programs • 17


8. Order of Courses: While there is a great deal of flexibility in the order that students may take their courses, it is recommended that the four required Foundations Courses (BIBL 501 & 502, INDS 501 & 502), Biblical Languages (LANG 500 or the first year of Greek or Hebrew) and Biblical Exegesis and Interpretation (BIBL 503) be taken in the first year of study. Also, the seminar and the major project should be done towards the end of the student’s program since these will build upon other courses. 9. Students intending to pursue doctoral study are advised to acquire reading knowledge of at least one more relevant language during their master’s work: normally Latin, French or German. 10. Concentration requirements are revised from time to time. Students may elect to complete the concentration according to the requirements as published when they were admitted or according to the current requirements.

Master of Divinity Program (MDiv)

(90 credit hours) As part of Regent’s mission (see p. 2) to equip women and men to live more thoughtfully in their varied vocations in the church and in the world, the Master of Divinity program is designed with the vocational pastor, missionary, church worker and para-church worker in view. One of the distinctive features of Regent’s MDiv program is our long-held conviction that before students ask the question, What does it mean to be a minister? they must first ask, What does it mean to be a human being in relationship with Jesus Christ in our time? Thus, the MDiv curriculum is shaped so that the formation of the Christian person precedes and underlies the more particular formation of the Christian leader. Consequently, MDiv students begin their program with the four foundational courses (see below) in which students reflect on the entire history of the people of God—in the Bible and throughout the history of the Church—in order to understand more clearly how we are actors in the same story. In addition, the MDiv curriculum focuses on the knowledge, skills and perspectives that are essential for ministry: biblical interpretation, theological understanding, historical awareness, practical training and the ability to integrate faith with life in the world. A working knowledge of at least one of the biblical languages is required. Elective options also give students the opportunity to pursue specific interests, and students may complete a concentration in a specific area if they wish. MDiv program can be completed through full-time study in three to four years. Students who have other responsibilities may take up to eight years to complete the program. The MDiv degree will be awarded upon the successful completion of 90 credit hours of study with a grade point average of 3.0 (= B) or better and with the recommendation of the MDiv Committee. The requirements of the MDiv program are as follows:

Required Foundations: (see note 1 below) Old Testament Foundations (BIBL 501) New Testament Foundations (BIBL 502) Christian Thought & Culture I (INDS 501) Christian Thought & Culture II (INDS 502)

Required Courses:

The Soul of Ministry (APPL 500) Christian Education & Equipping (APPL 522) Pastoral Care (APPL 546) Empowering the Church for Re-Evangelization (APPL 610) Preaching & Worship (APPL 619) Supervised Ministry (APPL 690) Biblical Exegesis & Interpretation (BIBL 503) Biblical Hermeneutics & Criticism (BIBL 600) Advanced Old or New Testament Exegesis (BIBL 701 or 702) History of Christianity I (HIST 501) History of Christianity II (HIST 502) Biblical Languages (see note 4 below) Systematic Theology A (THEO 605) Systematic Theology B (THEO 606) Systematic Theology C (THEO 607) History of Christian Doctrine (THEO 608) Pastoral Ethics or Basic Christian Ethics (THEO 630 or 560)

18 • Academic Programs

Credit Hours 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 12 3 3 3 3 3


Electives:

Biblical Studies Interdisciplinary Studies Spiritual Theology Other Electives

3 3 3 9 Total

90

Concentration Requirements Concentrations are optional in the MDiv program. Students who wish to pursue a concentration, however, may apply a maximum of 6 credits of their required MDiv courses towards their concentration (see note 5 below). The available concentrations and their requirements are as follows:

Pastoral Ministry Concentration APPL Concentration Electives

APPL Seminar

Credit Hours 12 3

Marketplace Theology Concentration

Credit Hours 15 3

Mission Studies Concentration

Credit Hours 3 3 12 3

Old Testament Concentration

Credit Hours

New Testament Concentration

Credit Hours 12 3 3

Church History Concentration

Credit Hours 12 3

Interdisciplinary Studies Concentration

Credit Hours 12 3

Marketplace Theology Concentration Electives Marketplace Seminar

Introduction to Mission & World Christianity (APPL 533) Empowering the Church for Re-Evangelization (APPL 610) Mission Studies Concentration Electives APPL Seminar Biblical Hebrew Advanced Old Testament Exegesis Old Testament Seminar New Testament Greek Advanced New Testament Exegesis New Testament Seminar

HIST Concentration Electives HIST Seminar

INDS Concentration Electives INDS Seminar

12 3 3

Christianity & Culture Concentration

Credit Hours 3 9 3

Christianity & the Arts Concentration

Credit Hours 3 9 3

Biblical Languages Concentration

Credit Hours 6 6 6 6 3

Theology of Culture (INDS/THEO 515) Christianity & Culture Concentration Electives INDS Seminar The Christian Imagination (INDS 560) Christianity & the Arts Concentration Electives INDS Seminar

Introductory OT Hebrew Intermediate OT Hebrew Introductory NT Greek Intermediate NT Greek LANG Concentration Electives

Academic Programs â&#x20AC;˘ 19


Spiritual Theology Concentration The Christian Spirit (SPIR 500)

Classics of Christian Spirituality (SPIR 670) SPIR Concentration Electives SPIR Seminar

Theology Concentration

THEO Concentration Electives THEO Seminar

Credit Hours

3 3 6 3

Credit Hours 12 3

Notes: 1. Foundations Courses: Old Testament Foundations (BIBL 501), New Testament Foundations (BIBL 502) and Christian Thought & Culture I & II (INDS 501 & 502) comprise the foundational core of the DipCS, MCS and MDiv programs. These four courses should be taken in the first year of study. MDiv students who are not able to take Christian Thought & Culture I & II (e.g., for unavoidable scheduling reasons) may, upon approval of the Registrar, substitute any three of the following courses: • The Christian Mind (INDS 510) • Theology of Culture (INDS/THEO 515) • Jesus In Literature (INDS 563) • Christian Faith & Practice In a (Post)modern World (INDS 581). (Similarly, students who need a substitute for one or the other of the Christian Thought & Culture courses may take any two of these courses.) Note that this substitution option will entail using 3 credits of electives. 2. Vocational Discernment: The process of vocational discernment is crucial to the MDiv program, involving both students’ personal reflection and faculty’s observation of students. The MDiv program consists of two stages: (i) Vocational Discernment Stage, and (ii) Candidacy for the MDiv Degree Stage. Progression from the first to the second stage occurs upon the recommendation of the MDiv Committee, and this recommendation is a requirement for graduation with the MDiv degree. The Committee recommends those students who, in its opinion, are especially gifted for Christian ministry, and its recommendation is based on a variety of reports which reflect on the student’s suitability for ministry, especially reports from The Soul of Ministry and from Supervised Ministry. The Soul of Ministry consists of a 3-credit course in the Winter Term. Supervised Ministry is offered each year, beginning in September and continuing through to April (1.5 credit hours each term) and involves both a practical ministry assignment and facilitated group sessions for theological reflection on ministry. 3. On-Campus Study: Regent places high value on personal interaction in its equipping for professional ministry. Consequently, it is expected that MDiv students will spend a minimum of 2 years at Regent College in order to complete the Soul of Ministry, Supervised Ministry and other required courses, and also to benefit from the community of faculty and students at Regent College. 4. Biblical Languages: In fulfilling the 12 credit hours requirement of Biblical Languages, students may take any combination of Hebrew and Greek courses, with the exception that LANG 500 may not be part of these 12 credits. In order to prepare for Biblical Exegesis and Interpretation (BIBL 503), which requires some knowledge of both biblical languages, MDiv students who have taken only one of the two biblical languages may familiarize themselves with the rudiments of the other language by availing themselves of the Hebrew or Greek Study Notes that are available from the Schedules & Forms page of the College website <www.regent-college.edu>; they may also, if they wish, audit the relevant half of the LANG 500 course at a reduced audit rate. 5. Concentrations: Concentrations in the MDiv program are optional. For students who wish to pursue a concentration, however, a maximum of 6 credit hours of specific courses required for the MDiv program may also serve as requirements for a concentration. For example, a concentration in Church History would involve the two MDiv required courses (History of Christianity I & II), 6 credit hours of concentration electives, plus a Church History seminar. Concentrations in Old Testament, New Testament and Biblical Languages, however, are not subject to this 6-credit limitation. For a list of upcoming electives in each concentration, see the concentration sheets on the Schedules & Forms page of the College’s website <www.regent-college.edu or in the Student Services Office. 6. Order of Courses: The following schedule is suggested for MDiv students. Note that occasionally required courses are offered in a different term than what is indicated below; thus, this schedule is for sample purposes only. While it is often the case that students take fewer courses each term than is indicated below, and therefore take longer than 3 years to complete the MDiv program, the sequence of courses given below is still recommended. For example, it is recommended that MDiv students begin their studies with The Soul of Ministry, and the biblical and language courses. Also, while it is true that the Systematic Theology courses may be taken in any order, there is a logic to following the A-B-C sequence. 20 • Academic Programs


MDiv Course Plan For students who begin in the Fall term: FALL

WINTER

SPRING & SUMMER

OT Foundations Christian Thought & Culture I History of Christianity I Biblical Language

NT Foundations Christian Thought & Culture II Soul of Ministry Biblical Language

Electives: 9 credits

Supervised Ministry (1.5 credits) Biblical Exegesis Biblical Hermeneutics & Criticism Biblical Language

Supervised Ministry (1.5 credits) Preaching & Worship History of Christianity II Systematic Theology B Biblical Language

Electives: 9 credits

Empowering the Church for Re-Evangelization Pastoral Care Systematic Theology A History of Christian Doctrine

Advanced Exegesis Christian Education & Equipping Pastoral Ethics Systematic Theology C

For students who begin in the Winter term: WINTER

SPRING & SUMMER

NT Foundations Soul of Ministry Electives: 6 credits

Biblical Language (6 credits)

OT Foundations Christian Thought & Culture I Supervised Ministry (1.5 credits) Biblical Language

Preaching & Worship Christian Thought & Culture II Supervised Ministry (1.5 credits) Biblical Language

Electives: 6 credits

Biblical Exegesis Biblical Hermeneutics & Criticism History of Christianity I Systematic Theology A

Christian Education & Equipping History of Christianity II Systematic Theology B

Electives: 6 credits

Empowering the Church for Re-Evangelization Pastoral Care History of Christian Doctrine

Advanced Exegesis Pastoral Ethics Systematic Theology C

FALL

For students who begin in the Summer term: FALL

SPRING & SUMMER

WINTER

Biblical Language (6 credits) OT Foundations Christian Thought & Culture I History of Christianity I Biblical Language

NT Foundations Christian Thought & Culture II Soul of Ministry Biblical Language

Electives: 6 credits

Supervised Ministry (1.5 credits) Biblical Exegesis Biblical Hermeneutics & Criticism Systematic Theology A

Supervised Ministry (1.5 credits) Preaching & Worship History of Christianity II Systematic Theology B

Electives: 9 credits

Empowering the Church for Re-Evangelization Pastoral Care History of Christian Doctrine Electives: 3 credits

Advanced Exegesis Christian Education & Equipping Pastoral Ethics Systematic Theology C

Academic Programs â&#x20AC;˘ 21


Denominational Programs Anglicans In 1996, Regent College established a program for those interested in preparing for ministry in the Anglican communion worldwide. Two specific Anglican Studies courses are offered biennially (Anglican History and Theology and a second course, Anglican Life, which deals with liturgy and polity). Regent graduates have found a welcome acceptance of their training at Regent by many bishops both in Canada and abroad. For more details see the website: <regentanglicanstudies.org>.

Presbyterians Persons wishing to pursue ordination within the Presbyterian Church of Canada (PCC) may complete a Regent MDiv and at the same time arrange their program so as to meet that denomination’s requirements for ordination. St. Andrew’s Hall at the Vancouver School of Theology (an official seminary of the PCC) offers a Diploma in Presbyterian Studies which meets these requirements. It involves taking a number of specific denominational courses, at least one course with each of its PCC faculty and several other elective courses—many of which may be transferred into Regent’s MDiv program. Under the regulations of the Association of Theological Schools, up to half of the courses in an MDiv program can be completed at another institution. (Depending on a student’s program, the completion of both the Regent MDiv and the Diploma in Presbyterian Studies may require a student to do courses above and beyond the regular MDiv program requirements.) The PCC also has expectations that prospective ordinands will arrange for their ministry field placements in PCC churches and be involved in denominationally-approved worship settings. For further details consult Regent’s Registrar.

Master of Theology Program (ThM)

(Minimum 30 credit hours) The Master of Theology is the highest academic degree awarded by Regent College, requiring an MDiv degree, an MCS degree or a master’s degree with equivalent theological background to an MDiv, with a GPA of 3.5 for admission. The minimum number of credit hours required to complete the ThM is 30 (see below). The Master of Theology program is thesis-based, encouraging an interdisciplinary approach to theological studies through the development of competence in theological research and writing. The ThM also serves to provide further time for students to continue focused study in a particular area of interest, and may be a useful academic supplement to a vocational degree, providing additional preparation for doctoral studies. The ThM program can be completed through full-time study in one-and-a-half to two years. Students who have other responsibilities may take up to five years to complete the program. The Master of Theology degree will be awarded for the successful completion of the following requirements with an overall GPA of 3.3 or better:

ThM Seminars: Credit Hours Methods of Theological Research (INDS 725) Readings in Modern Protestant Thought (INDS 726)

Concentration Requirements: (see note 2 below) Seminar in area of concentration Thesis in area of concentration

3 3

3 12

See below for additional requirements.

Electives: 9

Additional Concentration Requirements:

Total 30

Students are required to complete a minimum of 9 credit hours of graduate level course work in the area of their concentration in addition to their seminar and thesis. The following concentrations have specific requirements as indicated below. Students who have not taken these courses in their previous degree may use their ThM electives to do so. Some students may need to take more than 30 credit hours, depending on their concentration requirements and on the courses taken in their previous studies. ThM students may be exempted from any concentration requirements—other than the thesis and the seminars—which they have completed in previous study (see the Transfer Credit and Exemption Policy, p. 57). 22 • Academic Programs


Mission Studies Concentration

Introduction to Mission & World Christianity (APPL 533) Empowering the Church for Re-Evangelization (APPL 610)

Credit Hours 3 3

Old Testament Concentration Credit Hours Biblical Hebrew Biblical Hermeneutics & Criticism (BIBL 600) Advanced OT Exegesis (BIBL 701)

12 3 3

New Testament Concentration Credit Hours New Testament Greek Biblical Hermeneutics & Criticism (BIBL 600) Advanced NT Exegesis (BIBL 702)

12 3 3

Biblical Languages Concentration

Credit Hours

Spiritual Theology Concentration

Credit Hours

Biblical Hebrew New Testament Greek Advanced Greek or Hebrew Readings (LANG 720 or 721) The Christian Spirit (SPIR 500) Classics of Christian Spirituality (SPIR 670)

12 12 3 3 3

Theology Concentration Credit Hours History of Christian Doctrine (THEO 608)

3

Other Requirements:

Students admitted to the ThM from a program other than an MDiv will need to complete the following courses, in addition to the other ThM requirements, unless they have completed them in a previous program. ThM electives may be used for this purpose.

Credit Hours Old Testament Foundations (BIBL 501) New Testament Foundations (BIBL 502) Christian Thought & Culture I (INDS 501) Christian Thought & Culture II (INDS 502) Biblical Exegesis & Interpretation (BIBL 503) Biblical Language (see note 3 below) History of Christianity I (HIST 501) History of Christianity II (HIST 502) Systematic Theology A (THEO 605) Systematic Theology B (THEO 606) Systematic Theology C (THEO 607)

3 3 3 3 3 6 3 3 3 3 3

Notes: 1. Admission: As the ThM program calls for advanced academic writing skills in English, students applying for admission are required to submit a sample of academic writing in the area of their chosen concentration. Current Regent students also require an endorsement from two faculty members, one to be in the area of the chosen concentration. For further information on admission to the ThM program, see the Prospectus. 2. Concentrations: ThM students will choose one of the following areas of concentration: Applied Theology; Mission Studies; Marketplace Theology; Old Testament; New Testament; Church History; Interdisciplinary Studies; Christianity and Culture; Christianity and the Arts; Biblical Languages; Spiritual Theology; or Theology. 3. Biblical Languages: ThM students are required to complete a minimum of 6 credit hours in one biblical language, Hebrew or Greek (note that LANG 500 does not serve to meet this requirement). Those concentrating in Old Testament, New Testament or Biblical Languages must complete additional language requirements as indicated above. 4. Other Languages: Additional language requirements for the degree may include a reading competence in French, German or Latin when one of these is deemed essential to the desired program of study. 5. Students are encouraged to pursue research relevant to their thesis in the Methods of Theological Research Seminar (INDS 725), in the Seminar in the area of concentration, and in their electives. 6. For information on the ThM thesis, see p. 55.

Academic Programs â&#x20AC;˘ 23


Distance Education

Distance Education courses provide students the opportunity to take Regent courses for graduate credit while away from the College, thereby encouraging them to think theologically within the context of their own daily life and work. Many of the courses (but not all) come with materials relating to the lectures. Depending on the course, lectures are available in a variety of formats, including CD, MP3 CD, iTunes U and DVD. Tutorial support and assignment evaluations are provided by the professor or by a qualified grader for the course. In most cases, students may complete up to one-third of a Regent program through Distance Education courses (see Residence Requirements on p. 54). The following Distance Education courses are currently available: Darrell Johnson APPL 511*** Introduction to Preaching Darrell Johnson APPL 522 Christian Education & Equipping: The Making of Maturing Disciples for Jesus APPL/INDS 559* Business Ethics: Engaging Moral Issues in the Marketplace David Gill & Paul Stevens APPL/SPIR 560 Taking Your Soul to Work: Experiencing God in the Marketplace  Paul Stevens APPL 610 Empowering the Church for Re-Evangelization Darrell Johnson & Charles Ringma Iain Provan BIBL 501 Old Testament Foundations Rikk E. Watts BIBL 502 New Testament Foundations Gordon D. Fee BIBL 509 Holy Spirit in Pauline Theology Darrell Johnson BIBL 524*** Living in Sync: Studies on the Sermon on the Mount Rikk E. Watts BIBL 543*** The New Testament Use of the Old Testament J.I. Packer BIBL/THEO 561*** Letters to Colossae: Colossians, Ephesians & Philemon BIBL 580 Biblical Theology  Gordon Fee & Bruce Waltke Bruce K. Waltke BIBL 610 Book Study: Genesis Bruce K. Waltke BIBL 615*** Book Study: Judges/Ruth  Rikk E. Watts BIBL 628 Book Study: Isaiah Rikk E. Watts BIBL 651 Exegesis of Matthew Gordon D. Fee BIBL 662 Book Study: Galatians Gordon D. Fee BIBL 679 Book Study: Revelation John Toews HIST 501 History of Christianity I Donald Lewis HIST 502 History of Christianity II John B. Toews HIST 560 Agonies & Ecstasies:Varied Portraits of the Christian to 1550 AD J.I. Packer HIST/THEO 650 Anglican History & Theology INDS/SPIR 563 Jesus in Literature  Maxine Hancock Paul Stevens INDS/SPIR 578 Everyday Spirituality: A Theology & Spirituality of Everyday Life INDS/SPIR 638 Spiritual Pilgrimage: Image & Experience Maxine Hancock SPIR 588*** The Devotional Use of the Psalms James M. Houston Eugene Peterson SPIR 604 Jesus & Prayer SPIR/THEO 628*** The Meaning of the Sacraments  Gordon T. Smith SPIR/THEO 635*** Conversion & Transformation  Gordon T. Smith SPIR 648** Tell it Slant: Parables as Spiritual Direction Eugene Peterson Eugene Peterson SPIR 663** Soulcraft: Spiritual Formation J.I. Packer THEO 500 Systematic Theology Overview. THEO 605 Systematic Theology A: Prolegomena, the Knowledge of God & Revelation J.I. Packer J.I. Packer THEO 606 Systematic Theology B: Christology, Soteriology & Anthropology THEO 606 Systematic Theology B: Creation, Christology, Soteriology & Anthropology John G. Stackhouse, Jr Stanley Grenz THEO 607 Systematic Theology C: Pneumatology, Ecclesiology & Eschatology Hans Boersma THEO 607 Systematic Theology C: Pneumatology, Ecclesiology & Eschatology THEO 620 Theology of Missions Charles R. Ringma Ross Hastings THEO 630 Pastoral Ethics * Offered for 1 graduate credit hour. ** Offered for 2 graduate credit hours only. *** Offered for 2 or 3 graduate credit hours. Course descriptions may be found in the Course Offerings section of this Catalogue. Please check the College website for updates <www.regent-college.edu/distanceeducation>. 24 â&#x20AC;˘ Distance Education


