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REFLECTING ART AROUND STARKVILLE

FRIDAY

OCTOBER 19, 2012

Reflector The

LIFE | B9

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THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY SINCE 1884

Neon Trees Mystery behind the mascot cancels fall tour, will no longer be headlining Bulldog Bash BY JAMIE ALLEN Staff Writer

Gloriana, Andy Grammer still plan to perform

Since the very beginning, Mississippi State University students have exhibited school pride and spirit for athletics through a symbolic mascot. According to MSU’s website, MSU students have answered to a couple of different nicknames before being called Bulldogs. The first teams to represent MSU were known as the Aggies, and not long after that, were known as the Maroons. It was not until 1961 MSU students were officially called the Bulldogs, however, since 1905, the nickname Bulldog was exchanged frequently for Aggies or Maroons. According to Starkville News, on Oct. 11, 1935, Major Ralph Sasse, coach of the MSU grid team, went

to Memphis to get a bulldog to be MSU’s new mascot. “The boys sent me here to get a bulldog as a mascot, and they issued warning they wouldn’t play against Alabama’s Crimson Tide next Saturday at Tuscaloosa if I came back without one,” Sasse said. Today, MSU’s mascot, Bully, is a symbol of school spirit recognized by students, fans and alumni. The role of the mascot Bully is played not only by the actual English Bulldog named Champ, but also by seven guys who wear the Bulldog suit at sporting events, outside events such as kids’ birthday parties and university functions. George Salomon, senior biological engineering major, said he decided to be Bully as a way to give back to MSU in his last year

of being a student. “The first four years I was doing a lot of stuff here that would help me develop as a student, and now I wanted to give back,” Salomon said. During game days, Bully has different responsibilities such as Fan Fare, where he takes pictures with fans; Dawg Walk and keeping high energy during games. Jared Entrekin, senior sports studies and business major, said his favorite experience while in the suit was going into the stands with the fans during the games. “Getting in the crowd is an experience enough as far as getting into the games goes because if you’re up there everyone gets into it with you,” Entrekin said. Reid Newton, senior sports studies and communication major, said it is a strange

experience being Bully because the face behind the Bulldog is a mystery to most students and fans. “It’s pretty weird because nobody knows who you are. You are like the most known-unknown person on campus,” Newton said. Being Bully, Salomon, Entrekin, Newton and Ryan Wood, senior finance major, are given the opportunity to meet a lot of people and go a lot of places they would have never been able to outside the suit. Wood said one person he got to meet was a gentleman who used to be Bully in 1973. “We met someone who was Bully in ‘73, and it’s very interesting to hear about the suit that they wore,” he said. “They said that they had to put a cereal box in the head of the suit so it would stay on their head.”

BY JOHN GALATAS Staff Writer

Due to unforeseen circumstances Neon Trees canceled the remainder of its 2012 fall tour and will no longer headline this year’s Bulldog Bash. Student Association president Shelby Balius said the SA office was notified of the cancellation earlier this week, and the office is now searching for a replacement band. “We have been working the last couple of days to find a replacement act that could book within that quick turn around window,” she said. “We have some options open for us, and we’re currently trying to find a logistical way to book them in time.” Balius said she hopes a replacement act is found by the end of next week. She also said SA is searching for a new band to book within the same cost range as Neon Trees. “We’re looking in the same price range that Neon Trees was in, and we’re hoping that we’ll have enough in the sponsorship budget to up that a little if need be,” Balius said. “We’re doing our best to find another act to join Gloriana and Andy Grammer with Archnemesis opening up.” Balius confirmed Gloriana and Andy Grammer will still be performing, and the winner of the Battle of the Bands competition will still be the opening act at Bulldog Bash.

Left: George Salomon is one of the many men behind our mascot, Bully. Far Right: Jared Entrekin poses like he would when he suits up as Bully for game day.

HANNAH WILLIAMS | THE REFLECTOR

Romney, Obama plan to address student loans, debt BY ALEX HOLLOWAY Staff Writer

When students go to the polls on Nov. 6, they will be voting for candidates for many reasons, one of which may be how they plan to address student debt. Although the topic has not been at the forefront of their campaigns, like flashier issues such as taxes or health care, student finance and the constantly-rising costs of higher education impact millions of students. According to Mississippi State University’s Office of Institutional Research and Effectiveness, at MSU, in-state tuition rose 7.9 percent between the 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 school years, from $5,805 to $6,264. For the four school years from 2009-2010 to 20122013, tuition has risen from $5,151 to $6,264, an increase of 21.6 percent. Ten years ago, tuition was $3,874, representing a nearly 62 percent rise in costs over the past decade. The presidential candidates have dueled over many issues during the election cycle, including reform for stu-

dent finances, debt and loans. The Romney campaign has not yet revealed details on what Mitt Romney plans to do to address student loans and debt problems, and a representative of the Mississippi Republican Party was unable to provide many details. The Romney campaign’s website says the Republican candidate plans to “Strengthen and simplify the financial aid system, welcome private sector participation instead of pushing it away, and replace burdensome regulation with innovation and competition.” The Obama campaign offers a detailed plan for what President Barack Obama intends to do moving forward, if reelected. One part of the president’s plan, introduced earlier this spring, is the student loan forgiveness plan. This would cap payments that have to be made to repay loans at 10 percent of a borrower’s income, regardless of how much money he or she makes. Interest rates would also be limited accordingly. Borrowers who have been repaying their loans for a minimum of 20 years would be eligible to have the outstanding balance of their loans forgiven. SEE LOANS, 2

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Dawg Rally excites students for game BY HILLARY LAPLATNEY Staff Writer

Mississippi State University students are encouraged to support their Bulldog football team and 2012 Homecoming court by attending Friday’s Dawg Rally at 4:30 p.m. in the Junction. The Dawg Rally, hosted by the Student Association’s history and traditions committee, is designed to pump students up for the Homecoming game tomorrow against Middle Tennessee. Vijay Kannuthurai, co-director of the history and traditions committee, said the main goal of the Dawg Rally is to promote MSU school spirit. “We are very fortunate to have great coaches and athletic programs, and we felt that our student body could do more to really support our athletes,” Kannuthurai said. “While we have several spirit events planned for the upcoming year, we would love to kick-start our first history and traditions event with a lot of support for our Homecoming maids and our 6-0 football team.”

DAWG RALLY EVENTS - speech by Miss MSU 2010 and Mr. MSU 2010 - speech by Athletic Director Scott Stricklin - speech by Megan Mullen - surprise guest speaker - introduction of Homecoming court - business banner competition - float competition ZACK ORSBORN | THE REFLECTOR

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TUESDAY , OCTOBER 19 , 2012

LOANS

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This would cover up to $45,000, as long as borrowers have paid at least 10 percent of the loan’s value. This plan is aimed primarily at federal student loans, rather than those provided through private lenders. The president has also enacted measures to expand the availability of funding for students. In 2010, the Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act was signed into law. It expanded the funding for Pell Grants to $36 billion, nearly double previous levels and raised the maximum Pell Grant amount from $5,350 to $5,550. Beginning in 2014, the maximum amount for Pell Grants will be allowed to rise on a set basis to keep pace with inflation. Paul McKinney, director of financial aid for MSU, said MSU has seen a large increase in the number of Pell Grant recipients since the Pell Grant expansion. However, McKinney said a budget shortfall has held Pell Grants from expanding further and has led to changes in the system for attaining

RALLY

and maintaining grants. “There are some new restrictions to make up for the shortfall,” McKinney said. “They (Pell Grants) used to be unlimited — available for as long as you were an undergrad — but now they can only be for 150 percent of your major.” This means Pell Grants can only cover up to 150 percent of the course load for a major. McKinney also said another change that enabled Pell Grants to be used year-round for spring, summer and fall semesters was also redacted after a year of being in effect, limiting them only covering the fall and spring semesters. At a campaign stop in Manchester, N.H., on Aug. 13, Gov. Mitt Romney offered insight into his own plans for student finance reform. “It is very tempting as a politician to say, ‘You know what, I will just give you some money. The government is just going to give you some money and pay back your loans for you,’” he said. “I am not going to tell you something that is not the truth, because you know, that is just taking money from your other pocket and giving it to the other pocket.”

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Kannuthurai, along with fellow co-director Taylor Williams, planned the Dawg Rally to include some exciting elements. Williams said MSU athletic director Scott Stricklin will be speaking and a surprise guest will be speaking at the rally. The event will also include new and familiar MSU cheers, songs performed by the pep band and a presentation of the 2012 Homecoming Court. Miss MSU 2010 Libbo Haskins and Mr. MSU 2010 Price Davis will emcee the Rally. Williams said she hopes for a good turnout at the Dawg Rally.

“Our goal for the pep rallies this year is to have more student involvement than (in) years past,” Williams said. “We are looking to have great giveaways for the Bulldog Bash pep rally and have some sort of theme for the student body to dress up to really get into the Dawg Rally.” Sarah O’Quinn, junior biology major, expressed her enthusiasm for the Dawg Rally. “I think the Dawg Rally is a great way to get everyone pumped up for the football game,” she said. Students who come to the Dawg Rally are expected to bring their school spirit.

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THE REFLECTOR

STUDENT LOANS DEBT PLANS

&

The Obama campaign plans to enact a student loan forgiveness plan in addition to already increased Pell Grant funding.

OBAMA The Romney campaign plans to strengthen and simplify the financial aid system, welcome private sector participation instead of pushing it away and replace burdensome regulation with innovation and competition.

ROMNEY

ZACK ORSBORN | THE REFLECTOR

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BAD DAWGS

MICAH GREEN | THE REFLECTOR

Justin Glover, former Mississippi State University student, spends time at the Palmer Home thrift store on Highway 12.

Palmer Home gives back to community BY LIZZIE SMITH Staff Writer

The Palmer Thrift store, located on Highway 12, has some of the best re-purchased items in town, but many of its customers might not know 100 percent of the proceeds go directly to Palmer Home for Children in Columbus. Palmer Home for Children was founded in 1895 and provides a home and a family-structured environment for children who normally would not have a desirable home environment. The campus currently has six cottages with a host parent in each. They also have had a separate Hernando campus for the past 12 years that hosts around 30 kids. Katherine Hewlett, director of marketing and communication, said most of the children who come to stay at the campus are privately placed. “Most children are placed here by grandparents who can’t care for them either through financial or health reasons or their parents can’t take care of them because they are either incarcerated or have drug or alcohol problems,” she said. The Palmer Home, which

houses 60 children ranging anywhere from two years old to college-age young adults, not only provides a safe home environment, but is also an advocate for education. They continue to support a child three months after his or her furthest point of education. “We had a student who graduated with his MBA from Ole Miss back in May. He recently moved to Atlanta and got a job so he was a Palmer’s child until he finished his master’s degree,” Hewlett said. “We also have a student who is in nursing school and she came to us when she was eight or nine years old.” Palmer Home also hosts a therapeutic horse-riding program that services special needs members of the community. “It helps them with not only emotional and behavior problems, but it also helps out kids on the autistic spectrum,” Hewlett said. The program is free, and the Palmer Home children often help out with the services to give back to the community and to see the joy on another child’s face from getting to ride the horses. “We really try to meet the

full spectrum needs of a child between emotional, spiritual, physical and educational needs,” Hewlett said. Although Palmer Home goes through many lengths to care for the children and their community, only 30 percent of their income is privately funded, leaving them to raise 70 percent on their own. “Thankfully, the thrift stores provide about 17 percent of our annual budget so when you buy things at the thrift store, it supports our children and we then are able to take that money and provide for them,” Hewlett said. Mike Montgomery, district manager who has been working for Palmer Home for 13 years and overseeing it for six years, said over 85 to 90 percent of the store’s stocked items come from donations. He said the store significantly discounts clothing items and accommodates those who wish to donate clothes or furniture. “We offer 30 to 60 percent off all of our clothing and that’s for everyday. If you want to donate your items, we are open Monday through Saturday, 9-5 p.m.,” Montgomery said. “We also offer standard pick-up deliv-

ery for larger items.” Palmer Home mails around five items per year to people who make donations to the store, including magazines and a calendar showing photographs of some of the children who live at the home. “Even if you donated a T-shirt or whatever you will get a magazine so that you know that when you donated, you supported Palmer Home,” Hewlett said. The store also sells poinsettias in the winter and flowers in the spring. Volunteers are always needed to work in the greenhouse, the horse program, tutoring or even to play with the kids when they come home from school in the afternoon. “We hope to service more children in the future and hope we can help twice as many,” Hewlett said. “If we could just help a few more every day and provide a home for them so that when they grow up, they can provide a home for their children and not perpetuate the cycle they grew up in.” For more information about the Palmer Home Thrift Store and the Palmer Home in Columbus, visit palmerhome.org.

