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THE OFFICIAL STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS

Interview with Woody Myers > See Page 3

VOL.

99

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OCTOBER 21, 2020

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Indiana passes 150,000 COVID-19 cases

State's seven-day positivity rate at 6.7%, Holcomb extends Indiana's mask mandate until Nov. 14 By Noah Crenshaw EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

The state of Indiana has now passed the threshold of 150,000 cases of COVID-19 since the beginning of the pandemic, following an update to the Indiana State Department of Health’s COVID-19 dashboard. The milestone comes following a week of developments in pandemic’s impact on the state. On Oct. 20, the state reported 1,551 new cases of COVID-19 and 48 new deaths from the virus, according to the state’s COVID-19 dashboard, bringing the total number of cases to 150,664 and the total number of deaths to 3,775. On two seperate days last week, the state broke its own records by surpassing 2,000 reported cases in a single day, according to The Indianapolis Star. On Oct. 16, Indiana reported 2,328 new cases and on Oct. 17, Indiana reported 2,521, according to IndyStar. As of Oct. 20, 17,654 new tests have been administered, according to the dashboard. There have been a total 2,551,406 tests administered so far, according to the dashboard. The increase in cases and deaths comes a week after Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb extended Indiana’s mask mandate until Nov. 14 and after the city of Chicago and the state of Ohio issued travel orders requiring quarantines for travelers from Indiana. Positivity rate, hospitalizations increase During his weekly COVID-19 press conference on Oct. 14, Holcomb said that the state’s COVID-19 positivity rate has increased from less than 4% to 5.3% in less than a month. As of Oct. 20, the seven-day positivity rate is at 6.7%, according to the dashboard. ISDH Chief Medical Officer Lindsay Weaver said during the press conference that 1,357 people were hospitalized with COVID-19 as of Oct. 15. This is the highest number of hospitalizations since May, she said. Since the press conference the number has increased and as of Oct. 19, 1,425 people are hospitalized due to COVID-19, according to the dashboard. Holcomb ties increases to private, close-contact events Holcomb said that Indiana State

Health Commissioner Kris Box and her team are very concerned about close contact events, such as funerals and weddings and the receptions or parties that may come after. At these events, people let their guard down, are more trusting and assume the odds are not going against them, he said. “Those events are the very events that turn out to be big contributors to our positive cases and illnesses,” Holcomb said. “It's these events that have nothing to do with a 500-capacity limit. Tracing is proving that. We are proving that you can go to a Colts game or a soccer game or school, or go shopping, and you can do it safely.” Holcomb said that the numbers in fact show how many people are wearing masks and social distancing and aren’t letting their guard down, even at smaller, medium and larger events where safety protocols are not put into place, practiced, or reinforced.

The shutting down approach is missing the point." While Holcomb said that the increase in cases was significant, he said that he did not believe shutting down the state again would ultimately benefit Indiana. Holcomb said other states that have capacity limits of 10 people at some events or venues are still dealing with rising numbers. “The shutting down approach is missing the point,” Holcomb said. Holcomb said that the behavior and actions of Hoosiers are what need to be addressed to help solve the issue of increasing cases, not a blanket response. While some people are following the recommended preventive methods, too many Indiana residents are ignoring science and not wearing masks, he said. “Those decisions can directly or indirectly, even not intentionally, cost lives,”Holcomb said.“More than 3,609 to be exact as of today [Oct. 14], and those decisions, or lack ... of good decisions, are affecting our quality of life.” Chicago, Ohio add Indiana to

quarantine lists Travelers to Chicago from Indiana will now have to quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in Chicago, according to an updated emergency travel order that went into effect on Oct. 16. The updated order also added three other states to the city’s list of areas from which people must quarantine when arriving in Chicago. The order to quarantine applies to people coming from Indiana for nonwork purposes and to Chicago residents returning from Indiana, unless they are essential workers, according to the order. Exceptions to the order include travel for medical care and parental shared custody, according to the order. Even if the time in Indiana is less than 24 hours, people still will need to quarantine for 14 days upon their return to Chicago, unless they are deemed essential workers or students who commute for school, according to the order. People who are just traveling through Indiana on their way to Chicago and not coming from a state already on the travel order, do not need to quarantine if they were in Indiana for less than 24 hours, according to the order. Travelers from Indiana to Ohio also are being asked to quarantine for 14 days, according to a COVID-19 travel advisory issued by the Ohio Department of Health on Oct. 14. People coming to Ohio from any state reporting positive testing rates of 15% or higher for COVID-19 must self-quarantine, according to the order. As of Oct. 14, according to the ODH website, this includes Indiana. Box tests positive, Holcomb tests negative During the Oct. 14 press conference, Indiana State Health Commissioner Kristina Box announced that she had tested positive for COVID-19, after spending time with her grandson and daughter, who also tested positive. Box said that she, her daughter and her grandson got tested after two workers at her grandson’s daycare were positive for the virus. Holcomb tested negative for COVID-19, according to an Oct. 15 press release from his office, after being tested out of an abundance of caution following Box’s positive test on Oct. 14. Several members of his office, several > See Cases on page 4

Contributed Photos by Eric Holcomb via Flickr

Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb (top) and Indiana State Health Commissioner Kristina Box (bottom) speak to the media during a press conference about COVID-19 on March 24.

Living-Learning Communities at UIndy majors and help students do better in their courses. He said LLCs help STAFF WRITER universities with retention because it places students in tight-knit communities. “My goal since I started working Living-Learning Communities have on LLCs is to increase the number of been incorporated into many institutions, LLCs we have for underrepresented including the University of Indianapolis. groups on campus,”Johnson LLC s a re i m m e r s i ve said. “Because at UIndy learning experiences that we currently don’t have are designed to bring spaces — we currently students with common don’t have a multicultural academic interests together center, we don’t have a for heightened success, pride center, like a lot of according to UIndy’s LLC other institutions do — so I website.These LLCs include really want to make sure that the Engineering Livingthrough these communities L earning Community, we’re supporting those the Honors Livingunderrepresented groups.” Learning Community, the By focusing on Nursing Living-Learning JOHNSON underrepresented groups on Community and the Umoja campus, UIndy developed Scholars Living-Learning the newest LLC, Umoja Scholars, Community. Johnson said. The LLC’s current Assistant Director of Residence residence director is Vanesha Blackburn, Life Kyle Johnson said that LLCs according to the Umoja Scholars LLC help universities bring students back website. to campus, keep students in their

By Jazlyn Gomez

According to Central Hall Residence Director Rishawnda Archie, Umoja Scholars was created to make an environment where students who identify as Black, African American, or the African Diaspora. Richie said that the group was created to give

ARCHIE students an environment to be comfortable with who they are, being around people who they identify with culturally and keep them at the university. Umoja is Swahili for unity,

according to the Umoja Scholars LLC I think my experience here has been website. amazing thus far but to have had such a “What made me want to start foundation as this, I think that would’ve and create Umoja, [was that] myself been great to have.” and a former coworker of mine, According to Johnson, we saw that a lot of Black students UIndy will be adding a new LLC for on campus didn’t feel like they the LGBTQ+ community. He said belonged there,” Archie the university has recently said. done a lot of data collection Umoja Scholars by surveying students and Resident Assistant and alumni to see if this LLC junior communication could work at UIndy. The major Lauren Wright said university is also doing that what interested her focus groups on the subject, most about the LLC was Johnson said. that there is a need for a “ We ’re c u r re n t l y safe, inclusive space for doing some focus groups African American students .... [We had] a focus group at a predominately white with a group of students institution. She said she to talk about, ‘What are WRIGHT found it hard to feel like she some things we should be had a space at UIndy, as a thinking about for this LLC?’” woman of color. Johnson said.“‘What are some constructive “I wish there was something similar feedback they have?’ You know, for our to this when I was a freshman,” current ideas. Because ultimately these Wright said. “I think that would’ve communities are supposed to be for the made a world of difference. students, run by the students.”


