Avenue May/June 2023

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CALGARY

THE ISSUE 30 BEST THINGS TO EAT This year’s list of absolute can’t miss sweets, treats and drinks

How Calgarians are making an impact

ONWARD AND UPWARD

at home and beyond

What to do and what to wear in the mountains this summer


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THE SCHOOL OF YES, AND... Our parent school Strathcona-Tweedsmuir School (STS) is offering you a way to create the high school experience you want with STAND (ST&) – the ultimate hybrid program that lets you learn on your own terms. You might be busy pursuing opportunities in music, acting, dance, or sports. Maybe you have a chance to start your career while you finish high school. Or maybe a traditional classroom just isn’t the best place for you to learn. We say YES to all of this… AND offer the world class, innovation-focused high school education Strathcona-Tweedsmuir School is known for. Join a community of like-minded students saying YES to their futures. Here, you'll have the freedom to explore your passions and tackle advanced academics with one day a week of in-person immersive, studio-based learning at Platform in downtown Calgary and other partner organizations – and four days a week wherever you learn best.

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BEST THINGS TO

eat&drink MARKET AT CALGARY’S FIRST GARDEN-TO-TABLE COMMUNITY Shop and sample products from Avenue’s Best Things to Eat & Drink lists — everything from savoury delights to sweet treats.

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M AY | J U N E 2 0 2 3 I N N O VAT I O N I B E S T T H I N G S TO E AT I S U M M E R M O U N TA I N G U I D E

MAY/JUNE23

THE ISSUE 30 BEST THINGS TO EAT

PM# 40030911

This year’s list of absolute can’t miss sweets, treats and drinks

How Calgarians are making an impact

ONWARD AND UPWARD

at home and beyond

What to do and what to wear in the mountains this summer

on the cover Illustration by Gust of Wind Studio

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16 Editor’s Note 17 Letters 98 You Are Here

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D E PA R T M E N T S 21 Detours How late Calgarian Isaac Rotstein’s lifelong passion for plants lives on at the University of Calgary. Plus, the Calgary Horticultural Society shares three blooms to look out for this spring and homegrown country star Lindsay Ell prepares to play the Saddledome with Shania Twain. And, our new Dish It feature deconstructs an iconic Calgary dish — we kick things off with the chili-topped Tubby Dog at Beltline bar Tubby’s. 78 Decor Architect Dan Hapton transformed his

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FE AT UR ES parents’ condo into a peaceful retreat — we zoom in on the living and dining area, their favourite space. 80 Calgary Style JP Channa, founder of custom suit maker The Kingly, models a cool summertime look from his own closet. 85 Mountains Our guide to summer in the mountains has a ton of great ideas for what do out there this season, plus outdoor apparel and accessories on Mode Models International’s 2022 search winner.

29 An Innovative Approach Our annual focus on the local innovation economy looks at the evolution of the energy industry, homegrown technologies improving everything from health care to financial education, what the transition to a tech career really looks like, and more. By Tsering Asha, Kendall Bistretzan, Christina Frangou, Dominique Lamberton, Jaelyn Molyneux, Carol Patterson, Colleen Seto and Sean P. Young 52 Nina Kharey Meet the designer who set aside her

luxury womenswear line to make safer garments for health-care professionals. By Jacquie Moore 58 A Flood of Change Ten years after major floods submerged the city, there has been significant progress in the way we manage our waterways. By Drew Anderson 70 Best Things to Eat & Drink Our returning curators scoured Calgary’s markets and shops for a new list of flavourful foods and beverages to try. By Carmen Cheng and Chanry Thach

may/june 2023

K H A R E Y P H O T O B Y J A R E D S Y C H ; F L O O D P H O T O B Y YA R K O Y O P Y K ; M O U N TA I N C O A S T E R P H O T O B Y T O M P O O L E

contents


THE FUTURE OF CANCER CARE STARTS HERE. The new Calgary Cancer Centre opens in 2024, representing a once-in-a-generation opportunity to establish Alberta as a world-leader in cancer care, research and innovation. To learn how you can help, visit

OWNCANCER.CA Read the Fall issue of Avenue Calgary to learn more about the next generation of leaders helping to OWN.CANCER in your own backyard.