Sunday, October 14 • 1:26 a.m. A non-resident/visitor reported his rental car was damaged by a male driving a golf cart on campus. • 4:31 a.m. A student was arrested for driving under the influence and careless driving.

Monday, October 15 • 7:52 a.m. An employee strained his right side going over a handrail. Subject did not seek medical assistance. • 10:05 a.m. A student reported his bicycle stolen from the bike rack by the post office. • 9:42 p.m. A resident director reported the smell of marijuana in South Hall. • 11:23 p.m. A student was arrested in South Hall for possession of paraphernalia.

Tuesday, October 16 • 8:13 a.m. A non-resident/visitor reported his flat-screen television was stolen from a tailgating tent on Oct. 13. • 2:05 p.m. An unknown caller reported by phone he overheard Pike members brag about stealing televisions from the Junction on Oct. 13. • 3:42 p.m. An Aramark employee was arrested for driving with a suspended license.

Wednesday, October 17 • 7:30 a.m. A student received a student referral for driving his motor scooter on a sidewalk. • 7:57 a.m. An employee was arrested in Hand Lab parking lot for driving with a suspended license. • 9:59 a.m. A student reported his bicycle missing from the bike rack outside of Griffis Hall. • 1:06 p.m. A student injured his hand at the Sanderson Center. Subject was transported to OCH. • 2:16 p.m. An employee reported a suspicious incident in Hathorn Hall. • 3:17 p.m. A student reported his motorcycle was moved from one location to another behind Cresswell Hall. • 4:45 p.m. An employee passed out on the bathroom floor in Carpenter Hall. Subject refused transport to OCH.

Citations:

• 11 citations were issued for speeding. • 2 citations was issued for expired tag..

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THE REFLECTOR

JAY JOHNSON | THE REFLECTOR

Student Association Secretary Shelby Sims said she has been working on communication with the current executive council as well as familiarizing the student body with SA senators.

SA Secretary values time on executive council BY ALIE DALEE Staff Writer

Shelby Sims, now well into her current term as Student Association Secretary, ran unopposed in April with her platform promising to help utilize organization, transparency and communication within SA. Sims said she became aware of student complaints regarding transparency between SA and its student body. She said she felt the SA executive council have done a better job this year of being transparent with mistakes and what exactly is happening within SA. She also said transparency is a tough issue, but that she felt that this year’s council has done an excellent job of making the SA as transparent as possible.

Sims said one of the main focuses of her job is the SA senate. The secretary’s role works heavily along side Vice President Park Wynn and student senate. Sims said when working with senate, as well as cabinet, communication is key. “Communicating with the senators and just making sure they know how to write legislation, and know they can ask ‘Do you know what can I do?’ and being more accessible,” Sims said. Last year’s senate passed legislation restructuring the Senate, which lead to a downsize in the amount of elected senate seats. Sims said communication between her and the senators has been easier this year with a smaller senate. Sims described her position as the “catch-

all” of the SA executive council and said organization is a pivotal attribute of the position. She said her job involves helping President Shelby Balius with anything she needs, along with the other elected positions. However, her main role involves keeping the attendance at cabinet and senate, along with the voting, legislation and minutes at senate. “My main focus is being everywhere, and making sure everyone has everything they need,” Sims said. Sims said she has been assisting Wynn with planning a Senator Outreach Day, a day dedicated to the SA senators going out into the Starkville community and giving back. Additionally, Sims has been working on and publicizing for a Meet Your Senator Night. “I feel like people do not realize if they have

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a problem they can go talk to their senators and they can write legislation,” Sims said. “This past year and this year have been monumental years for Senate and they really are gaining power and utilizing that power.” Along with the Meet Your Senator Night, Sims said she is also trying to encourage senators to go and speak to student groups on campus associated with their senate seat’s college and making senators more accessible. Overall, Sims said she has enjoyed her time as SA Secretary and it has been an excellent learning experience. “I have loved being secretary. It has been a huge learning experience,” she said. “I do not feel like any of the five of us who are elected are really that more knowledgable about student government than anybody else, but we have learned so much through this.”

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MSU Ducks Unlimited chapter prepares for seasonal banquet and half the fun is the camaraderie with your peers,” Foth said. Foth said college students The Mississippi State Bulldog Chapter of Ducks Unlim- have come to play a highly ited will host its annual Fall important role in DU over the Banquet fundraiser at Rick’s past decade. “The college chapters are Café on Wednesday, Nov. 7, great for recruitment. College from 6 to 9 p.m. Stephen Leininger, senior students, who may not have a wildlife and fisheries major lot of money now, will look and chair of the DU Bulldog for local DU chapters and doChapter, said the banquet will nate later in life,” he said. According to Megan Annicomprise a buffet-style pork tenderloin supper, numerous son, senior wildlife and fisheries major and co-chair of raffles and a live auction. the DU BullLeininger said the event The college chapters dog Chapter, students from is open to are great for across camall, including those who do recruitment. College pus and from various backnot hunt wastudents, who may grounds have terfowl themnot have a lot of shown an inselves. “You don’t money now, will look terest in DU. Annison have to be a for local DU chapters said a growredneck to enand donate later in ing number joy the event,” of girls are on he said. “The life.” the committee beautiful Justyn Foth for the Bullthing about it dog Chapter. Silent auction is that you’ll She also said see doctors coordinator for DU the raffle will and lawyers there with farmers and every- include a ladies’ table with items ranging from purses to one else.” Justyn Foth, PhD student gift certificates to clothing. Leininger said the Bulldog in the College of Forest Resources and silent auction co- Chapter has won the Duck ordinator for the DU Bulldog Bowl, a fundraising compeChapter, said DU is success- tition among MSU, the Uniful because a wide variety of versity of Mississippi, and the people are willing to support University of Southern Misits mission of preserving and sissippi, for the past two years. Leininger said attendees protecting waterfowl. “A big key to DU is getting will be able to bid on items your community involved, such as guns, wildlife prints, By James ToBermann Staff Writer

coolers, decoys, calls, knives, watches and more. He also said attendees will hear from the DU director for the state of Mississippi about the organization’s recent activities. According to Leininger, a single student ticket costs $35 in advance and $45 at the door. Similarly, he said a student couple’s ticket costs $55 in advance and $65 at the door. He also said attendees can purchase a drink cup ($5 pre-sale, $10 at the door) for all-you-care-to-drink beverages during the event. “Also, if you buy your ticket during the pre-sale, you get a shot at winning a Yeti cooler in a drawing,” he said. Annison said the reaction from students who have attended the event in the past has been very positive. “A lot of my friends loved it and are asking if it’s time for the DU Fall Banquet again,” she said. She also said the purchase of a ticket includes a one-year membership in DU with a magazine subscription and decals. Leininger said the Bulldog Chapter has high expectations for this year’s Fall Banquet. “Our goal is for this to be a fun, well-organized event where people can relax, see their friends, and enjoy a good meal,” he said. The Bulldog Chapter can be found on Facebook at Ducks Unlimited Bulldog Chapter and on Twitter at @ DUdawgs.

zack orsborn | the reflector

SA presents annual Halloween Carnival By Jamie allen Staff Writer

student organizations set up booths and play various games with the children as well as give out candy. Mara Smith, president of Gamma Beta Phi said her organization is participating with a booth in the carnival. She said she likes the event because it promotes unity between the organizations on campus. “All the organizations are out there to provide candy for the children during the Halloween Carnival and there’s no competition between anyone,” Smith said. “It’s not about competition, it’s about the kids getting the candy” Amina Bahammou, co-director of Special Events on the Student Association cabinet said that the student and faculty of MSU play a vital role in the production of this event. “The students and faculty of Mississippi State are able to play a vital role in the carnival

through their participation in setting up individualized booths that, often, correlate to the objective of their organization,” Bahammou said. Bray and Bahammou said the event is also a great way to bring families together on a budget. “For just $1 admission, children are able to participate in over 50 different games, a bouncy castle, parade of costumes, and even decorate pumpkins to take home as a souvenir,” Bahammou said. The Halloween Carnival will last from 5-7 p.m. at the Junction with trick-or-treating starting at 4:30 p.m. Bahammou said the success of this event can be attributed to her committee, SA and the faculty at MSU. “None of this would have been possible without the help and guidance of our committee, the Student Association, and the wonderful faculty,” she said.