Course Offerings This section contains descriptions of most of the courses that are offered in Regent Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diploma and degree programs for Fall and Winter Terms . The full complement of Summer Term courses is listed in a separate brochure . Not all courses are offered every year (see Frequency of Course Offerings below) .

curriculum Courses and programs undergo regular review by the College and are therefore subject to revision . A detailed schedule of upcoming courses and course syllabi will be published in advance of each term . Every effort will be made to inform students ahead of time of curriculum changes; however, it is possible that some changes may be made about which it will not be possible to provide advance notice .

priority EnrollmEnt Enrollment in all courses is limited; most courses will be filled on a first come, first served basis . Enrollment in some courses is priority due to the nature of the course (e .g ., seminars); a list of these priority enrollment courses will be published with the registration information prior to each term . Priority in these courses will be given to those students who need them for their program .

crEdit hours Most courses are offered for 3 credit hours only . In some evening and weekend courses, at the discretion of the instructor, a 2-credit hour option may also be offered . Spring and Summer Session courses are typically offered for 1, 2 or 3 credit hours depending on their length .

coursE numBEring Prefix: 4-letter abbreviation identifying the discipline (e .g ., APPL for Applied Theology) . Number: 500 level courses are basic introductory courses, some of which are prerequisite to higher level courses . 600 level courses are usually more advanced and focused than 500 level courses and generally assume the completion of some theological studies . 700 level courses are generally reserved for seminars, senior courses and major projects in which a high level of independent work and methodological skill are assumed .

prErEquisitEs Prerequisites, corequisites and courses recommended to be taken beforehand (if any) are indicated at the end of the course descriptions below (see also the Timetable Notes for Fall and Winter Terms and the Summer Programs brochure) . Students who lack a prerequisite for a course will not be permitted to register for that course without the instructorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s permission . Students who lack a recommended course will be permitted to register, but they should be prepared to do additional work in the course .

frEquEncy of coursE offErings Course offerings are determined year by year, based on the needs of the curriculum and the availability of faculty . In general, courses that are required for a program are offered every year . Other courses may be offered every second year or as the opportunity arises . In the following pages, courses are arranged in each 25


discipline according to the following categories: • Courses Offered Annually or in Alternate Years • Courses Offered Occasionally • Courses Offered through Distance Education • Guided Studies, Seminars & Major Projects On-campus courses that are also available through Distance Education are marked “Distance Education Option.”

General Non-Credit Courses The following non-credit courses are offered every Fall and Winter Term. Genr 301 Mcs Thesis Orientation This non-credit seminar introduces the student to the techniques of research, to library and bibliographical sources, to the writing of a thesis proposal, and to the organization and format of a thesis. This seminar is required for all MCS thesis students, and recommended for ThM students. GENR 311 ACADEMIC WRITING Papers at Regent must demonstrate graduate school level competence in structure, argument and style. This course, which is open to all Regent students, addresses the fact that many students, including those with technical (rather than arts) backgrounds, and English-as-aSecond-Language (ESL) students, may need to restore or improve their skills. The goal is not only to remove those errors which cause frustration for both professor and student, but also to establish a process which transforms the writing of a paper into a deeper way of learning. The course will include tours of the Regent and UBC main libraries. Attendance is voluntary, though the Admissions Office and faculty may require certain students to attend. GENR 313 Integrative project in the arts and theology ORIENTATION This non-credit seminar introduces students to the integrative project in the arts and theology. It is required of all students choosing this major project.

Applied Theology Courses in Applied Theology combine action and theological reflection in order to develop the necessary understanding and skills for Christian life and ministry.

Courses Offered Annually or in Alternate Years

Courses required for a program are offered every year and are marked with an (A). APPL 500 THE SOUL OF MINISTRY (A) This course is designed to help students explore some of the critical dynamics of ministry. In particular, we (i) develop more firmly a biblical vision of the Christian leader, and (ii) address issues relative to the person of the leader. It involves lectures from a variety of faculty, readings, selected personality and motivational tests, and one-on-one meetings with the professor. The goal is to help in the life-long process of identity, giftedness and vocational discernment, giving students a framework for the rest of their program at Regent. APPL 522 CHristian EDUCATION AND EQUIPPING: Empowering the Whole People of God (A) (Distance Education Option) Equipping the saints for the work of the ministry (Eph 4:11-12) is a fundamental mandate for church and parachurch leaders. Therefore this course will explore models of Christian ministry that empower the whole people of God for ministry in the church and the world. Central to this is the exploration of the theology of the laity (laos) and leadership, discipleship ministries, education for the formation of mature Christians, workplace ministry, the spirituality of everyday life, and the body-life or systemic approach to learning and equipping. 26 • Course Offerings


APPL 530 INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIAN COUNSELLING Using a combination of lecture, video and skills training, this course will present the student with the basic skills that undergird counselling. Major topics include: a theological integration of psychology and counselling, basic listening skills, issues in clinical practice, assessment and intervention, and special topics in counselling. Class time will be divided between the material presented and practising counselling skills in role play situations. See also APPL 535. APPL 531 YOUTH AND FAMILY MINISTRY This course examines the family from an integrated theological and psychological perspective. The main focus will be on adolescents and their families. The major areas explored in this course will be: understanding and applying family systems theory; understanding the family from a developmental perspective; understanding the dynamics of family functioning; learning to work with youth in the context of family life; and learning to build ministries that help families grow spiritually. The emphasis of this course will be to provide the student with a theological basis and practical skills in ministering to families and adolescents. APPL 533 INTRODUCTION TO mission and WORLD CHRISTIANITY (A) An introduction to mission studies and world Christianity today that will sketch the biblical and theological foundations of mission, trace the historical development of mission to the present, survey the contemporary world church, examine selected current missiological issues such as the scope and nature of mission, gospel and culture(s), world religions, mission in western culture, urban mission, missional ecclesiology, and missions. APPL 535 CHRISTIAN COUNSELLING LABORATORY The aim of this course is to enhance counselling abilities through the systematic development of relational and communication skills. Students should expect a major stress on the practical dimensions of counselling as they are rooted in personal character and theoretical understanding. Through the creation of a laboratory environment, students will be able to reflect on their own strengths and weaknesses, become more aware of effective and ineffective helping strategies, and understand people in a more holistic fashion. Prerequisite: Introduction to Christian Counselling (APPL 530). APPL 546 PASTORAL CARE (A) An introduction to the basic principles of pastoral care required to minister to people through the life cycle from birth to death. This course will facilitate the understanding and acquiring of basic skills for the shepherding ministry of the pastor. Attention will be given to the learning of listening skills and to basic pastoral care and counselling issues confronting the pastor and caregiver in various kinds of ministry settings. Particular attention shall be given to those issues concerning marriage and family. APPL 571 MARKETPLACE MINISTRIES This course helps people develop a biblical foundation for their life in the marketplace whether they are in leadership or not. Themes to be explored include: integrating values into everyday life, developing governing commitments, developing a framework for ethical decision-making and discovering spiritual disciplines for the marketplace. Participants will gain transferable concepts and ideas that can help them make a difference in the work world. APPL 572 MINISTRY AND SPIRITUALITY Note: For course description see SPIR 572 (p. 45). APPL 573 VOCATION, WORK AND MINISTRY This course addresses the need for vocational counselling in the largest biblical sense, including: understanding giftedness and the theology of vocation, work and ministry; receiving help in moving towards a suitable occupational expression; and developing spiritual disciplines appropriate for those wanting to find a more satisfying and fruitful service. Students will gain a deeper selfknowledge, a theological basis for life whether one enters a Christian service career or chooses a

Course Offerings • 27


societal career, and spiritual foundations for vocational decision-making, and will take practical steps in discerning appropriate vocational expressions. Note: This course may also be taken for Interdisciplinary Studies credit (INDS 573). APPL 574 BUILDING STRONG MARRIAGES Using biblical principles and psychological insights, the focus of this course is on foundations critical to building strong Christian marriages. Attention will be paid to the dynamics of marriage with emphasis on: communication patterns, marital adjustments, enrichment possibilities and spiritual unity. The student will acquire skills and resources that will enable him/her to help couples build stronger marriages in the local church. For couples attending the class, practical assignments will be given to enrich their own marriage. APPL 610 EMPOWERING THE CHURCH FOR FIRST WORLD RE-EVANGELIZATION (A) (Distance Education Option) This course has in view the empowerment of the church in urban centres for mission and ministry. It recognizes the cultural, ethnic and social diversity of contemporary cities and the challenges this diversity creates for effective witness and service. It is also cognizant of the internal challenges facing the church with its religious consumer mentality, its lack of a corporate missional identity and its cultural captivity. At the same time, this course recognizes the fundamental missional identity of the church and its call to be the servant of God’s Kingdom purposes. In order for this missional vision to be strengthened and encouraged, this course seeks to situate this vision in a Trinitarian and Kingdom of God theology. From this starting point, the course explores models of the church, strategies for effective witness and service, themes in holistic mission and the contours of a missional spirituality. These themes are explored within the setting of the challenges, problems and possibilities of our urban environments. APPL 619 PREACHING AND WORSHIP (A) This course explores the dynamics of the worship event, with particular focus on the preaching moment, seeking to learn how to preach in a way that is not only about the Word but is the Word for the people of God. We will look at the biblical origins, historical development and contemporary issues of worship. Each student will preach two times during the year for his/her section of the class. Corequisites: BIBL 501, 502, 503. APPL 620 ADVANCED PREACHING This course explores ways to participate in the creating, redeeming and sustaining work of the Word through preaching. The aim is for students to gain greater confidence in the inherent, performative, transformative power of the Word of God; to acquire greater facility in allowing the text to be preached to shape the sermon; to develop a life-style out of which transformative preaching emerges; to understand how to preach the various literary genres of Scripture; and to be able to plan a year’s preaching ministry (around the traditional Christian year). Prerequisites: Preaching and Worship (APPL 619). APPL 636 CREATIVE PROSE Note: For course description see INDS 636 (p. 40).

APPL 651 ANGLICAN LIFE: POLITY AND LITURGY Note: For course description see THEO 651 (pp. 50). APPL 690 MDIV SUPERVISED MINISTRY (A) The goal of this course is readiness for and competence in effective ministry. It involves an 8-month orientation to Christian ministry, beginning in the Fall Term and continuing through the Winter Term. For each student a ministry internship will be individually designed to provide significant supervised ministry experience in as many aspects of ministry as possible, involving mentors, ministry-oriented classes, reading, discussion, experience-in-ministry reports, an evalu28 • Course Offerings


ation instrument and the action/reflection model of doing ministry. The student will engage in guided, integrative theological/biblical reflection upon various functions of Christian ministry in the church and in the world. Prerequisite: APPL 500. APPL 691 MCS FIELD EDUCATION (A) The goal of Field Education is to offer students an opportunity to integrate their academic study with their spiritual life through ministry experience. For each student a ministry practicum will be individually designed to provide supervised field experience in a specific aspect of ministry. Mentors, class time and experience-in-ministry reports will complement the learning process. The student will engage in guided reflections upon the various functions of Christian ministry. This is a 2-term course, beginning in Fall Term and continuing through Winter Term. Note: This course may not substitute for Supervised Ministry in the MDiv program.

APPL 692 MCS MARKETPLACE FIELD IMMERSION This course is the field education alternative for MCS students in the Marketplace Theology concentration. Students will meet with the Marketplace Theology Coordinator to determine an appropriate field assignment. Note: This course may not substitute for Supervised Ministry in the MDiv program.

Courses Offered Occasionally Courses in this category have been offered recently and may be offered again, but the purpose of their inclusion here is more to give students a sense of the kinds of courses that are offered. APPL 519 BUILDING CHRISTIAN COMMUNITIES Note: For course description see INDS 519 (p. 41). APPL 521 EMPOWERING THE WHOLE PEOPLE OF GOD This course will focus on the ministering leader as an equipping person. Participants will develop a philosophy of ministry which is committed to equipping all the people of God for ministry both in the church and in society. The formation of biblical theology of the laity will be fundamental to developing a philosophy of ministry. Basic people-helping skills will be gained. APPL 570 SMALL GROUP AND BIBLE STUDY LEADERSHIP This course seeks to equip students with effective Bible study and small group skills, and to provide them with the ability to teach these skills to others. Students will learn and practise the basics of Inductive Bible Study as well as manuscript study and other kinds of Bible study. Each session will include a small group meeting that will enable the students to exercise leadership and observe first-hand the stages of group development. The strategic role of small groups in developing church and parachurch ministries will be considered. APPL 581 ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND TENTMAKING The mission of the church in the twenty-first century requires a new generation of entrepreneurial Christians. Many pastors are self-supporting (tentmakers like Aquila and Priscilla). Vital intercultural ministry is being undertaken by Christian servants who have two areas of ministry: their daily work and their engagement in the holistic mission of the church. This course provides both a biblical theology and practical hands-on help in creative service in mission, church leadership and business. APPL 603 DOING GOD’S BUSINESS: TOWARD A THEOLOGY AND SPIRITUALITY OF EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP Business and professional activity often neglect the soul; this leads to a divided life. Making the Monday connection is especially difficult in an environment of performance and success. This integrative course considers the leader as a whole person and business as a ministry. Issues of executive life and the mission of the Christian professional will be explored in a biblical and practical way. Expected outcomes include: new working priorities, a Christian worldview and integration of mind, heart and action.

Course Offerings • 29


APPL 604 URBAN ANTHROPOLOGY AND MISSION This course is a combination of lectures, theological reflection, fieldwork and the conceptualization of appropriate ministry responses. The course examines contemporary rapid urbanization; develops a theology of the city and urban ministry; provides the student with basic research skills; provides sources for theological reflection on the problems and opportunities for mission that urbanization has created; and finally, assists the student in developing appropriate ministry strategies.

Courses Offered through Distance Education APPL 511 introduction to preaching This course seeks to explore the implications of the conviction that the church of Jesus Christ is as alive and transformative as its preaching. The course aims to teach expository preaching, with a particular focus on learning how to live in the Biblical text in such a way that the text both inspires the content and shapes the form of the sermon. Since most preaching happens within the context of the Lord’s Day service, the course will also explore the dynamics of corporate worship. Note: Offered for 2 or 3 credit hours.

APPL 522 Christian Education and equipping Note: For course description see p. 26.

APPL 559 business ethics : engaging Moral issues in the marketplace This course is a study of a Christian ethics grounded in the Decalogue and the Sermon on the Mount. The Ten Commandments and the Beatitudes will be interpreted and applied as instruction in the key ways of loving God, loving our neighbor, pursuing justice, and promoting life and freedom. The Law and the Gospel are inextricably together in this great covenant between God and his people. Case studies in ethical issues will be explored as a hands-on method of engaging morally complex situations in the day-to-day work world. The course will explore integrity and vocational holiness in the workplace. Note: Offered for 1 credit hour. This course may also be taken for Interdisciplinary Studies credit (INDS 559).

APPL 560 TAKING YOUR SOUL TO WORK: EXPERIENCING GOD IN THE MARKETPLACE This course will explore the integration of spirituality and work (business, trades, professions, volunteer service and public service). In contrast with the dualistic approach (the upper level for the contemplative and the lower for the person engaging in a societal occupation) and the compartmentalization of Sunday from Monday, a fully biblical spiritual theology will be discovered as both applied and practical. The course will consider various approaches to integration, and the rich and diverse traditions of spirituality in the history of the people of God, especially the “mixed life. Note: This course may also be taken for Spiritual Theology credit (SPIR 560). APPL 610 EMPOWERING THE CHURCH FOR FIRST WORLD RE-EVANGELIZATION Note: For course description see p. 28.

Guided Studies, Seminars & Major Projects APPL 695 GUIDED STUDY: APPLIED THEOLOGY APPL 696 GUIDED STUDY: MISSION STudies APPL 698 GUIDED STUDY: MARKETPLACE THEOLOGY Under special arrangement with a member of the full-time faculty, students may take a guided study—for 1, 2 or 3 credit hours—in which they focus on a subject of their particular interest which is not otherwise covered in regular course offerings. APPL 7— SEMINAR: APPLIED THEOLOGY (A) Applied Theology seminars are for senior students wanting to explore specific issues relating to 30 • Course Offerings


this field in greater depth. Enrollment is limited to allow for each student to make a major presentation and to encourage meaningful discussion. Seminar topics vary from year to year; recent seminar topics include the following: Marriage and Family Ministry; Worship; Pastoral Theology; Issues in Missiology; The Missional Church and the Multi-Cultural World; Theological Education East and West; Of Martyrs, Radicals and Saints: A Contemporary Social Spirituality; Inner Healing; Marketplace Ministries; Travelling Business Seminar; Internationalization and Christian Global Development. APPL 790 MCS COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION: APPLIED THEOLOGY APPL 797 MCS THESIS: APPLIED THEOLOGY APPL 798 TH M THESIS: APPLIED THEOLOGY

Biblical Studies Courses in Biblical Studies deal primarily with the exegesis and interpretation of Scripture or with related matters (e.g., ancient history, culture, literature, etc.).

Courses Offered Annually BIBL 501 OLD TESTAMENT FOUNDATIONS (A) (Distance Education Option) This course presents an overview of the background and contents of the books that make up the Old Testament, and offers some reflection on the question of how they are best read together as part of the Christian canon of Scripture. It is most profitably taken in conjunction with Christian Thought & Culture I (INDS 501) which further explores how the Old Testament functions as an intrinsic part of the scriptural rule of faith and life for the Christian. This course is a prerequisite to 600 and 700 level BIBL courses. BIBL 502 NEW TESTAMENT FOUNDATIONS (A) (Distance Education Option) This course introduces the content of the books of the New Testament with a view to providing a basis for further reading and study. The primary focus will be on the message of each book within its particular historical-cultural setting, with some attention being given to its contribution to the theology of the New Testament as a whole. It is most profitably taken in conjunction with Christian Thought & Culture II (INDS 502) which further explores how the New Testament functions as an intrinsic part of the scriptural rule of faith and life for the Christian. This course is a prerequisite to 600 and 700 level BIBL courses. BIBL 503 BIBLICAL EXEGESIS AND INTERPRETATION (A) This is an introductory course designed to acquaint students with the basic issues involved in interpreting the New and Old Testaments. Emphasis is placed on “hands-on” exposure to (a) the methods involved and (b) the various tools available to assist in doing exegesis, i.e., seeking the original meaning of the text. At the same time, some of the preliminary issues surrounding hermeneutics (the science of interpretation and meaning) will be discussed. This course is a prerequisite to all 600 and 700 level BIBL courses. Prerequisites: One of BIBL 501 or 502, and one Biblical Language course (LANG 500, 510 or 550). Students will require some knowledge of both Hebrew and Greek. Those who take the regular Introductory Hebrew or Greek course should familiarize themselves with the basics of the other language through the use of Study Notes available on the Schedules & Forms page of the College’s website <www.regent-college.edu>. Corequisite: The other of BIBL 501 or 502. BIBL 600 BIBLICAL HERMENEUTICS AND CRITICISM (A) This course examines the assumptions, history and variety of critical methods and perspectives brought to bear on the biblical texts in the modern period, asks intelligent questions about the coherence and value of these methods, and engages critically with them to develop a methodol-

Course Offerings • 31


ogy for biblical study that is both intellectually sustainable and consistent with the faith of the church in respect of its Scriptures. This is a prerequisite for all 700 level BIBL courses. Prerequisites: BIBL 501, 502, 503 (or as corequisite), and one of LANG 500, 510, or 550. BIBL 6—

OLD AND NEW TESTAMENT BOOK STUDIES (A) These are studies of individual biblical books intended to help students sharpen their exegetical skills and to begin to understand how this one part of Scripture relates to the message of the whole Bible. Highly Recommended: BIBL 501, 502, 503, and LANG 500 or 510/511 (for OT courses) or 550/551 (for NT courses).