2

OPINION

THE REFLECTOR

Staying engaged remotely By Kassandra Darnell STAFF WRITER

Adjusting to a mostly online semester is difficult. Not having to get up and go to an in-person class every day can make acting like classes do not exist far too easy. And when I’m in a Zoom lecture, the urge to get on my phone and not pay attention during the class is sometimes overwhelming. Despite all the distractions and adjustments, remaining engaged while attending online classes is important. One of the most effective ways I have found to stay engaged while learning remotely is to keep track of everything. Knowing what time classes are, when assignments are due or when I have an important interview are essential to my success. Everyone has a different method of time management that he or she prefers, but what works best for me is consolidating everything into one calendar, such as Google Calendar. I love using Google Calendar. It allows me to keep track of my entire class schedule with Zoom links, so I never have to go to the instructors' class pages to hunt for the link. I enter all assignments and due dates from my syllabi into the Tasks section, which allows me to carry my to-do list everywhere and check off each assignment.

Google Calendar also allows me to share my school calendar with my personal email, so that I have all of my engagements in one place. If you don’t like Google Calendar, College Info Geek has a great list of other calendar apps you can use. Something else that has helped me stay engaged in online classes is continuing to

take notes. Sitting in bed, eating lunch and having your phone next to you while in an online lecture can make concentrating difficult and letting your

attention wander easy. Personally, I find focusing in class difficult if I accidentally fall asleep. But taking notes, even though I am not in a physical classroom, is one of the best ways for me to stay awake and concentrate in class. According to The Princeton Review, taking notes forces you to stay awake, pay attention and actively follow along in your classes, which helps you to learn properly

engaged outside of the classroom is the study environment. While some students may have a dedicated study space, I personally prefer to attend online classes or do my online work in a variety of different locations, because what helps me is to leave my dorm room every once in a while and avoid sitting in bed all day. However, there are more scientific reasons to switch up your study space. According to The New York Times, frequently changing your study space can actually help you retain more information. Making your brain associate information with more than one location can make recalling that information later on easier, enriching what you have learned, which in turn, “slows down forgetting.” Whether in the library, Schwitzer Park, or my roommate’s side of the room, I try to change up where I study whenever possible. Staying engaged during a pandemic is difficult. But that will only get worse if you fall behind in your classes. Practicing Graphic by Jazyln Gomez time management skills, ensuring that you are and absorb the information covered in concentrating in class and doing your class. Notes are also an important study best to study and retain information tool, a way to keep a record of what you are all important ways to stay on top have learned in class that will help you of things. Ultimately, though, you need recall information later. to take the initiative to do what is Another important factor in staying best for your ability to learn.

UIndy's dominance in the GLVC

Parity is gone when university continues to consistently win All-Sports Trophy By Jacob Walton SPORTS EDITOR & PHOTO EDITOR

A competition between the University of Indianapolis and Truman State University, called the Top Dog Challenge, will raise money for charity, according to a Twitter announcement during Homecoming. In his video about the challenge, University President Robert Manuel talked about the number of GLVC All-Sports Trophies that UIndy has won. According to GLVC.com, UIndy has held the trophy for eight straight years, the longest stretch in the trophy’s history. I am not sure that this is a positive thing for UIndy or the GLVC. The way the All-Sports Trophy is tallied up is that each school gets points based on its finish in the GLVC. There are 13 sports that count toward the trophy tally, according to the GLVC. Certain sports do not contribute to the tally, such as wrestling, because not enough schools have those sports, according to the GLVC website. Last year, UIndy scored 147

points and won the trophy, while the years. This is especially worrisome for University of Southern Indiana scored the GLVC, when its most dominant 109 and came in second. That 38-point school, UIndy, keeps growing in size. difference is rather large, which may This is a clear signal that change needs not be a good thing for UIndy or the to happen. conference. This legacy of winning benefits Parity, the idea that all participating UIndy in the short term: it brings teams are on an equal or close-to-equal in higher level recruits, who in turn level, with no obvious winner, is one of strengthen the quality of the teams. the most important attributes in all of The cycle of dominance keeps spiraling athletics. Without parity, competition upward. has little point. But what happens to the conference When a team when one team is overwhelmingly wins a third of dominant, parity is its conference Parity ... is one of the gone, and with it championships, most important attributes as UIndy has goes the excitement of winning and the done in the 2019in all of athletics. significance of a 2020 and 2018trophy like the All2019 years? Do Sports Trophy. That 38-point difference teams such as USI leave and go to a from first to second place means that conference that is not so top loaded, even without its two most successful where they might have the ability to GLVC sports last year, women’s soccer win the conference's greatest prize? and men’s basketball, UIndy still would If this happened, the conference have won the trophy with breathing would lose funding because it would room. have fewer teams or would have to The parity of the All-Sports Trophy bring in teams to replace those it had is gone when a school the size of UIndy lost. can dominate the biggest prize in a Would the GLVC bring in better conference for so many consecutive schools to replace those at the bottom?

If the GLVC decided to do this, it would upset those who value the historical side of sports and love to see certain teams compete, even if one team blows out the other by 70 points. All of this raises the question of whether Ulndy should move on from the GLVC. I do not think that is what needs to happen, but something does need to change. From second to third place in last year's competition for the All-Sports Trophy there was a difference of only five points. This closer competition would result in the trophy having some more meaning. Schools with high levels of success have moved on from the GLVC, such as Bellarmine University, which moved up to Division I. I do not think this is the route UIndy should take, but some form of change is needed in the conference to increase parity. While the Top Dog challenge is a great way to celebrate Homecoming and bring back some of the competition between schools that has been lost due to COVID-19, it is sad to think that this might be the only way Truman could compete with UIndy.

Corrections The Reflector acknowledges its mistakes. When a mistake occurs, we will print corrections here on the Opinion page. If you catch a mistake, please contact us at

reflector@uindy.edu.

On Page 5 of our Oct. 7 issue, in the article "From wrestling to MMA," we used the incorrect form of alumni. It should have said 'alumnus,' which is singular and not alumni, which is plural.