The Student Association will host the 40th annual Halloween Carnival on the campus of Mississippi State University on Oct. 25. This event will be fun for the whole family with inflatables, pumpkin decorating, a parade and booths hosted by 60 different student organizations. Meagan Bray, co-director of Special Events on the Student Association cabinet, said the event has grown every year bringing the Starkville community closer together. “The event started as just a nice way for MSU’s faculty and staff to have their families on campus and the even has just grown year after year from there,” Bray said. “We throughout my tenure at Mississippi State, and I invite approximately 7,000 By mary Chase Breedlove will for the rest of my life,” he said. “Always put children from Starkville, West Opinion Editor everything you can into everything you do and Point and Columbus.” The 2012 Mr. and Miss Mississippi State Uni- you will not be disappointed with the outcome.” As a part of this event, Vance is a political science major from Jackversity are seniors Morgan McDowell and Sara Vance. They were chosen to represent MSU by the sonville, Fla. After graduation, her plans include to pursue either an MBA at MSU or attend law student body during the Homecoming elections. McDowell is a marketing major from Indiano- school. As an undergraduate, she has been a part of la. After graduating, he plans to attend MSU to MSU roadrunners, SA and Zeta Tau Alpha sororpursue an MBA. As an undergraduate, he has been involved in ity, as well as serving as a Gamma Chi for panhellenic recruitment and an orientamany organizations on campus tion leader in 2012. including SA, SEC Exchange It is such an Vance said in an email her idea Committee, SA senator for the incredible honor to of Miss MSU is someone who College of Business, MSU roadbe voted Miss MSU. loves the school and is a represenrunners, Honor Code Council Committee, Campus Crusade I would have never tative of the whole student body. “It is such an incredible honor for Christ and Sigma Chi Fraexpected to be able to be voted Miss MSU. I would ternity. have never expected to be able to McDowell said he feels honto represent the ored and privileged to represent student body in this represent the student body in this role when I came here as a freshthe university as Mr. MSU. role when I came man,” she said. “Being a student at “There is no greater feeling in One Rack: Polo 5-Pocket the world than to be able to give here as a freshman.” State has given me so many opporPolo Longsleeve tunities for personal growth, and I back to the university that has Corduroy Jeans Sara Vance feel so humbled to have been given done so much for me,” he said REG $89.50 Sport Shirts: in an email. “In being a lifelong Bulldog, it will such a great privilege.” NOW $69 1/2 PRICE! Vance also said her parents have been her bigbe very special to stand on the field and look up at 55,082 members of the Bulldog family and know gest influence during her time at MSU. “My parents are incredibly hard working and that I am representing this great university.” Polo 1/4 Zip McDowell said the greatest lesson he has loving. They instilled a strong work ethic in me, Polo Shortsleeve learned at MSU is to become invested in the pro- and they taught me the importance of dedication. Longsleeve Pullover Knits: grams and organizations the school has to offer. My parents are also a great example of how to love REG $95.00 He also said serving others is the best advice he and serve others. They both give more than willBUY 2 GET 1 FREE! NOW $79 ingly of their time to our community, our church could share. “One of my teachers in high school gave me ad- and our family,” she said. McDowell and Vance will be honored during vice before I even came to MSU. Her wise words College Park Shopping Center were, ‘Morgan, always remember one thing: ser- halftime on Saturday’s game against Middle TenMon-Sat 9:30 am- 6 pm vice over self. I have kept those words with me nessee. 100 Russell Street

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BULLETIN BOARD CLASSIFIEDS POLICY The deadline for Tuesday’s paper is 3 p.m. Thursday; the deadline for Friday’s paper is 3 p.m. Tuesday. Classifieds are $5 per issue. Student and staff ads are $3 per issue, pre-paid. Lost and found: found items can be listed for free; lost items are listed for standard ad cost. HELP WANTED Bartending. Up to $300 / day. No experience necessary. Training available. Call 800.965.6520 ext. 213. Personal assistant needed to organize and help. Basic computer skills needed, good with organization. We are ready to pay $870 per week. Interested person should email resume for consideration: markthompson147@aol.com. Representative service is needed for developing strong customer relationships and meeting aggressive sales goals. Successful candidates must be reliable and possess excellent communication skills, both oral and written. No job experience can also apply. Send your resume to: ronaldjuan1212@gmail.com. Personal assistant is urgently needed with a good salary. He or she must have good qualities to work. Interested applicants should contact: ronaldjuan1212@gmail. com. Earn good money at every game. Now hiring energetic workers for walking vendors position at Mississippi State University games. For more information, call 404.512.0822. FOR SALE

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Classic comics and albums. The largest collection of comic books and albums in the area. Also movie posters, sports memorabilia, DVDs, CDs and beer signs. Located in Ziggy’s Buy & Sell, 434 Highway 12. Details on Facebook. New and used vehicles. First time and college student purchase programs. Contact Anthony Lowe at 327.3673 or

418.9107. Premier Ford-Lincoln, Inc. 2120 Highway 45 North, Columbus. idontlietoyou.com. 2005 Jeep Liberty 4x4 Limited 3.7L Auto all records. Always garaged. Looks and drives great. Mostly highway miles. Must see, non-smoker, one owner. One year tires with hazard warrant. Scheduled maintenance. Call or text 571.249.5678. FOR RENT 100 King Richard Road, 3B, 2B brick house near campus. Two-car garage, fireplace, fenced yard. $1250.00. Call 228.324.2289 after 4 p.m. Available December 15. Two bedroom, 1.5 bathroom townhouse for rent. Quiet complex on South Montgomery. Grad students, professionals and families. Available now. Call 312.4722. CLUB INFO The deadline for Tuesday’s paper is 3 p.m. Thursday; deadline for Friday’s paper is 3 p.m. Tuesday. MSU student organizations may place free announcements in Club Info. Information may be submitted by email to club_info@reflector.msstate. edu with the subject heading “CLUB INFO,” or a form may be completed at The Reflector office in the Student Media Center. A contact name, phone number and requested run dates must be included for club info to appear in The Reflector. All submissions are subject to exemption according to space availability. WESLEY FOUNDATION Insight Bible study and worship on Tuesdays at 8 p.m. at the Wesley Foundation Worship Center on East Lee. Boulevard next to Campus Book Mart. MSU CATHOLIC STUDENT ASSOCIATION The MSU Catholic Student Association invites you to join us for Sunday mass at 5:30 p.m. at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 607 University Dr. All are welcome to $2 Tuesday night dinner at 6 p.m. in

the Parish Hall. Like us on Facebook: facebook.com/msstatecsa MSU STUDENT CHAPTER OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MICROBIOLOGY Contact msuasm@yahoo.com or like us on Facebook, “MSU ASM,” for membership information. SIGMA GAMMA RHO SORORITY, INC. PaRHOnormal Activity costume contest: Oct. 31 at 12 p.m. on the Drill Field. First place prizes for winners in categories of funniest, scariest and school spirit. For more information, email djk84@msstate. edu. SIGMA GAMMA RHO SORORITY, INC. Join us as we educate youth on Halloween safety at the Boys and Girls Club on Oct. 26 at 4 p.m. Contact djk84@ msstate.edu for more information. YOGA MOVES CLUB School or work stressing you out? Get moving into Yoga Moves! Try our moves to get into shape and our relaxation techniques to handle the stress. Yoga Moves meets at the Sanderson Center in Studio C, Thursday evenings 5 to 6:30. Like Yoga Moves Club-MSU on Facebook. STARLIGHT DANCERS HIP HOP TEAM Starlight Dancers will be hosting their first event, called The Knockout: Pink Edition, on Oct. 30 at 7 p.m. in the Colvard Student Union Ballroom. It is a breast cancer awareness program. Other MSU organizations will be performing. Donations are accepted. SOCIOLOGICAL STUDENT ASSOCIATION The Sociological Student Association is based in the Department of Sociology. Undergraduates of all ages are welcome. Meetings are held the last Thursday of every month in Bowen Hall room 250 at 5 p.m.


REFLECTOR-ONLINE.COM

OPINION

FRIDAY , OCTOBER 19, 2012

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the voice of MSU students

THE WORD ON JOHNSON STREET | MATT TAYLOR

RED HERRINGS | CLAIRE MOSLEY

Debates resemble sporting events Writers deserve better treatment

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Here is where I wish there ther than breast cancer awareness, Octo- was an ESPN sound crew with ber is often referred the half-domed microphones to as the best time of the year that pick talk on the football for sports. Let’s take a look at field in the audience; I would what we have: professional love to hear what Romney football is hitting the grid iron has to say to Obama when hard, the BCS is keeping the he shakes his hand with that steam rolling in college ball, smug smile. The debate is then moderthe long awaited MLB postseason is in full swing, NA- ated by a ref whom every specSCAR racers are keeping their tator thinks does a God- awful engines tuned and running job. for the sprint cup, World Cup The only addition I would soccer qualifying matches are make here would be for he being played, NBA training or she to have the power to camp is tipping off and the throw penalty flags: “UnNHL is just starting to scratch sportsman-like conduct, Govthe ice. However, this year is ernor Romney. Thirty second a particularly special year for penalty, resume rebuttal.” sports fans. By the way, I love how they Just as the World Cup and have a shot clock and think the Olympics take place every they shouldn’t be penalized for four years, so has a new, ex- going over. citing sport: the presidential When the debate ensues, it debates. resembles a childhood game Yes, this is by far the most of HORSE. Each candidate interesting event on TV right gets to try a shot dictated by now (not to mention it carries the moderator or an audience the most weight as the winner member in order to best the will lead our country for the other; whenever a candidate next four years). Some may missteps, he gets a letter and shy away from comparing this the first to spell DEBATE losto a sport, but with the media es the match. holding the cards, it doesn’t At certain points in the detake much imagination to see bate you might actually think the connections. it will turn into a boxing Since the first televised de- match; the drama is real and bate between Kennedy and I keeping thinking Obama is Nixon, it has going to slap been extremeWith all the ads and the smirk off ly apparent of Romney’s hype, it is hard to the public face at some deny the influence perception of point. a candidate is Once the the media has on an almost just as debate ends, event like this. It is important as the candidates simply a reflection of again shake the platform for which he is hands with reour society.” running. spect toward Many would say appearance each other in similar fashion helped secure Kennedy the to football coaches, but we all victory. However, this year know they hate each other’s the line between two politi- guts at that point; just smile cians debating the best way to and wave. lead our country has turned I am eagerly waiting the day into nothing short of a slug Vegas releases odds and opens fest. the floor for betting. The much anticipated How funny (or sad I guess) Romney vs. Obama bout has would it be to find out Rombeen in talks all this year and ney is a 10 percent underdog has received more hype than with the popular vote going a Bama and LSU match-up. into the election? I am actually surprised we With the amount of anaare able to watch the debates lysts out there, I can’t imagine for free and not via pay-per- it would be hard for them to view. Luckily we get to watch come up with an algorithm to a best two out three (in true give the public a spread just post-season baseball fashion) like a football game. for the win of the popular vote I think taking Romney for free. against the spread would be a So here are the rules: the tough bet right now. debate starts off with a coin Though I might have used toss just as any normal foot- a bit of imagination in these ball game to decide who gets past comparisons, it is what the first or, more importantly, goes on before and after the the last word. The candidates debates that brings a sport to then, as in any civil boxing mind the most. match, “tap gloves” as a sign The candidates are the front of respect for each other. runners of a party (that even

The

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MATT TAYLOR Matt Taylor is a senior majoring in mechanical engineering. He can be contacted at opinion@ reflector.msstate.edu. have specific team colors) who are prepared by their campaign managers in much the same way a coach does for any team. There is a great bit of strategy in the preparation of debates, and a failure to have tact can easily lose votes. What is more similar is how the pundits scrutinize every play just like sports analyst. They have numbers and directions each candidate should take in order to make each run successful. Lastly, as in any game, strategy is key for victory. In the first debate on Oct. 3, Romney came out swinging hard. This left Obama on the ropes for most of the debate and hurt him throughout as he seemed unsure how to react toward Romney’s offense. 1-0 Romney. In the weeks leading up to this past Tuesday, Obama knew he had to stifle the skepticism of his oral success predicated by his use of a teleprompter and work on his offense in order to gain possession of the clock to avoid a sweep. This is exactly what happened. A strong Obama executed a great debate as he held his ground to secure a close win and tie the series at 1-1. This leaves our drama- filled society salivating as we cannot wait to see what happens when the two meet up for a final bout in Boca Raton on Oct. 22. Now I know the debates are no laughing matter and hold serious implications. However, with all the ads and hype, it is hard to deny the influence the media has on an event like this. It is simply a reflection of our society. We may say we don’t like the superfluous drama but 67 million viewers don’t lie. That is nearly a quarter of our nation! However, with a little perspective we can have the best of both worlds. We can enjoy the fanfare and not let it skew our views by fact checking the candidates to make a truly informed decision. We don’t have to let this ruin the experience for us because the drama is real.