T

he first Avenue innovation issue came out in June of 2020, a period mostly characterized by great uncertainty. The most optimistic among us held out hope that the widespread pandemic-induced lockdowns in place were merely temporary; the least felt a sense of impending doom. But, wherever you landed on that spectrum, stories about innovators and the innovation mindset became something of a balm, a reminder to look above and beyond what was weighing down the here and now. Four issues later, we’ve emerged warier, if not wiser, but just as dedicated to celebrating the innovation sector and the bright minds within it. Our city is fertile ground right now for those who see our current hand and would raise it one better. From new approaches to the old-stock industries that built this city (oil and gas, agriculture) to tech startup enterprises in a range of fields, the innovation economy in Calgary is a hive of activity and this issue pinpoints some of its buzzworthy individuals and organizations. Along with the innovation issue, we’re once again staging our annual Innovation Event on June 14 at Platform Calgary. It’s a chance for readers and stakeholders to join us as we dive deeper into some of the themes represented in these pages and expand upon them as well. For tickets and information, visit AvenueCalgary.com/InnovationEvent. While the innovation event traditionally includes a focus on the “food of the future,” this issue focuses on the treats we’re craving right now with a new

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edition of the “Best Things To Eat” list. Returning curators Carmen Cheng and Chanry Thach — a pair of local writers/content creators we like to refer to as our “BFFs” (best foodie friends) — share their latest round of flavourful finds, a mouthwatering assortment of baked goods, bottled sauces, beverages and more. Those who know and love this list understand that it’s as much about exploring as it is about eating, a de facto guide to discovering new makers and markets in the city. For those who would rather have these food and beverage items all in one place, however, I’m happy to announce that we’re bringing back the Best Things To Eat Market, with vendors drawn from this year’s as well as previous years’ lists. The market is set for Saturday, July 22, out in Rangeview, a new community with an innovative planning approach that pays homage to the area’s legacy of farming and rural culture. The market event will be free and open to the public. We hope to see you there.

SHELLEY ARNUSCH EDITOR IN CHIEF s a r n u s c h @ re d p o i n t m e d i a . c a

THE INNOVATION STORY

A-list ADVANTAGE

If you’re interested in attending the Innovation Event, consider signing up for Avenue’s membership program (a.k.a. the “A-List”). A basic membership provides early-bird access and a 15-per cent discount on ticket purchases, while A-List+ members get free access to all Avenue events. Memberships come in six-month or one-year plans. To purchase, visit AvenueCalgary.com/shop.

may/june 2023

P H O T O B Y H E AT H E R S A I T Z ; C L O T H I N G S T Y L I N G B Y G R A V I T Y P O P E

Editorʼs Note


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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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W NO U LT R A E S TAT E L I V I N G

Endless Views. Limited Opportunity.

Language Barriers Leaving Restaurants Out Thank you so much for publishing your Best Restaurants 2023 issue [March/April 2023]. I’m always excited to read it and it helps me discover new and different restaurants, especially with cuisines that I may not be as familiar with. That being said, I feel that some restaurants are not being represented. I am Canadian-Chinese. I grew up in Calgary and English is my first language. I’ve noticed that some great Chinese restaurants (such as Marco’s Kitchen and Eastern Fortune) are missed every year, perhaps because English isn’t the first language of many authentic ethnic restaurants, nor their clientele, and thus they may not be aware of such lists or how to contribute. I believe that some restaurants are absent from the issue because some ethnicities value different things. For example: Chinese restaurants value passionate family talk at the table, which may affect how they are judged in regard to ambience. I also passed the list to my Korean friends, who noticed that many of their favourite restaurants are also not mentioned, restaurants such as Gogi Korean BBQ, Manna, Namsan, Han Corea, Kiwa, Jjamppong and San Dong Banjeom. I have no affiliation to any of these restaurants, but just feel the need to point out how some amazing and authentic restaurants may be missed in a Best Restaurants issue. —Angie Hung

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Spinning Our Wheels The article by Jessica Barrett about Calgary Transit was right on [“Stops and Starts,” March/April 2023]. I was a rider of Calgary Transit for well over 15 years and it was a constant struggle to get around. This is a case of “if you build it they will come,” however, that would take leadership based on what riders want and demand: safe, clean, affordable transit that comes every 10 minutes, not only for the CTrain but bus commuter routes as well. This fix would require a large sum of money that I don’t think the people of Calgary are willing to pay. —David Wood

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RedPoint Media Group 1721 29 Ave. S.W., Suite 375 Calgary, Alberta T2T 6T7 (letter mail only) Phone 403-240-9055 Toll Free 1-877-963-9333 x0 Fax 403-240-9059 info@redpointmedia.ca AvenueCalgary.com Facebook Avenue Magazine — Calgary Instagram @AvenueMagazine Subscriptions (Prices do not include 5% GST) 3 issues: $18 1 year (6 issues): $25 2 years (12 issues): $40 3 years (18 issues): $60 1 year (USA): $36 US To subscribe, visit AvenueCalgary.com/shop subscriptions@redpointmedia.ca Advertising Inquiries Phone 403-240-9055 x0 Toll Free 1-877-963-9333 x0 advertising@avenuecalgary.com AvenueCalgary.com Published six times a year by RedPoint Media Group. Copyright (2023) by RedPoint Media Group. No part of this publication