What do you think? Send your letters to the editor or other correspondence to: reflector@uindy.edu

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OCTOBER 21, 2020

Guest restrictions unfair to students By Tyshara Loynes STAFF WRITER

The University of Indianapolis’s administration initiated a new mandate to on-campus residents this fall: no guests from outside the university would be allowed in residence halls or on-campus apartments. With all of the pandemic restrictions that left us at home and away from friends, dealing with more restrictions from the university felt overwhelming. This made some students feel even more restricted and isolated. During the summer, restrictions across the state and country varied, and students were left wondering what the upcoming school year would be like. Would the university open back up fully? Would all classes be virtual? We weren’t sure, but we did know that we had signed leases and applied for housing and meal plans that we were no longer sure would be worth the cost. University President Robert Manuel’s “Welcome Home” email, sent out on June 30, answered some of the questions about the fall semester but left some of us even more confused. The email addressed some housing concerns by saying that the residence halls would open, but students could choose to opt out if needed. However, not all university housing is easy to get out of. University Lofts, Greyhound Village and College Crossing required special appeals to break the leases that students had signed the previous academic year. The email included information on just about everything from housing to dining, and even the move-in process, but what it seemed to lack was concern for students’ mental health, learning experience and finances. Tuition would not be reduced, guests from outside the university would not be able to visit and the information seemed cut and dry. Nothing emotional was attached, beyond acknowledging the pandemic. On Aug. 10, five days before move-in, I received an email from my residence director, and what caught my eye was not the lack of volunteers, two person help limit or the tardiness of the email. What stood out to me was that “no outside guests are permitted at this time.” None. Not a friend who stays in another dorm or even your mom coming by to check on you — no one. This felt crushing, like a complete disregard for my mental health and relationships. We are still able to go to in-person classes, visit other students living in our apartment buildings and residence halls and leave campus, but we are not allowed to have UIndy students from other residences over as guests? This made me question whether I wanted to stay on campus, and honestly I still do. The restrictions do not feel effective, and that's one of the biggest issues I have with them. We university students are allowed to travel wherever we want but are restricted from bringing people into our home— the home that we pay a lot of money for, the home that is OURS. These policies were not included in the lease we signed last semester. My space is important to me, and I do not like when people try to impose such strict rules and regulations on it. I expect the basic rules: no command strips, no smoking, yada yada yada. But this feels like a restriction of my rights. In the future, I hope a better plan is provided for us—whether we are having in-person classes, if those are necessary, food delivery services or even a certain group we are allowed to be with. Whatever that plan is I hope it is strategic, and most importantly I hope it makes sense.

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NEWS

An interview with

THE REFLECTOR

3

OCTOBER 21, 2020

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Woody Myers

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Woodrow 'Woody' Myers discusses his campaign focuses In the 2020 Indiana gubernatorial election, there are three major candidates for governor: Republican, and incumbent, Gov. Eric Holcomb, Democrat Woodrow “Woody”Myers and Libertarian Donald Rainwater. The Reflector reached out to all three campaigns for interviews. Holcomb’s campaign did not respond to our interview requests before our publication deadline,and discussions with Rainwater’s campaign are currently underway as of The Reflector’s print time. We were able to interview Myers before our publication

deadline and also interviewed University of Indianapolis Associate Professor of Political Science Laura Merrifeld Wilson about the candidates, some of their positions and what makes them stand out in the election. Even though the governor is a unique office, University of Indianapolis Associate Professor of Political Science Laura Wilson said the unfortunate reality is that the national election will cause a coattail effect of the gubernatorial election. Indiana is one of a handful of states that elects their governor the same

year as a president, which completely eclipses the gubernatorial election, according to Wilson. “Many people don't know what the governor does, they don't know who's running for governor and oftentimes they may not necessarily care,” Wilson said. “The challenge that will ultimately face a lot of Hoosier voters is they may not know Holcomb and Myers and Rainwater, but they do know [Democratic Candidate Joe] Biden and [Republican Candidate, and incumbent, Donald] Trump and [Libertarian Candidate Jo] Jorgensen,

By Jacob Walton & Noah Fields

SPORTS/PHOTO EDITOR & FEATURE EDITOR One of the candidates for Indiana Governor is third generation Hoosier Woodrow “Woody” Myers. He served as the first African American Indiana State Health Commissioner from 198689, according to the Indiana State Department of Health. Before that, Myers was an emergency room physician and a teacher at the Indiana University School of Medicine and saw a lot of the problems with the medical system firsthand, according to his campaign website. He said that he has been campaigning for a better future for Indiana and to prevent his grandchildren and other young Hoosiers from inheriting the issues caused by his generation. “That's why I've been running hard for this job for the last 16 months or so. I could have retired, I thought about it. I tried it for a hot minute, decided, 'Nope, I'm not ready,'” Myers said. “There's just way too much to do …. I believe in Indiana. Indiana is a terrific place, but we can be so much better. If I'm elected, it will be much better.” According to Myers, one of the significant focuses of his campaign is healthcare, and the issue of money being spent on the wrong things. Myers said he wants to put more money into healthcare for all and make sure everyone has an equal opportunity to receive care. “Right now, we don't have that in Indiana. We've got programs that don't work well together,” Myers said. “That's Medicare for the folks over 65 and Medicaid for the elderly and for folk that are at certain poverty levels. Then we have health insurance for most of the working population. But there are a lot of gaps between those big three. I want to try to fill those gaps by expanding Medicare [and] Medicaid.” The handling of the COVID-19 pandemic was one of the biggest failures of Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb’s administration, according to Myers. He said that he would have handled it differently by recognizing the issues earlier and being able to acting earlier. Myers said one of the issues that was ignored was online schooling. “We didn't take the step of making sure that they all had the hardware, the software needed in order to do distance learning, nor did we take the steps to figure out how to get the kids that needed to be on the internet in order to go to school the access to the internet,” Myers said. “Because there was a false assumption made that every kid had the internet and that … everybody had a computer, [those] both were false assumptions. And it certainly has hurt those kids that are not in fortunate circumstances.” The educational system in Indiana is another priority of Myers' campaign. He said an important focus is on K-12 and making that better for both teachers and students. Teachers are incredibly valuable because of their ability to address problems with students,

and they will see those as a referendum on the top of the ticket.” While there are not any direct policies pertinent to college voters on the ballot this year, Wilson said she thinks college voters are going to be influential when it comes to issues like the economy. She said the economy had a horribly rough bump in March and April. In many sectors, the economy has recovered, she said, however, the service industry, which is important for students as they work their way through college, is still suffering.

“I'm not a college student. I can't tell you what matters to you, but you know how you can recognize what it is that's important you know in terms of social issues, in terms of economic issues,” Wilson said. “It's not a monolithic group just because you're between 18-to-22, it doesn't mean you all share the same values or ideas. So I think educating yourself on what is most important to you, where the candidates stand, and ultimately decide which one's best for you that's the very best thing you can do for yourself and democracy.”

Myers said. The goal is to make being a teacher in Indiana better and more beneficial, according to Myers. He said that he hopes to reward teachers for continuing their education and give them incentives to do so. “We can make it more attractive to be a teacher in our state by paying our teachers more,” Myers said. “We can make it less onerous to stay a teacher in our state by reducing the regulation of teaching to the test[ing] and stopping this competition between school districts based upon test results that have very little long-term meaning.” Myers said that one thing Indiana has done well is the 21st Century Scholars Program set up to encourage younger students to go to college. He wants to continue to advance that program in order to fight the deficit of college graduates that Indiana is having, according to Myers. “Right now, we have a deficit of folks that are getting bachelor's degrees and two-year degrees and … staying around in our state to help us out,” Myers said. “Because we’re going to need those kinds of people to take the jobs of the 21st century, the jobs of the 21st century require much more than just high school.” Myers is a unique candidate among Indiana Democrats, according to University of Indianapolis Associate Professor of Political Science Laura Merrifeld Wilson. She said that Democratic candidates are traditionally more moderate to appeal to the average Hoosier voter, but Myers has maintained more liberal stances, such as his pro-choice stance on abortion. “I think that shows you just a little bit about his candidacy,” Wilson said. “Not just in terms of where he stands, the national Democrats versus the state Democrats, but also who he is as a candidate relative to other candidates that you see running on the Democratic ticket.” Photos contributed by Woody Myers Campaign Page Design by Ethan Gerling