n Oct. 11, 2012, mates working members tend Laura Siegel Larson, to make $40,000 to $110,000 daughter of famed annually, which doesn’t even Superman co-creator Jerry Sie- amount to much once one gel, wrote a letter addressed to factors in cost of living (par“Superman fans everywhere” ticularly in large cities such as concerning her family’s fight New York or Los Angeles) and to restore her father’s rights as then this sum dwindles quite a bit. co-creator to her family. Considering these writers The gist is this: Jerry Siegel’s rights reverted back to the are responsible for some of family in 1999, but the family your favorite movies and TV has yet to see a large percent- shows, most of them average age the profits that — under the same salary (or less) than the copyright act — the fami- an elementary school teacher. When you watch TV, you ly is entitled. In 2008, the U.S. District are watching an actor portrayCourt ruled Laura Siegel and ing a character. Perhaps the portrayal is a her mother had successfully brilliant reclaimed her father’s Considering these writers one (Who arSuperman are responsible for some could gue Nick rights and of your favorite movies Offerman’s were entitled portrayto profits and TV shows, most of al of Ron since April them average the same S w a n s o n 1999. So, is anything happy endsalary (or less) than but briling right? an elementary school liant?), but Wrong. As teacher.” it’s importof writing, ant to keep there is still a major battle going on between in mind in the end these are Warner Bros. filing a suit portrayals of characters. Sure, the actor animates through DC against Siegel’s these characters, but the flesh lawyer, Marc Toberoff. Warner has also, in the and bones were created on pawords of Siegel,“…spent per. The Dowager Countess about $35 million on corporate lawyers to fight my fam- of “Downton Abbey,” Ron ily…instead of investing in a Swanson of “Parks and Recreation” and Walter White of fair settlement.” These are the basic facts of “Breaking Bad” are written a case that is long and ugly, characters. Every line and action is and one that brings up some important question: Where written by people who esdo the writers stand when it sentially (either in a group or comes to the rights and profits singlehandedly) have created of their creations? the characters we know and Do comic creators, screen- love. writers, etc., earn a decent Without the writers for profit from their creations? movies, TV, comics and more, Well, the answer seems to some of your favorite shows be, typically, nope. Writers might not even exist. WithGuide of America-West esti- out Jack Kirby, we wouldn’t

CLAIRE MOSLEY Claire Mosley is a sophomore majoring in accounting. She can be contacted at opinion@ reflector.msstate.edu. have Thor, the X-Men and countless other Marvel characters (not to mention the subsequent movie and television adaptations), and how is this creativity rewarded? In other words, without Thor we wouldn’t have movies of actor Chris Hemsworth prancing around in tights. With a court ruling in favor of Marvel claiming Kirby’s creations were created as “work for hire” and thusly owned and controlled by Marvel. Pretty bum deal for the man who helped create some of the most iconic superheroes of the day. Remember the writers’ strike, way back in 20072008, and the disastrous effect it had on television, film and radio? The total estimated loss, according to UCLA Anderson School of Management was $380 million. Three-hundred eighty million in just 14 weeks and two days. Nobody wants another entertainment drought, so let’s support the writers and creators who make the characters and stories we love. Because Lord knows nobody needs another TLC monstrosity (I’m looking at you, “Here Comes Honey Boo Boo.”)

Zack Orsborn | The Reflector

WHO SPEAKS FOR EARTH? | CAMERON CLARKE

Life outside our planet is not unlikely

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he Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, better known as SETI, is run by a private, nonprofit organization called the SETI Institute, which is dedicated to scientific research, education and public outreach, according to www.seti.org. Also stated on its website, “the mission of the SETI Institute is to explore, understand and explain the origin, nature and prevalence of life in the universe.” Now, many people immediately discredit anyone who takes the idea of intelligent aliens seriously. Admittedly, pretty much all claims of alien abductions and unidentified flying objects are completely ungrounded and lack even the beginnings of credible evidence. The argument for intelligent life existing in the universe somewhere, anywhere besides just here on Earth, is grounded in statistics and logical reasoning, not on wild tales of abduction, vivisection and impregnation. Frank Drake, who used to work in the astronomy department at Cornell, developed an equation to model the probable number of advanced, communicating extraterrestrial civilizations within the Milky Way Galaxy. Although there are several ways to calculate this, according to Carl Sagan’s book “Cosmos,” the

Drake Equation is: decide some of the variables. N = N* * Fp * Ne * Fl * Fi * We should consider many Fc * FL earth-like planets may be outN = Probable resultant num- side of the habitable zone, but ber of communicable civilizations they could still harbor life due to within the Milky Way. other sources of energy, all judgN* = Best estimate of the num- ing from our own solar system. ber of stars in the Milky Way. Therefore, a group of probable Fp = Fraction of these stars that values, many of which are still have planetary systems. under research and debate, are Ne = Average number of plan- N* = three hundred billion stars, ets in a planetary system that are Fp = 1/2, Ne = 3 planets, Fl = suitable for life in some way. 1/100, Fi = 1/100, Fc = 1/100, Fl = Fraction of those suitable and FL = 1/1,000 (assuming one planets where life actually arises. out of a thousand civilizations Fi = Fraction of life bearing are either new or have never deplanets which give rise to intelli- stroyed themselves violently). gent life. Multiplying these numbers Fc = Fraction of intelligent civ- together yields a possible number ilizations that are able to commu- of civilizations in the galaxy of nicate with each other. about 450. Obviously the lower FL = Fraction of the planet’s boundary for this number is one, lifetime that a communicable civi- because we exist, but it could lization is alive. also be the probability for all According to an interview the correct factors to come into with Mississippi State Astron- play for the development of life omer, Angelle is much harder It is nearly impossible than we think Tanner, these are some acthat there are not any and that conceptable edusequently life aliens out there.” cated estimates only pops once for Fp at .5, one out of two stars in just a few galaxies. Regardless have planets, and Ne at about 3 of the range of numbers, from planets per solar system. Tanner thousands per galaxy to one in warns the variables get compli- every thousand galaxies, it should cated and that the Kepler Space be apparent that due to the sheer Telescope program she is work- size of the universe (which coning with is currently trying to tains billions of galaxies, each

CAMERON CLARKE Cameron Clarke is a sophomore majoring in physics. He can be contacted at opinion@reflector.msstate.edu. with billions of stars etc.) it is not unlikely that there are aliens somewhere out there. I have tried to show barring some complicated philosophical argument it is nearly impossible there are not any aliens out there; it would be more remarkable we were alone as the only sentient beings, or even the only life in the entire universe than if there were aliens on Mars waiting for us. Until we make first contact we must wait, but while we wait we can invest in astronomy and astrobiology, actively pursue hypothetical philosophy and continue sending out probes and rovers into our own solar system to discern the possibility and probability of alien life so we will not be taken by surprise if and when aliens show up on our doorstep, or even better, when we show up on theirs.


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OPINION

FRIDAY , OCTOBER 19, 2012

EARTH TO AMERICA | JAMES ARENA

ONE LITTLE SPARK | WHITNEY KNIGHT

Religion of president is irrelevant

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lot of people have been you choose, however you choose, bandying around the terms as long as it does not affect the “separation of church rights of others. This means Tom and state.” However, much like Cruise can jump up and down Vizzini in “The about ScientoloIt is not the president’sgy as much as he Princess Bride,” I’m not sure they wants on your job to make sure know what it but everyone in America television, means. Underhe can’t come acts in a way that standable, since to your house it’s a pretty big and force you to suits his morals. concept which watch it. some of our greatest leaders have Because separation of church struggled with. Unacceptable, be- and state means government ofcause it is historically the biggest ficials should not be using their win the U.S. has ever claimed. It’s personal beliefs to make decisions so important it is the first amend- that affect the American people, ment to the Constitution. the term “public servant” is intiTo begin, we should probably mately attached to the concept. define what freedom of religion Congressmen, local and executive means to the citizens who are officials are meant to serve the lucky enough to have it. Having people who elect them. I don’t freedom of religion means the care which religion my president leaders of our country are charged is, as long as I am sure he is going with making it as easy as possible to serve my interests and those of for all people, regardless of how the people around me. Because many other people practice their that’s his job. That doesn’t mean religion, to freely worship whatev- because the predominant religion er they want. of the U.S. is Christianity, the That does NOT mean your government serves only the interprincipal should be able to pray ests of the Christian people. over the loudspeaker at the high Separation of church and state school football game. It DOES requires the president, and all mean groups of students should other leaders, to make judgments be able to gather to talk together based on protecting the freedoms about whatever faith they want. of the constituents, not on perFreedom of religion is the free- sonal biases from their faith. It is dom to practice whichever faith not the president’s job to make

THE REFLECTOR

WHITNEY KNIGHT Whitney Knight is a junior majoring in English education. She can be contacted at opinion@ reflector.msstate.edu. sure everyone in America acts in a way that suits his morals. It is his job to make sure that you can express your morals and practice your religion anywhere, as long as it doesn’t interfere with the rights of others. This is why it should not matter whether Lincoln was Deist or JFK was Catholic or Obama is Christian or Romney is Mormon. From the Constitution, it is imperative the president not use his faith to lead the American people. In his personal life, I would sincerely hope the president is free to worship whomever he chooses and follow the direction he is led by his religion. However, when he puts on his president hat and sits down in the Oval Office, he must be led by the people, not by his religion. To do otherwise would not make him a good Christian. It would make him a bad president.

Candidates acted childish in debate

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e are beginning to Romney would use the quessee the light at the tions the 82 voters were alend of the tunnel lowed to ask as a spring board everyone; the election will be to get into what they want to upon us in just a few weeks. do in office or to throw blame Until then, we have one more on the other for actions in the debate between President past. It was disrespectful. Obama and Candidate RomWhen I think about this in ney. detail I think back to a politiThe first debate I thought cal science class that I took last was just a poor showing from spring called “the presidency,” both sides, granted Romney and we studied the differdid come out with more en- ent presidents, their policies ergy than President Obama and the elections throughout showed all night. American history. However, Tuesday’s debate I remember my professor between the saying someWill this final debate thing along the president and his challenger be enough to give line of, “in detook on a new candidates Governor Romney or bates tone: unprofesseldom answer president Obama the the questions sionalism. In a town hall asked of them, lead in the race? setting with unrather they andecided voters all around them swer the question they wish it seemed at times Obama and had been asked.” Romney were going to come I think President Obama to blows. and governor Romney did a Does this not bother any- great job of sticking to that one the president and the man plan of not really answering who has a very good chance to the voter’s questions directly. become the president could A good example of this is not debate and act like adults when one of the voters asked in front of, not only the coun- the question related to gas try, but the many millions of prices; Romney attacked the people watching all over the president’s policies and then world? said what his energy poliThe president and governor cy will be, Obama defended

JAMES ARENA James Arena is a senior majoring in political science. He can be contacted at opinion@reflector.msstate. edu. himself and then proceeded to say what his policy on energy will be in the next term all while never answering the voter’s question. I think what America got to see last night was a microcosm of what is going on at all levels of government in the United States; politicians getting too wrapped up in politics and rhetoric to do their jobs. I hope in the next debate we see the president and governor Romney show a little restraint and act like adults. Will this final debate be enough to give Governor Romney or President Obama the lead in the race? Probably not because I think most voters’ minds are already made up, but its going to be a very interesting home stretch.