Courses Offered Occasionally Courses in this category have been offered recently and may be offered again, but the purpose of their inclusion here is more to give students a sense of the kinds of courses that are offered. BIBL 519

READING THE BIBLE WITH THE DAMNED The course will explore the hermeneutical, theological and pastoral issues related to Scripture study and the celebration of the Word and Sacraments with people who feel excluded from the church and society and rejected by God. The course will survey biblical messages addressed to the marginalized (slaves, exiles, tax-collectors and sinners, etc.), study some of these key texts exegetically, and discuss the specific content and function of key biblical concepts. The course will also include practical teaching on effective ways to lead Bible studies, to facilitate worship and to offer spiritual counsel to marginalized people.

BIBL 520 EXODUS AND LIBERATION This course will explore the dynamics of oppression and liberation through a combination of systematic overview of the entire book of Exodus, careful reading of key texts and continual discussion about the relevance of this book for current situations of oppression. Students will learn to make use of diverse approaches to biblical exegesis (historical-critical, narrative, structural, theological, rabbinic). Special emphasis will be placed on developing an approach to the Scriptures that is intellectually responsible, engaged with the real world and spiritually sensitive. BIBL 560 PAUL AS MISSIONARY/THEOLOGIAN From the time of the primitive church up to today, the Apostle Paul’s missionary endeavours as recorded in the book of Acts, along with his theological teachings as found in his own letters, have exercised enormous influence on Christian thought and practice. The purpose of this course is to come to terms with something of the genius of this man’s life and ministry. By studying the available sources we will seek to understand the spring of his drive and character, reconstruct a credible outline of his life and times, highlight the salient features of his missionary strategy and probe some of the depths of his theological thinking. BIBL 631

MESSAGE OF THE PROPHETS Although “prophecy” as such was not unknown in the world of antiquity, the distinctive features of biblical prophecy went far beyond any similarities it had with prophetic phenomena in surrounding cultures. The purpose of this course is to study the writings of the Old Testament prophets in order to determine as far as possible the quality of their lives and the essence of their message. Along the way it will be seen that this corpus of Old Testament revelation has a great deal of relevance to the issues of spirituality, theology and ethics in our own day. Prerequisites: BIBL 501, 502, 503, and LANG 500 or 510/511.

BIBL 650 THE LIFE OF JESUS This course seeks to understand Jesus’ mission and message primarily within his first-century Palestinian setting as the one in whom Yahweh’s covenant with Israel finds its culmination. The course will begin with a brief overview of modern “Life of Jesus” research and an introduction to the nature of the sources for Jesus’ life and teachings, noting in particular issues related to the 32 • Course Offerings


canonical Gospels. Attention will then be focused on the major elements of Jesus’ life, particularly the nature and meaning of his mighty words, mighty deeds, death and resurrection in the light of Old Testament hopes and prevailing Jewish “messianic” expectations. As appropriate there will be some reflection on how it is that Israel’s story then becomes the story of the whole world. BIBL 680 BIBLICAL THEOLOGY FOR CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIANS This course is specifically designed to help contemporary people think through the overall message of the Bible and to discover how it relates to their everyday life and work. Beginning with Genesis we will examine major issues such as creation (how should we relate to the world around us?), the image of God (what does it mean to be human?), human autonomy (the problem of freedom and knowledge), abuse of political power, etc., noting how these themes are developed throughout the rest of the biblical data and, in particular, wrestling with their immensely practical implications for life in the modern world. Where appropriate, the relationship of the Bible to science with respect to, e.g., creation, the flood, will be discussed. This course is not eligible for Theology credit. Prerequisites: BIBL 501, 502, 503, and LANG 500 or 510/511 or 550/551. BIBL 682

OLD TESTAMENT THEOLOGY A study of the historical development of major themes of the biblical revelation in their literary contexts, giving a broad overview of the message of the Bible, with a particular emphasis on the Old Testament.

Courses Offered through Distance Education BIBL 501

OLD TESTAMENT FOUNDATIONS Note: For course description see p. 31.

BIBL 502 NEW TESTAMENT FOUNDATIONS Note: For course description see p. 31. BIBL 509 HOLY SPIRIT IN PAULINE THEOLOGY This course examines the role of the Holy Spirit in Paul’s experience and his reflection on that experience. Key texts will be analysed in the process of investigating Paul’s understanding of the Spirit in relationship to key elements in his theology. Questions of contemporary relevance will also be pursued. BIBL 524 LIVING IN SYNC: STUDIES ON THE SERMON ON THE MOUNT What are we to make of the collection of sayings in Matthew 5-7 we call “The Sermon on the Mount”? Some have argued that Jesus’ words describe the eschatological Kingdom of God and are not to be lived in this present era; others argue that the words have relevance only for the immediate period of the middle first century for those alive in the expectation of the immanent end of history; still others argue that the words are either for a special, “holy” class of disciples, or are given to drive all disciples to their knees before such “exceeding righteousness.” In this course we will work with the pre-supposition that “the Sermon on the Mount” naturally, inherently flows from Jesus’ first “sermon,” his one-sentence announcement of the Gospel of God (as Mark calls it), “Repent, for the kingdom of the heavens has come near” (Matthew 4:17). In Matthew 5-7, Jesus is describing what happens when his Gospel of the in-breaking rule of God grabs hold of an individual or community. In his sermon Jesus is describing “kingdom-ized” people, “Gospel-ized” humanity. This course is, therefore, an exegetical, hermeneutical, theological, spiritual grappling with how Jesus’ words are lived out in this and any age. Note: Offered for 2 or 3 credit hours.

BIBL 543

THE NEW TESTAMENT USE OF THE OLD: WHAT WERE THE NEW TESTAMENT AUTHORS UP TO? No documents exercised as much influence on the writers of the NT as did Israel’s Scriptures (our Old Testament). Yet few matters are the subject of such impassioned and wide-ranging debate as is the question of how the NT authors interpret the OT, particularly in the light of Jesus and his gospel.

Course Offerings • 33


Questions abound: What, if at all, is the role of the OT context? How do we explain the significant variations and sometimes remarkable differences between the OT text and its supposed quotation in the NT? How can a text that was not even considered a prophecy be “fulfilled”? Are the NT authors reliable guides or must we admit that they use methods that no modern bible reader could accept? Note: Offered for 2 or 3 credit hours.

BIBL 561

LETTERS TO COLOSSAE: COLOSSIANS, EPHESIANS AND PHILEMON A guess worth exploring is that Paul’s letter to the Ephesians was a circular letter to churches in Asia Minor, written after Colossians was composed, and that the letter to the Laodiceans which the Colossians were to acquire and read was Laodicea’s copy of the circular. However this may be, Colossians and Ephesians form a pair, and it is illuminating to study them side by side. This course will do that, covering Colossians in the first week and Ephesians (and Philemon) in the second. Note: Offered for 2 or 3 credit hours. This course may also be taken for Theology credit (THEO 561)

BIBL 580 BIBLICAL THEOLOGY This course aims to show the continuities and discontinuities between the contributors to the Bible, especially between the Old and New Testament, by a study of the major themes and ideas of the biblical revelation in the context of their historical development, giving a broad overview of the message of the Bible. BIBL 610

BOOK STUDY: GENESIS This course aims to explain the contribution of Genesis to Christian theology by exegeting the book in its historical contexts. More specifically it aims to facilitate the encounter between God and the students; to develop a biblical world and life view; to become skillful in narrative theology; and to interpret the book of Genesis within the canon of Scripture.

BIBL 615

LIGHT IN THE DARK AGES: AN EXPOSITION OF JUDGES AND RUTH In this course the lecturer exposits the books of Judges and Ruth with the aim of showing their meaning to Israel and their relevance to the Church today. These books cover the time when judges ruled the kingdom of God and the kingdom fell into anarchy. Amazingly, Hebrews 11 celebrates these flawed heroes from Israel’s Dark Age as exemplary heroes of the faith. The books’ narrator, through brilliant literary techniques, presents this history, and through enthralling biographies, shapes the people of God. This course aims to analyse the techniques to let their message be inscribed on the student’s heart. Note: Offered for 2 or 3 credit hours.

BIBL 628

ISAIAH This course will introduce students to the book of Isaiah, one of the most influential works in the canon. We will focus on the leading themes of the multifaceted message of Isaiah, noting in particular their continuity and their development throughout, and thereby providing students with a sense of both the unity and the diversity of the material within the overall purpose of the book. Attention will be given to the relevance of the various Isaianic concerns to the life of the people of God in the contemporary world and in so doing to highlight ways in which the book can be preached both in the church and the world.

BIBL 651 EXEGESIS OF MATTHEW This course will undertake a careful exegetical study of Matthew in an attempt to master the basic content of the gospel through the application of sound exegetical method, note Matthew’s emphases vis-à-vis the other Synoptics, and address some of the hermeneutical issues concerning its significance in the modern world. Given the sheer size of the book some selectivity will be necessary. Students will also become with a number of the critical issues relating to the scholarly study of Matthew. BIBL 662 BOOK STUDY: GALATIANS A careful study of Paul’s letter to the Galatians in an attempt (1) to master the content of this epistle through sound exegetical methodology, (2) to place the letter within the historical and theological contexts of Paul and the early church, and (3) to wrestle with some of the hermeneutical issues raised by the letter. 34 • Course Offerings


BIBL 679

Book Study: Revelation A careful study of John’s Revelation in an attempt (1) to master the content of this document through sound exegetical methodology, (2) to place the Revelation within the historical and theological contexts of John and the early church, and (3) to wrestle with some of the hermeneutical issues raised by this “word of prophecy.”

Guided Studies, Seminars, Advanced Exegesis & Major Projects The prerequisites for 700-level courses in Biblical Studies are BIBL 501, 502, 503, 600 and LANG 510/511 or 550/551. Specific courses may have corequisites and additional prerequisites. BIBL 695 GUIDED STUDY: BIBLICAL STUDIES BIBL 696 GUIDED STUDY: OLD TESTAMENT BIBL 697 GUIDED STUDY: NEW TESTAMENT BIBL 698 GUIDED STUDY: ANCIENT STUDIES Under special arrangement with a member of the full-time faculty, students may take a guided study—for 1, 2 or 3 credit hours—in which they focus on a subject of their particular interest which is not otherwise covered in regular course offerings. BIBL 7—

SEMINAR: OLD TESTAMENT (A) Old Testament seminars are for senior students wanting to explore specific issues relating to this field in greater depth. Enrollment is limited to allow for each student to make a major presentation and to encourage meaningful discussion. Seminar topics vary from year to year; recent seminar topics include the following: Historiography; Servant Songs; Hebrew Narratives; Old Testament Ethics; Old Testament Theology; God’s Call in the Hebrew Scriptures; Literary Approaches to the Old Testament. Prerequisites: BIBL 501, 502, 503, 600 (or as corequisite), and LANG 510/511.

BIBL 7—

SEMINAR: NEW TESTAMENT (A) New Testament seminars are for senior students wanting to explore specific issues relating to this field in greater depth. Enrollment is limited to allow for each student to make a major presentation and to encourage meaningful discussion. Seminar topics vary from year to year; recent seminar topics include the following: The Use of the Old Testament in the New Testament; Grace in the New Testament; The Miracles of Jesus; The Historical Jesus; Passion Narratives; Gospel & Letters of John; Ephesians: Pauline Theology, Spirituality & Ethics; Issues in 1 Corinthians; Pauline Christology; The Book of Hebrews; New Testament Textual Criticism. Prerequisites: BIBL 501, 502, 503, 600 (or as corequisite), and LANG 550/551.

BIBL 701 ADVANCED OLD TESTAMENT EXEGESIS (A) This course takes the student beyond 500 and 600 level courses on exegesis and exegetical method, giving advanced hands-on experience with the tools acquired there for Old Testament exegesis. Prerequisites: BIBL 501, 502, 503, 600 and LANG 510/511 BIBL 702 ADVANCED NEW TESTAMENT EXEGESIS (A) This course takes the student beyond 500 and 600 level courses on exegesis and exegetical method, giving advanced hands-on experience with the tools acquired there for New Testament exegesis. Prerequisites: BIBL 501, 502, 503, 600 and LANG 550/551 BIBL 790 MCS COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION: OLD TESTAMENT BIBL 791 MCS COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION: NEW TESTAMENT BIBL 796 MCS THESIS: OLD TESTAMENT BIBL 797 MCS THESIS: NEW TESTAMENT BIBL 798 THM THESIS: OLD TESTAMENT BIBL 799 THM THESIS: NEW TESTAMENT

Course Offerings • 35


Church History

Courses in Church History deal primarily with the influences and consequences of significant people, events and movements in the life of the Church after the New Testament period.

Courses Offered Annually or in Alternate Years Courses required for a program are offered every year and are marked with an A. HIST 500 THE CHRISTIAN SPIRIT: A HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN SPIRITUALITY (A) Note: For course description see SPIR 500 (p. 45).

HIST 501 HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY I (A) (Distance Education Option) This course surveys the history of Christianity from its beginnings to about 1560. It will progress thematically, stressing the highlights of each given era. Students are encouraged to think in terms of broader issues and themes rather than specific chronology and specific events. HIST 502 HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY II (A) (Distance Education Option) This course surveys the history of Christianity from the end of the Reformation on the Continent (post-Calvin) through to the twentieth century. The title History of Christianity, rather than Church History, is designed to suggest that the course is concerned not just with church organization and practice, but with the history of theology, doctrine and spirituality, and the impact of Christianity upon society and society upon Christianity. HIST 612 HISTORICAL ROOTS OF EVANGELICAL SPIRITUALITY Note: For course description see SPIR 612 (p. 46).

HIST 650 ANGLICAN THEOLOGY AND HISTORY (Distance Education Option) Note: For course description see THEO 650 (p. 50).

Courses Offered Occasionally

Courses in this category have been offered recently and may be offered again, but the purpose of their inclusion here is more to give students a sense of the kinds of courses that are offered. HIST 560 AGONIES & ECSTASIES: Varied Portraits of the Christian to 1550 AD (Distance Education Option) This course will be a walk through the Christian centuries with representative guides such as the theologian Augustine, the monk Benedict, the missionary Columbanus, the mystic Catherine of Siena, the reformer Martin Luther, and the pacifist Menno Simons. The walk will not only provide helpful knowledge of the past but will inspire and challenge students in their own pilgrimages. HIST 561 AGONIES & ECSTASIES: MODERN CHRISTIAN BIOGRAPHIES This course will be a walk through the Christian centuries from the Reformation to the twentieth century. Representative guides will include: the reformer, John Calvin; the German Pietist leaders, Spener, Francke and Zinzendorf; the renewer of churches John Wesley; the revivalist George Whitefield; the Countess of Huntingdon (the “Queen of the Methodists”); the hymnwriter John Newton; the missionary William Carey; the slave-trade abolitionist William Wilberforce; the social reformer the Seventh Earl of Shaftesbury; and the greatest evangelist in the history of the Chinese church, John Sung. HIST 600 HISTORY OF THE EVANGELICAL TRADITION This course examines the rise of the popular movement known as Protestant Evangelicalism in the 1730s and its growth and expansion in the English-speaking world from that time to the present. HIST 634 STUDIES IN CONVERSION AND SPIRITUAL AUTOBIOGRAPHY Note: For course description see SPIR 634 (p. 47).

HIST 646 THE GLOBALIZING OF EVANGELICALISM IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY Three religious movements in the world today can claim to be global faiths: Roman Catholicism, Islam and Evangelicalism. Of these three, it is perhaps surprising that the Evangelical 36 • Course Offerings


movement is so little studied and poorly understood. Yet in the second half of the twentieth century, Evangelicalism managed to grow rapidly in pluralistic settings in the non-Western world. The purpose of this course is to examine the ways in which Evangelicalism, a religious movement which arose in the context of the eighteenth-century English-speaking world, became indigenized in cultures throughout the whole world in the twentieth century. It will do this by looking at the growth and characteristics of Evangelicalism in various sections of the modern world. HIST 660 THE ANABAPTIST STORY This course is a descriptive and analytical study of sixteenth-century Anabaptist history and theology within the context of other sixteenth-century developments, and an exploration of the relevance of this heritage for contemporary doctrinal, congregational and personal life. HIST 665 HISTORY OF MISSIONS This course examines the different approaches that Christian missionaries have used in crosscultural work. Its aim is not so much to chronicle the story of Christian missions as it is to look at the factors influencing the development of Christian mission theory and practice. Recommended: HIST 501 and 502. HIST 680 An HISTORICAL SURVEY OF WOMEN IN THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH The purpose is to examine the various ways in which women have contributed to the life and ministry of the Christian church. Although the course will begin with an examination of the biblical material regarding women, the main focus will be on the period from the second through the nineteenth centuries. In so doing, we will examine the social, political and theological influences affecting women’s roles in the Christian community.

Courses Offered through Distance Education HIST 501 HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY I Note: For course description see p. 36.

HIST 502 HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY II Note: For course description see p. 36.

HIST 560 AGONIES & ECSTASIES: Varied Portraits of the Christian to 1550 AD Note: For course description see p. 36.

HIST 650 ANGLICAN THEOLOGY AND HISTORY Note: For course description see p. 50.

Guided Studies, Seminars & Major Projects HIST 695 GUIDED STUDY: CHURCH HISTORY Under special arrangement with a member of the full-time faculty, students may take a guided study—for 1, 2 or 3 credit hours—in which they focus on a subject of their particular interest which is not otherwise covered in regular course offerings. HIST 7— SEMINAR: CHURCH HISTORY (A) Church History seminars are for senior students wanting to explore specific issues relating to this field in greater depth. Enrollment is limited to allow for each student to make a major presentation and to encourage meaningful discussion. Seminar topics vary from year to year; recent seminar topics include the following: Philosophy of History; Early Monasticism; Medieval Monasticism; The English-Speaking Evangelical Tradition: 1735–1945; British Evangelical Tradition: 1785–1900; Wesley, Whitefield & Edwards; Early Celtic Christianity: ca. 450–1000; Puritan & Evangelical Spirituality; Women and Spiritual Identity. HIST 790 MCS COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION: CHURCH HISTORY HIST 797 MCS THESIS: CHURCH HISTORY HIST 798 TH M THESIS: CHURCH HISTORY

Course Offerings • 37


Interdisciplinary Studies Courses in Interdisciplinary Studies deal primarily with Christian reflection on subjects that traditionally do not fall within the theological curriculum (e.g., philosophy, science, art, literature, culture, education, etc.).