NEWS

4 THE REFLECTOR

NEWS BRIEFS COVID-19

UIndy reports 23 positive COVID-19 tests From Oct. 6-19, 23 people have tested positive for COVID-19 at the University of Indianapolis, with 21 being students off-campus, one being a student on-campus and one being a staff member, according to UIndy’s COVID-19 dashboard. 117 people have had to go into quarantine in the last 14 days, including 76 students offcampus, 31 students on-campus, eight faculty and two staff. At least 99 students, faculty and staff have tested positive for COVID-19 since August. 406 people have had to go into quarantine at some point over the last three months. All data is as of Oct. 20. - UIndy COVID-19 Dashboard

CAMPUS UIndy offering flu shot clinics beginning Oct. 28 UIndy will be having flu shot clinics from Oct. 28 to Nov. 12. Students, faculty and staff will need to make an appointment for the clinic by calling the Health & Wellness Center at (317) 788-3437, according to an email from Vice President for Campus and Student Affairs Kory Vitangeli. Students, faculty and staff will need to bring a pen, wear a shirt that will allow for an upper arm injection, wear a mask, bring a signed consent form and review a vaccine information sheet. The consent form and information sheet will be sent over email prior to the appointment. The clinics will take place at the Athletic Recreation Center (ARC) on Oct. 27, Nov. 3 and Nov. 10. On Oct. 29, Nov. 5, and Nov. 12, the clinics will take place in a tent outside Schwitzer Student Center. - Kory Vitangeli’s email

ATHLETICS Men’s, Women’s Basketball to begin on Nov. 28 The GLVC Council of Presidents unanimously voted on Oct. 6 to resume play and practices for both men’s and women’s basketball. The season will feature 22 games, with each school playing 11 home and away games, according to UIndy Athletics. UIndy, along with the rest of the teams in the GLVC, will be divided into three, fiveteam divisions, with UIndy being in the East Division. The GLVC tournament is currently set to be played in March and it will consist of the top eight teams. Only essential personnel will be allowed at the games. - UIndy Athletics

FACULTY Hancher-Rauch featured on job search site Professor and Director of the Public Health Program Heidi HancherRauch was featured in an article on Zippia about trends in the public health job market. In the article, HancherRauch said that in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic, she hopes that legislators and other decision makers will better understand the importance of a robust public health workforce. - Intercom

Cases from page 1 members of ISDH and Weaver also were tested out of an abundance of caution, according to the press release. According to Box and Weaver, Holcomb and the staff members did not meet the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s guidelines for close contact as they were socially distanced and wore masks during their interactions with Box. Both Box and Weaver advised Holcomb that he could resume his normal schedule with vigilance about social distancing and wearing a mask, according to the press release. “Janet [Holcomb] and I are wishing Dr. Box and her family a speedy recovery,” Holcomb said in the release. “The coronavirus does not discriminate, and this further highlights the importance of wearing masks and social distancing.”

OCTOBER 21, 2020

First-Time Voters Guide Election Day is just around the corner for Hoosiers to vote in local, state and federal races. If you are voting for the first time, it can be confusing to understand how it works, especially amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Here is what you need to know about voting for the first time. By Noah Crenshaw EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2020 How do I check to see that I am registered to vote? Voters can check their registration status by going to the Indiana Voters website. On the site, voters can look at their provisional ballot status, find their county’s contact information,find their polling place and check on the status of their absentee ballot applications. If you are not registered to vote, you cannot vote in this election. The last day to register in Indiana was Oct. 5. In order to vote, you need to have an ID, according to the Indiana Secretary of State’s office. The ID needs to have your photo, your name, display an expiration date and either be current or have expired after Nov. 6, 2018, the date of the last general election, and be issued by the state of Indiana or the U.S. Government. According to the Indiana Secretary of State’s office, an Indiana driver’s license, photo ID card, military ID or U.S. Passport is sufficient in most cases. College students can vote for candidates at either their home or school address, depending on how they registered to vote, according to the Indiana Secretary of State’s office. A student ID from an Indiana state school can only be used if the ID meets the criteria above, according to the Indiana Secretary of State’s office. However, a student ID from a private institution cannot be used for voting purposes. If you are a first-time voter, you will need to present documents at the poll that confirm your residence address if you registered by mail. These documents will need to include your current name and address, according to the Indiana Secretary of State’s office. Examples of these documents are: • An Indiana driver's license or state ID card • Any current and valid photo ID • A current utility bill • A bank statement • A government check • A paycheck • Any other government document that shows your current name and address You will also need to make sure your photo ID meets Indiana’s requirements, according to the Indiana Secretary of State’s office.

Can I vote early? In-person early voting in Indiana is available from Oct. 6 to Nov. 2. All registered voters in Indiana are eligible to vote early. To find out information about your county, you can go to the Indiana Voters portal at indianavoters.in.gov. If you are registered to vote in Marion County, you can vote early at the Indianapolis City-County Building from Oct. 6 to Nov. 2. Additional early voting locations will be open from Oct. 24 to Nov. 1, according to the Indy Votes website. Those additional locations are: • Krannert Park Community Center • Metropolitan School District of Lawrence Township Administration Building • Perry Township Government Center • St. Luke’s United Methodist Church • Warren Township Government Center Voters who want to vote early need to already be registered and wear a mask and bring a valid photo ID.

Can I vote by mail? In Indiana, you are required to give a reason why you need an absentee ballot to vote. The COVID-19 pandemic is not one of the excused reasons to vote by mail, according to CBS 4. The state currently has 11 accepted excuses to vote by mail, according to the Indiana Secretary of State’s office: • The voter has a "reasonable expectation" that they will be out of county during the entire time polls are open on Election Day • The voter has a disability • The voter is 65 years old or older • The voter has official election duties outside of their voting precinct • The voter is scheduled to work during the entire time the polls are open • The voter will be "confined due to illness or injury" or caring for someone who is confined as such for the entire time the polls are open • The voter is prevented from voting due to a religious discipline or holiday on Election Day • The voter participates in the state's address confidentiality program • The voter is a member of the military or a public safety officer • The voter is considered a "serious sex offender" as defined by state statute • The voter does not have access to transportation to the polls • The voter does not have access to transportation to the polls For information on the voting by mail procedures for your county, go to the Indiana Voters portal. If you are still planning to vote by mail in Marion County, you have to complete and return an application by 11:50 p.m. on Oct. 22, according to the Indy Votes website. Applications can be submitted online or sent to the Marion County Election Board by mail, email or hand-delivery, according to the Indy Votes website. Once you receive your ballot, it needs to be marked, signed and returned to the Marion County Election Board at 200 E. Washington St., Indianapolis, IN 46204 by 12 p.m. on Nov. 3 for it to be counted, according to the Indy Votes website. For more information on the procedures in Marion County, go to vote.indy.gov

How do I find my polling place and find out who is on my ballot? Registered voters can find their polling place and find out who is on their ballot by going to the Indiana Voters website. Marion County voters can go vote.indy.gov/vote-centers to find the list of voting centers in the county. Graphic by Noah Fields and Ethan Gerling