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CONSISTENCY IS KEY Baker Swedenburg has been a huge part of MSU’s success this season on special teams. PAGE B2

FROM CANADA TO MSU Soccer sophomore Shannen Jainudeen has made her mark on the team in just two years. PAGE B3

CLUB SPORTS FEATURE

The club shooting sports team is one of the fastest growing club sports on campus. PAGE B4 With the second smallest budget in the SEC, the athletic marketing staff creates innovative ideas. PAGE B5

ATHLETIC MARKETING

By Austin ChAnCe Staff Writer

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s homecoming arrives, the Bulldog nation is halfway through the 2012-13 football season without a blemish. No. 12 ranked Mississippi State will host Middle Tennessee State University (4-2, 2-1 Sun Belt) on Saturday in hopes to continue its winning ways in search of the first 7-0 season since 1999, when State finished the year at 10-2, winning its first eight games. This season, State features a group of unlikely stars on the field. In recent years, the quarterback play on offense, as well as the running backs, has dictated the way the game has been played. This season, the tight end play has created a new vision for this year’s team. Tight ends Malcolm Johnson, Brandon Hill and Marcus Green have combined for 230 yards on 19 catches, as well as scoring six of the 13 receiving touchdowns State has scored all season. Only one positional receiver (Chad Bumphis) has caught a touchdown pass this season. Bumphis has six touchdowns receptions and fullback Adrian Marcus has one touchdown catch, rounding out the receiving touchdowns for the Bulldogs this season. Green is ranked third in the country in receiving touchdowns this season behind Nevada’s Zach Sudfeld (6) and Marshall’s Gator Hoskins (7). Green said he strives to be the leader of the tight end core, leading the pack in both experience and statistics. “I am trying to show the guys (Hill and Johnson) some things that I hope will help them in the future,” Green said. “They know how to make plays, so we just have to go out on the field and get wins.” see FOOTBALL, B4


SPORTS B2

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friday , october 19 , 2012

THE REFLECTOR

Stat of the day:

quaRteRBack tyleR RuSSell iS one of five fBS quaRteRBackS to thRow foR douBle-digit touchdownS (12) and leSS than two inteRceptionS.

Swedenburg an unsung hero for MSU By Ray ButleR Staff Writer

Anytime a team is undefeated at the halfway mark of the regular season, there is no question specific players will garner national spotlight and media attention due to their on-field performances or high profile position. Other players, ones who still play a large role in a team’s success but from a less popular position, often go unmentioned in game recaps and are unheralded by the general public. This perfectly describes Baker Swedenburg, a junior punter for Mississippi State University, who is having an outstanding season for the Bulldogs. With the Bulldogs being undefeated and currently ranked No. 12 in the BCS, Swedenburg, a native of Columbus has been nothing less than magnificent when his number is called. The junior has averaged 40.7 yards on 26 punts, 11 of which have been downed inside the 20-yard line. Last Saturday’s game against the Tennessee Volunteers epitomized the punter’s first-half performance when Swedenburg had punts downed at the 12-yard line and the 4-yard line during the fourth quarter of the SEC contest. Head coach Dan Mullen said Swedenburg’s punts were crucial in the game. “We made plays in the kicking game when we needed it,” Mullen said. “We had some big punts.” In MSU’s last four games, Swe-

FREE t! Even

courteSy of mSu media relationS| the reflector

Baker Swedenburg has allowed the Dogs to be ranked second in the nation, allowing negative four punt return yards this season. denberg has placed four punts inside the opponent’s 20-yard line. On the season, the junior has forced 12 fair catches by the opposition and has three punts of over 50 yards. Another shining aspect of Swedenburg’s skill set is the amount of hang time on the junior’s punts. MSU ranks second nationally with negative four punt return yards allowed. This feat is largely due to Swe-

denburg, who adds height to his punts as well as distance, which allows his teammates to run downfield before a return can be made. Although he is only a junior, Swedenburg is easily one of the most veteran players on State’s special teams unit. The punter said he attributes his success to his experience and maturity as a player. “Going out there and doing it a bunch of times really helps me,” Swedenburg said. “If I let it, I can

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get myself worked up. But (my experience) helps me control those nerves.” As an upperclassman with multiple years of in-game experience, Swedenburg also plays a vital role in the development and maturation of younger kickers on MSU’s special teams. Having now played in 19 games at MSU, Swedenburg’s maturity has had a direct impact on Devon Bell, a true freshman place kicker who has made eight field goals midway through his first collegiate season. Bell, whose performance has progressed with each game, said Swedenburg keeps him focused during games and is a source of motivation for the young kicker. “He’s one of the main reasons why I’ve been so calm lately,” Bell said. “Going into the first game, he could tell I was a little nervous, he just gave me some advice on what to do and how to approach each kick. He’s been a big benefit to me.” Swedenburg succeeds off the field as much as he does on the field. He is currently in graduate school, where he said he hopes to obtain multiple degrees involving computers and information technologies. Surprisingly, the punter said while his studies have increased in difficulty, balancing schoolwork and football has become simpler over time. “I would say it’s almost easier now,” Swedenburg said. “It’s more time consuming, but I really think my undergrad helped with that.” Once his career at MSU comes to a close, Swedenburg said he hopes to pursue a career playing football professionally. Punting in the NFL will certainly be a possibility, but Swedenburg said he is keeping all options open when looking at the future. “I’ve got one more season left, and then I’ll pursue the NFL,” Swedenburg said. “I’m not going to put all of my eggs in one basket. I’m really flexible, and I want to keep my options broad.”

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Canada native Jainudeen finds home at MSU By Forrest Buck Staff Writer

The 2012 season has been up and down for the Mississippi State University soccer team. But through the highs and lows, there have been a few stand-out players on the team this year who have managed to play consistently well. Sophomore Shannen Jainudenn has been one of the most consistent players this year. The 5’11” Ontario, Canada, native anchors the defense at center back. In her second season on the team, she has remained a full-time starter and an impact player on the team, just as she was her freshman year. Head coach Neil MacDonald said Jainudeen means so much to the Bulldog defense. “She’s very committed,” Macdonald said. “She’s growing into a leadership role for the team, starting to lead the back line. I feel like she’s been one of our most consistent

and outstanding players all when I play well, it motivates season.” the rest of the team to play Junior captain Morganne well.” Grimes, who also plays on Earlier in the year, Jainuthe back line, said Jainudeen deen suffered a concussion, is one of the best players on which forced her to miss the team. some games. While she was “I trust her more than I out, the defense was not the trust any other player on the same and further proved just field,” Grimes said. “She’s so how valuable her presence on aggressive, so competitive the field is to this team. and so aggressive on the ball.” MacDonald said the deJainudeen is aware of her fense lacked strength without talents and Jainudeen and said she has missed her statI have a lot of been pleased ure to win balls. pressure on me, but with her per“Offensively, sonal perforshe’s also good I like the pressure mance so far enough to carbecause it keeps me ry the ball out this year. motivated to play “It feels of the back and great to be well and keep playing create things an important when we have well.” part of the the ball,” he team so earShannen Jainudeen, said. “When ly in my calose a playsophomore defender you reer,” Jainuer like that, it deen said. “I have a lot of makes things very difficult, pressure on me, but I like the and I think it has a psychopressure because it keeps me logical effect on the team motivated to play well and when a player of that stature keep playing well. Hopefully, and ability is missing.”

Though Jainudeen is far away from home, she has adjusted quite well and said she loves being in Starkville. “I love the southern hospitality. People are a lot nicer down here than in Canada,” Jainudeen said. “My visit made me want to come down here, and I just loved the campus, the coaching staff and the atmosphere.” During the summer, Jainudeen returns home. While she is there, she plays on a Canadian national team to help keep her in shape. Being so far from home, Jainudeen said she has become close with her teammates to help her with the transition. “I love my teammates,” Jainudeen said. “They are like a family away from home.” Jainudeen has carried her success from freshman year to lead her team this season. As she continues to improve, she will undoubtedly have a huge impact on the future potential success of the MSU soccer program.

ian prester | the reflector

Sophomore Shannen Jainudeen has made multiple big-time plays for State, leading the Bulldog defense this season.

Volleyball hosts South Carolina, Arkansas at the Hump By Brittany young Contributing Writer

The Mississippi State University volleyball team is looking for its first couple of conference wins this weekend as it hosts South Carolina and Arkansas. But this weekend’s homecoming matches will be played at Humphrey Coliseum instead of the usual venue of the Newell Grissom Building. Head coach Jenny Hazelwood said having a strong fan base is imperative more than ever this weekend. “If we can get as many MSU fans at Humphrey Coliseum as possible, it adds to that big home-court advantage,” Hazelwood said. “These girls work hard day-in and day-out, and it means a lot to have people come out and support what they do because a large crowd has a large impact on a game.” Other exciting events will take place during the volleyball games. This year’s Homecoming court will be introduced at tonight’s game against South Carolina, featuring Mr. and Miss MSU as guest coaches. Sunday’s game at 1:30 p.m. against SEC West foe Arkansas is the “Dig Pink” game for Breast Cancer Awareness month, and 250 pink “Hail State” sunglasses will be given away.

ian prester | the reflector

Last year, the MSU volleyball team defeated then No. 25 Kentucky at the Hump, and the girls are hoping for similar results this weekend. The Bulldogs have been Bulldogs defeated then No. practicing at the Hump all 25 Kentucky for their first week, and Hazelwood said win against a ranked oppothis is vital going into this nent. The match drew an weekend’s matches. MSU and state collegiate at“It’s a lot different when tendance record 4, 525 fans you get into an open arena, to Humphrey Coliseum. so it’s important for us to be Sophomore Alex Scott, able to practice in the facil- who was recently moved ity and have an edge going from defensive specialist to into this weekend,” she said. Hazelwood and the players said they are excited about playing at the arena, because in the past they have been victorious there. In October of 2011, the

the libero position, said she believes the team can carry the momentum from last year’s victory over Kentucky into this weekend’s matches. “I think it’s all about a confident mindset with each of us because we are starting to unify as a team and put things together,” Scott said. “Since we did something great in this arena last year, it’s going to motivate us to do it again because we don’t want to be the team that didn’t get it done.” Senior outside hitter and co-captain Chanelle Baker said not only was homecourt advantage important but also the main focuses in practices are the scouting reports and being prepared for South Carolina tonight. “Right now we are looking at what we’re going to

see against South Carolina and what they like to do, because knowing the other team’s tendencies will really help us.” Baker said. Hazelwood said there is no doubt the effort and intensity is there from the girls, but the girls have to trust themselves more in order to be able to play at a higher level. “We (the coaches) want them to understand that they are too hard on themselves and they have to relax, because the more tense you are the more you will struggle,” Hazelwood said. “They have to learn what works for them and find ways not be frustrated mentally.” Besides trust and frustration, Hazelwood also said youth and most impor-

tantly passing has been the team’s biggest issue. She said although last week’s match against Missouri was close throughout, the team’s struggle to make good passes was the determining factor. In addition to its struggles, the team also has to finish the season without co-captain and starting junior setter Paris Perret, who recently left the team for personal reasons. Baker said initially the team’s performance struggled, but the girls are slowly bouncing back. “Although our play has improved, it’s still not where it needs to be because we have to win games,” Baker said. “Hopefully practices this week will help us get our first SEC win.”