Courses Offered Annually or in Alternate Years

Courses required for a program are offered every year and are marked with an A. INDS 501 CHRISTIAN THOUGHT & CULTURE I (A) INDS 502 CHRISTIAN THOUGHT & CULTURE II (A) These two courses are intended to provide an historical, theological and cultural complement to OT and NT Foundations. The aim is to provide students with the opportunity, within an historical framework, to reflect both upon Christian faith and character and upon Christianity and culture. Christians are indeed shaped not only by the biblical events and their story, but by the legacy of 2000 years of meditation on what those events–culminating in the life, teaching, death and resurrection of Jesus–mean for human life. These courses seek to continue that meditation today in the light of that legacy. They are historically organized, moving in CTC I from the first century to the Reformation, and in CTC II from the Reformation to the present. The intention is not to provide a comprehensive history of the Christian church, but to choose representative persons and movements from within that history and to present them in ways that illuminate key moments within the history of the church as well as the problems and possibilities faced by those who are trying to be obedient to God in contemporary life. Various threads will be traced throughout the two courses: (i) the formation of Christian theology; (ii) the record left in art (painting, poetry, music, sculpture, etc.) of Christian thought in these times; (iii) the problems of spiritual, moral and vocational formation; and (iv) the missional impact of the church on the world. INDS 510

THE CHRISTIAN MIND All Christians think, but not all Christians think always as Christians. Yet when Christian A meets issue X and determines to think about it in a Christian way, what is he or she actually to do? What resources should he or she consult, and how should one coordinate them with each other? What spiritual factors are involved? And what, finally, is the point of Christian thinking? This course attempts to answer these questions particularly in the context of cultural pluralism and postmodernity.

INDS 515

THEOLOGY OF CULTURE (A) This course considers the ways in which the Christian church has understood its engagement with the culture in which it lives. It will help equip people to understand and respond to cultures today. Primary questions to be addressed include: What are the historic Christian teachings on these subjects? What are the contemporary alternatives? How does one decide about such things and put them into practice? and Why do these things matter? Note: This course may also be taken for Theology credit (THEO 515).

INDS 530 WORLD RELIGIONS Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto and Primal Religions are the focus of this course. A religion includes beliefs and behaviours, experienced individually and communally, and expressed both ideally and imperfectly. Each displays denominational, geographical and generational variety. We will ask of each religion: what patterns of beauty, truth and caring are present? What patterns of idolatry and exploitation? What theological and behavioural points of contact for Christians? How can we contextualize a biblical apologetic in relation to our faith? How can we disciple, train leaders and nurture churches in this context? INDS 560 THE CHRISTIAN IMAGINATION: AN INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIAN AESTHETICS (A) This course examines, biblically and theologically, the human experience of thinking and communicating through images and the relationship between the Christian Gospel and the human 38 • Course Offerings


imagination. Subjects addressed will include the necessity of image to language, major theories about the nature of the arts, the dangers and opportunities that the imagination presents for the Christian and the uses of the arts in worship. INDS 563 JESUS IN LITERATURE (Distance Education Option) This course surveys ways in which Jesus has been represented in major works of English literature from the Middle Ages to the end of the twentieth century. We will look at direct representations of Jesus and at indirect representations through embodiments of aspects of Jesus’ character and work in “Christ-figures.” We will also consider ways in which such motifs as “incarnation,” “kenosis,” “atonement” and “death and resurrection” have been assimilated into literary art. Surveying literature from this perspective will provide students with an unusual overview of literature, creating opportunities for critical evaluation of the literature, for theological reflection on Christology and the gospel and for devotional contemplation of the One in whom “all things hold together.” Note: This course may also be taken for Spiritual Theology credit (SPIR 563).

INDS 570 CHRISTIANITY THROUGH LITERATURE: STORIES OF FAITH AND DOUBT Faith in God is one of the major themes in Western literature. This is so whether that faith is presented as vital and life-giving (as it has been through much of Christian history) or whether it is presented (as it often has been in the past century) as a life-denying trap. In fact, people have always lived with varying degrees of certainty about what they hold to be foundational. Consequently, much literature which deals with belief (or disbelief) in God actually explores a continuum between faith and doubt. By reading such stories of faith and doubt, this course intends to (i) help us be clearer about our own struggles, and serve ultimately to strengthen our faith; (ii) help us understand the processes both of conversion and of loss of faith; and (iii) demonstrate how faith is foundational to knowledge, and how knowledge informs faith. We are using the word “story” loosely, since in this course we will be reading poems, short stories, novels, and autobiography. INDS 573 VOCATION, WORK AND MINISTRY Note: For course description see APPL 573 (pp. 27–28).

INDS 576 BOOKS, CHILDREN AND GOD This course seeks to develop the critical and comprehensive acuity needed to be good readers, and a Christian perspective for our reading of children’s literature. By “burying ourselves in volumes of literature” for children we will better “hold fast to dreams,” “sail off to where the wild things are” and “foster our own compassion and humanness.” As we read good “children’s” books, these phrases will become touchstones for the response of all children in any culture to the beauty, the power and the glory of word. We will also sharpen our understanding of what makes word live as literature and why and how word in story—nursery rhymes, picture books, folk tales, fantasy and fiction classics—is a heritage that we must not only hold for ourselves, but also pass on to our children in order that we and they may respond more fully and richly to each other, to Creation—and to God. INDS 579 CHRISTIAN APOLOGETICS This course explores several “hot zones” in which Christianity seems to be problematic, if not scandalous: sexism and sexuality; science, technology and ecology; the problem of evil; religious pluralism, multiculturalism and proselytism; and colonialism, terrorism and war. The class will attempt to clarify the issues, resolve misunderstandings, acknowledge genuine problems, and formulate a response adequate for faith. Note: This course may also be taken for Theology credit (THEO 579).

INDS 581 CHRISTIAN FAITH AND PRACTICE IN A (POST)MODERN WORLD While faith in Jesus Christ has never come easily, there appear to be certain features of modern—and now purportedly “postmodern”—secular societies, which make Christian faith and practice particularly perplexing. By drawing on the insights of a number of prominent social thinkers, this course aims to provide students with a theoretical and practical understanding of the processes of modernization and secularization, their impact upon Christian theology and their impact upon (post)modern discipleship.

Course Offerings • 39


INDS 636 CREATIVE PROSE Language is a gift of God for the use of which we will give account; the making of meaning is an evidence of God’s ongoing grace in a fallen world. This course is designed for people who care about communicating well in English, a language enriched and shaped by the English Bible. Students will be challenged both to understand more fully the nature and resources of the English language, and to use it with greater grace and power. The goal will be to help every person grow in the ability to recognize and respond to the grace of God in the gift of language, and to learn how to write with greater fluency and clarity. The course will include an introduction to the philosophy and theology of language, an historical introduction to the development of English prose style, rigorous examination and analysis of a range of styles, the development of an “inner ear” for the cadence and rhythms of prose, and the assumption of responsibility for the stewardship of words. Note: This course may also be taken for Applied Theology credit (APPL 636).

INDS 637 PARADISES LOST AND FOUND This course will examine the Christian doctrine of the fall as it is replayed in the literary motif of “paradise” or “Eden” lost—and sometimes found again. We will first turn to Paradise Lost, the masterpiece of the great Puritan writer, John Milton, to understand the way in which the Puritan vision of human fallenness and divine grace is embodied in this work. Milton’s Paradise Regained will then lead us into an examination of the way in which the theme of the fall and its aftermath is taken up in English and American literature since Milton. Some of the works we will look at are: Charles Dickens, Great Expectations; John Steinbeck, East of Eden; Charles Williams, Descent into Hell; C. S. Lewis, The Great Divorce; and Toni Morrison, Paradise. Note: This course may also be taken for Spiritual Theology credit (SPIR 637). INDS 638 SPIRITUAL PILGRIMAGE: IMAGE AND EXPERIENCE (Distance Education Option) One of the more enduring metaphors for the spiritual life is that of journey or pilgrimage. In this course, students will encounter a range of ways in which that journey has been portrayed in literature–from John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress to contemporary works such as Anne Lamott’s Traveling Mercies. We will examine the literary motif of “pilgrimage” or “journey” against the biblical narrative patterns, and through reflection on literary representations seek to find recognizable patterns in our own lives. Note: This course may also be taken for Spiritual Theology credit (SPIR 638). INDS 639 SOUL FOOD: DEVOTIONAL POETRY AS A SOURCE OF SPIRITUAL NURTURE In this course students will encounter devotional poetry, especially that of the seventeenth century, in order to quicken their appreciation for literature that springs from a love for God and to feed the flame of their own devotion. Students will engage poetry with heart and mind–with the same kind of wholeness with which they engage the conversation with and about God in poetry. We will look especially closely at the spiritually informed work of what have been called the “metaphysical poets,” John Donne, George Herbert and Henry Vaughan and of their literary and spiritual sister, Anne Bradstreet. We will conclude the course with the work of some contemporary writers in the same tradition, especially Margaret Avison and Denise Levertov. Note: This course may also be taken for Spiritual Theology credit (SPIR 639). INDS 661 CHRISTIANITY AND THE ECONOMIC ORDER This course is intended to help students understand the importance of the economic/business sphere, and the Judeo-Christian and secular roots of modern economic thought and practice and to explore the ethical and religious issues raised thereby. Topics to be considered include the biblical teaching on wealth and poverty, property, social responsibility, justice, attitudes of the early church and medieval Christianity toward economic issues, Calvinism and the rise of capitalism, secular roots for modern economic thought, the Marxist critique of capitalism, the welfare state, the problem of Two-Thirds World poverty, modern democratic capitalism and the like. INDS 681 CHRISTIAN PERSPECTIVES ON THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY This course surveys the Western philosophical heritage from the vantage point of the Christian life 40 • Course Offerings


and worldview. The primary emphasis will be on the major physical, metaphysical and epistemological themes with occasional focus on their application in ethics, aesthetics and political thought. Some of the major movements and figures to be considered include: the pre-Socratic philosophers, classical philosophy, medieval Christian philosophers, the early scientists as philosophers, rationalism, empiricism, nineteenth-century philosophy, Wittgenstein, phenomenology and existentialism and contemporary “neo-pragmatist” and deconstructive philosophy. Although the focus is mainly on Western philosophy, we will from time to time listen also to other voices, particularly from Arabic (Muslim), Indian (Hindu and Buddhist) and Chinese (Confucian and Taoist) philosophy. An effort will be made throughout to relate the historical issues and problems to contemporary thinking.

Courses Offered Occasionally Courses in this category have been offered recently and may be offered again, but the purpose of their inclusion here is more to give students a sense of the kinds of courses that are offered. INDS 507 READING FILM: A THEOLOGICAL APPROACH The objectives of the class are three-fold: (i) to provide an introduction to the history of cinema by studying great auteur directors (e.g., Hitchcock, Lang, Ford), (ii) to teach students the language of film thereby equipping them with tools necessary to analyse and critique film, (iii) to intelligently evaluate the work of established filmmakers who are attempting to integrate theological ideas within their work. The students benefit from the course by learning to engage and comment on film intelligently and responsibly. INDS 519

BUILDING CHRISTIAN COMMUNITIES This course will introduce students to a range of models of Christian community from the early church, Monasticism, the Anabaptists, Moravians and contemporary Christian communities such as Catholic Covenant Communities, L’Arche, Sojourners, House Churches and the Base Ecclesial Communities. It will provide perspectives for evaluation and determining general applicability and will identify ways in which Christian communities are developed and maintained. Note: This course may also be taken for Applied Theology credit (APPL 519)

INDS 556 GENDER, SEXUALITY AND THE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY Central to our understanding of what it is to be human is our understanding of our sexuality and of relationships between the genders. In this course, we will seek to develop a thoroughly Christian perspective from a clearly articulated biblical and theological basis on a range of issues that are crucial to our personal conduct, to relationships within the church and to our witness to our culture. The student can expect to be challenged to establish a theological and biblical framework for considering issues of sexual wholeness, gender equality and the negotiating of roles and relationships within the Christian community. The student will also be helped to respond thoughtfully to cultural trends in these areas and to their effect on the community of believers. INDS 572 ART INTO THE 21ST CENTURY This course will survey visual art from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day by means of slide-illustrated lectures. Significant artists and movements will be looked at for their artistic and philosophical importance. Christians are too often unaware of this information and reject modernism for superficial reasons. Yet an understanding of the reasons why our culture has arrived at its present volatile state is crucial to our being responsible, culturally-involved stewards in our day. INDS 578

EVERYDAY SPIRITUALITY: A THEOLOGY AND SPIRITUALITY OF EVERYDAY LIFE (Distance Education Option) Note: For course description see SPIR 578 (p. 46).

INDS 583 EXEGETING POPULAR CULTURE This course takes a disciplined exegetical approach to several important media of popular culture: the newspaper, television programming, and print and television advertising. The goal of the course is to move toward a Christian appreciation and critique of popular culture. More specifically, we want to try to understand: (a) the ways these media function; (b) the extent to

Course Offerings • 41


which these media shape the messages that are channelled through them; and (c) the ways that we are in turn affected by these media. INDS 600 UNDERSTANDING CREATION This course examines the current concern about human relationship to Creation, in order to come to understand some of the spiritual, philosophical, social and economic forces which have shaped that relationship, to survey and evaluate contemporary ethical and religious responses to environmental issues and to lay the foundations for a biblical ethic of “earthkeeping”: stewardship of creation. INDS 620 ADDICTION: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH Addiction as a modern disease is reaching epidemic proportions affecting men and women from all walks of life. It manifests itself in individuals, families, communities and corporations. This course, utilizing psycho-social, medico-physiological and biblical-spiritual resources, seeks to trace its etiology, analyse the symptoms of addiction, track its course of development and offer a few prescriptions for its control and remedy. INDS 630 BOOKWRITING FOR ASIA, AFRICA AND LATIN AMERICA This course will help mature students begin writing significant biblically-rich and culturally contextualized books for people in Asia, Africa or Latin America. INDS 685 BIOETHICS: MORAL ISSUES OF LIFE AND DEATH This introductory course of bioethics explores the risky yet rewarding frontiers of moral medicine. It reviews, in a Christian context, classical ethical theories as they apply to major biomedical principles and key issues in the modern medical world. The general approach for the discussion of each moral issue includes a scientific/clinical analysis to begin with, followed by an understanding of the secular approaches to the moral dilemma and finally an honest search for resources within Christian tradition(s) which may contribute towards reaching a resolution of the issue. INDS 686  PHILOSOPHY FOR THEOLOGIANS The relation between Christian thought and philosophy has been rich, fascinating and at times controversial. This course first looks generally at the relation between philosophy and Christian theology (between “faith” and “reason”) and then at a number of case studies illustrating this relationship. In some of these the interaction with philosophy has been fruitful, while in others it has been less so. Among the case studies are creation, christology, the atonement, our knowledge of God, personal identity (the “soul”), and God’s relation to time. The course is particularly aimed at those with an interest in systematic theology, the philosophy of religion and the relation of faith to culture. Note: This course may also be taken for Theology credit (THEO 686).

Courses Offered through Distance Education INDS 559 business ethics : engaging Moral issues in the marketplace Note: For course description see APPL 559 (p. 30).

INDS 563 JESUS IN LITERATURE Note: For course description see INDS 563 (p. 39).

INDS 578

EVERYDAY SPIRITUALITY: A THEOLOGY AND SPIRITUALITY OF EVERYDAY LIFE Note: For course description see SPIR 578 (p. 46).

INDS 638 SPIRITUAL PILGRIMAGE: IMAGE AND EXPERIENCE Note: For course description see INDS 638 (p. 40).

42 • Course Offerings


Guided Studies, Seminars & Major Projects: INDS 695 GUIDED STUDY: INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES INDS 696 GUIDED STUDY: CHRISTIANITY & CULTURE INDS 697 GUIDED STUDY: CHRISTIANITY & THE ARTS Under special arrangement with a member of the full-time faculty, students may take a guided study—for 1, 2 or 3 credit hours—in which they focus on a subject of their particular interest which is not otherwise covered in regular course offerings. INDS 7— SEMINAR: INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES (A) Interdisciplinary Studies seminars are for more advanced students wanting to explore specific issues relating to this field in greater depth. Enrollment is limited to allow for each student to make a major presentation and to encourage meaningful discussion. Seminar topics vary from year to year; recent seminar topics include the following: Landscape and Soulscape: “Spiritual Geography”; Philosophical Hermeneutics; Women’s Voices: Issues in Women’s Faith and Development; Theology of Religions; World Religions; Christianity and Capitalism; “Theories of Everything”: Foundations for Integration; Acts of Defiance: The Making of Meaning in the (Post)modern Milieu; Dante in Our Time; Theology and Science Fiction; The Vocation of the Artist; Theological Education East and West; Issues in Missiology; Christian Philosophy and the Chinese Mind. INDS 725 TH M SEMINAR: THEOLOGICAL RESEARCH & WRITING (A) This course introduces advanced students to the perspectives, tools and methods required for research and writing in the various theological disciplines and is intended to prepare students to design, research and write a ThM level thesis. The course is required of ThM students but will be open to a limited number of MCS students. INDS 726 TH M SEMINAR: READINGS IN MODERN PROTESTANT THOUGHT (A) Modernity has posed and continues to pose a number of profound challenges to Christian faith, challenges with which Protestant thinkers in the West have been wrestling for several centuries. By reading and discussing a number of important works in modern Protestant thought we want to look closely at this challenge and at the ways it has been met. The aim of this course is to sharpen our perspective on the intellectual and theological task today. INDS 790 MCS COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION: INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES INDS 795 MCS Integrative project in the arts and theology INDS 797 MCS THESIS: INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES INDS 798 TH M THESIS: INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Biblical Languages

Courses in Biblical Languages deal primarily with the translation and exegesis of Scripture and other ancient literature from the original languages. Note: Each summer, both Introductory Old Testament Hebrew (LANG 510, 511) and Introductory New Testament Greek (LANG 550, 551) are offered in intensive formats for 6 credit hours each.

Courses Offered Annually LANG 500 PERSPECTIVES ON BIBLICAL LANGUAGES (A) This course gives students an overview of biblical languages–the first half focusing on the basics of Old Testament Hebrew (alphabet, morphology, syntax) and the second half on New Testament Greek. In addition, a major concern will be to develop a familiarity with the research

Course Offerings • 43


tools available for studying the biblical text (lexicons, concordances, wordbooks, etc.). This course is intended to function as preparation for BIBL 503 which will teach students how to use the Hebrew and Greek tools within the exegetical and interpretive tasks. Together these courses lay a basic foundation for studying the biblical texts with sensitivity to the original languages. LANG 510 INTRODUCTORY OLD TESTAMENT HEBREW (A) This course lays the essential groundwork for a basic reading knowledge of Biblical Hebrew. The primary focus will include a thorough memorization of the most common Hebrew words and a mastery of elementary morphology and syntax. LANG 511 INTRODUCTORY OLD TESTAMENT HEBREW (A) A continuation of LANG 510 in the Winter Term. Prerequisite: LANG 510. LANG 550 INTRODUCTORY NEW TESTAMENT GREEK (A) This course lays the essential groundwork for a basic reading knowledge of New Testament Greek. The primary focus will include a thorough memorization of the most common Greek words and a mastery of elementary morphology and syntax. LANG 551 INTRODUCTORY NEW TESTAMENT GREEK (A) A continuation of LANG 550 in the Winter Term. Prerequisite: LANG 550. LANG 610 INTERMEDIATE OLD TESTAMENT HEBREW (A) Building on Introductory Old Testament Hebrew, this course develops students’ abilities as careful readers of biblical Hebrew by paying close attention to the details of morphology, syntax and semantics, and by studying structure, genre and various literary and rhetorical features. Prerequisites: LANG 510/511. LANG 611 INTERMEDIATE OLD TESTAMENT HEBREW (A) A continuation of LANG 610. Prerequisite: LANG 610. LANG 650 INTERMEDIATE NEW TESTAMENT GREEK (A) Building on Introductory New Testament Greek, this course seeks to enable students to read the Greek New Testament with greater competence. Central to this course is the translation of a variety of biblical texts, paying special attention to the grammatical and semantic features of the language. Prerequisites: LANG 550/551. LANG 651 INTERMEDIATE NEW TESTAMENT GREEK (A) A continuation of LANG 650. Prerequisite: LANG 650.