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Editor in Chief Shelley Arnusch, sarnusch@redpointmedia.ca Design Director Steve Collins, scollins@redpointmedia.ca Managing Editor Dominique Lamberton, dlamberton@redpointmedia.ca Senior Digital Editor Alana Willerton, awillerton@redpointmedia.ca Digital Engagement Editor Alyssa Quirico, aquirico@redpointmedia.ca Special Projects Editor Tsering Asha, tleba@redpointmedia.ca Contributing Editors Karin Olafson, Colleen Seto Editorial Assistant Michaela Ream Digital Editorial Assistant Chris Landry Staff Photographer Jared Sych Design Intern Sofia Velasquez Contributors Carl Abad, Drew Anderson, Kendall Bistretzan, Carmen Cheng, Elizabeth Chorney-Booth, Sarah Comber, Christina Frangou, Phoebe Heard, Michelle McIvor, Jaelyn Molyneux, Jacquie Moore, Mateusz Napieralski/Gust of Wind Studio, Carol Patterson, Andrew Penner, Jarett Sitter, Chanry Thach, Sean P. Young Contributing Fact-Checkers Samantha Gryba, Amber McLinden Land Acknowledgement Advisors Elder Edmee Comstock, Elder Reg Crowshoe, Elder Rose Crowshoe Print/Digital Production Manager Mike Matovich Digital Producer Paula Martínez Client Support Coordinator Alice Meilleur Account Executives Michaela Brownlee, Jocelyn Erhardt Printing Transcontinental RBW Distribution City Print Distribution Inc.; NextHome REDPOINT MEDIA GROUP INC. CEO, Co-owner Roger Jewett President, Co-owner Käthe Lemon, klemon@redpointmedia.ca Director Strategy & Content Meredith Bailey, mbailey@redpointmedia.ca Art Director, RPM Content Studio Veronica Cowan, vcowan@redpointmedia.ca Accountant Jeanette Vanderveen, jvanderveen@redpointmedia.ca Administrative and HR Manager Tara Brand, tbrand@redpointmedia.ca Marketing Specialist Kristen Thompson, kthompson@redpointmedia.ca

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This is the place to start. Best Neighbourhoods Our annual look at the places and spaces we love in Calgary.

Looking to start a career in tech, build your own business, or invest in a local startup? We'll connect you.

Filipino Food Guide An insider’s take on the best restaurants here serving authentic Filipino cuisine.

Trails Less Travelled Where to go hiking in the regional mountains to avoid summer crowds.

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PlatformCalgary.com 19


THERE IS A HERO INSIDE OF US ALL.

On now in the Digital Immersion Gallery at TELUS Spark Science Centre Created by Justin Jack Bear and Earl Benallie. Based on a Jack Bear Legacy Pictures Original Series Experience adaptation. Design and production by Supply & Demand. Immersive technology solution created by Supply & Demand. The Sacred Defenders of the Universe digital immersion experience was made possible through the generous support of Prairies Economic Development Canada, the Government of Alberta and Canadian Natural Resources Limited. TELUS Spark Science Centre gratefully acknowledges the City of Calgary, the Government of Alberta and the Government of Canada for their support of Phase One of the Good Chemistry Campaign.

sparkscience.ca

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may/june 2023


Detours [ A NOTEBOOK OF THE CITY]

nature

PLANTING A LEGACY HOW A CALGARIAN’S LIFELONG HOBBY BECAME AN ACADEMIC TREASURE.

P H OTO G R A P H BY T K T K T K P H O T O S C O U R T E S Y O F L I B R A R I E S A N D C U LT U R A L R E S O U R C E S D I G I TA L C O L L E C T I O N S , U N I V E R S I T Y O F C A L G A R Y

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very vacation in the 1980s and ’90s for the late Isaac Rotstein and his family meant a road trip. But, it wasn’t your typical road trip: The family minivan would travel at a speed of around 25 kilometres per hour, as Rotstein scanned the roadside for unusual plants. Upon spying one — common nipplewort in Horseshoe Bay, B.C., perhaps, or common corncockle near the Idaho-Washington border — Rotstein would slam on the brakes. His wife, Linda, and daughters, Gena, Kim and Sam, grumbled while Rotstein took meticulous notes about the plant and its location, carefully dug it up with his trowel, and then pressed it between newspaper pages with his homemade plant press. Wrangled into the mission, the family was instructed to hold the plant at various angles for photos, and stand on the press for optimal cinching. “It was pure madness,” recalls Rotstein’s daughter Kim Nagan. “We’d have so many fights in the car. We wanted to go see stuff and my dad would say, ‘We are seeing stuff!’” Born in 1947 in a displaced persons camp in Heidelberg, Germany, Rotstein immigrated to Canada with his family in 1950, settling in Calgary. In 1969, he earned a zoology degree from the University of Calgary, followed by a pharmacy degree from the University of British Columbia in 1971. A career pharmacist — he owned the Alberta Clinic Pharmacy in Mission avenuecalgary.com

Solanum dulcamara Linnaeus (bittersweet nightshade).