SPORTS

5 OCTOBER 21, 2020

THE REFLECTOR

Women’s Basketball loses starter to injury By Taylor Strnad

MANAGING EDITOR & CO-BUSINESS MANAGER

board,” Robinson said. season last year with multiple top five Herbst struggled last year, with his finishes leading up to a national meet best finish being at the 2019 GLVC appearance. On her way to nationals she Championships where he finished 33rd. had a first place finish at the John Bullock For this year he has had two top five Invite and then a second-place finish at finishes so far this season setting multiple the GLVC Championships, according to personal bests. According to Herbst, it UIndy Athletics. Bailey said that running was mentally challenging and boring again gave her a new outlook. training without his team. One way “So the big goal that I had was just the team kept each other accountable to look at running in a different way,” for training was through social media, Bailey said. “From a new perspective according to Herbst. of just regaining that sense of joy “Runners are and remembering connected on social that this is running media, ” Her bst is something that I think we’ll just show up should be taken as said. “We would post every day and a joy each and every with the intention to we could see our day.” compete for the title. mileage and runs, The Greyhounds and that would kicked off their encourage us to get season at the GLVC good training in.” Triangular Meet at Northview Church. Herbst said he is excited to be back The women’s team placed second and the with his teammates, not just because he men third. To start off her senior season, missed them, but they can build each Bailey had a time of 17:00.1, resulting in other up. a first-place victory and to start off his “Being back with my teammates, I feel junior season, Herbst achieved a new like I’ve gotten my head kind of screwed personal best record of 18:54.1, leading back on right... I feel like that has helped him to third place according to UIndy me mentally a lot too, just to help me Athletics. push myself more to develop physically During the week of Sept. 29, Bailey and get stronger as well,” Herbst said. was named not only the GLVC Runner As for Bailey, she had an impressive of the Week but also the week’s national

runner. Bailey won GLVC Runner of the Week once again for the season, on Oct. 13. Robinson said anytime an athlete is nationally recognized, it should be celebrated. “Lauren [Bailey] is somebody who raises the bar consistently, it’s one of those that she surprises us and doesn’t surprise us anymore just because of the determination, the goals that she sets and what she’s striving for,” Robinson said. The Hounds competed in the East Division Race on Oct. 10. The women’s team placed in third while the men’s team placed in fourth according to UIndy Athletics. Bailey finished the 6K with a time of 20:20:71, which is a personal best, and in the process broke a UIndy record. Herbst earned a 90-second personal best time of 24:42.72, resulting in a third place. The Greyhounds travel to Elsah, Illinois on Oct. 24 for the GLVC championship. Herbst said the Hounds are looking to put a stop to the University of Southern Indiana’s title they have held for the last 20 years. “I think we’ll just show up with the intention to compete for the title. We’re going to leave it all out there and see what happens,” Herbst said. Editor’s note: In the interest of transparency, Nathan Herbst is the Opinion Editor for The Reflector.

When a team loses one of its starters, one might think that it is a time of crisis and restructuring, but for University of Indianapolis Head Women’s Basketball Coach Kristin Wodrich, it is part of the job as a coach. This year the team is without starter, redshirt senior forward Paige Barrett, due to a surgery, according to Wodrich. “... I think as a coach, you get used to [losing players]. It’s going to happen, you’re going to lose players to injuries, you’re going to lose players to graduation and different things.”Wodrich said.“You always have to be prepared in [that] the next man up [has] got to be ready to go.“ Barrett’s injury leaves the Hounds with four forwards, two seeing as much as 27 minutes per game and the other two being freshmen. Last season was Barrett’s first season with UIndy after she transferred from Division I Murray State University, according to UIndy Athletics. She finished second in points scored, averaging 9.4 points per game and 5.3 rebounds per game, according to UIndy Athletics. Assistant Women’s Basketball Coach Evan Dodd said Barrett was a huge part of their success last season and it is always a challenge when a team loses a player. “... That’s our job as coaches to brainstorm and then get the kids together and regroup the team to figure out what’s going to be our game plan for the success of the season,” Dodd said. However, Dodd said that as coaches, they do not dwell on losing a player too much because they have to start working harder and they have to prepare players to fill that spot. Wodrich said they recruited good players to come in and that will be helpful this season especially. Although Barrett is not on the court, Dodd said she is still involved in practice and being a leader for newcomers. Even with the loss, their goal as a team has not changed for this season.They will continue to play hard, according to Dodd. “Basketball is very much a team sport, and you don’t have those individual players that can put a team on their back, like Paige Barret does,” Dodd said. “It’s going to make crucial plays and such, so important.” GLVC basketball returns Nov. 24. The UIndy Women’s Basketball team will open their season alongside the men’s team at a home double header on Nov. 27 against William Jewell College.

said. “I really put in the extra time and work to get there so when I saw that I got the cut, I was very excited.” Driggers participated in a swimming program based out of Phoenix, Arizona, called Rio, according to athletics.uindy. edu. He said Rio, which is short for Rio Salado Swim Club, has been a great platform for him and it contributed a great deal to his accomplishments. Head Swim and Dive Coach Jason Hite said he gives “a huge kudos” to Driggers’s coach at Rio. “It just says a lot about that program with that coach, and then also the

recruiting trip with other future hounds in January 2019. On that trip, Hite said Driggers’s positive, easygoing vibe seemed to fit well with their group. “That’s really what we do a lot of focusing on here [in UIndy Swim and Dive]. We have a very good culture, we work really hard and we look for people who fit that culture and Landon definitely does,” Hite said. “So not only is he talented in the water, does just as well in the classroom, but he obviously has the leadership and the positivity and the work ethic that we look for.” According to Hite, this semester

marks the first time in his Division II coaching career that all the freshman men’s swimmers are American, including Driggers. He said both teams have international swimmers, but that they generally have more high-quality swimmers at a national level. “It says that we’re able to recruit anywhere,” Hite said. “We can recruit within the United States and get these top-level individuals to come here because of what we offer as a school, and what we offer as a program. And so I think it does say a lot for the direction our program is continuing to go.”

Photo contributed by UIndy Athletics

Senior runner Lauren Bailey leads the pack at the GLVC East Division Race in which she won the race by over 45 seconds for her second win so far, according to UIndy Athletics.

Photo contributed by UIndy Athletics

Junior runner Nathan Herbst runs at the first cross country meet of the year in Carmel, Indiana for the GLVC Triangular meet on Sept. 25. Herbst finished on the podium third.

Cross Country opens strong

Hounds look to continue success in 2020 following historical 2019 season By Giselle Valentin

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER The University of Indianapolis Cross Country team had a successful season in 2019 and now in 2020 are being led by junior runner Nathan Herbst and senior runner Lauren Bailey. Last season both teams advanced all the way to the NCAA Midwest Regional and then Bailey was the lone runner for nationals where she finished 9th which qualified her an AllAmerican, according to UIndy Athletics. The Greyhounds are looking to continue this success this season. Men’s and Women’s Cross Country is one of the only sports happening for the fall season due to the pandemic according to UIndy Athletics. The GLVC has collaborated with coaches to establish a plan for competing teams with proper safety procedures, according to UIndy’s Athletics. Head Cross Country Coach Brad Robinson said the team has been adjusting due the pandemic and the changes it has caused. He said figuring out the new normal was uncertain at first. “Hearing that we were actually going to have the opportunity to get a few races in this season definitely changes the demeanor and the attitude for everybody in a much more positive light across the

UIndy swimmer qualifies in Olympic trials By Noah Fields FEATURE EDITOR

At an outdoor pool on the morning of Aug. 9, without a ceiling to follow or competitors to amp him up, University of Indianapolis freshman swimmer Landon Driggers performed the backstroke, among other events, at the Olympic trials. The Arizona native soon became the first U.S. swimmer at UIndy to qualify ever, according to UIndy Athletics. “It’s been something that I’ve been training for a very long time,” Driggers

individuals and what the kind of character that they expect on that kind of team,” Hite said. Driggers, alongside his normal training for the swim team, is training for the qualifying meet on June 13, 2021, in Omaha, Nebraska. He said he practices about 10 times a week, eight for swimming and two for lifting. “We do aerobic work, lots of stroke work and technique just to focus on the efficiency of the stroke, as well as the speed,” Driggers said. Hite said that Driggers came on a

Photos contributed by UIndy Athletics

Left: Freshman swimmer Landon Driggers takes a breather during a practice at UIndy. Right: Freshman swimmer Landon Drigger practices the backstroke during practice. He will compete in the Olympic qualifiers in June 2021.