Guided Studies, Advanced Readings & Major Projects LANG 695 GUIDED STUDY: BIBLICAL LANGUAGES LANG 696 GUIDED STUDY: OLD TESTAMENT HEBREW LANG 697 GUIDED STUDY: NEW TESTAMENT GREEK Under special arrangement with a member of the full-time faculty, students may take a guided study—for 1, 2 or 3 credit hours—in which they focus on a subject of their particular interest which is not otherwise covered in regular course offerings. LANG 720 ADVANCED GREEK READINGS This course seeks to provide students who have taken 12 credits of Greek language with another 44 • Course Offerings


opportunity to continue developing their proficiency in Greek. It will focus primarily on reading texts drawn from a variety of Hellenistic sources outside the New Testament itself, such as the Septuagint, the deutero-canonical books, Josephus and the early Church Fathers. In this way students will develop their facility with Hellenistic Greek through a broad exposure to Greek literature beyond the New Testament. Prerequisite: LANG 651. LANG 721 ADVANCED HEBREW READINGS After 12 credits of Hebrew language study, the student has acquired a degree of competence in the areas of morphology and syntax, and a good working vocabulary. In addition, the student has read portions of biblical narrative and poetry, and has been given some detailed training in Hebrew exegetical skills. The present course is designed to build on this foundation by introducing the student to a wider range of Hebrew material, with readings drawn from both biblical and non-biblical sources. The aim is to enhance the student’s experience of the language and provide a wider framework for engagement in biblical Hebrew. Prerequisite: LANG 611. LANG 790 COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION: BIBLICAL LANGUAGES LANG 797 MCS THESIS: BIBLICAL LANGUAGES LANG 798 THM THESIS: BIBLICAL LANGUAGES

Spiritual Theology

Courses in Spiritual Theology deal primarily with recognizing and responding to the reality of God in human experience.

Courses Offered Annually or in Alternate Years Courses required for a program are offered every year and are marked with an A. SPIR 500 THE CHRISTIAN SPIRIT: A HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN SPIRITUALITY (A) This course offers an introduction to the Christian spiritual tradition. For two millennia Christians have been praying and responding to the self-giving love of God in Jesus Christ by the gift of the Holy Spirit. This response to God has taken place under the conditions of our humanity and it is therefore possible to trace a cultural history of the spiritual life. The value of learning this history of Christian spiritual life is that it allows us to see the threats and opportunities of our own times more clearly. It also exposes us to resources, exemplary models, and warnings of which we might not otherwise be aware. This course begins with the Scriptures and God’s final revelation in Jesus Christ, for if spirituality is to be Christian it must start and end with Christ. We will then survey a number of historical traditions of spiritual life and thought as they have emerged among believers during the chronological and geographical spread of Christianity. The survey will be representative, rather than exhaustive, but it should give the student an opportunity to learn the map of Christian spirituality. Note: This course may also be taken for Church History credit (HIST 500).

SPIR 563 JESUS IN LITERATURE (Distance Education Option) Note: For course description see INDS 563 (p. 39). SPIR 572

MINISTRY AND SPIRITUALITY This course addresses the need for integrating personal spirituality, biblical revelation and actual ministry as it is exercised in either workplace in society or church/parachurch. The goal is to develop both understandings and disciplines that will be formational for an authentic Christhonouring ministry over a lifetime. Note: This course may also be taken for Applied Theology credit (APPL 572).

Course Offerings • 45


SPIR 600 PRAYER: A SURVEY OF ITS TRADITIONS AND PRACTICES IN THE CHURCH This course surveys the major traditions and practices of prayer. It exposes the contemporary Christian to attitudes and aspects of prayer usually neglected in our modern life, and it recognizes the value of contemplation—generally neglected in evangelical life today. By reading the great classic literature on prayer, we hope to deepen and enhance our practice of prayer, giving enriched perspectives for further growth in prayer. This course will trace the interconnectedness of theology, personal life and prayer in the inner lives of theologians and saints such as Augustine, Gregory the Great, Bernard, Catherine of Siena, Teresa of Avila, Martin Luther, John Calvin, John Owen and other great Christian leaders. SPIR 612

HISTORICAL ROOTS OF EVANGELICAL SPIRITUALITY This course explores the current interest in “spirituality” by examining the period when modern evangelicalism itself arose. The classic works of evangelical leaders such as John Wesley, Jonathan Edwards and John Newton are viewed as eighteenth-century specimens of “spirituality.” By looking at evangelicalism as an early-modern revival of spiritual concern, we will ask what lessons we can learn today as we aspire to live by the gospel, that is, to achieve an authentically evangelical spirituality. Note: This course may also be taken for Church History credit (HIST 612).

SPIR 637

PARADISES LOST AND FOUND Note: For course description see INDS 637 (p. 40).

SPIR 638 SPIRITUAL PILGRIMAGE : IMAGE & EXPERIENCE (Distance Education Option) Note: For course description see INDS 638 (p. 40). SPIR 639

SOUL FOOD: DEVOTIONAL POETRY AS A SOURCE OF SPIRITUAL NURTURE Note: For course description see INDS 639 (p. 40).

SPIR 670

CLASSICS OF CHRISTIAN SPIRITUALITY (A) This is a reading course that focuses on a number of classic works of Christian spirituality selected from different times and traditions of the history of the church. Augmenting the survey course in spiritual theology (SPIR 500, “The Christian Spirit”), this course allows an in-depth study of particular spiritual writers. The aim is to stimulate a close reading of classic texts that is both devotional and critical, and the seminar format is ideally suited to allow us to read not just privately, but in dialogue and in communion with others. Prerequisite: SPIR 500.

Courses Offered Occasionally Courses in this category have been offered recently and may be offered again, but the purpose of their inclusion here is more to give students a sense of the kinds of courses that are offered. SPIR 578

EVERYDAY SPIRITUALITY: A THEOLOGY AND SPIRITUALITY OF EVERYDAY LIFE (Distance Education Option) This course will address the biblical emphasis of everyday, vocational holiness, providing both a theological foundation for the ministry of the ordinary Christian and a spiritual motivation. Developing a Christian lifestyle involves much more than being faithful in devotional and church activities. In this course we will consider our mentalities, pressures, environments and Christian patterns of response. Note: This course may also be taken for Interdisciplinary Studies credit (INDS 578).

SPIR 619 

DIVINE GUIDANCE AND SPIRITUAL discernment An introduction to the art of spiritual discernment, which will enable students to recognize and respond to the prompting or inner witness of the Spirit. The course will provide a model for effective decision-making that will incorporate the wisdom of the Christian heritage. The primary focus will be upon seeking the wisdom and direction of God for critical choices and decisions. Attention will be given to two additional questions: corporate discernment and decision-making as well as the role of the spiritual mentor in helping others make wise choices.

46 • Course Offerings


SPIR 628 

MEANING OF THE SACRAMENTS (Distance Education Option) Note: For course description see THEO 628 (p. 50).

SPIR 634 STUDIES IN CONVERSION AND SPIRITUAL AUTOBIOGRAPHY This course traces the history of conversion and spiritual autobiography from the New Testament to the rise of evangelicalism in the modern period. By taking this long view, the evangelical experience can be seen within the larger story of the response of women and men to Christian proclamation through the centuries. Attention will be paid chiefly to theological themes, but this will be augmented by some discussion of literary insights and interdisciplinary perspectives on conversion. We will explore the relevance of all of this to our experience of faith and ministry in the contemporary world, and participants will be encouraged to think through their own theology of conversion. Note: This course may also be taken for Church History credit (HIST 634). SPIR 635

CONVERSION AND TRANSFORMATION (Distance Education Option) The theology of religious experience, with particular examination of the nature of Christian conversion and spiritual change. The course enables students to think critically and theologically about religious experience in general, but the focus of the course will be the nature and character of conversion. The lectures and readings will demonstrate that a comprehensive experience of conversion is essential for spiritual transformation and a vital piety. Attention will also be given to the theological rational for programs that foster conversion and spiritual formation. And, as a primary focus, the course will enable students to see how understanding their own conversions fosters self-knowledge and personal transformation. The course will be based primarily on lectures but will also include guided group discussions. Note: This course may also be taken for Theology credit (THEO 635).

SPIR 643 AUGUSTINE’S CONFESSIONS Note: For course description see THEO 643 (p. 51). SPIR 652

STUDIES IN ENGLISH SPIRITUALITY This course offers a series of studies in English spirituality through the centuries. Although there is arguably a coherence and genius to English spirituality, the aim of this course is less to discover this than to read the tradition as an episode in the continuing story of the human response to the self-giving love of God in Jesus Christ, a response that the Holy Spirit has enabled in real people in real places. By examining a number of themes, biographies, and classic texts in their settings, we will seek to glean wisdom and insight into the Christian spiritual experience as a historical reality.

SPIR 675

THE SPIRITUAL VISION OF C. S. LEWIS AND GEORGE MACDONALD C. S. Lewis (1898–1963) was one of the most influential Christian authors of the twentieth century as an essayist, poet, critic and writer of fiction. Throughout his life as a Christian and his writings there is a profound and joyful spiritual vision. In this he acknowledged his debt to the nineteenth-century Scottish writer George MacDonald (1824–1905). Indeed, Lewis claimed that reading MacDonald had baptized his imagination, and that he fancied he had never written a book in which he did not quote from MacDonald. Like Lewis, MacDonald was a poet, fantasy writer, novelist, children’s author and theologian. And he too communicated a compelling spiritual vision of goodness (not moralism) and “the divine, magical, terrifying and ecstatic reality in which we all live.” This course is designed to explore the spiritual wisdom and insight of these two important and related figures. We will expound the spiritual vision they shared through studying their lives and representative works in a variety of genres.

Courses Offered through Distance Education SPIR 560

TAKING YOUR SOUL TO WORK: EXPERIENCING GOD IN THE MARKETPLACE Note: For course description see APPL 560 (p. 30).

SPIR 563 JESUS IN LITERATURE Note: For course description see INDS 563 (p. 39).

Course Offerings • 47


SPIR 578

EVERYDAY SPIRITUALITY: A THEOLOGY AND SPIRITUALITY OF EVERYDAY LIFE Note: For course description see p. 46.

SPIR 588

THE DEVOTIONAL USE OF THE PSALMS IN THE HISTORY OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Much of the history of the Church has viewed the Psalter as the Bible in miniature for lay devotees. Indeed, only since the eighteenth century has hymnody replaced the Psalms in the exercise of worship. This historical survey uses many newly translated texts of psalm commentators from the early Fathers to the Reformers and later scholars. The course is intended to alert Christians today to the critical importance of the Psalms for the contemporary defense of Christian orthodoxy, as well as the recovery of psalmic consciousness for personal and corporate devotion. Note: Offered for 2 or 3 credit hours.

SPIR 604 JESUS AND PRAYER Jesus provides both the theological and personal centre for a life of prayer. We acquire a sense of the reality and the way of prayer by first observing Jesus and then keeping company with him. Putting together a life of prayer out of the scraps of emotion and need that surface from time to time in our lives clamouring for attention never amounts to much. We are after something substantial and whole: prayer revealed by the Father through the Son by the Holy Spirit. SPIR 628 

MEANING OF THE SACRAMENTS Note: For course description see p. 50

SPIR 635   CONVERSION AND TRANSFORMATION Note: For course description see p. 47.

SPIR 638 SPIRITUAL PILGRIMAGE: IMAGE AND EXPERIENCE Note: For course description see INDS 638 (p. 40). SPIR 648 TELL IT SLANT: PARABLES AS SPIRITUAL DIRECTION As we become practised in sin, we develop excellent defenses against grace. God is out to penetrate our defences. How does he do it? By frontal assault? Sometimes. But sometimes indirection is called for, slipping past the defenses on “the slant.” It was a favourite method of Jesus; his parables show him at work. By examining the Lukan parables we will train ourselves in discerning both the spiritual defenses that we build up against grace and the method of “indirection” that Jesus uses to get through to us. Note: Offered for 2 credit hours only. SPIR 663 SOULCRAFT: SPIRITUAL FORMATION The Letter to the Ephesians is a primary text in developing the craft of spiritual formation (soulcraft). As we study this text we will develop an approach to spiritual formation that is distinctively Christian, in contrast to approaches that stress psychological development or lapse into religious conformism. We will explore the text in the actual conditions in which this formation takes place in us—conditions comprised by home, workplace, congregation, institutions, culture. As God does his formational work in us and those with whom we live, we will develop skills in recognizing what he is doing, and look for the appropriate ways in which we can respond, participate, and guide. Note: Offered for 2 credit hours only.

Guided Studies, Seminars & Major Projects SPIR 695 GUIDED STUDY: SPIRITUAL THEOLOGY Under special arrangement with a member of the full-time faculty, students may take a guided study—for 1, 2 or 3 credit hours—in which they focus on a subject of their particular interest which is not otherwise covered in regular course offerings. 48 • Course Offerings


SPIR 7—

SEMINAR: SPIRITUAL THEOLOGY Spiritual Theology seminars are for senior students wanting to explore specific issues relating to this field in greater depth. Enrollment is limited to allow for each student to make a major presentation and to encourage meaningful discussion. Seminar topics vary from year to year; recent seminar topics include the following: Augustine’s Confessions; Medieval Spirituality; Cistercians and Puritans; Inner Healing and Deliverance; Landscape and Soulscape: “Spiritual Geography”; Women’s Voices: Issues in Women’s Faith and Development; Of Martyrs, Radicals and Saints: A Contemporary Social Spirituality; Puritan & Evangelical Spirituality; Spirituality & Work; Prayer.

SPIR 790 MCS COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION: SPIRITUAL THEOLOGY SPIR 797

MCS THESIS: SPIRITUAL THEOLOGY

SPIR 798 TH M THESIS: SPIRITUAL THEOLOGY

Systematic and Historical Theology Courses in Systematic and Historical Theology deal primarily with the systematic articulation of the Christian faith, whether in the past or in light of contemporary realities.

Courses Offered Annually or in Alternate Years

Courses required for a program are offered every year and are marked with an A. THEO 500 THE CHRISTIAN FAITH: SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY OVERVIEW (A) (Distance Education Option) This course surveys the whole range of Christian doctrine as set forth in the Bible, grappled with and fought over in history and debated in our day. The aim throughout is to give resources for deciding at each point what theological assertions and “moves” in discussion express a truly biblical faith. THEO 515 THEOLOGY OF CULTURE (A) Note: For course description see INDS 515 (p. 38). THEO 579 CHRISTIAN APOLOGETICS Note: For course description see INDS 579 (p. 39). THEO 605 SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY A: PROLEGOMENA, THE KNOWLEDGE OF GOD AND REVELATION (A) (Distance Education Option) This course introduces the student to the study of Systematic Theology in the light of Biblical foundations, Christian history and present-day discussions. The five major themes to be discussed are the following: (1) the nature of systematic theology; (2) theological method; (3) revelation; (4) faith; and (5) God. THEO 606 SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY B: CREATION, CHRISTOLOGY, SOTERIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY (A) (Distance Education Option) This course explores four fundamental themes of Christian theology: God’s creation, the Lord Jesus Christ, salvation and the nature of human personhood. The course will examine the historic Christian teachings on these subjects, how the church came to these conclusions, how these doctrines interact with each other and why these things matter. THEO 607 SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY C: PNEUMATOLOGY, ECCLESIOLOGY AND ESCHATOLOGY (A) (Distance Education Option) By exploring three major foci of systematic theology—the doctrines of the Holy Spirit (pneumatology), the church (ecclesiology) and last things (eschatology)—in the light of Scripture, the theological heritage of the church and the contemporary context, this course seeks to develop students’ expertise as a theologically informed Christian for the sake of their life and ministry.

Course Offerings • 49


THEO 608 HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN DOCTRINE (A) In an age suspicious of the past it is all the more important for the Church to be aware of her tradition. It is through a loving connection with the Church of all times and places that today also God provides us with an identity in Christ through the Holy Spirit. This course, therefore, explores the history of the doctrine of the Church as it has taken shape both in the thoughts of individual theologians and through the Creeds, confessions, and decisions of councils and synods. The course not only presents an overview of the history of Christian doctrine, but also examines some of the most seminal theological writings that have shaped the Church throughout her history. THEO 630 PASTORAL ETHICS (A) (Distance Education Option) This course explores the Christian moral ideal as well as Christian principles of judgment and action, especially as they relate to ministering as Christians in the contemporary world. While the course is designed primarily with a view toward what we often refer to as the “professional” Christian ministry, the principles explored are applicable to Christians in all vocational contexts. Students should gain an understanding of Christian ethics, while developing a foundation for, and expertise in thinking through, the ramifications of Christian faith for living and serving as a Christian minister. THEO 650 ANGLICAN THEOLOGY AND HISTORY (Distance Education Option) This course surveys Anglican history and the core convictions, contentions and concerns that have marked theology within it from the Reformation up to today. It includes readings from theologians in the Evangelical, Anglo-Catholic and Broad Church traditions in their various forms and will conclude with a discussion of Anglican identity today. It will thus serve as preparation for a teaching ministry in any Anglican context, and as a contribution to transdenominational understanding. Note: This course may also be taken for Church History credit (HIST 650).

THEO 651 ANGLICAN LIFE: POLITY AND LITURGY This course is designed to introduce students to the nature and practice of Christian worship, liturgy and sacramental theology. After these subjects are introduced, the class will use its understanding of these subjects as a foundation for looking at the theology, history and practice of baptism, the eucharist and other services used in Anglican parishes, particularly in light of the Book of Common Prayer tradition. Attention will also be given to the pastoral issues surrounding the administration of the sacraments and pastoral services within the local parish. Note: This course may also be taken for Applied Theology credit (APPL 651).

Courses Offered Occasionally Courses in this category have been offered recently and may be offered again, but the purpose of their inclusion here is more to give students a sense of the kinds of courses that are offered. THEO 620 THEOLOGY OF MISSION (Distance Education Option) This course examines the biblical basis for understanding God’s redemptive and transformative concern for our world and our mission in the light of God’s passion and care. The course will evaluate various theological models for understanding mission, including Reformed, Anabaptist, Pentecostal, Evangelical and Liberation Theology. Furthermore, the course will examine the major contemporary missiological documents from Roman Catholics, the World Council of Churches and Evangelicals. THEO 628   MEANING OF THE SACRAMENTS (Distance Education Option) This course is a theological examination of the sacraments and their place in the life, worship and witness of the church. Attention will be given to the place of ritual and gesture in Christian worship, the biblical basis for the sacraments, the historic debates and controversies as well as the more recent ecumenical discussions and agreements. Further, the practice of the sacraments will also be addressed insofar as they reflect theological perspectives and convictions. Particular attention will be given to the meaning of the Lord’s Supper or Holy Communion. Each student will be urged to appreciate more fully the understanding of the sacraments within their own theological and 50 • Course Offerings


spiritual tradition, as well as the heritage and sacramental practices of other traditions. Note: This course may also be taken for Spiritual Theology credit (SPIR 628).

THEO 635   CONVERSION AND TRANSFORMATION (Distance Education Option) Note: For course description see SPIR 635 (p. 47).

THEO 641 PURITAN THEOLOGY FOR TODAY Following a general historical and theological characterization of the Puritan movement and a survey of its literature, explorations will be made in such areas as Scripture, grace, faith, regeneration and sanctification, church life, Christian ministry and personal Christian responsibilities. THEO 643 AUGUSTINE’S CONFESSIONS Augustine’s Confessions is a seminal work in the development of Christian thought, as well as being one of the classics of Western culture. The course will introduce the Confessions by examining the Manichean and Platonic background of the work, and will consider its main themes– memory, time and creation, grief and joy, faith and culture, grace and conversion–from both a philosophical and a theological angle. The course will attempt to convey both the strangeness and the excitement of the Confessions, as well as seek to understand the source of the book’s abiding power and fascination. Note: This course may also be taken for Spiritual Theology credit (SPIR 643). THEO 686  PHILOSOPHY FOR THEOLOGIANS Note: For course description see INDS 686 (p. 42).

Courses Offered through Distance Education THEO 500 SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY OVERVIEW Note: For course description see p. 49.

THEO 561 LETTERS TO COLOSSAE: COLOSSIANS, EPHESIANS AND PHILEMON Note: For course description see BIBL 561 (p. 34).