Rhus radicans Linnaeus (poison ivy).

Lysimachia thyrsiflora Linnaeus (tufted yellow loosestrife).

Solanum sarrachoides Sendtner (ground-cherry nightshade). 21


Detours Spring has Sprung!

Issac Rotstein (1947-2022).

CALGARY IN BLOOM T H E C A L G A RY H O RT I C U LT U R A L S O C I E T Y ’ S JOANNA TSCHUDY SHARES THREE OF THE MOST PROMINENT L O C A L B L O S S O M S T O L O O K O U T F O R T H I S S E A S O N.

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ince its founding in 1908, the Calgary Horticultural Society (celebrating its 115th anniversary this year), has been a primary source of gardening knowledge in the city, brightening our landscapes and connecting green-thumbed residents to expert resources, community gardens, plant

shares and more. “We strive to be a city of excellence in the world of gardening,” says Joanna Tschudy, the Society’s community development coordinator. Whether you’re a gardening enthusiast, or simply an admirer, here are Tschudy’s picks for the top Calgary blooms to experience this spring.

Prairie Crocus/Pasque Flower ( Anemo ne Patens))

Li lac Bush (Syring Vulgaris)

Hardy Tulip (Tulipa Tarda)

Sometimes referred to as “the harbinger of spring,” this member of the buttercup family typically arrives right after the snow melts, and is able to withstand cold springtime temperatures and frost because of the white exterior hairs that insulate it. You can find these small blueor purple-flowered perennials in natural areas like Nose Hill Park, says Tschudy.

If you’ve lived in Calgary for even a short time, you’re bound to have smelled lilacs — the fragrant blooms are so prolific there’s even an annual springtime festival named after them (this year’s 4th Street Lilac Festival is on Sunday, June 4). According to Tschudy, the purpose of the bush’s bright purple flower is to spread its seeds, something it has clearly succeeded at here. Look for bushes all over the city, especially in historic neighbourhoods like Ramsay and Mount Royal.

This atypical tulip’s flower is long and pointy. Usually yellow and white, you won’t find this varietal in the wild, but instead in the city’s gardens at Prince’s Island Park, Reader Rock Garden and others. Tschudy says this bulb is great for first-time gardeners: “You just pop ’em in the ground and they do their thing!” —Amber McLinden To learn more about the Calgary Horticultural Society, including 115th anniversary events, visit calhort.org MAY/JUNE 2023

I S A A C R O T S T E I N P H O T O C O U R T E S Y O F T H E R O T S T E I N F A M I LY ; F L O W E R P H O T O S B Y D E B O R A H M A I E R

for 22 years — Rotstein’s passion for plants was spurred when he worked at UCalgary’s herbarium; it was there he learned how to collect and preserve them. When Rotstein died last August at the age of 75, shortly after being diagnosed with cancer, his family didn’t know what to do with his basement lab, replete with 35 boxes of textbooks on botany and toxicology, and notebooks containing more than 4,000 plant specimens collected over 50 years from all over the world, including Hawaii, South Africa, Morocco and the Amazon. It turns out, UCalgary’s herbarium was interested. Now, the Rotstein family is donating the collection, valued at roughly $40,000, to the Department of Biological Sciences. “We’re very grateful,” says UCalgary professor Jana Vamosi. “His collection will positively impact our international representation.” In particular, Vamosi says she is grateful for the Australian specimens, which help fill gaps in the herbarium’s inventory. Family and friends of Rotstein have also established an award in his memory, to support students’ work in the herbarium — fitting, as Rotstein was indeed a lifelong student. “We’d be sitting at the table and all of a sudden notice that my dad wasn’t there,” says Nagan. “He’d be in the basement playing with his plants. That was his domain.” —Danyael Halprin


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Detours music

COUNTRY IDOL F O R C A L G A RY- R A I S E D S I N G E R-S O N G W R I T E R L I N D S AY E L L , P E R F O R M I N G W I T H S H A N I A T WA I N AT T H E S A D D L E D O M E I S A N E X T R A O R D I N A RY F U L L - C I R C L E M O M E N T.