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SPORTS

friday , october 19 , 2012

THE REFLECTOR

club sports feature:

SHOOTING SPORTS CREATES FUN, SAFE ENVIRONMENT club meets every Wednesday at the Starkville Gun Club from 3:30-8 p.m. There is The shooting sports club a $25 yearly fee to join the is one of the fastest growing team. Starkville Gun Club club sports at MSU. At the provides guns for use, so ownend of last semester, the team ing a gun is not necessary. Senior team president Skyhad 15 members, and it cures Heard said he would enrently has 45 members. The team was started in courage students on campus 2010 by five members and to try the sport. “We provide an environcoaches Jim Porter and Don Fields. MSU offers shooting ment for students to come sports as an intramural sport shoot and enjoy the sport of and those who participated shooting,” Heard said. “Anygot together and decided to body can come out and try it, start a club team. From there, and if they like it, they can join.” the team has Porter said grown treNot everyone is 6’5” the draw of the mendously and runs a 4.3 40 sport is because and turned it is like a virtuinto a pop(yard dash). This is al video game. ular club something anyone “Not everysport. can do...Nobody one is 6’5 and On Oct. runs a 4.3 40 10, the Miscomes and says, ‘I (yard dash),” sissippi State don’t want to do it Porter said. Universiagain.’” “This is somety shooting thing anyone sports club Jim Porter, can do. You get received a shooting sports coach to see the target grant for fly, you pull the $20,000 from the National Wild- trigger and you get to see the life Turkey Federation. This target break. Nobody comes money will be used to help and says, ‘I don’t want to do grow the program, buy sup- it again.’” Senior secretary Aynne plies needed and assist with Swindell, who was the first traveling funds. The MSU shooting sports female to officially join the By Forrest Buck Staff Writer

forrest buck | the reflector

The National Wildlife Turkey Federation gave the Mississippi State club shooting sports team a $20,000 grant Oct. 10. team, said shooting sports are very appealing. “I came out with one of my friends who was on the team, I tried it and I’ve been hooked ever since,” Swindell said. “It’s a relaxed and fun environment, and there’s no pressure. It doesn’t matter if you’re good or bad, it is just about having fun.” Porter said the sport is extremely safe. “We are the safest sport

in the nation. In 122 years, there has never been a shooting fatality at an event,” he said. “When you go to a football game, you see trainers on both sides, and there is even an ambulance standing by sometimes in case someone gets hurt. We don’t have any of that out here because we don’t need it.” For those worried about not being able to pick shooting sports up, Swindell said

learning to shoot is not very hard. “It really is a lot harder than it seems,” she said. “But we have great coaches, so the learning curve is not that challenging. “ The team offers three primary shotgun events, which are skeet, trap and five stand. Last May, the team sent a five-person squad to the Mississippi State Trap Shoot. The team composed of

FOOTBALL

Swindell, Austin Davis, Tyler Dixon, Dustin Caruso and Rome Johnson won the state championship in the collegiate division. Those interested in learning more about the shooting sports team or finding directions to the Starkville Gun Club can contact Heard at msh200@ msstate.edu or Mike Brown at for mike.brown@msstate.edu more details or for directions to the Starkville Gun Club.

continued from B1

jay johnson | the reflector

Sophomore tight end Malcolm Johnson made this game-sealing touchdown catch with less than a minute left in his first game of the season last week against Tennessee.

Green said he strives to be the leader of the tight end core, leading the pack in both experience and statistics. “I am trying to show the guys (Hill and Johnson) some things that I hope will help them in the future,” Green said. “They know how to make plays, so we just have to go out on the field and get wins.” The “three-headed monster” in the tight end position was especially recognized in last weekend’s game against Tennessee. In what most people saw as this year’s most crucial game thus far, Johnson, Hill and Green accumulated 110 yards on nine catches, as well as scoring three touchdowns in the game, including Johnson’s one-handed touchdown catch with nine seconds left in the game to send Tennessee home with a 41-31 loss. Last weekend’s game against the Volunteers was Johnson’s first appearance this season after tearing his right pectoral muscle during the off season. Linebacker Cameron Lawrence said John-

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son’s catch was amazing. The Blue Raider defense is also “That was a huge highlight struggling in all other parts of the catch,” Lawrence said. “Malcolm defense in October, allowing over has prepared well to come back, 100 more total yards per game and I think he did a great job in than in August and September his season debut.” combined. MSU quarterback Tyler RusAll week in practice, State fosell is using this new threat to cused on this week’s game instead the offense to jumpstart a season of overlooking MTSU and strictin which he has ly focusing on thrown 12 touchnext week’s I trust those guys downs and only game against (Johnson, Hill and one intercepAlabama. AfGreen) to make plays, ter throwing tion. Russell said the tight ends his first touchand they do.” have helped him down pass Tyler Russell, spread the field last Saturday this season. against Tenquarterback “I trust those nessee, redshirt guys (Johnson, Hill and Green) freshman Dak Prescott said he is to make plays, and they do,” Rus- focusing on the present, not the sell said. “They work hard day-in past or future. and day-out, and it shows on the “Coach Mullen always tells us field.” that you play like you prepare, so Tomorrow against MTSU, we are just focusing on our opRussell will be going up against ponent this week,” Prescott said. a defense that has allowed almost “We’ll worry about our next op300 passing yards per game on ponent after we come out of this the road. This should allow every week with a win.” receiver the opportunity to make Prescott hopes to continue his big plays and find the end zone. success this weekend with the

addition of a passing game that teams must now recognize after throwing his first touchdown pass of his college career to Green. Historically, State has had the Blue Raiders’ number, winning every matchup against MTSU alltime, the last game being played in 2009 when the Bulldogs beat MTSU by a score of 27-6. Also, the first game on the 1999 schedule was a 40-7 victory over MTSU to begin what most fans view as one of the best seasons in Mississippi State Football history, when MSU started off its season at 8-0 before losing to Alabama in its ninth game of the 1999 season. It seems almost like fate that the Blue Raiders would be placed on our schedule on the week State hopes to become the first team since the 1999 season to begin its season 7-0. This week, the Dawgs are hopeful Homecoming will be a coming out party for every player on the field. Kickoff for this weekend’s game at Davis Wade Stadium is scheduled for 6 p.m.

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MSU Ducks Unlimited chapter prepares for seasonal banquet and half the fun is the camaraderie with your peers,” Foth said. Foth said college students The Mississippi State Bulldog Chapter of Ducks Unlim- have come to play a highly ited will host its annual Fall important role in DU over the Banquet fundraiser at Rick’s past decade. “The college chapters are Café on Wednesday, Nov. 7, great for recruitment. College from 6 to 9 p.m. Stephen Leininger, senior students, who may not have a wildlife and fisheries major lot of money now, will look and chair of the DU Bulldog for local DU chapters and doChapter, said the banquet will nate later in life,” he said. According to Megan Annicomprise a buffet-style pork tenderloin supper, numerous son, senior wildlife and fisheries major and co-chair of raffles and a live auction. the DU BullLeininger said the event The college chapters dog Chapter, students from is open to are great for across camall, including those who do recruitment. College pus and from various backnot hunt wastudents, who may grounds have terfowl themnot have a lot of shown an inselves. “You don’t money now, will look terest in DU. Annison have to be a for local DU chapters said a growredneck to enand donate later in ing number joy the event,” of girls are on he said. “The life.” the committee beautiful Justyn Foth for the Bullthing about it dog Chapter. Silent auction is that you’ll She also said see doctors coordinator for DU the raffle will and lawyers there with farmers and every- include a ladies’ table with items ranging from purses to one else.” Justyn Foth, PhD student gift certificates to clothing. Leininger said the Bulldog in the College of Forest Resources and silent auction co- Chapter has won the Duck ordinator for the DU Bulldog Bowl, a fundraising compeChapter, said DU is success- tition among MSU, the Uniful because a wide variety of versity of Mississippi, and the people are willing to support University of Southern Misits mission of preserving and sissippi, for the past two years. Leininger said attendees protecting waterfowl. “A big key to DU is getting will be able to bid on items your community involved, such as guns, wildlife prints, By James ToBermann Staff Writer

coolers, decoys, calls, knives, watches and more. He also said attendees will hear from the DU director for the state of Mississippi about the organization’s recent activities. According to Leininger, a single student ticket costs $35 in advance and $45 at the door. Similarly, he said a student couple’s ticket costs $55 in advance and $65 at the door. He also said attendees can purchase a drink cup ($5 pre-sale, $10 at the door) for all-you-care-to-drink beverages during the event. “Also, if you buy your ticket during the pre-sale, you get a shot at winning a Yeti cooler in a drawing,” he said. Annison said the reaction from students who have attended the event in the past has been very positive. “A lot of my friends loved it and are asking if it’s time for the DU Fall Banquet again,” she said. She also said the purchase of a ticket includes a one-year membership in DU with a magazine subscription and decals. Leininger said the Bulldog Chapter has high expectations for this year’s Fall Banquet. “Our goal is for this to be a fun, well-organized event where people can relax, see their friends, and enjoy a good meal,” he said. The Bulldog Chapter can be found on Facebook at Ducks Unlimited Bulldog Chapter and on Twitter at @ DUdawgs.

zack orsborn | the reflector

SA presents annual Halloween Carnival By Jamie allen Staff Writer

student organizations set up booths and play various games with the children as well as give out candy. Mara Smith, president of Gamma Beta Phi said her organization is participating with a booth in the carnival. She said she likes the event because it promotes unity between the organizations on campus. “All the organizations are out there to provide candy for the children during the Halloween Carnival and there’s no competition between anyone,” Smith said. “It’s not about competition, it’s about the kids getting the candy” Amina Bahammou, co-director of Special Events on the Student Association cabinet said that the student and faculty of MSU play a vital role in the production of this event. “The students and faculty of Mississippi State are able to play a vital role in the carnival

through their participation in setting up individualized booths that, often, correlate to the objective of their organization,” Bahammou said. Bray and Bahammou said the event is also a great way to bring families together on a budget. “For just $1 admission, children are able to participate in over 50 different games, a bouncy castle, parade of costumes, and even decorate pumpkins to take home as a souvenir,” Bahammou said. The Halloween Carnival will last from 5-7 p.m. at the Junction with trick-or-treating starting at 4:30 p.m. Bahammou said the success of this event can be attributed to her committee, SA and the faculty at MSU. “None of this would have been possible without the help and guidance of our committee, the Student Association, and the wonderful faculty,” she said.