THEO 605 SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY A: PROLEGOMENA, THE KNOWLEDGE OF GOD AND REVELATION Note: For course description see p. 49.

THEO 606 SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY B: CREATION, CHRISTOLOGY, SOTERIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY Note: For course description see p. 49.

THEO 606 Systematic Theology B: Christology, Soteriology and Anthropology This, the second of a three-course series covering the whole Christian faith, deals with (1) the human person: our nature, dependence, destiny, and fallenness; (2) the Lord Jesus Christ: his person, place and mediatorial role; (3) the Holy Spirit: his person and agency in new birth and new life. The aim throughout is to provide theological resources for personal life and pastoral ministry. Rival options, past and present, will be compared.

THEO 607 SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY C: PNEUMATOLOGY, ECCLESIOLOGY AND ESCHATOLOGY (A) Note: For course description see p. 49.

THEO 620 Theology of Mission Note: For course description see p. 50.

THEO 628  MEANING OF THE SACRAMENTS Note: For course description see p. 50.

Course Offerings • 51


THEO 630 PASTORAL ETHICS Note: For course description see p. 50.

THEO 635 CONvERSION & TRANSFORMATION Note: For course description see SPIR 635 (p. 47).

THEO 650 ANGLICAN THEOLOGY AND HISTORY Note: For course description see p. 50.

Guided Studies, Seminars & Major Projects THEO 695 GUIDED STUDY: THEOLOGY THEO 696 GUIDED STUDY: SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY THEO 697 GUIDED STUDY: CHRISTIAN ETHICS THEO 698 GUIDED STUDY: HISTORICAL THEOLOGY Under special arrangement with a member of the full-time faculty, students may take a guided study—for 1, 2 or 3 credit hours—in which they focus on a subject of their particular interest which is not otherwise covered in regular course offerings. THEO 7— SEMINAR: THEOLOGY (A) Theology seminars are for senior students wanting to explore specific issues relating to this field in greater depth. Enrollment is limited to allow for each student to make a major presentation and to encourage meaningful discussion. Seminar topics vary from year to year; recent seminar topics include the following: Augustine’s Confessions; Cistercians and Puritans; Theology of Religions; World Religions; Discovering Calvin’s Institutes of the Christian Religion; The Atonement; Mere Christianity: A Careful Reading of C.S. Lewis’ Most-Read Apologetic; Theology of Dietrich Bonhoeffer; Issues in Pentecostal Theology & Practice. THEO 790 COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION: THEOLOGY THEO 797 MCS THESIS: THEOLOGY THEO 798 TH M THESIS: THEOLOGY

52


Academic Information Note that all of the forms mentioned in this section are available in the Student Services Office; many can also be found on the Schedules & Forms page of the College website <www .regent-college .edu> .

Program Requirements

See pp . 13–23 for the course requirements for each program .

acadEmic advising Students are responsible for knowing the program requirements and policies of the College . The Academic Catalogue is published every year; program and policy information is posted on the College website <www .regent-college .edu>; notices are placed on the Registrar’s Notice Board and in the student newspaper . All students are strongly encouraged to keep themselves apprised of current program and policy information . New students are expected to attend Orientation sessions held immediately before the Fall and Winter Terms, during which they will be introduced to faculty and staff, to the academic programs and policies, and to other general information concerning life at Regent (see the Community Life section of the Prospectus) . Students needing further assistance with program planning should make an appointment to speak with the Assistant Registrar/Academic Advisor . This can be done through the Student Services Office . Appeals for exemption from any policy or program requirement or for transfer of credit from other academic institutions must be directed to the Registrar of the College . Students having general questions regarding their academic pursuits, personal development or vocational goals are encouraged to consult with members

of the faculty . Note, however, that faculty are not able to grant exemptions from policies or program requirements; questions regarding these should be directed to the Registrar . Faculty are available, to a limited extent, to meet with students to provide counsel on personal or spiritual matters; however, students seeking help with more acute psychological issues are encouraged to contact the Dean of Students and/or participate in Regent College’s Adjunct Counselling Services . Information on these services may be obtained in the Student Services Office .

admission to programs Regent College welcomes men and women of any race, colour, nation or ethnic origin to all the programs and activities offered by the College . Anyone who has an accredited bachelor’s degree may take up to a maximum of 12 credits hours overall (maximum of 6 credit hours in any given term) before applying for admission to the College (these are called “Unclassified Students”) . Those who do not have an accredited undergraduate degree but who are at least 23 years of age may audit most classes; those who are at least 30 years of age may take most courses for credit, up to the maximum of 12 credit hours . Applicants may apply directly into the DipCS, MCS, MDiv or ThM program . In selecting applicants for admission, Regent College considers a variety of factors in addition to strong academic record, such as employment history, voluntary activities and creative pursuits . See the Calendar of Important Dates (pp . 4–8) for application deadlines . For further information on the admissions policies and procedures, see the Admissions section of the Prospectus. 53


Residence Requirements

Concentrations in Degree Programs

Some aspects of the educational experience offered by Regent College are available only when students share in the community at the Vancouver campus. For this reason, students are required to complete the following number of credits in residence: Program Residence Requirement DipCS . . . . . . . . . . . 12 credits MCS . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 credits MDiv . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 credits ThM . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 credits Residency is defined as study pursued on the Vancouver campus in Fall, Winter or Summer Term. Distance Education courses do not serve to fulfill the residency requirement. However, DipCS students may complete up to 9 credits of their program by Distance Education; MCS and MDiv students may complete up to one-third of their program through Distance Education; and ThM students may complete up to one-third of their program by Distance Education provided they fulfill the ThM residency requirement of 24 credits. (For further information on Distance Education see p. 24.) Students who intend both to transfer credits from another institution and to take courses by Distance Education must plan carefully to ensure that they meet the Residence Requirement.

Concentrations are required for MCS and ThM students; they are optional for MDiv students; they are not available to DipCS students. Concentrations are available in the following areas: • Applied Theology (MCS and ThM only) • Pastoral Ministry (MDiv only) • Mission Studies • Marketplace Theology • Old Testament • New Testament • Biblical Studies (MCS only) • Church History • Interdisciplinary Studies • Christianity & Culture • Christianity & the Arts • Biblical Languages • Spiritual Theology • Theology For concentration requirements, see pp.14–23; additional information can be obtained in the Student Services Office and from the Schedules & Forms page of the College website <www.regent-college.edu>.

Time Limits for Completion of Programs Upon acceptance into a program at Regent College, students are permitted to postpone beginning their studies for up to one year. After a postponement period of one year, students must reapply should they wish to study at Regent College (see the Admissions section of the Prospectus). Students are expected to satisfy all program requirements in effect at the time they are accepted to begin their studies. Students who exceed the program time limits given below must appeal in writing to the Academic Standards Committee in order to complete their program. The Committee may require students who exceed their time limit to take additional courses, particularly if the program has been modified since they were admitted. The maximum time limits for each program are as follows: Program Time Limit DipCS . . . . . . . . . . . no time limit MCS . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 years MDiv . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 years ThM . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 years Students are encouraged to complete their degree requirements while resident in Vancouver. Note that a number of required courses in the master’s programs are offered only during Fall and Winter Terms. 54 • Academic Information

Major Projects MCS students are required to complete a comprehensive exam, thesis or integrative project in the arts and theology; this is normally done towards the end of their program, thereby enabling them to build upon related course work. ThM students must complete a thesis. MCS students who are interested in completing a thesis or an integrative project in the arts and theology are required to take the relevant non-credit orientation seminar offered each Fall and Winter term (see p. 26). In order to secure a supervisor for any of the major projects, students need to contact a member of faculty who is approved to teach in the same discipline as the proposed project (e.g., Applied Theology, Church History, etc.) to see if he or she would be willing to act as supervisor. Except in the case of the comprehensive exam, a detailed proposal must be submitted for approval by the appropriate committee. Dates for submission of proposals are listed on the Registrar’s Notice Board. It is strongly recommended that students complete their major project while in Vancouver.

1. Comprehensive Examinations and Papers The comprehensive examination track in the MCS program tests the breadth of a student’s knowledge within a concentration. To prepare for the exam, which includes both a written and, if required by the student’s examining professor, an oral component, candidates will read a representative selection of material (normally between 3,000 and 4,000 pages)


chosen by a professor from the concentration discipline. The written examination, which is of primary importance, is normally three or four hours in duration and focuses on specific questions taken from topics relating to the reading list. The oral examination, if required, will be more general within the field of interest than the written examination and will provide the opportunity to amplify what has been tested in the written examination. Written exams are normally scheduled during the 10th and 11th teaching weeks of both Fall and Winter Terms, and oral exams normally take place during the 12th teaching week (the final week of the term). Students should register for the comprehensive exam in the term in which they anticipate writing it. The final grade will be determined by the candidate’s performance in the written and, if required, oral examination. The oral examination will not detract from the grade achieved in the written part, but it may enhance it. The passing grade for the comprehensive examination is B-. Comprehensive Paper: Upon special approval of the supervisor, the exam may take the form of a major paper. As this is an alternative within the comprehensive exam track, similar policies apply. The comprehensive paper will be based on the same reading list as the comprehensive exam. The paper should be approximately 10,000 words (40 pages) in length, and should demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of all the material on the reading list. Students should be aware that this option will probably consume more time than the exam option. The faculty supervisor will select a second reader for the paper. Each of them will grade the paper, and together they may conduct an oral exam which will cover both the paper and the reading. The final grade will be determined by the candidate’s performance in both the paper and the oral examination. The oral examination will not detract from the grade achieved in the paper, but it may enhance it. The passing grade for the comprehensive paper is B-.

2. Theses A thesis is a substantial piece of independent research on a specific, focused subject, involving both critical analysis and theological reflection. Students should not underestimate either the vigour demanded or the time required to complete the project. The normal range for theses is between 30,000 and 45,000 words in length (inclusive of footnotes, but exclusive of bibliography). Few students are able to complete a thesis within one term. Students must have a GPA of at least 3.5 before being approved to write a thesis.

Students interested in writing a thesis are required to do the following: 1. Register for and attend the non-credit Thesis Orientation (GENR 301) either in the Fall or Winter Term. GENR 301 provides a concise introduction to research methodology, to library and bibliographical resources, to the writing of a thesis proposal, and to the organization and format of a thesis. GENR 301 is required for MCS thesis students, but is optional for ThM students. 2. Approach a member of faculty who teaches in the discipline of the proposed thesis, and ask if he or she would be willing to supervise the thesis. While the College will endeavour to facilitate thesis supervision in the area of the student’s choosing, admission to the MCS or ThM program does not guarantee this. 3. Produce an acceptable thesis proposal and submit it to the Thesis Proposal Approval Committee. The Committee may accept the proposal as it stands, reject it outright, or make recommendations for revision. Submission deadlines for proposals are posted on the Registrar’s Notice Board. 4. Register for the thesis either by the end of the term that the proposal is approved, or by the registration deadline of the subsequent term. Registration for theses may be done in the Fall, Winter or Summer term, and may be split over two consecutive terms. If the thesis registration is split over two terms, students do not need to submit a registration form for the final 6 credits; they will automatically be registered and charged for the credits at the beginning of the subsequent term (including Summer), and students must pay the fees by the tuition payment due date of that term. Beginning from September 1 following the registration of the thesis, students have a maximum of three years to complete their thesis. Students who do not complete within these three years must appeal in writing to the Academic Standards Committee to request permission to continue. Their appeal must include (i) a description of the progress they have made, (ii) an explanation of why they did not complete within the time allotted, (iii) a proposed date of completion, and (iv) a letter of support from their supervisor. Extensions, however, are by no means guaranteed. The final grade will be determined by the supervisor and the second reader (to be chosen by the Thesis Proposal Approval Committee). The passing grade for an MCS or ThM thesis is B. See pp. 67–68 for further details on payment of tuition and other thesis fees.

3. Integrative Projects in the Arts and Theology The integrative project in the arts and theology pro-

Academic Information •  55


vides students who have a background of experience in the arts an opportunity to create and present an original work of art (e.g., a novel, paintings, the writing and performance of music or a play, etc.) and to reflect on it theologically. This option is normally chosen by students completing a concentration in Christianity and the Arts and may be taken for either 6 or 12 credit hours depending on the size of the project. The project will be accompanied by a critical essay of 5,000 to 7,500 words (20 to 30 pages) engaging in theological and aesthetic reflection on the medium and tradition in which the integrative project in the arts and theology is done. It is important to note that the integrative project in the arts and theology is primarily intended for people who have already achieved significant competency in their chosen art field. A portfolio of work must be presented for adjudication as part of the proposal process. The level of completed work is expected to be publishable, acceptable for juried exhibit, or ready for performance. Students who are at a more exploratory stage with regard to their chosen medium or genre, and who wish to be considered for the integrative project in the arts and theology, may be required to take some courses through UBC, art schools or community colleges outside their Regent program. Students must have a GPA of at least 3.3 before being approved to do an integrative project in the arts and theology. Students interested in doing an integrative project in the arts and theology need first to do the following: 1. Register for and attend the non-credit Integrative Project in the Arts and Theology Orientation (GENR 313). 2. Take The Christian Imagination (INDS 560), normally offered in the Fall Term. 3. Take The Vocation of the Artist seminar (INDS 785), normally offered in the Fall Term. As a prerequisite for this seminar, in addition to taking INDS 560, students must present a portfolio of work in their art form, together with a short CV showing other relevant training, performance or publishing in that art form, to one of the seminar instructors in order to gain permission to take the course. 4. Approach a member of faculty to ask if he or she would be willing to supervise the project. While the College will endeavour to facilitate supervision in the area and art form of the student’s choosing, admission to the MCS program does not guarantee this. 5. Produce an acceptable integrative project in the arts and theology proposal and submit it to the Arts Advisory Committee. The Committee may accept the proposal as it stands, reject it outright, or make recommendations for revision. Submission deadlines for proposals are posted on the Registrar’s Notice Board. 56 • Academic Information

6. Register for the Integrative Project in the Arts and Theology either by the end of the term that the proposal is approved, or by the registration deadline of the subsequent term. Registration for integrative projects may be done in the Fall, Winter or Summer term and may (for 12 credit hour projects only) be split over two consecutive terms. If students choose to split their registration over two terms, they do not need to submit a registration form for the final 6 credits; they will automatically be registered and charged for the credits at the beginning of the subsequent term (including Summer), and students must pay the fees by the tuition payment due date of that term. Beginning from September 1 following the registration of the integrative project in the arts and theology, students have a maximum of three years to complete their project. Students who do not complete within these three years must appeal in writing to the Academic Standards Committee to request permission to continue. Their appeal must include (i) a description of the progress they have made, (ii) an explanation of why they did not complete within the time allotted, (iii) a proposed date of completion, and (iv) a letter of support from their supervisor. Extensions, however, are by no means guaranteed. The passing grade for the integrative project in the arts and theology is B. Further information on the integrative project is available from the Student Services Office or from a faculty member on the Arts Advisory Committee. See pp. 67–68 for further details on payment of tuition and other fees.

Graduation Requirements and Procedures In order to graduate, students must do the following:

1. Submit an online or paper Application for Graduation to the Registrar’s Office by the end of January in the year they wish to graduate (the College cannot be responsible for confirming graduation candidacy if this application is not received). 2. Submit the Graduation Application fee along with the Application. 3. Settle all financial obligations with the College, including any amounts owing on their student account and any Library fines. 4. Complete all the requirements of their program as outlined in this Academic Catalogue. 5. Attain the minimum grade point average for their respective program, which are as follows: Program Graduation GPA DipCS . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7 MCS . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 MDiv . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 ThM . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3


6. For students who have received US student loans: Complete the exit interview with the Financial Aid Officer. While the Registrar’s Office is available for academic and program consultation, students are themselves responsible for their course selection. Students are advised to study their chosen program and its requirements carefully prior to entrance. Students are required to complete their program according to the requirements as published when they were officially admitted into the program by the Admissions Office. If the program requirements have changed since their admission, however, they may elect to complete according to the newer requirements. Regent diplomas and degrees are officially conferred by the Board of Governors at Convocation which normally takes place in April shortly after the end of Winter Term. Only those students who have completed all their program requirements are permitted to graduate.

Academic Policies Transfer Credit and Exemption Students who have already completed theological studies at an accredited graduate school may be granted transfer credit for that work. Such credit will be given only for courses considered relevant to Regent’s programs and of equivalent academic standard. Credit will not normally be granted for courses which are not theological in nature or have not been taught from a theological perspective. The maximum amount of transfer credit varies according to each program: Program Maximum Transfer Credit DipCS . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 credits MCS . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 MDiv . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 ThM . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 A minimum grade of B (or a Pass in a Pass/Fail course) based on the external institution’s grading scale is required for courses to be considered for transfer. Since credits may be defined differently at different institutions, transfer credits from some institutions will be subject to a ratio to make them equal to credits taken at Regent. Transfer credit from nonaccredited institutions is not normally given. Under no circumstances will transfer credit be awarded for work or life experience. Where a particular undergraduate course from an accredited institution can be shown to have special relevance to one’s program at Regent, transfer credit may be granted at a 3:2 ratio. To be eligible, however, the course cannot have been used to satisfy the requirements for a bachelor’s degree. Furthermore, first or second year undergraduate courses will not normally be considered for transfer. An exception is made in the case of Hebrew and Greek which may be transferred

at full credit value even though they were taken at an undergraduate level (as long as they are not part of the student’s bachelor’s degree). A minimum grade of B+ based on the external institution’s grading scale is required to be considered for transfer. Exemption from specific required courses at Regent may be requested on the basis of work done at an accredited undergraduate institution, whether as part of the student’s bachelor’s degree or not. A minimum grade of B+ is required for exemption consideration. Exemption, however, does not entail transfer of credit; therefore, alternative, normally more advanced courses in the same discipline must be taken to make up the total number of credit hours required for a diploma or degree. Application for transfer credit or exemption must be made to the Registrar of the College. In making such application, students are required to supply an official transcript from their college; they may also be asked to provide a college catalogue or course syllabus which describes the course(s) they have taken.

Full-Time Status For external purposes (e.g., Study Permits) full-time study is defined as 18 credit (or audit) hours per academic year (September to August). For the minimum number of credit hours required to maintain eligibility for financial aid, see the Financial Aid section in the Prospectus. Solely for the purpose of qualifying for government student loans, thesis students may be granted full-time status during the two terms in which they register for their thesis credits (e.g., 6 credits per term). See the Registrar for additional information about this exception.

Registration Registration for each term opens well before the term begins: typically by July 1 for Fall courses, by November 1 for Winter courses, and by March 1 for Summer courses. Registration policies and procedures are published with each registration form. Students should also pay careful attention to the information provided on the timetable.

Guided Study A guided study is a course in which a student is able to focus on an issue of his or her particular interest under the guidance of one of the regular full-time faculty of Regent College. Only students who are admitted to Regent College are permitted to take a guided study. Furthermore, students are limited to a maximum of one guided study per term for a total of: Program Guided Studies Permitted DipCS . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MCS . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MDiv . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ThM . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Academic Information •  57


Guided studies may be taken for 1, 2 or 3 credit hours depending on the amount of work involved (1 credit for each 45 hours of work). Guided studies are subject to the availability of a faculty supervisor, are subject to the same academic guidelines as other regular courses and are not offered in place of regularly offered courses. Students wishing to take a guided study must, in consultation with a faculty supervisor, complete a “Guided Study Contract” form and submit it to the Student Services Office with their registration form or course change form at the beginning of a Fall or Winter Term. Guided Studies are not normally offered in the Summer Term. Guided studies must be completed within the Fall or Winter term in which they are registered. Note that only a general title will appear on the student transcript (e.g., “Guided Study: Applied Theology”).