3 More Upcoming Musical Events Marvel Studios Presents Black Panther in Concert MAY 18 AND 19 Watch the exhilarating Black Panther on a big screen at the Southern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium as the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra, led by American conductor Lawrence Loh, performs Ludwig Göransson’s Oscar-winning score. calgaryphil.com

Sled Island JUNE 21 TO 25 This eclectic music and arts festival, now in its 17th year, will bring more than 150 artists to venues across the city, with select acts (Helado Negro, KAINA, Gulfer) handpicked by guest curator Bartees Strange. sledisland.com

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LINDSAY ELL

W

hen she was a little girl, Lindsay Ell would stand in front of a mirror, plastic toy microphone in hand, and pretend to be Shania Twain. The country star’s style, musical chops and values made her a role model as both a musician and a strong, independent woman. So, it’s no surprise that Ell, who grew up in Calgary but has lived in Nashville for the last decade becoming a country singer-songwriter in her own right, was thrilled when Twain asked her to be the opening act on her upcoming tour, including two nights (May 9 and 10) here at home at the Scotiabank Saddledome. “To be invited on her Queen of Me tour is just so surreal,” Ell says. “I don’t think I’d be doing what I’m doing if it wasn’t for Shania Twain.” While Twain remains Canada’s greatest country music success story, Ell’s trajectory is also impressive. Now in her early 30s, Ell got her start as a teenager under the mentorship of Randy Bachman, who produced her debut album, Consider This. Moving to Nashville helped her to form connections and win substantial accolades: Ell’s album The Project was named the Best Country Album of

2017 by Billboard, and, in 2019, she and singer Brantley Gilbert landed a number one country single with their duet “What Happens in a Small Town.” Ell’s latest single “Right on Time,” released last year, pushes back against the pressure to settle down by a certain point, reminiscent of the fierce independent anthems she grew up singing. Until 2020, Ell was touring non-stop, but the COVID-19 pandemic gave her the opportunity to find a balance with some new projects. Earlier this spring, she returned as host for the second season of Citytv’s Canada’s Got Talent. “I still love touring more than anything in the world, but I’ve learned how to incorporate some other things, rather than being in one gear all the time,” says Ell. The hits, the TV show and her reputation as a hardworking musician have put Ell in a position where she’s now inspiring young talent, just like Shania Twain did for her. Fans, particularly young girls, will tell Ell she gave them the confidence to learn to play guitar. “I only hope that I can help inspire the next generation half as much as Shania has inspired me,” she says. “They’re big shoes to fill, but I’m ready to get into them.” —Elizabeth Chorney-Booth MAY/JUNE 2023

L I N D S AY E L L P H O T O B Y T I M D E E G A N ; S L E D I S L A N D P H O T O B Y B R I T T R O S E , C O U R T E S Y O F S L E D I S L A N D

Madeleine Peyroux + Martha Wainwright MAY 30 American jazz artist Peyroux teams up with singer-songwriter Wainwright on a Canadian tour that will see them taking the stage at MacEwan Hall to perform Peyroux favourites, including those from her 2004 album Careless Love. machallconcerts.com

“I don’t think I’d be doing what I’m doing if it wasn’t for Shania Twain.”


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Detail from “2428 - Ⅰ - 17”, Mark Dicey

3 CONTEMPORARY JUN CALGARY avenuecalgary.com

PRESENTED BY

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Detours

BY E L IZA BE T H C HO R N E Y- BO OT H P HOTO BY JAR E D SYC H

dish it

A TUBBY DOG

DECONSTRUCTED THE BUN At the original Tubby Dog, Truch steamed his buns; at Tubby’s, where there’s less room for equipment, the soft, locally sourced buns are butter toasted. As before, they’re strategically sliced to hold more toppings: “They’re cut on the top, so the dogs sit like a submarine rather than flopping over on your plate.”

Just over a year after closing his Tubby Dog hot dog emporium on 17th Avenue S.W., owner Jon Truch has returned to his bartending roots with Tubby’s, a new Beltline spot he insists is “just a bar.” But, this bar also serves hot dogs, including the classic Tubby Dog that Truch first started making at the Night Gallery over 20 years ago, when he worked at the legendary rock club slinging drinks. Here, Truch breaks down everything that goes into his chili-topped signature.

THE DRINK PAIRING Don’t expect fancy cocktails at Tubby’s. It’s all about bottles of beer, easy-to-mix drinks and shots. “Our signature drink is a rye and Coke,” Truch says.

Is there an interesting, innovative or iconic Calgary dish or drink you think we should deconstruct? Send us a DM on Instagram: @avenuemagazine.

THE WIENER You can substitute homemade Ukrainian sausage, or veggie or turkey dogs, but the default is a high-quality all-beef wiener. “A lot of people can’t eat pork, so we do all-beef for a wider appeal,” Truch says.

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THE CHILI The star of the show is a heaping scoop of house-made steak chili, slow cooked and flavoured with Truch’s own blend of spices. “Chili made with ground beef tends to turn into nothing after cooking it for eight hours. Ground steak retains its integrity.”