The Student Association will host the 40th annual Halloween Carnival on the campus of Mississippi State University on Oct. 25. This event will be fun for the whole family with inflatables, pumpkin decorating, a parade and booths hosted by 60 different student organizations. Meagan Bray, co-director of Special Events on the Student Association cabinet, said the event has grown every year bringing the Starkville community closer together. “The event started as just a nice way for MSU’s faculty and staff to have their families on campus and the even has just grown year after year from there,” Bray said. “We throughout my tenure at Mississippi State, and I invite approximately 7,000 By mary Chase Breedlove will for the rest of my life,” he said. “Always put children from Starkville, West Opinion Editor everything you can into everything you do and Point and Columbus.” The 2012 Mr. and Miss Mississippi State Uni- you will not be disappointed with the outcome.” As a part of this event, Vance is a political science major from Jackversity are seniors Morgan McDowell and Sara Vance. They were chosen to represent MSU by the sonville, Fla. After graduation, her plans include to pursue either an MBA at MSU or attend law student body during the Homecoming elections. McDowell is a marketing major from Indiano- school. As an undergraduate, she has been a part of la. After graduating, he plans to attend MSU to MSU roadrunners, SA and Zeta Tau Alpha sororpursue an MBA. As an undergraduate, he has been involved in ity, as well as serving as a Gamma Chi for panhellenic recruitment and an orientamany organizations on campus tion leader in 2012. including SA, SEC Exchange It is such an Vance said in an email her idea Committee, SA senator for the incredible honor to of Miss MSU is someone who College of Business, MSU roadbe voted Miss MSU. loves the school and is a represenrunners, Honor Code Council Committee, Campus Crusade I would have never tative of the whole student body. “It is such an incredible honor for Christ and Sigma Chi Fraexpected to be able to be voted Miss MSU. I would ternity. have never expected to be able to McDowell said he feels honto represent the ored and privileged to represent student body in this represent the student body in this role when I came here as a freshthe university as Mr. MSU. role when I came man,” she said. “Being a student at “There is no greater feeling in One Rack: Polo 5-Pocket the world than to be able to give here as a freshman.” State has given me so many opporPolo Longsleeve tunities for personal growth, and I back to the university that has Corduroy Jeans Sara Vance feel so humbled to have been given done so much for me,” he said REG $89.50 Sport Shirts: in an email. “In being a lifelong Bulldog, it will such a great privilege.” NOW $69 1/2 PRICE! Vance also said her parents have been her bigbe very special to stand on the field and look up at 55,082 members of the Bulldog family and know gest influence during her time at MSU. “My parents are incredibly hard working and that I am representing this great university.” Polo 1/4 Zip McDowell said the greatest lesson he has loving. They instilled a strong work ethic in me, Polo Shortsleeve learned at MSU is to become invested in the pro- and they taught me the importance of dedication. Longsleeve Pullover Knits: grams and organizations the school has to offer. My parents are also a great example of how to love REG $95.00 He also said serving others is the best advice he and serve others. They both give more than willBUY 2 GET 1 FREE! NOW $79 ingly of their time to our community, our church could share. “One of my teachers in high school gave me ad- and our family,” she said. McDowell and Vance will be honored during vice before I even came to MSU. Her wise words College Park Shopping Center were, ‘Morgan, always remember one thing: ser- halftime on Saturday’s game against Middle TenMon-Sat 9:30 am- 6 pm vice over self. I have kept those words with me nessee. 100 Russell Street

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friday , october 19, 2012

LIFE & ENTERTAINMENT

THE REFLECTOR

jay johnson | the reflector

Improv group, Lab Rats, to perform Halloween-themed show By Daniel Hart Staff Writer

The Texas Rat Massacre is happening here on campus, tonight in the Lab Theatre on the bottom floor of McComas Hall. The Lab Rats, Mississippi State University’s “one and only” (as they like to put it) improvisational comedy troupe will be holding their October, Halloween-themed performances at 7:30 and 10 p.m. Tickets can no longer be reserved online but will be available at the show beginning as early as 45 minutes before show time. Senior computer engineering major Matt Hoelter, Lab Rats head director, short form director and member for seven semesters, said this month’s show

will continue the same tradition of audience intimacy and participation. “Improv has a leg up on a lot of other entertainment medias as you have a very one-to-one relationship. Whether the audience realizes it or not, they are another actor; we feed off their energy, and they feed off ours,” he said. According to Hoelter, the nature of an improvisational show means only about 5 percent of the show is actually written and practiced beforehand. Hoelter said the audience tosses suggestions when incited by the troupe and gets to watch the actors work through them, whatever they may be, resulting in unpredictable performances. “When we ask for suggestions, the audience has often thrown us for a loop.

One of my favorites, we once asked for an emotion and got ‘blind fury.’ That’s something I could never throw out,” he said. “We don’t even know what to expect. One of the beautiful things is that nobody has any idea what will happen.” The level of interaction is even higher this month, as Holter said the October-specific theme (chosen in a Facebook-fan naming contest) will carry with it yet another special contest. “It’s Halloween-themed; it is October. We’re having a costume contest; the winner will get a very special prize,” he said. Senior international business major Ben Bailey, member of Lab Rats for six semesters, said despite the general themes, the crowd is the catalyst for

the direction of each performance. “Since most of our games rely on suggestions from the audience, it is frequently up to the audience to influence the style or theme of any scene,” he said. Megan Kwasinski, junior English major, said although she’s comfortable not doing the shouting, at her three Lab Rats experiences, the ideas came loudly and frequently. “I’m not really the type to speak out, but sometimes it’s hard to hear; they have to section it off because it gets so loud,” she said. “It’s really interactive and fun.” Rather than existing exclusively, Hoelter said Lab Rats consists of a cross section of majors on campus, from engi-

neering and business to graphic design. Bailey said part of the inclusivity of Lab Rats comes from the universal antidote they provide: laughter. “We have Lab Rats at Mississippi State because people enjoy laughing. There is a demand for it. Lab Rats, being the industrious young minds that we are, recognize this demand. We thus supply laughter, fulfilling the exchange process,” he said. For a dose of unpredictability and camaraderie, students can head to the Lab Theater tonight dressed in a Halloween costume. Just make sure to get there early enough to snag a ticket, as the Lab Rats seem to be pulling in demand faster than they can supply their improv-fueled laughter.


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Movies based on books create inconsistencies By Mary Kate Mcgowan Staff Writer

Movies based on books have a long-standing history of becoming blockbusters. From “Harry Potter” and “The Hunger Games” to “To Kill a Mockingbird,” movies inspired by literature have been popular and have influenced our culture. But which version is better? With “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey,” the first of a trilogy of films about the prelude to the legendary trilogy Lord of the Rings, being released this December, fans have been speculating about the quality and similarities between the film and the classic prelude. Hannah James, freshman English major, said she is worried about “The Hobbit” movie not being like the book. “The book is so long that it would be easy to cut out a lot of the book,” James said. Because the anticipated hype about movies based on books can become intense and prove to be disappointing, some people choose to read the books before experiencing the movie screenplay. Kelly Bonner, junior human sciences major, said she does not normally read the book

before she sees the movie, but her friends made her read “The Hunger Games” before she saw the movie. “I’m actually glad they made me because the books are even better,” Bonner said. While some movies fall short in the eyes of the devoted readers, others have been very successful. For example, the classic film “Gone with the Wind” was released in 1939 — three years after its parent novel was first published. The movie made box office records and became stuff of legend. More contemporary literature and film pairs exist as well. The cultural phenomenon of the Harry Potter book and movie series swept through the hearts of readers and watchers alike. Cody Faulkner, sophomore poultry science major, said she liked the books better because they go into more detail, but also liked the Harry Potter movies because they are quicker. “Some parts of the movies do not match up with the book, so it kind of upsets me,” Faulkner said. Not only have movies been made from beloved books and literature, television shows have also used inspiration from the written word. Networks

such as ABC and NBC have run series such as “Once Upon a Time” and “The Firm,” based on John Grisham’s novel. Based on famous fairy tales, ABC’s “Once Upon a Time” has given viewers a new perspective on characters such as Snow White and Prince Charming. Amanda Gilstrap, sophomore kinesiology major, said she likes how the fairy tales and characters interact with each other. “I like finding out about the characters’ pasts and learning why they developed into who they are,” Gilstrap said. The major difference between a story line for a book or a screen is one is read and the other is seen. Inconsistencies between the book and the screenplay are unavoidable for writers and directors. People enjoy learning more about their beloved story characters and seeing them embodied in a film. Because of this, people are bound to flock to movie theaters for movie adaptations. “I am excited (for “The Hobbit”) because of the trailer I saw,” James said. “It looks like the movie is going to be great. I don’t think I will be disappointed because I have loved the other Lord of the Rings movies.”

friday , october 19, 2012

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“A WALK TO REMEMBER” Kristen Spink (Sports Editor)

“SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION” Mary Chase Breedlove (Opinion Editor)

“THE HUNGER GAMES” Rachel Burke (Copy Editor)

“THE HELP” Zack Orsborn (Life Editor)

“ONE DAY” Emma Crawford (News Editor)

“HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET OF FIRE” Candace Barnette (Copy Editor)

“HOLES” “HOLES John Galatas (News Editor)

“Q&A” - “SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE” “Q& Hannah Rogers (Editor in Chief)

“JURASSIC PARK” Jay Johnson (Photo Editor)

“FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS”

“THE NOTEBOOK” Kaitlyn Byrne (Managing Editor)

Eric Evans (Multimedia Editor)

zack orsborn | the reflector

Fall fashion breezes into season Ray said boots are a must for the fall season. “Fall is boot season, and Fall weather is an exciting riding boots are back in full time to express style and make force again this fall, as are ana statement. During the colder kle boots. Lace-up boots are a weather, it can often feel like big trendsetter, too,” she said. students have less of a variety Lindsey-Jorden Cox, sophof clothing to choose from. omore business major, said it Erin Ray, owner of Harmo- is fun to find unique pairs of nie Boutique, had some great boots. suggestions for how to style “Since everyone wears boots different pieces of clothing this time of year, it can be and stand out hard to find a during the way to stand Statement pieces colder seaout. Pick out sons. are key to making a unique pairs, Staying lace up or wardrobe pop. Throw like warm is a nefringe boots on a colorful scarf or that reflect cessity, and Ray has some cardigan to brighten your personal advice for how style without up an outfit, or maybe blending in,” to top off a cute outfit a simple dress with Cox said. with a warm Brooke bright leggings or big G o l d m a n , jacket and accessories. sophomore elchunky jewelry.” “Blazers ementary edErin Ray are huge right ucation major now, from baand sales assosic black or white to loud col- ciate at Deep South Pout, said ors. Bomber jackets are very in layers are also in this fall. right now, too. Leather is huge “Layering your clothes is this fall, in everything from super cute for fall. It makes jackets to skirts and even leath- your outfit stand out more er leggings,” she said. “Cardi- and keeps you warm. You can gans and scarves are also big ac- use cardigans or vests and deficessory items for every outfit.” nitely scarves,” she said. By Magan Ford Staff Writer

stephanie godfrey | the reflector

Katie Beth Walton shows off the newest trends in fall fashion from Harmonie Boutique.