Credit Hours and Work Load Fall and Winter Term courses are normally offered for 3 credit hours and meet 3 hours per week. Evening and weekend courses may be offered for 2 or 3 credit hours at the discretion of the instructor. In cases where a 3-credit hour course spans over two terms (Fall and Winter), students will register for half the total credit hours in each term; however, they will not receive any academic credit until the full course has been completed. Spring and Summer School courses vary: one-week courses are normally 1 or 2 credit hours, two-week courses are 2 or 3 credit hours, three-week courses are 3 credit hours (6 credit hours of Hebrew or Greek may also be taken in the Summer). Students taking courses for academic credit should expect to invest a minimum of 45 hours of work per credit hour. Where applicable this includes class lectures, assigned reading, papers, assignments and exams. Given that 12 credit hours per term is considered to be a full load of academic work, students are encouraged, where possible, to spread their studies out over Regent’s academic year (Fall, Winter, Spring and Summer) particularly if they wish to earn 30 credits per year. Students for whom English is a second language are encouraged to take no more than 9 credit hours in their first term.

Extensions to Course Work The deadline for an assignment is considered to be part of the course requirements. Due to the additional workload and awkwardness for faculty to have to grade late papers, and due to the College’s intention to be fair to students who, often through considerable hardship, submit their work on time, extensions for course work will be considered only in exceptional circumstances. Students should take serious consideration of this when planning their course load. 58 • Academic Information

Grounds for an Extension Extensions for course work are granted only in cases where the student demonstrates there was an unforeseeable and unavoidable emergency. Emergencies considered to be grounds for an extension typically include: • personal sickness or injury which prevents one from working • sickness, injury or death which requires the student’s attention • emotional or psychological crisis for which the student has sought professional help • unexpected increase in job responsibilities By contrast, the following will not normally be considered grounds for an extension: providing hospitality, relocating, difficult living situations, failure to anticipate the amount of work involved in a course, confusion over the nature of the assignments, computer problems (it is the student’s responsibility to keep files backed up), lost assignments, lack of proficiency in English.

Application Process Application for Extension forms are available from the Student Services Office and on the Schedules & Forms page of the College website <www.regent-college.edu>. The process to apply for an extension is as follows: • For Fall and Winter courses offered on the Vancouver campus: Students may apply for an extension of up to 7 days beyond the end of the term directly from the professor. To apply for an extension beyond this, students must (i) complete an Extension Application, and (ii) submit the Application to the Student Services Office by the deadline (see next page). Note that for Fall and Winter courses, extensions beyond one week of the end of term are granted solely at the discretion of the Registrar. • For Spring and Summer Session courses offered on the Vancouver campus, students must (i) complete an Extension Application, and (ii) submit the Application to the Registrar’s Office by the deadline (see next page), along with the $25 Summer Term Extension Administration Fee. Note that for Spring and Summer School courses, extensions are granted solely at the discretion of the Registrar. • For Distance Education courses, students must contact the Distance Education Office for extension information by the deadline (see next page). Note that for these courses, extensions are granted solely at the discretion of the Distance Education Coordinator. Extensions may be granted by the Registrar or the Distance Education Coordinator for a period of between 1 and 30 days at their discretion. The length of extension granted may depend on the nature of the


emergency the student faced. A grade penalty may be assigned at the discretion of the Registrar or Distance Education Coordinator. The deadline to apply for an extension is as follows: • For Fall and Winter courses offered on the Vancouver campus: For an extension of up to 7 days past the end of the term, to be granted by the professor, the deadline for applying is the date the assignment is due. For an extension of up to 30 days past the end of the term, to be granted by the Registrar, the deadline for applying is 7 days beyond the end of the term. • For Spring and Summer Session courses offered on the Vancouver campus: the final submission deadline for assignments for the course. • For Distance Education courses, which are administered through the Distance Education Office: the final submission deadline for assignments for the course. When an extension has been approved, the Registrar’s Office or the Distance Education Office will inform the student on how and when to submit assignments.

Submission of Assignments Students granted an extension by the Registrar’s Office must attach the Extension Submission Form to their assignment(s) and must submit or post them to the Registrar’s Office by the assigned deadline. Assignments must not be submitted directly to the professor or the Teaching Assistant. Failure to submit on-campus course assignments to the Registrar’s Office by the assigned deadline will result in a grade reduction of 1/3 of a letter grade per day late. Failure to submit Distance Education assignments to the Distance Education Office by the assigned deadline will result in a grade reduction of 1/3 of a letter grade per week. Failure to follow extension policy instructions will result in a grade of F being assigned to the course. Note that the grading of assignments submitted on extension may take longer than usual.

Appeals Students wanting to appeal a decision made with regard to an extension, or to request an extension beyond 30 days, must submit a letter of appeal to the Registrar, addressed to the Academic Standards Committee, within 30 days of the decision or before the end of the extension deadline, explaining the extenuating circumstances that might warrant the appeal. Supporting documents (e.g., a letter from the student’s doctor) are recommended. Students granted an extension that continues into the following term will normally be limited as to the number of credit hours they may take. The decision of the Academic Standards Committee shall be final.

In a situation where the crisis facing the student continues beyond the period of an extension, he or she may appeal to the Registrar for a Withdrawal (a grade of W on the transcript) from a course. See Withdrawal Policy below.

Assignment Format The default style manual for documentation of sources used and format of presentation for all written assignments is The Chicago Manual of Style (current edition). For most purposes, A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations by Kate Turabian will be sufficient for students. Exceptions or alternatives to this format may be made at the discretion of the instructor.

Withdrawal Policy Students who undergo extreme hardship which was not of their causing, was beyond their ability to control, and prevented them from completing course requirements even given an extension, may appeal to the Registrar for a Withdrawal from the course. This would normally be accompanied by a letter from a professional supporting the student’s appeal (e.g., the student’s doctor). If granted, a grade of W will be recorded on the student’s transcript; this does not affect the GPA.

Combining Degrees Students wishing to complete two master’s degrees in theology are subject to certain restrictions on how many credit hours may be shared between the two degrees. For example, in order to complete both an MCS and an MDiv degree, students are allowed to have a maximum of 30 credit hours in common between the two; thus, they must earn a minimum of 120 credit hours for the two degrees. The ThM degree requires a minimum of 30 credit hours beyond an MDiv or an MCS. Students are discouraged from attempting to complete two degree programs concurrently.

Grade Reports & Transcripts Course grades are either posted online by the instructor or submitted on paper to the Registrar’s Office for posting. Grades may be viewed online immediately after they are posted. Students have four months from the date grades are posted to appeal any disputed grades (see Appeals, p. 62). Official transcripts bearing the seal of the College and the signature of the Registrar may be ordered online or by submitting a Transcript Request Form along with the appropriate fee. All fees must be fully paid before an official transcript can be issued.

Course Retake Policy Students may retake a course—subject to regular registration restrictions and limitations—in an effort to achieve a higher grade. This involves registering and

Academic Information •  59


paying tuition for the course a second time. Both courses will appear on the transcript in the terms they were taken; however, credit will not be granted more than once, and the best grade achieved will be retained. Only one retake will be permitted per course. Comprehensive exams may be retaken only once; students who do so will be assessed a comprehensive exam retake fee.

uate degree with a GPA less than the minimum normally required for admission, but who, in the opinion of the Admissions Committee, are suitable candidates for admission, may be admitted on probation. Students admitted to the College who are applying to the MCS or MDiv program, but whose GPA is less than, but within 0.3 of, that required for admission, may be admitted to the program on probation.

Aegrotat Policy

Process for Students on Probation

The grade designation AG (Aegrotat) is granted to students who for reasons of serious illness or other extraordinary circumstances outside their control are unable to complete a course. Application for consideration must be made to the Academic Standards Committee within one week of the end of the course. A favourable evaluation may be given where the circumstance is beyond doubt, where the student has an otherwise excellent record of completion, and where neither further assessment (e.g., a deferred exam) nor extension of time are considered feasible (e.g., the student being in the final term of a program of study). The Committee will determine whether the course should be awarded an AG (passing but without grade point) or a grade calculated on the basis of work already completed for the course. Students whose application is denied will be given a grade based on the work they submitted in the course.

Students who have been placed on probation for having a low GPA shall be required to do the following in the order indicated: 1. Meet with the Registrar in order to devise a recovery plan for raising their GPA above the minimum required (e.g., retaking courses with low or failing grades, taking fewer courses at a time so as to achieve higher grades). 2. Meet with the Dean of Students and on the basis of the recovery plan approved by the Registrar discuss any other actions that may need to be taken in order to improve their academic performance (e.g., restricting non-academic activities, taking a course in Academic Writing and/or English). A record of the recovery plan and any recommendations from the Dean of Students shall be kept in the student’s file. Students who have been admitted to the College on probation shall remain on probation for one year, but they shall not be required to do (1) and (2) in the paragraph above unless after their first term their GPA is lower than that required to be taken off of probation. Students who have been admitted to the MCS or MDiv program on probation shall remain on probation for one year and shall be required to do (1) and (2) in the paragraph above.

Academic Probation The purpose of the probation policy is to alert students, where applicable, to the fact that they are not succeeding academically and to impress upon them the importance of giving serious attention to their academic performance in order to continue their studies. The policy also provides a mechanism for preventing students who are not likely to succeed from continuing their studies.

Criteria for Probation Students admitted to Regent College are expected to maintain a grade point average (GPA) high enough to graduate. Students admitted to a program must maintain the minimum graduation GPA for that program (see Graduation Requirements and Procedures). In addition, students admitted to Graduate Studies must maintain the minimum graduation GPA for the DipCS program; students admitted with Special Student status must maintain the minimum graduation GPA for the DipCS program over the first 30 credit hours, but must maintain the minimum GPA for the MCS program in order to go beyond 30 credit hours. Students who fall below the minimum level, who have completed at least 12 credit hours of studies at Regent, shall be placed on academic probation. Applicants to the College who have an undergrad60 • Academic Information

Action to be Taken at the End of Probation Year Students shall be taken off probation if after one year their cumulative GPA has risen above the minimum level as defined under “Criteria for Probation” above. If after one year of being on probation a student’s cumulative GPA does not rise sufficiently for him or her to be taken off probation, then: 1. T hose admitted to the Diploma in Christian Studies program or to Graduate Studies, and those admitted on Special Student status, will not be permitted to register for further courses at the College. 2. Those admitted to the MCS, MDiv or ThM program will not be permitted to continue in their program. Those who would still be on probation if they went into the DipCS program will not be permitted to register for further courses at the College. When a student is not permitted to register for further


courses in accordance with this policy, an indication that the student is not in good standing shall be made on the student’s academic transcript. Probationary status, however, shall not be indicated on the transcript.

Appeal Process Students who believe that an exception ought to be made in their case (concerning probation, continuing in a program or taking further courses) may appeal in writing to the Academic Standards Committee. The decision of the Academic Standards Committee shall be final. Students shall not be permitted to take courses at Regent while an appeal is in process. In the event where a student’s appeal is successful, he or she shall remain on probation for one year and shall be subject to all the regulations of this Probation Policy and to any conditions stipulated by the Academic Standards Committee. Also, where a student has completed academic courses at another institution while he or she has not been permitted to register for courses at Regent College, and then successfully appeals to continue to take courses at Regent, the credits earned at the other institution may be transferred to a program at Regent in accordance with the College’s Transfer Credit and Exemption Policy and the Residence Requirements Policy.

Academic Integrity All students at Regent College are expected to practise uncompromised integrity in all academic matters. The fact that Regent is a Christian college makes vigilance in this area all the more imperative. Consequently, academic offences shall not be tolerated.

Academic Offences Academic offences which are subject to penalty include, but are not limited to, the following: 1. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is an academic offence in which someone presents, in whole or in part, the work of another person as his or her own work. Academic work properly involves the examination, critical evaluation and utilization of contributions of other people. However, whenever someone uses the contributions of others in an academic setting, he or she must acknowledge the author of those contributions through footnotes or other acceptable referencing practices. Failure to do so constitutes plagiarism. Plagiarism can occur in written work (e.g., failure to acknowledge the use of other people’s words and ideas) and in non-written work (e.g., failure to acknowledge the use of other people’s images or creations in a work of art, or of other people’s words in an oral presentation). 2. Cheating: Cheating is an academic offence

involving the failure to follow the instructions pertaining to the conditions for writing an assignment or examination, or falsifying material subject to academic evaluation. Cheating includes, but is not limited to, copying work from another person or text, using unauthorized materials or equipment in an examination, obtaining examinations or similar materials by improper means, and impersonating another student or submitting work under another student’s name. 3. Duplicating Assignments: It is an academic offence to submit the same, or substantially the same, essay, presentation or assignment in more than one course, whether the earlier presentation was at Regent College or at another institution, unless prior approval has been obtained. 4. False Representation: Making false representation by submitting false records or information, whether in writing or orally, by falsifying or submitting false documents (including, but not limited to, the following: transcripts, letters of reference, financial aid documents), or by failing to submit required records or information, is an academic offence.

Penalties The assessment of penalties for academic offences is at the discretion of the Academic Standards Committee; recommendations for suspension shall be referred to the Senate. Where the Committee determines that a student’s behaviour does warrant discipline, it may impose one or more of the following penalties: (i) A reduced grade, including a grade of zero or Fail, on the assignment, test or exam in question. (ii) A reduced grade, including a grade of Fail, on the course in question. (iii) A notation to be placed on the student’s transcript stating that the student has committed an academic offence and indicating the penalty imposed. (iv) Suspension or cancellation of any bursaries, scholarships or other forms of financial aid. (v) Suspension from the College, whether for a specified period of time, an indefinite period of time, or permanently (i.e., expulsion). (vi) Rejection of admission to a program or to the College. Consideration of the severity of the offence shall be given in determining the appropriate penalty. Under normal circumstances, however, the penalties shall be as follows: (a) In cases of plagiarism or cheating, the penalty for the first offence shall be failure of the course; the penalty for a subsequent offence shall be failure of the course and suspension from the College. (b) In the case of duplicating assignments, the pen-

Academic Information •  61


alty for the first offence shall be a full letter grade reduction in the course and the student shall be required to re-write and submit the assignment in acceptable form; the penalty for a second offence shall be failure of the course and suspension from the College. (c) In the case of false representation in the context of an application for admission, the penalty shall be rejection of admission to the College; in the case of false representation in the context of a course, the penalty shall be failure of the course and suspension from the College. In all cases of academic offence, a notice shall be placed in the student’s file. In the case of suspension, a notation of the penalty shall be entered on the student’s record which shall appear on his or her academic transcript. After at least two years following the termination of the suspension, the student may appeal to the Academic Standards Committee to have this notation removed. Students shall not receive credit for courses taken at another institution while on suspension.

Process All work submitted by students may be reviewed, by whatever means seem appropriate, to ensure that an academic offence has not been committed. These means may include, but are not limited to, using one or more software and/or internet-based services to verify the authenticity and originality of students’ work. Professors who suspect that a student has committed an academic offence must report their suspicions to the Registrar, with supporting evidence. Upon receipt of a report from a professor of an alleged academic offence, the Registrar shall refer the matter, along with supporting evidence provided by the professor, to the Academic Standards Committee. The Registrar shall also invite the student alleged to have committed an academic offence to answer, in writing, the allegations being raised against him or her. The student shall be given a minimum of 14 days to provide a written defense before the Academic Standards Committee meets. The Academic Standards Committee shall consider the evidence provided by the professor and the defense provided by the student (if any), and any other information that may be relevant to the case, in determining whether or not an academic offence has been committed, and, if so, what the appropriate penalty shall be, with reference to the penalties outlined above. Where the penalty is suspension from the College, the Academic Standards Committee shall make recommendation to the Senate and the Senate shall make the final decision regarding the penalty. The student has the right to appeal, in writing, to

62 • Academic Information

the Senate the decision or recommendation of the Academic Standards Committee regarding a penalty against him or her. Letters of appeal must be submitted to the Academic Dean within 30 days of the decision of the Academic Standards Committee, failing which, no appeal shall be entertained by the Senate. The Senate shall consider whatever information has been provided by the Academic Standards Committee and by the student, and any other information that may be relevant to the case, in deciding whether to uphold the recommendation of the Academic Standards Committee, to impose a different penalty, or not to impose a penalty at all. All decisions of the Senate are final.

Appeals Students who feel aggrieved regarding a decision relative to their academic program (e.g., admission to a degree, a ruling regarding an academic requirement or policy) may appeal the decision. The general appeal process is as follows: 1. The appeal would normally be made, in the first instance, to the person or committee responsible for the contested decision (e.g., the Registrar). 2. Where the student is not satisfied that the appeal has been fairly heard or considered, or where he or she wishes to appeal for an exception to College policy, a further appeal may be made: (a) In the case of an admissions matter, appeal should be directed to the Admissions Committee which meets regularly throughout the year. (b) In the case of a ruling regarding an academic requirement or policy, appeal should be made to the Academic Standards Committee. For specific information on the appeal process for the following, see the relevant section in this Catalogue: Course Extensions, see pp. 58–59 Major Project Extensions, see pp. 54–56 Academic Probation, see pp. 60–61 Academic Offences, see pp. 61–62 Submission deadlines for t he Academic Standards Committee are posted on the Registrar’s Notice Board.

Academic Committees of the College Academic Policy Committee Chair: Paul Williams, Academic Dean For approval of all academic policies.

Academic Standards Committee

Chair: Craig Gay, Associate Academic Dean For approval of all appeals for exemption to academic policy and program requirements.

Thesis Proposal Approval Committee Chair: Hans Boersma


For approval of all MCS and ThM thesis proposals.

Arts Advisory Committee

Chair: Dal Schindell For approval of integrative project in the arts and theology proposals, and other arts-related issues.

Financial Aid Committee

Chair: Greg Cowley, Registrar For approval of all applications for financial aid and for appeals to financial aid policy.

MDiv Committee

Chair: Ross Hastings For approval of students progressing from the Vocational Discernment Stage to the Candidacy Stage of the MDiv program, and other MDiv-related issues.

Graduation Prizes Each year, at the discretion of the Senate (on the advice of the Academic Standards Committee), the following prizes are awarded at Convocation: ■ The Board of Governors’ Prize for Proficiency in

the DipCS Program ■ The Board of Governors’ Prize for Proficiency in the MCS Degree Program ■ The Board of Governors’ Prize for Proficiency in the MDiv Degree Program ■ The Board of Governors’ Prize for Proficiency in the ThM Degree Program ■ The Professor W. J. Martin Prize in Hebrew ■ The Greek Prize ■ The Old Testament Prize ■ The New Testament Prize ■ The Biblical Studies Prize ■ The Church History Prize ■ The Theology Prize ■ The Spiritual Theology Prize ■ The Interdisciplinary Studies Prize ■ The Mission Studies Prize ■ The Pastoral Care Prize ■ The Preaching Prize ■ The Marketplace Theology Prize ■ The Christianity & the Arts Prize

Grading Schedule Letter Grade Explanation A+ A Excellent work A-

Grade Point 4.0 4.0 3.7

B+ B Good work B-

3.3 3.0 2.7

C+ C Passable work C-

2.3 2.0 1.7

F Other Designations AG

0.0

AU

Fail Aegrotat

Audit

Unacceptable work

Ungraded Pass: Granted by the Academic Standards Committee to a student who, for exceptional reasons, was unable to complete a course in the final term of study. Non-credit: Attendance recognized.

EX Extension

Temporary designation for course in which a student has been granted a Registrar’s extension for course work.

CIP Course in Progress

Temporary designation for course in which the grade has not yet been recorded.

P Pass

Competency: Used only where a letter grade is deemed inappropriate.

Course subsequently retaken.

R

Retake

W Withdrawal

Granted by the Registrar when, because of exceptional circumstances, the student was unable to complete the course.

Academic Information •  63


Fees & Expenses

Note: All fees are subject to change . For payment deadlines, see the Calendar of Important Dates (pp . 4–8) . All deadlines are 4:30 pm on the dates indicated . Also, for information on employment opportunities and financial aid, consult the “Financing Your Education” section of the Prospectus .