THE OTHER TOPPINGS In true ballpark style, the Tubby Dog is also topped with yellow mustard (Truch maintains that “mustard is the foundation of a great hot dog”), raw white onions for crunch, bacon bits and a generous helping of gooey jalapeno-studded nacho cheese.

THE SIDES A departure from the Tubby Dog days, Tubby’s serves its dogs “deli-style” on an oval plate with a side of creamy coleslaw, plain ripple chips and a pickle. “It’s a nod to how my mom used to serve us hot dogs when we were kids,” Truch says.

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TURNING INNOVATION INTO OPPORTUNITY Innovative ideas are just that – ideas. Until they have the right kind of backing to make them a reality. Enter the Opportunity Calgary Investment Fund (OCIF). Established in 2018 by the City of Calgary to attract investment, drive innovation and stimulate economic development in our city, it gives innovators the launch pad they need to take flight. To date, OCIF has made 25 investments, including the University of Calgary’s Life Sciences Innovation Hub, Plug and Play, Movement51, and Avatar Innovations, that tackle global challenges. And people are taking notice. After all, there’s a reason the word “opportunity” is in OCIF’s name. By supporting public and private investments that help grow Calgary’s economy, it’s creating opportunities for everyone to reach new heights.

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AN

APPROACH

Whether we’re reenvisioning the industries that built this city, or exploring new frontiers, Calgary’s innovation economy is making strides. From energy and agriculture, to health care, finance, knowledge and more, there’s a spirit of progress afoot. Meet some of the Calgarians moving our city forward and, in doing so, making it a hub for innovators of all kinds. ILLUSTRATIONS BY GUST OF WIND STUDIO

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BY COLLEEN SETO

Innovation in Calgary’s energy sector is poised to shape the world’s energy system. hange happens, whether we’re ready for it or not. To be competitive in the global energy market, especially amidst the next great energy transition, innovation is key. Innovation helps drive growth and create new opportunities, as well as improve efficiency and costeffectiveness. Perhaps most importantly, innovations in the energy sector help build a more sustainable future for all of us. Calgary has a long history of energy innovation. Richard Masson, a longtime energy project development consultant and executive fellow of the University of Calgary School of Public Policy recalls that in the early 1990s, there were only three main oil sands projects in Alberta — and it took ingenuity to make them work. “Oil sands are a tough resource. We had to figure out how to get it out of the ground ourselves,” he says. “Getting those first projects off the ground was a huge accomplishment in innovation.” Masson points to continual innovation since then, involving academics, engineers and companies, resulting in oil sands production growing from around 400,000 barrels a day to more than three million barrels a day. “We’ve had that kind of innovative culture for decades,” he says. Now, this culture of innovation is poised to take Calgary in a different direction, as the energy sector prepares for the approaching global energy transition. “The only way we’re going to be able to produce this resource in a responsible way for the world is if we can address climate change,” says Masson. “We have an ecosystem of companies and organizations who are aligned on this and have been for a long time.” Brad Hayes, a geoscience consultant and instructor at Mount Royal University, agrees. “Innovation in the energy sector right now takes a lot of forms” he says. “In oil and gas, it is focused primarily on reducing [greenhouse gas] emissions footprints by devising new means to produce the evergrowing volumes of oil and gas that society demands.” He lists examples, including switching to nuclear energy for steam production in heavy-oil extraction, powering liquefied natural gas facilities with hydroelectricity, and using novel detection devices on drones and satellites to identify methane emissions. This represents a huge change.

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“Every analysis of future energy production, including from the International Energy Agency, points out that much of the technology we need to ensure energy security and to minimize emissions in the future does not exist in commercial form today,” Hayes says. That means there’s an urgency for continued innovation in the global energy industry, making events like the upcoming World Petroleum Congress, happening in Calgary in September, all the more timely and critical. This will be the first time at the World Petroleum Congress that the global oil and gas industry will collectively address the theme of energy transition and the path to net zero, and it’s a chance for Calgary and Canada to affirm its position as an energy leader. “We sit on one of the biggest hydrocarbon deposits in the world, so we need to do everything we can to reduce the environmental impact of the hydrocarbon we’re producing,” says Masson, who is chair of the World Petroleum Council-Canada, the host of the congress. “The congress brings people from all over the world — CEOs, energy ministers, academics, companies — to talk about how we tackle this issue,” he says. “It’s a key opportunity to showcase what Canada is working on.”