Waltmon Frame & Body Shop Open Monday thru Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

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Although it is easy to just throw on a T-shirt for class, it is more fashionable to take advantage of the cool weather. Ray said it is simple to be cute and comfortable for class. “For casual class days, take a pair of jeans and a simple tee, but dress it up with a classic cardigan or sweater and a pair of boots. Or take a simple oversized sweater paired with leggings and boots for a comfy-cute look,” she said. Standing out during fall can be easy if you learn how to layer and pair different pieces together. Ray said it just takes a few key accessories to make an outfit stand out. “Statement pieces are key to making a wardrobe pop. Throw on a colorful scarf or cardigan to brighten up an outfit, or maybe a simple dress with bright leggings or big chunky jewelry. Purses make great accessories, as well. We carry Big Buddha handbags and the stylish colors of the bags can really make an outfit pop,” she said. You can purchase these items at local boutiques in Starkville and surrounding areas.

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LIFE

friday , october 19, 2012

Girl

THE REFLECTOR

VS GUY

ALEX MONIé

CATIE MARIE MARTIN

shows

SPOILER ALERTS!

“GOSSIP GIRL”

“WALKING DEAD”

shows

Love. Lies. Scandal. Debauchery. If the first two episodes of “Gossip Girl” are any indication of how the rest of the sixth season will go, the final season is set up for a beautiful resolution. Blair’s saucy rebuttals, Chuck’s precious plaid suits, Dan’s self-righteous bitterness (not to mention that haircut — come on, Dan, did you get attacked by a weedwacker over the summer?), Nate’s undeniable charm and Serena’s long legs are all back for the show’s final run around the block. But will faithful fans be satisfied? Will Blair and Chuck finally work things out, or will she choose Dan “Lonely Boy” Humphrey? Will Serena ever learn her pouty lips only bring trouble? Will Rufus and Lily reconcile their differences once and for all, or will Lily remain a frigid gold-digger, piggy-backing on Bart Bass’s success forever? Executive producer Josh Schwartz has promised to give us answers, but only time will tell if they are the answers we desire.

In an age of vampires and werewolves taking over every screen, zombies are still the way to go. “Walking Dead” is starting its third season this month and is looking to keep up the intense zombie thriller it has established the last two years. The show focuses on a group of survivors struggling to find supplies and shelter safe from “walkers,” the undead who have risen again. Last season ended with the main group of the show losing their only reliable shelter and several members of their group. Season three picks up several months into the future with the group still on the run. Desperate and scared, the remaining survivors attempt to take refuge in a prison over-run with walkers. What “Walking Dead” does perfectly is balance the human drama between the survivors with plenty of zombie action to fill the gaps.

“GREY’S ANATOMY”

“HOW I MET YOUR MOTHER”

“ONCE UPON A TIME”

“ARROW”

Warning: This season of “Grey’s Anatomy” is not for the faint of heart. Many a time have I walked into my friends’ bedrooms only to find them sobbing into their sheets, completely distraught over the latest passing of a beloved “Grey’s” character. With two serious deaths preceding the current season, this fall promises to be an emotional roller coaster for long-time “Grey’s” viewers. “Grey’s Anatomy” writers have their work cut out for them in order to lift the spirits of viewers from the funereal pits they were tossed into last season. The ninth season finds all of the characters going their separate ways and completing fellowships in different locations, which leaves much to be desired by fans who just want a reunion of their favorite doctors. Despite the melancholy start, expectations for this season are sky-high. Hold onto your hats, folks, it’s going to be a bumpy, tear-streaked ride.

If you’re a college-age girl still fantasizing about white horses, poison apples and Prince Charming, then “Once Upon A Time” is for you. With all the fairy-tale fluff of a classic Disney film without the embarrassing reputation that comes with being “that girl” who knows every word to “Part of Your World,” “Once Upon A Time” is a whirlwind drama about what happens when fiction and reality become indecipherably intertwined. This fall finds last season’s characters recoiling after the curse on Storybrook is broken. It also introduces new characters, revitalizing classic children’s heroes, heroines and villains like Hook, Mulan, Ariel, Aladdin, Jafar and Jack (the one from the beanstalk) in a way that only “Once Upon A Time” can without getting too cheesy and cliché.

10

top

ways to spot a

For a comedy, “How I Met Your Mother” is probably the most stressful show on television. In 2005, it was a show about a man dealing with his best friends getting engaged and looking for the woman of his dreams. Now on its eighth season, Ted’s story of finding his future wife has never been closer to an end. Last season ended with Marshall and Lilly having their first child and the audience learning about the relationship between Robin and Barney may not be completely over. This is still Ted’s story, though, and hopefully we will see the mysterious Mrs. Mosby by the end of the season. “How I Met Your Mother” has one of the best-developed group of characters on television and is just as funny as when it began eight years ago.

“Arrow” looks to rekindle the spark “Smallville” had over a decade ago with Oliver Queen, or Arrow, as the hero. Oliver Queen’s story starts with him being a spoiled billionaire who shipwrecks on an island. Upon returning five years later, Queen looks to turn his life around and seek vengeance for those who need it. It seems like “Arrow” hopes to have the same tone as “Batman Begins,” which gave legitimacy to all of the superhero media being produced these days. What this could be is a great jumping point for an eventual Justice League movie. “Arrow” could set up a whole new world for these comic book characters, something the Batman trilogy failed to do. It is not impossible, but will it have enough steam to last for 11 seasons like “Smallville”?

Not many years can compare to your freshman year of college. It is one of the most different and exciting times of your life. Although we love our “newbies” here at Mississippi State University, there are some stereotypical freshmen actions we all have had a good laugh at. Because freshmen are still trying to figure everything out, it is usually pretty easy to spot one around campus. Since most of us have endured the freshmen jokes in the past, we have now gained rights to have our own laughs. Here are the top 10 ways to spot a freshman.

freshman

1. If they walked around the first couple of weeks of class with a lanyard around their neck. 2. If they carried a map to get to their classes. 3. If they got to class 30 minutes early. 4. If they wore a fitted T-shirt…. 5. If you see numerous guys wearing sports coats or embarrassing outfits.

6. If they are at every club interest meeting on campus. 7. If they travel in packs. 8. If they use all of their block meals at the Templeton. 9. If they do not respect the bell. 10. If everyone they meet is their new “BFF.”

by magan ford

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LIFE

TUESDAY , OCTOBER 19, 2012

mirrors

THE REFLECTOR

REFLECTING ART AROUND STARKVILLE

LOCAL ARTIST SHOWCASES WORK BY CHRISTINE BOWMAN Staff Writer

Laurie Burton, local Starkville artist, displays her paintings and scultpures at her gallery “Wild Rose Studio and Galllery.”

Laurie Burton, a local Starkville artist, has always had a passion for art, and in 2007, she opened the doors to her current studio. Burton’s studio, “Wild Rose Studio and Gallery,” houses her artwork and the artwork of other artists who make an effort to seek her out. Burton said she wanted a location to display her art. “I’ve always wanted to open a studio and gallery so that I could have a place to showcase my art,” she said. Burton has a day job in Starkville, but she said art is her favorite past time. She started to spend a lot of time painting once her children were older, which was about 15 years ago. Her main emphasis with her previous works has been landscapes and still life. Burton uses a variety of mediums and likes to try new artistic forms. Her art includes paints, notecards, furniture, tables and painted windows. Her most recent addition to her collection of works is sculpture. She has been

THE WRITER’S LAMENT by Catie Marie Martin SHORT STORY

#2 by Emma Crawford POEM

IAN PRESTON | THE REFLECTOR

“They’ve got me all wrong,” she said wearily. Her words were accompanied with a soft smile and a slow sigh, but it was a good-natured sigh, one that was singed with happy memories of which she alone knew. Her weathered hands clutched the edges of the rocking chair, holding on for dear life. The creak of the curved wood against the ground was oddly comforting. “They’ve read my books and they’ve interviewed what’s left of my friends and they’ve even ransacked my house, but those are just pieces of a huge puzzle that they know nothing about. They’ve tried to construct

my entire being out of hospital records and certificates and strings of words tied together in sentences, but they’ll never truly fill in all of the parts. What they have is an outline filled with nothing but air, a skeleton of my meaty life. “They’ll never know.” Here she looked up into the sky, her eyes tracing the clouds that she had described so many times in her poetry. “They’ll never know that, on the day my father died, I ran for two hours straight; I ended up eleven miles from my house. They’ll never know that I loved my second husband more than I loved my first. They’ll never know that my favorite fruit

is oranges because they remind me of the lots we used to buy our Christmas trees from. Do you know why?” She slowly brought her gaze down from the sky and looked me in the eyes. “It’s because I never wrote them down. These are secrets I kept just for the sake of keeping. It’s hard to have secrets when you’re a writer, because, as a writer, you’re only good when you’re thinking. You must continually think deep, introspective thoughts that no one else has ever thought before. And when you discover something substantial and halfway interesting deep in the concaves of your mind, you write it down and you tidy it

up and you ship it off to be published and you get paid to write down thoughts, both pretty and horrid. Your sinful desires can be masked in character development and nice poetry, but no matter how you try to conceal it, all of your dirty characters and stories came from the creases in your brain. Do you understand?” I nodded, because to speak would put a rift in her magnificent speech, and I didn’t know if either of us would be able to recover from such an interruption. “They’ll never know,” she repeated once more, her smile now covering her entire face. “They’ll never know.”

HISTORY by Zack Orsborn POEM you learn about history in school about wars about bombs how countries stole other countries but they never teach you how people loved it’s about how people fought on fields

Want to submit your poetry, short stories, artwork or photography? Submit at zorsborn@reflector.msstate.edu.

not for each other’s hearts it’s about how soldiers marched not how two lovers walked it’s about how statues crumbled not how love was built I want to learn your history I want to know your atomic ways your corrupted states

your bills, your constitutions your rising empires and falling kingdoms I want to study your battle plans what you will plot next place me here, in the line of fire so you and I can be written about in the history books.

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but what if none of it matters? that’s the thing, it has to. each day we breathe, we breathe -a gift of grace to make us free if it doesn’t matter, the wind through the trees doesn’t whisper the story the branches don’t intertwine the birds don’t sing when you stand at the tip of the earth and reach for the sky’s hand, you won’t feel a moment of awe, not even a sliver of enamored love for the air and the sun and your eyes and this place under this blanket of sky and for the person standing next to you with whom you would share all of your days, counting them down, moon by moon and sun by sun,

working with the body as her main focus for her sculpture pieces. Burton said she is inspired by several outlets but especially by outdoor surroundings. “Nature inspires me, I love to go on walks and see all of the colors outside. But a lot of different things give me inspiration, such as traveling to unique places,” she said. Her most recent adventure took her to Santa Fe, N.M. She said the landscapes there captured her attention. When she returned to Starkville, Burton was ready to go back to the studio because she had a wealth of new ideas. Burton is very involved with the Starkville community. She is serving as a Cotton District Art Festival coach this year for the event in April. Burton also participates in the Starkville Area Art Council where she has a chance to meet a lot of other artists. Burton’s works can be found at laurieburtonart.com and Wild Rose is open by appointment only. The studio can be reached at 662-694-1107 and is located at 302 S. Jackson St.

sweet morning by sweet morning and even the dim corners of the evening and so you say, does it matter? when you’re a grain of sand drowning in the bank when the river comes high and you to your knees when each inch of air that fills your lungs only brings you pain when it happens, yes it will. when your heart is weak when you close your eyes and speak does it matter?


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friday , october 19, 2012

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THE REFLECTOR

Interested in modeling for beauty, fashion, editorial and commercial photo? Send your current pictures and your resume to jonesjeffrey319@gmail.com

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