Payment, Accounts & Refunds mannEr of paymEnt All tuition and fees are charged in Canadian funds . Payment can be made in the following forms: ■ Canadian or US cash or traveller’s cheques (if paying in person) ■ cheque drawn on a Canadian or US bank account ■ Canadian or US bank or postal money orders ■ Credit card (Visa or MasterCard; charges will automatically convert to US dollars if using a US credit card) or debit card (Interac) Fees on page 68 are listed in Canadian dollars . Regent College accepts cheques drawn on US bank accounts for payment of tuition and tuition-related fees . Contact Student Services for the current rate and assistance in calculating the US dollar equivalent .

outstanding accounts The College maintains an account for each student . Students will not be permitted to register for courses or apply for admission if they have fees owing from a previous term . In addition, students with fees owing will not be issued an official transcript nor will they be permitted to graduate .

adJustmEnt of accounts

In the event of an increase of course load during the term, additional charges are added at the full course fee regardless of when the course is added . Students who reach four or more credit and/or audit hours by adding a course later in the term (e .g ., thesis, comprehensive exam, Distance Education course) will be subject to pay all student fees .

schEdulE of rEfunds For Fall and Winter Terms, please consult the Calendar of Important Dates (see pp . 4–8) or the Student Contract which accompanies each registration form for refund deadlines . Unless otherwise indicated on the course syllabus, the deadlines to receive a refund for dropping a course, reducing the number of credit hours in a course, or changing from credit to audit are as follows: Refund Deadline 100% Friday of the 2nd week of the term 75% Friday of the 5th week of the term No further refunds are available after the 75% refund deadline . The deadline to make any of these changes, without refund, is Friday of the seventh week of the term . After this latter date, students will be said to have attempted the course and are committed to receive a grade . For Spring and Summer Sessions, unless otherwise indicated on the course syllabus, the deadlines to receive a refund for dropping a course, reducing the number of credit hours in a course, or changing from credit to audit are as follows: Course Length Refund Deadline 1 week 100% Day 1 75% Day 2 2 week 100% Day 2 65


75% Day 4 100% Day 3 75% Day 6 No further refunds are available after the 75% refund deadline. The deadline to make any of these changes, without refund, is the last day of the class. After this latter date, students will be said to have attempted the course and are committed to receive a grade. The schedule of refunds for courses held at irregular times will be published on the course syllabus. All deadlines are 4:30 pm (Student Services Office closure) on the dates indicated. In the case of requesting a refund (e.g., due to dropping a course), please allow 30 days for processing. 3 week

Tuition Receipts for Income Tax Tuition receipts for income tax purposes (form T2202A) will be issued by the end of February of the following year. A fee of $5 will be charged for replacement of lost receipts.

Regular Fees Application Fee Students applying externally for entrance to a College program will be charged a $60 non-refundable application fee. MCS and MDiv students will be charged a $25 non-refundable application fee when applying to the ThM program. Students admitted to the DipCS program are not charged a fee when applying to the MCS or MDiv program. Late Application Fee: An additional non-refundable fee of $20 will be charged for applications received after published deadlines.

Registration Fee All students must pay a $35 non-refundable registration fee each term when registering for one or more courses in that term. When adding courses (including a Distance Education courses) after registering for the term, students do not pay an additional registration fee. Late Registration Fee: An additional non-refundable fee of $50 will be charged to students who register after the published registration times and dates.

Payment of Tuition Fees For Fall and Winter courses, tuition is due in full on the Friday prior to the beginning of classes. For Spring and Summer Session courses, the payment deadline is the first day of class. Once registered in a course students are considered to be in attendance and are responsible for tuition fees in full unless they drop the course by notifying the 66 • Fees & Expenses

Student Services Office in writing. Students are not automatically dropped from a course if they do not attend.

Late Payment Fee Students who have not paid their fees in full by the payment deadline will be charged a non-refundable late payment fee of $50 plus a monthly interest charge calculated at a rate of 8.5% per annum.

Course Drop Fee A $10 charge is assessed for each request for dropping courses as indicated on the Student Contract each term. A $25 charge is assessed for dropping or changing a Distance Education course. No charge is assessed for adding a course.

Student Fees All students registered for 3 or more credit hours in the Fall or Winter Terms are required to pay the following Student Fees: 1. Regent College Student Association Fee which provides membership in the Regent College Student Association and which supports the work of the Student Council including representation of students in the life of the College, publication of the College newsletter (the Et Cetera) and the College Directory, provision of computers in the Library for student use, and organization of many social activities throughout the year. 2. Fall Retreat Fee which subsidizes the annual Fall Retreat. 3. AMS Fee which provides students membership in the Alma Mater Society (AMS) of the University of British Columbia and gives them access to UBC libraries, e-mail and internet, sports facilities, student discounts as well as links to UBC clubs and political processes. 4. U-Pass Fee which provides students membership in the UBC U-Pass BC program giving them transit privileges (TransLink buses, the SkyTrain & the SeaBus) within the Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD). This fee is mandatory for all students who pay the Student Association Fee regardless of where they live. 5. Health & Dental Plan Fee making students members of the AMS Health & Dental Plan which provides a comprehensive package of extended health, dental, vision and travel benefits to supplement students’ basic medical insurance (e.g., BC Medical Services Plan). Students may purchase additional coverage for their spouse and children by contacting the AMS Health & Dental Plan Office. Students who can show that they are already members of an extended health


and dental care plan may opt out of this program through the AMS Health & Dental Plan Office. Students taking only Distance Education courses are not subject to these fees; however, students who are taking a Distance Education course in the same term that they are taking an on-campus course will be subject to these fees provided their total credit/audit hours are three or more. Furthermore, students who are taking at least one on-campus course and who by adding credits during the term (e.g., by adding a Distance Education course, comprehensive exam or thesis) raise their total credit hours to 3 or more will be charged these fees regardless of when in the term they add the additional credits. Students who register for 3 or more audit hours may opt to pay these fees if they wish to take advantage of the services they provide; however, the option is either to pay all of the fees or none of them. Students who register for less than 3 credit/audit hours are not eligible to pay these fees.

within the 3-year time limit must appeal in writing to the Academic Standards Committee for permission to continue (see pp. 55–56). Those granted an extension will be required to pay an extended continuation fee (in addition to the regular registration fee).

Thesis & Integrative Project in the Arts and Theology (IPIAT) Fees

Retreat Costs for Spouses, Children and Part-Time Students

Thesis and IPIAT students must register for their thesis/IPIAT either by the thesis/IPIAT registration deadline of the same term in which their proposal is approved, or by the Friday before classes begin in the subsequent term; students who wish to register for their thesis/IPIAT prior to having their proposal approved should consult with the Registrar. Registration and payment for 12-credit-hour theses/ IPIAT may be done all at once or divided equally over two consecutive terms. Students who choose to split credits over two consecutive terms do not need to submit a registration form for the final 6 credits; they will automatically be registered and charged for these credits at the beginning of the subsequent term (including Summer), and must pay the fees by the tuition payment due date of that term in order to avoid late payment charges. Students are also subject to pay for the cost of handling and binding/ archiving and, in the case of theses, proofreading and microfilming. Payment for these costs is due at the time of registration.

Thesis & Integrative Project in the Arts and Theology Continuation (IPIAT) Fees Beginning from September following the initial registration of the thesis/IPIAT, students have three years to complete their thesis/IPIAT. Students who have not completed their thesis/IPIAT by the first September after their registration will be automatically charged a yearly continuation fee (in addition to the regular registration fee) at the beginning of each Fall Term until the end of their three-year time limit. Students who have not completed their thesis/IPIAT

Other Fees & Expenses Textbooks Students are advised that books can constitute a major expense. If your resources are limited, you are advised to invest carefully in essential reference works that will become a permanent and valued part of your library long after you leave Regent. Please note that the John Richard Allison Library is not able to provide a sufficient number of all textbooks. Students are therefore expected to purchase the basic textbooks for each course. Textbooks may cost between $85 and $180 per course.

Spouses and children of students are encouraged to attend the Fall Retreat. For further information see the Community Life section of the Prospectus. A basic accommodation charge applies. Students who do not pay the Student Association Fee must pay full accommodation charges.

Graduation and Application Fee When applying to graduate, students must pay a nonrefundable, non-transferable Graduation Application Fee. This must be paid each time a student applies for graduation.

Academic Hoods Degree students are loaned academic hoods and gowns for Convocation. Hoods (but not gowns) are also available for purchase. DipCS students do not require a hood for convocation.

Transcripts and Official Documents Official transcripts, which may be ordered online or by submitting a paper form, cost $5 each ($10 if needed in less than one week). Requests for copies of documents from student files cost $5 each.

Graduation Certificate Replacement Fee A charge of $25 is made for a diploma or degree certificate replacement.

Fees & Expenses • 67


Summary of Fees for 2010–2011

CAD$ Notes

Application Fee

$60.00 $50.00 US; Non-refundable

Late Application Fee

$80.00 $70.00 US; After published deadlines

Registration Fee

$35.00 Non-refundable; Payable each term

Late Registration Fee

$50.00 After published registration deadlines

Tuition: ■ Graduate level

$495.00 Per credit hour if registered for less than 9 credits.

$480.00 Per credit hour if registered for 9 to 11.5 credits.

$445.00 Per credit hour if registered for 12 or more credits.

Audit

$294.00 Per audit hour

Late Payment Fee $50.00 + interest charge per month based on 8.5% per annum (interest rate subject to change) Course Drop Fee

$10.00 Non-refundable

Distance Education Course Drop Fee $25.00 Non-refundable RCSA (Student Association) Fee

$40.00 3 or more credit/audit hours per term

AMS Membership Fee

$68.50 3 or more credit/audit hours per term

Health & Dental Plan Fee

$214.37 3 or more credit/audit hours per term

U-Pass Fee

$120.00 3 or more credit/audit hours per term

Fall Retreat Fee

$25.00 3 or more credit/audit hours per term

Academic Writing Course

$35.00

Thesis Orientation

$35.00

Thesis Binding Deposit Integrative Project in the Arts and Theology Handling Fee

$350.00 For final proofreading, binding, etc. $70.00 For binding, etc.

Thesis/Integrative Project Continuation Fee

$100.00 Per year

Thesis/Integrative Project Extended Continuation Fee

$500.00 Per year

Binding of Additional Theses

$30.00 Per copy (shipping extra)

Comprehensive Exam Retake Fee

$200.00

Program Extension Fee

$100.00 Per year

Graduation Application Fee Transcripts and Official Documents Failure to Register Course Change in Writing Fee

$90.00 Non-refundable $5.00 Non-refundable $25.00 Non-refundable

Graduation Certificate Replacement $25.00 Non-refundable Dishonoured Cheques

$20.00 Non-refundable

Grade Re-assessment Fee

$75.00 (charged if re-assessment does not result in a grade change)

Summer Term Extension Admin. Fee $25.00 (charged only if extension is approved) All amounts listed above are in Canadian dollars. Charges will automatically convert to US dollars if payment is made with a US credit card. Regent College accepts cheques drawn on US bank accounts for payments of tuition and tuitionrelated fees. Please contact Student Services for the current rate and assistance in calculating the US dollar equivalent.

68 • Fees & Expenses


Board of Governors

Regent College Board of Governors (2011–2012)

CHI, Uli (Dr .) Chairman and CEO, Computer Human Interaction, LLC, Seattle, WA COX, Frank (Mr .) Urban Planning & Engineering Consultant, The Cox Company, Charlottesville, VA DANIELSON, Dennis (Dr .) Professor, Department Head, Department of English, UBC, Vancouver, BC DAROU, Louise (Mrs .) Human Resources Consultant, with Royal Trust/RBC, Vancouver, BC, retired HAMILTON, Bob (Mr .) Retired Executive, TD Bank, Toronto, ON HINDMARSH, Julie (Ms .) Instructor, John Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD LANG, Georgialee (Ms .) Barrister & Solicitor, Georgialee Lang & Associates, Adjunct Professor of Law, UBC Law School, Vancouver, BC

TAN, Lip-Bu (Mr .) Chairman, Walden International, San Francisco, CA VAN DER KAMP, Bart (Dr .) Professor Emeritus, Department of Forest Sciences, UBC, Vancouver, BC WILSON, Rod J . K . (Dr .) President, Regent College YONG, James (Mr .) Professional Engineer (P .Eng .), Jakin Engineering and Construction Ltd ., Richmond, BC

Invited Guests of the Board (2011–2012)

BANDSTRA, Bev (Ms .) Assistant to the President and Board Coordinator, Regent College GAY, Craig (Dr .) Associate Academic Dean, Regent College HASTINGS, Ross (Dr .) Faculty Representative, Regent College

LOEWEN, Paul (Hon . Dr .) President, C . Paul Loewen Holdings Inc ., Winnipeg, MB

SHAW, Stephen (Mr .) President, Student Association, Regent College

PHILLIPS, Susan (Dr .) Professor/ Executive Director, New College Berkeley, Berkeley, CA

STINTON, Diane (Dr .) Dean of Students, Regent College

RODMAN, Geri (Ms .) President /CEO, InterVarsity Christian Fellowship of Canada, Toronto, ON

TOWLER, Patricia (Ms .) Vice-President, External Relations, Regent College

SHEPPARD, Greig (Mr .) Certified General Accountant, Greig Sheppard Ltd ., Richmond, BC

UNGER, Kevin (Mr .) Vice-President for Administration, Regent College

SUN, David (Mr .) Chairman/CPA, Ernst & Young, Hong Kong, retired

WILLIAMS, Paul (Mr .) Academic Dean, Regent College 69


Senate

Alumni Representative NORDLUND, Jean

Student Representatives SHAW,, Stephen, President, Student Association YANKOSKI, Danae, VP Academic, Student Association

Board Appointies LEY, David

Ex-Officio

VANDER KAMP, Bart

COWLEY, Greg, Registrar WILLIAMS, Paul S ., Academic Dean

Community Representative BAXTER, Martin

Faculty HASTINGS, Ross HINDMARSH, Bruce PROVAN, Iain W . WILLIAMS, Sarah C .

70

WILSON, Rod J .K ., President (Chair)


Privacy Statement Regent College respects the privacy of the personal information of its employees, students, donors, alumni, customers and other stakeholders . We are committed to protecting the privacy of personal information entrusted to us . In line with that commitment, we seek to be transparent and accountable with respect to the collection, use, disclosure and security of personal information . The following is a brief summary of our Privacy Policy . The complete text of the Policy may be accessed by contacting the Privacy Officer at the College or by visiting the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website . Collection of personal information Personal information is only collected to enable us to provide services and to meet legal and regulatory requirements . Only personal information that is relevant to and necessary for the purposes identified below will be collected . The main purposes for which we collect personal information are: 1 . To provide educational services . This includes but is not limited to offering courses and conferences, determining eligibility for admission to the College and into specific degree programs, processing of applications for bursaries and financial aid, bills processing, provision of student services in connection with the University of British Columbia and facilitating membership at the Vancouver School of Theology Library . 2 . To provide library services . We provide library services to our students as well as to members of the public . 3 . To develop, enhance, and administer relationships with donors . Some examples are the issuance of donation tax receipts, communication with

4 .

5 .

6 .

7 .

donors of College news, activities and events, and other services to promote donorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; relationships with the College . To provide services to alumni . Some services are communication of news and events to alumni in order that the College may continue to maintain a relationship with its graduates after the completion of their studies . To maintain a responsible commercial relationship with the bookstore customers . Some examples are billing and credit card payments for items purchased, mail-order services, communication of news of products and services, and club membership services in order to earn discounts . To manage, plan and develop our business and operations . For example, information on students may be used to help us analyse and plan student recruitment efforts . To meet legal and regulatory requirements . This includes meeting the reporting requirements of government agencies such as the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency and Statistics Canada .

Disclosure of personal information The College does not sell, rent or loan the personal information of its students, donors, alumni, employees and customers (e .g ., mailing lists) to third parties . Personal information is only disclosed to third parties when it is necessary for the provision of services and to meet legal requirements . Disclosure of personal information for any purpose other than those outlined above will only be made with consent . The main examples of disclosure of personal information are: 71


1 . Selected personal information of students is disclosed to the University of British Columbia (UBC) and its Alma Mater Society (AMS) in order that students may enjoy services such as UBC library services, AMS membership, extended health and dental insurance and the TransLink U-Pass program and to the Vancouver School of Theology Library, and Trinity Western University Library, in order to obtain library services . 2 . Selected personal information is disclosed to the Regent College Student Association (RCSA) to enable RCSA to provide services to the students . 3 . Personal information may be disclosed in the filing of returns or reports to government agencies . 4 . Data required by our accrediting body, the Association of Theological Schools (ATS) . There may be instances, as permitted in the legislation, where personal information is disclosed without knowledge and consent of the individual . An example of this is where disclosure is clearly in the interests of the individual and consent could not be obtained in a timely way and where disclosure is required to comply

72 • Privacy Statement

with a subpoena, warrant or order issued by a court or person with authority to compel the production of personal information . Protection of personal information Personal information collected by us is kept in confidence . Employees are authorized to access the information solely on the basis of their need to deal with the information in order to discharge their official responsibilities . Safeguards are in place to prevent unauthorized access to personal information . Personal information shall be retained only as long as is necessary for the fulfilment of those purposes listed above . Reasonable effort will be made to ensure that all personal information is accurate and up-to-date as is necessary for the purposes identified above .

Contact information Anyone who wishes to read the College’s Privacy Policy or who has any questions, concerns or complaints regarding the College’s Privacy Policy and practices, is invited to contact the Privacy Officer at the College .


Index A Academic Advising 53 Academic Offences 61–62 Academic Policy Information 53–63 Accounts, Student 65 Accreditation 4 Admission to Programs 53 Aegrotat Policy 60 Affiliation 4 Appeals 62 Assignment Format 59 Audio Correspondence Courses . See Distance Education Awards . See Prizes

B, C Board of Governors 69 Christian Thought & Culture Courses 38 Combining Degrees 59 Committees, Academic 62–63 Comprehensive Examinations 54–55 Concentrations 54 MCS Program 14–17 MDiv Program 19–20 ThM Program 22–23 Core Values 2 Course Numbering 25

Course Offerings Applied Theology Courses 26–31 Biblical Studies Courses 31–35 Church History Courses 36–37 General Non-Credit Courses 26 Interdisciplinary Studies Courses 38–43 Biblical Languages Courses 43–45 Spiritual Theology Courses 45–49 Systematic and Historical Theology Courses 49–52 Credit Hours 25, 58

D Dates, Calendar 4–8 Deadlines 4–8 Denominational Programs 22 Diploma in Christian Studies 13 Distance Education Courses 24

E Email Addresses . See inside front cover Ethos 4 Exemptions from Required Courses 57 Extensions to Course Work 58–59

F Faculty 9–12 Fees and Expenses 65–68 Summary 68 Field Education 17, 29 . See also Supervised Ministry 73


Foundations Courses 13, 17, 20 Full-Time Status 57

G Grade Reports 59 Grading Schedule 63 Graduation Requirements 56–57 Guided Studies 57–58

I Integrative Project in the Arts and Theology 55–56, 67

L Language Requirements Biblical 17, 20 for ThM Program 23 Priority Enrollment 25

M Major Projects 17, 54–56 Master’s Programs. See Programs Mission, Educational 2 Mission, Global 2

O, P Orientation 53 Payment, Methods of 65 Plagiarism. See Academic Offences Prerequisites 25 Privacy Statement 71–72 Prizes, Graduation 63

74 • Index

Probation Policy 60–61 Programs, Academic Diploma in Christian Studies 13 Master of Christian Studies 14–18 Master of Divinity 18–22 Master of Theology 22–23

R Receipts, Tuition 66 Refunds, Schedule of 65–66 Registration 57 Residence Requirements 54 MDiv Program 20 Retake Policy 59–60

S Seminars 30–31, 35, 37, 43, 49, 52 Supervised Ministry 20, 28–29. See also Field Education

T Theological Position 3 Theses 55, 67 Time Limits for Programs 54 Transcripts 59, 67 Transfer Credit 57 Tuition 66, 68

W Withdrawal Policy 59 Work Load 58


Regent Academic catalogue