HOUR

COLLABORATION IS KEY

At the crux of energy innovation in Calgary is collaboration. While the energy sector generates a lot of revenue and jobs for Calgarians, it also poses great environmental challenges, putting it at the centre of a complex and often divisive debate. Enter the Energy Futures Lab (EFL), which, according to managing director Alison Cretney, was created in response to this harmful polarization around energy issues. The lab brings together a diversity of perspectives — oil and gas professionals, renewable energy developers, Indigenous leaders, environmental groups, government and even artists. “We asked: How can we build from our strengths in order to accelerate transition to the energy system the future requires of us?” Cretney says. “And how do we do that in a way that incorporates equity and prosperity in a future that people want to be part of?” EFL acts as a platform to transform those polarized conversations into actionable solutions. The lab’s guiding principle is that finding innovative energy solutions requires collaboration, insights and contributions from diverse stakeholders. It takes a multifaceted approach that recognizes the complexities and interconnectedness between our social systems and our energy system. “Innovation in the energy sector needs a comprehensive and holistic approach,” says Cretney. “The challenges we face cannot be solved in isolation.” She adds that we need to foster conditions for innovation through competitiveness, social-cultural acceptance, public policy, regulatory controls and investment attraction. “By bringing together the right people on the right issues at the right time, we can unlock the biggest opportunities we’re seeing for the province and the city, in relation to a changing energy system.” Such unprecedented collaboration is already happening.

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Cretney refers to the global “sea change” in 2020-21, when both industry and investors, alongside governments, began making public commitments towards net-zero emissions by 2050, and acknowledging that climate risk is investment risk. The launch of the Pathways Alliance, a joint effort by Canada’s largest oil sands producers to work together to address climate change, was a signal of that change. The Alliance companies decided to pool resources and share intellectual property. “This way, when somebody makes a breakthrough, everybody benefits quickly,” Masson says. “It’s a great innovative model. We benefit by working collaboratively.”

UPSKILLING INDIVIDUALS TO SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONS Part of successfully fostering collaboration and innovation is ensuring individuals have the skills and resources to set targets for their organizations and to be able to hit them. That’s where the newly launched Calgary Innovation Peer Forum comes in. Put together by the Strategic Capability Network (SCN) in Calgary, the monthly forum serves as a place for the city’s corporate innovators — many from the energy sector — to network and learn from subject matter experts. “We wanted to focus on a framework of innovation — how do you get people to innovate in large organizations?” says Mike Procee, manager of enterprise innovation enablement and culture at TC Energy and SCN board member. “How can you inject a bit of startup culture into these behemoth organizations where you can be a catalyst for change within the organization?” The forum aims to build a community and what Procee calls a “hive mind” to educate and upskill innovators so that they know how to help their organizations. Another pillar is establishing best practices for working with the startup community and connecting with entrepreneurs and experts. “For example, if a large organization wanted to ramp up work on blockchain, sometimes it doesn’t make sense for them to take engineers and repurpose them to recreate the wheel when there are likely multiple startups in Calgary that are blockchain experts,” says Procee. “So, [larger organizations] need to figure out how to connect with these smaller organizations and work with them better. What we hope to see is this really cool intersection between big corporations working with startups to inspire their own innovation.”

THE RIGHT PIECES TO THE INNOVATION PUZZLE Calgary’s energy sector is uniquely positioned to grow exponentially during the energy transition. Procee points to Calgary’s oil and gas companies being financially stable, and therefore better equipped to take more risk with innovation,

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such as investing in new technologies. “In terms of resources, it’s prime time for Calgary,” Procee says. “Companies have strong balance sheets and we have all the right types of talent right here. We have the technology, the universities and the startups. We just need to get all the people at the table and get them working together to have Calgary be a massive innovation hub.” Hayes agrees that Calgary leads with its highly educated workforce. “Many scientists and engineers have been innovating for decades to improve oil and gas production,” he says. “Now some

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of their knowledge and entrepreneurial experience is being turned toward things like lithium extraction.” Cretney points to A Roadmap for Canada’s Battery Value Chain, a collaborative report by Transition Accelerator, the Battery Metals Association of Canada, Energy Futures Lab and Accelerate, which identified an important aspect of the battery value chain that’s missing right now. “That’s the midstream, refining raw elements like lithium into battery-ready components. This is something that Alberta could be really well positioned for, alongside lithium extraction. That means we have an opportunity to integrate into a full electric-vehicle value chain across the country. It’s that type of thinking, collaboration and coordination that’s required to take advantage of the opportunities before us,” she says. Hayes also cites the city’s entrepreneurial mindset as being critically important. “I’ve seen how innovation and new business approaches happen here, while equally smart people in less innovative cultures simply don’t have the mindsets to successfully innovate and make the innovations productive — that is, set up the business structures and investment to commercialize the innovations,” he says.