FEATURE

6 THE REFLECTOR

OCTOBER 21, 2020

Out-of-print book published

Students, faculty, staff publish edition of a Gothic classic “The Castles of Athlin and Dunbayne” By Kassandra Darnell STAFF WRITER

Photo contributed by UIndy 360

English and art & design students, faculty and staff researched, illustrated and designed this edition of the Gothic classic, “The Castles of Athlin and Dunbayne” by Ann Radcliffe.

University of Indianapolis students, faculty and staff in the Art & Design and English departments published a student edition of Ann Radcliffe’s “The Castles of Athlin and Dunbayne,” now available on Amazon. Students and faculty worked on this project since the 2019-2020 academic year, a process that included heavy research, reviewing and illustrating from students. Assistant Professor of English and Co-Advisor of Etchings Press Liz Whiteacre said she was involved in the project. According to Whiteacre, the project was proposed by Associate Director of the Strain Honors College and Professor of English Jennifer Camden and combines the efforts of the English and Art & Design departments to bring the out-of-print novel to the attention of teachers as well as general readers.This edition of the novel includes annotations and illustrations created by UIndy students, Whiteacre said. Sophomore English and secondary education double major Ali Viewegh said the research process was collaborative amongst students in the ENGL 420: Critical Edition course. According to Viewegh, students read and reread the novel, find elements that needed clarification and do the research necessary for the annotations. “We transcribed the chapters, we put everything in Google Docs, and then we reread chapters and started marking everything with things that [were] needed: footnotes or things that

were confusing,” Viewegh said. “After we identified those areas, we divided them into areas like history or culture and gender norms, and then we divided our class into small groups that would specifically focus on those little subject areas. And then we spent a really long time researching,and finding information for that stuff and then changed groups.” Junior creative writing major Grant Boyer said one of the most difficult parts of the process was the research itself. As part of the Critical Editions class, according to Boyer, his role was centered around research, but it was difficult to find sources for the Gothic era. “In my case, we were trying to not use the same source for different information. And so I had to look for a reference to barons in that time period that the book would be set in, and I had to dig through a lot of strange stuff,” Boyer said. Senior creative writing major and studio art minor Hope Coleman was involved in the illustration portion of the project. According to Coleman, students tasked with illustrating would make either full-page images or small thumbnail sketches to go within the chapters of the book. “We did some research on buildings of the era, outfits, things like that. And we did little thumbnail sketches where there were some smaller elements people did,” Coleman said. “I personally did a map that was printed in the front of the book. I did a little bit of research on the area. I was given some reference images, I looked up some stuff on buildings, so that way I could try to accurately portray the buildings.” Randi Frye, Franklin College assistant

professor of art and former UIndy assistant professor of art & design, said when instructing students creating illustrations for the novel, students utilized a style sheet in order to ensure the appearances of characters, as well as styles of dress and landscapes, are cohesive while allowing students to explore their own styles of illustration. “If it was talking about Mary, the sister and her brother is Osbert, that Osbert and Mary looked the same.That’s really what the style sheets did. The media or their technical approach to it was completely up to them, and so there’s a wide range of some that look more graphic, some that have more modeling or kind of like 3D quality to them,” Frye said. According to Whiteacre, promoting the book requires many different elements. Students in the classes involved with the project have made several promotional elements, including social media posts, postcards,bookmarks, flyers, a book trailer, and discussion questions for faculty.There have also been several press releases as well as doing promotional work with their publisher, Ingram, that includes a feature in their catalog for booksellers, aiming for educational audiences. “As we’re heading into the winter term, we are getting in touch with different faculty and different literature organizations, etc., to let people know around the country who are selecting textbooks for their students that this book now exists, and they can select it as an excellent option for their literature courses,” Whiteacre said. “So this is one of those projects that will be promoted for a while.”

Professors research alleged murderer death. He was arrested yet again, but once he was put in jail, a mob of citizens took MANAGING EDITOR & him out and publicly hung him. CO-BUSINESS MANAGER Kinslow said she first came across this case when she was researching for her dissertation back in 2018. Fuller and D uring the summer of 2019, Kinslow said they have always wanted to University of Indianapolis Professor co-author a book together. of History A. James Fuller and UIndy “It wasn’t necessarily that we sought Adjunct Professor of History Krista out to write about a serial killer,”Kinslow Kinslow decided to dive deep into the said. “It’s more that I kind of stumbled crimes and history of George Mangrum. on the story and then I realized just how Mangrum was an alleged rapist and much you could really spin it out in ways murderer during the 1870s who was of understanding so many different issues predominantly active in the northern [justice, gender, and sectionalism] of this Kentucky area, but committed crimes time period.” in New Richmond, Ohio that resulted Because of the age of the case, Fuller in the end of his life, according to Fuller. and Kinslow have faced numerous He said Mangrum was arrested and challenges while researching the crimes convicted only once, in 1871, when he of Mangrum, they attacked a woman said. Kinslow and people nearby struggled to find heard her calling It’s much more of a information on his for help. However, historian as [a] detective wife, she said. She he was let go early looked through because his family kind of a project.” census records and was poor and in bad there was only one shape. time Mangrum’s wife came up and that He was acquitted once because the Kinslow could be sure it was his wife. victim was of “low moral and of low Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, character,” Kinslow said. Another time access to records became harder because was when he allegedly murdered his of the lockdowns and limited hours of sister-in-law, the jury decided that there locations, according to Fuller. was not enough evidence to convict him “‘The courthouse burned,’ they’ll and there was a hung jury, leading to no always say, and all the records are lost, conviction, according to Fuller. right?,” Fuller said. “... But sometimes The one crime committed in New you find out that they know the records Richmond was that of Amanda Abbott, aren’t lost.They’re just stored somewhere a woman who was allegedly beaten and where it’s difficult to get to them.” left for dead, Fuller said. According to Fuller said that they are used to going Fuller, this would ultimately lead to his

By Taylor Strnad

Photo contributed by A. James Fuller

In 2019, University of Indianapolis Professor of History A. James Fuller and UIndy Adjunct Professor of History Krista Kinslow researched George Mangrum, an alleged murderer and rapist in the 19th century Midwest. Court records, news archives and historians were utilized.

into archives and looking at collections of written records. Looking at things such as letters, family items and diaries, but with Mangrum’s case it was not possible to look through these kinds of records. “This is a different kind of enterprise, in that you don’t have those records and then [with]Mangrum … and his wife both being illiterate, we don’t have anything from them,” Fuller said. “So there’s not a letter written to him when

he’s in jail, or that he wrote while he was in jail or anything like that, that you have to to account for. It’s much more of a historian as [a] detective kind of a project.” Not only are Fuller and Kinslow relying on court records and newspaper archives but on other historians as well. They said they are trying to learn from others about what went on in this time period.

“We are in conversation with others... and I think that’s one of [the] things we want to talk about is ‘historian as detective,’” Fuller said. “But also historians relying on the work of others and reaching out to them not only to have them look at it, and say what they think is good or bad or right or wrong, but also to use what they’ve written to help interpret something that’s very difficult to interpret.”

Viral ‘coronaspeak’ changes English language By Marie McCullough

THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER (TCA) — This weekend, I’m having quarantinis with my quaranteam. It will be nice to be together in person, since we all have Zoom fatigue. We’ll meet outdoors, so no need for PPE, but we’ll still social distance. After all, we aren’t covidiots, and we sure don’t want a second wave. If we have to lock down to flatten the curve again, it would be a coronapocalypse. A year ago, that paragraph would have been unintelligible. Now, it’s as clear as a plexiglass shield. The eight-month-old pandemic has had such a huge impact on the English language that editors of the venerable Oxford English Dictionary have so far issued two special updates to document it. The Canadian

government has compiled a pandemic glossary, from antigen to zoonosis. And King’s College London slang specialist Tony Thorne has a Lockdown Lexicon. Because of a microscopic new germ, our daily speech is now full of medical and epidemiological jargon such as “viral load”and “contact tracing.”“No mask, no entry” warnings are as ubiquitous as “No turn on red” signs. We are also using language to relieve the awfulness of pandemic life, embracing slang, puns, catchphrases, acronyms, memes, and goofy new words that blend the sounds and meanings of existing words. “This process isn’t new. What is different is the scale of it,” said Andrea Beltrama, a sociolinguist at the University of Pennsylvania. “This is a social, medical, psychological, political and economic situation that

affects us around the globe. It affects fun, work, relationships. We have a clear snapshot of how language is shaped.” Will the vernacular of the pandemic disappear when normalcy (hopefully) returns? “It will be interesting to look back in 20 years to see what stuck and what didn’t,” Beltrama said. “Making a word part of the lexicon is a big step toward normalizing a completely abnormal situation.” In February, U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams tweeted: “Seriously people – STOP BUYING MASKS! They are NOT effective in preventing general public from catching coronavirus, but if healthcare providers can’t get them to care for sick patients, it puts them and our communities at risk!” By Memorial Day, he and other top

public health officials were tweeting a very different, but still muddled, message: a mask won’t protect you from inhaling the virus, but wear one anyway to protect other people from you in case you’re infected but don’t know it. Studies since then have shown that masks, even cloth ones, do indeed help protect wearers from catching, as well as spreading, the virus. Some technical terms have morphed into symbols. “Flatten the curve” is an epidemiological concept, complete with a now-familiar graphic, meaning curbing the spread of disease to avoid overloading hospitals. But in the spring, the phrase became a rallying cry — and a rebuke to people who rejected precautions. “In no time, I noticed bars and cafes having signs that said, ‘Help us flatten the curve,’” Beltrama recalled.

The Economist offered some rules for successful coinages in its weekly column on language: “The words that went into the new word should be obvious. Few English words end in ‘tini,’ so if someone invites you for a quarantini, you know what to expect. By contrast, loxit, the much hoped-for exit from lockdown, is a dud. ... It sounds as though it has to do with brined salmon.” “If you want your contribution to coronaspeak to take off,” the column concluded, “you need to lobby not the dictionary-writers, but you friends and colleagues, and get them to use and publicize it.” ___ (c) 2020 The Philadelphia Inquirer Visit The Philadelphia Inquirer at www.inquirer.com Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.


THE REFLECTOR

ENTERTAINMENT

7 OCTOBER 21, 2020

UIndy alum becomes comedian By Giselle Valentin

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

Photo contributed by Elisabeth Hoegberg

The University of Indianapolis’ Symphonic Wind Ensemble prepares for their rehearsal while following the university’s COVID-19 safety regulations. The Department of Music is having some classes and rehearsals take place in-person, requiring students to wear face coverings and to social distance. Other classes are taking place outside of Christel DeHann.

Music department adapts to pandemic

Comedian and University of Indianapolis alumnus Brent Terhune has been trending on YouTube and Facebook with his satirical political comedy videos. Terhune’s love of comedy started when he was 16, and according to Terhune, he would perform at comedy clubs. Terhune said that when he was growing up his comedic inspirations were Jay Leno, Conan O’Brien, Dave Chappelle, Mitch Hedberg, and Roy Wood Jr. After getting paid for a comedy show for the first time at 18, he discovered he could make a career performing standup comedy. Terhune said he tailored his education to try and do stand-up after college. He graduated from UIndy in 2012 with a degree in communication and a concentration in electronic media, Terhune said. During his time at UIndy, he completed an internship with “The

Changes brought to Department of Music to make rehearsals, classes safer By Dashanee Hunter STAFF WRITER

Music students voiced that their talents give a sense of belonging, along with an escape from the events concerning the COVID-19 pandemic according to senior music major Luis Rivera. Despite the pandemic, they are still preparing for this semester’s unwanted occurrences. Elisabeth Hoegberg, associate professor of music, interim theatre department chair and music department chair, has found that there are benefits to online learning as well as disadvantages. Online learning creates more flexibility for students with busy schedules and addresses unique learning styles, Hoegberg said. It can also allow the students to do their work at the rate they chose without being coerced in the class and help obtain structure, but it’s different for every student. However, one difficulty professors are facing is disconnection, Hoegberg said. According to Hoegberg, so much of what happens in music needs to be live and interactive, so

having that disconnection makes music difficult. According to Hoegberg, there are classes and rehearsals taking place inperson this semester in both the music and theatre departments. Classes, such as the instrumental methods classes in the Music Department and the directing class in the Theatre Department, are taking place in-person, along with almost all of the ensembles, Hoegberg said. “But it’s much, much different than it would have been in a normal semester in terms of the extra social distancing and the use of masks,” Hoegberg said. Assistant Dean of Shaheen Arts and Sciences Brenda Clark said that singing students have to wear a shield with a draping. Clark said that this contains all of the aerosols that may be projected as students sing or talk. In addition, students are socially distancing as well, Clark said. Students who play string instruments wear a mask while they play, Clark said. For band instruments, Clark said that over the summer, students were directed to create a covering for the bell, or hole, of their instrument. Clark said this keeps aerosols contained.

“All of the students followed that directive and came to school prepared. They’ve got their little cloth covering over their bells and… it’s really much, much safer than one would think,” Clark said. “So if you were to visit one of their ensemble rehearsals you would see those coverings on their instruments.” In addition, some music classes are taking place outside, Clark said. These classes meet on the west side of the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center or other available spaces across campus, Clark said. Performances are also being held differently, according to Clark. For example, the ensembles are preparing a repertoire and they have chosen to present this as a recorded livestream, Clark said. According to senior music major Luis Rivera, it can be difficult to be in online classes. Virtual learning has been something that the music students have been introduced to this semester Rivera said. He sees it as a disadvantage. “For me, as a commuter, it’s a little rougher because I don’t have a general area to do my online classes,” Rivera said. One class could be in an actual classroom setting, and for the next class

he might have to go someplace else. “As a vocalist, it’s a bit more irritating and stressful,” Rivera said. Voice lessons are being held asynchronously and are more difficult while trying to establish how the class will be run, Rivera said. Even though there are safety precautions, wearing a mask can help contain how the virus spreads, Rivera said. For any music students needing support during this time, both Clark and Hoegberg said that students stay in close contact with professors and seek out help across campus. According to Clark, there are people to help at the Center for Advising and Student Achievement, and music students also have individual advisors within the department to look to for guidance, Clark said. “One of the really difficult things about this is losing that close contact that we’re used to having as musicians and feeling isolated and not being sure about what to do or how to get help and just to remember that we’re all here to help each other and there’s no such thing as a stupid question, and the more questions you ask, the more answers you get,” Hoegberg said.

Theatre department hosts radio drama By Madison Gomez

ONLINE EDITOR & CO-BUSINESS MANAGER The year is 1938, you find a radio broadcast while skimming the FM waves that said that aliens were invading Earth. Fear and panic shoots through your body, and others are panicking as well, adding to the nervousness you feel. There were already threats of war and a dictator looming in the air, anything else could happen to make it worse. Unfortunately, that was the reality for some on Oct. 30, 1938 with the broadcasting of the radio drama “War of the Worlds,” because some of the people did not hear the disclaimer at the beginning of the broadcast. The University of Indianapolis Department of Theatre will be reenacting the radio drama on WICR on Halloween night at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. However, the cast has changed a bit in terms of gender roles, Grant Williams, director of the UIndy production of “War of the Worlds” and associate professor of theatre, said. The atmosphere of the broadcast will be similar, though, as the global pandemic is occurring, creating uneasiness, Williams said, but the audience should be more informed this time around. Technology has been around for a while and it is harder to be misled from a broadcast, senior theatre major Marcus Sciarra said.

“The new inventions of technology the need for theatre’s season to continue. were just beginning and, there was The theatre department had to cancel the radio then came TV and then the its planned 2020-2021 season because internet. So it was probably easier to of COVID-19 making in-person get misled back then due to the lack of shows out of the question, Williams technology,” Sciarra said. “But nowadays said. However, WICR approached the we have the technology to kind of know department, suggesting they do a radio when we’re being misled and not, but I drama, Williams said. would say the overall message you should Remote rehearsal sessions are going take away from [the radio drama] is if to lead to socially distant in-person you encounter something that makes you recordings,Williams said. And according skeptical, go with it. Don’t just believe to Wiliams, after the theatre’s job is done, it immediately because there could be it is going to be sent to the UIndy Music some more underlying details. You never Department to help mix the recording, know.” and WICR will broadcast it. Sciarra is playing S ome of the two characters, the challenges the cast narrator of the play, has had to overcome ... It was probably easier to are things that come Orson Wells, and Richard Pearson, get misled back then due n o r m a l l y w i t h a scientist who is virtual encounters to the lack of technology...” s u c h a s p o o r studying Mars at the time of the invasion. connections, lag In terms of rehearsal or speaking louder and overall performance, Sciarra said he than normal, but another element believes this play is like the majority of the Williams said is affecting them is the others he has been in. There is a friendly level of comfort. In the theater studio atmosphere, rehearsals are similar, they in person, with fellow cast members just lack physical elements, according surrounding you and with the guidance to Sciarra. of a director who is right in front of you, “Honestly I don’t feel a difference,” cast members may feel more comfortable, Sciarra said. “I mean obviously the Williams said, but remotely, none of the obvious difference being in-person and physical aspects are there. virtual, but the experience for me is it’s “… [An issue] I had once [was] when still the same, but it’s fun. And I enjoy ... I needed them [a cast member] to yell doing this acting and voice acting.” and I needed them to raise their voice Williams said the play was chosen and I was pushing them. And finally she for a number of reasons, but one being said, ‘Well, I’m in my dorm room and

it’s like nine o’clock’ and she didn’t want to be yelling in her dorm room with all of her neighbors next door, screaming about [a] Martian invasion,” Williams said. “When you’re in a theater, you can get your actors to yell all they want. You’re in a safe space, but a lot of these people are [in different areas]. I’ve had cast members be outside, I’ve had them in their dorm room. It presents challenges to the traditional rehearsal kind of idea.” While there is not a direct parallel being drawn between the 1938 broadcast and the UIndy collaborative broadcast, the department is trying to create a similar feeling of the 1938 broadcast to honor its influence, Williams said. Plus, with new gender roles, such as female characters replacing the original male roles, being added to the piece, Williams said it makes the play more accessible to audiences. “You’re tapping into that national feeling at that moment. I think there’s a lot of parallels between [the] heightened feelings of national crisis. That may not be a direct parallel, and I don’t think maybe people listening to this are going to be like, ‘Oh, this is so, so relevant,’ but I think that there’s some parallels that can be drawn,” Williams said. “One, I think it’s an exciting piece. It’s fun. No one is going to listen to it this time and think,‘Oh my goodness, we’re under alien attack,’ but in our efforts to recreate the feeling and the sentiment of that 1938 broadcast, I think it’ll be fun.”

TERHUNE Bob & Tom Show,” which he still works at 10 years later as a contributing writer, he said. “When you see Jimmy Fallon do monologue type of style jokes, that’s kind of what I do, but for Bob and Tom, the jokes don’t have to be as tight because I can write several jokes,” Terhune said. “It’s more conversational, so they [Bob and Tom] can slip them in, rather than just do like a setup, punchline type thing.” In some of his videos, Terhune said he plays a Trump-supporter character. This character came about because NFL player Colin Kaepernick knelt during the national anthem, he said. According to Terhune, he saw Indianapolis Colts fans burning their season tickets, jerseys and shoes. Terhune said his most viewed video, a rant about Colin Kaepernick’s Nike ad campaign, has had more than 10 million views on YouTube and Facebook. Terhune said that to be trending on the internet felt weird. “It’s not like one of my jokes, where everybody’s in on the joke,” Terhune said. “Some people thought it was real … [while] some people knew it was a joke. My intention wasn’t to trick you.” The character is not the only character Terhune includes in his stand-up. Terhune said that he also talks about everyday life, including topics such as his marriage and his cats, when he does stand up as well. Terhune said that the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the comedy world. He said that he performs his shows over Zoom. A typical show for Terhune consists of pre-recorded bits, characters and special guests on the show. He said that one of the most rewarding parts is being timely with his video content. “It’s got to be funny, but also timely, because nine things have already happened by tomorrow, and you can still comment on things, but it’s never going to be hotter than when it’s at the top of trending,” Terhune said. Issac Landfert is an Indianapolis comedian who said he met Terhune while doing standup in 2006. Fifteen years later, he said, they have performed several comedy acts together, including a variety of character routines. Landfert said he admires Terhune’s dedication to his comedy act. “He’s more than just the redneck character that he’s doing,” Landfert said. “I really appreciate the hustle, not only just in the amount of videos that he puts out, but the amount of jokes that he writes, the amount of jokes that he fits into his live act. His work rate is pretty above and beyond almost anybody [else].”


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8 THE REFLECTOR

OCTOBER 21, 2020

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Oct. 21, 2020 | The Reflector  

The Oct. 21, 2020 issue of The Reflector. Vol. 99, Issue #4. For our latest coverage, go to reflector.uindy.edu. *NOTE: Some images may...

Oct. 21, 2020 | The Reflector  

The Oct. 21, 2020 issue of The Reflector. Vol. 99, Issue #4. For our latest coverage, go to reflector.uindy.edu. *NOTE: Some images may...

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