THE LAND OF NEW ENERGY OPPORTUNITIES

“It’s prime time for calgary. Companies have strong balance sheets and we have all theright types of talent right here.” MIKE PROCEE, TC ​​ ENERGY

avenuecalgary.com

As the energy sector continues to evolve, Calgary must take a leading role in energy transition to capitalize on emerging possibilities. “The amount of opportunities that are ahead of us with the energy transition is just phenomenal — as is the amount of capital that’s available,” says Procee (noting how Calgary set a quarterly record for venture funding at the start of 2022). Commercialization and investment are often the most challenging parts of the innovation process. But again, Calgary’s energy sector holds an advantage. “Because our market is publicly traded, well regulated and transparent — especially compared to a lot of the other places where energy is produced — innovators are willing to come here,” says Masson. As local innovators develop technologies that work for our energy industry, other places will want them, too, which will lead to an ability to attract investment to Calgary and Alberta. Alberta also has several government programs, incentives and resources that encourage innovation and investment in the province, from early research stages all the way through the different steps of commercialization. “The reality is market expectations are changing and investor preferences are changing,” says Cretney. “It becomes a smart business decision to align with where things are headed. We’re seeing that reflected, even with the Alberta government looking at critical minerals, hydrogen and real diversification when they talk about energy. It’s much broader than historical oil and gas as our lifeblood. We can’t be static in a rapidly changing world.”

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BY CHRISTINA FRANGOU

il and gas tends to get all the buzz, but Calgary also has resources aplenty in the health-care sector that are changing the way illnesses are diagnosed, treated and prevented. The city is home to two universities with a life sciences presence, and their researchers have access to a centralized health database for the entire province — a rarity even by Canadian standards. The local health field gets an additional boost from Calgary’s burgeoning tech industry and incubators like Alberta Innovates that bridge gaps between industry and academia. Currently, the city is home to more than 120 life sciences companies that are saving lives and improving the quality of lives, be it as one-person startups or multi-million-dollar companies. Here are seven innovations that are changing the health field.

KINETYX BY ORPYX MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES Since its founding in 2010, Orpyx has been a perennial star on Canada’s health innovation scene. The startup made its name with a remotemonitoring technology, designed for shoes, that can help prevent diabetic foot ulcers. Now, Orpyx is moving into an expanded market with its new product line, Kinetyx. This product, also a shoe-based technology, measures how a body moves in the real world, similar to the way that a wrist watch can measure movement, but Kinetyx provides details on what’s happening in the space between the bottom of a foot and the ground. “There are more than 24 billion pairs of shoes produced annually,” says Breanne Everett, Orpyx’s CEO and co-inventor (and a member of Avenue’s Top 40 under 40 Class of 2012). “If you can drive the innovation behind footwear, you can have massive impacts on the way that people move.”

PURPOSEMED Virtual care is a booming industry world-wide, but PurposeMed taps into underserved areas — HIV prevention, and ADHD diagnosis and treatment. People across Canada face long waits for ADHD care and barriers to HIV prevention services. In Alberta, only two per cent of prescribers are licensed to prescribe pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), the medication that’s 99 per cent effective in preventing HIV transmission. With PurposeMed’s Freddie service, patients can have a virtual assessment with a clinician who can 34

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w prescribe PrEP, while the company’s Frida service offers patients an online ADHD assessment for a $599 fee and, if diagnosed, ongoing care for $29 a month. Freddie is available in all provinces outside Atlantic Canada, while Frida is available in Alberta, B.C. and Ontario. “We believe that using smart technology and the best clinicians will enable us to deliver a better health-care experience and ultimately better health-care outcomes,” says co-founder and COO Pete MacLeod.

HEADVERSITY In 2019, newly minted Top 40 Ryan Todd, told Avenue that he hoped that his new startup could eventually impact one million people — a goal he called “arbitrary, audacious and maybe a bit foolish.” Turns out, it wasn’t foolish at all. Today, Headversity provides support for more than one million people in 22 countries. Todd, a psychiatrist, launched Headversity for companies that wanted to improve the resilience and mental well being of their employees. The idea grew from his experience treating workers in Alberta who did not have access to mental health tools that could improve focus and mindfulness, and reduce depression, substance use and workplace accidents. “We were hell-bent on helping the people who needed it most,” says Todd. Now, it seems, they’re hell-bent on expansion: Headversity’s client base grew by 250 per cent in 2021, while last year the company secured $12.5 million in Series A financing to expand into the United States, acquiring Health Improvement Solutions for an undisclosed amount.

LUMIIO Advancements come slowly with rare diseases, one reason being that there are too few patients in any one place for researchers to gather enough data about rare conditions. That’s where Lumiio comes in. The locally founded digital health company specializes in building patient registries and collecting real-world data from around the globe. The data is then used by researchers, pharmaceutical companies and patient organizations to accelerate understanding of rare diseases. Lumiio is the result of a project started 15 years ago by Dr. Lawrence Korngut, a neurologist at the University of Calgary. He partnered with doctors, clinicians and researchers across the country to form the Canadian Neuromuscular Disease Registry and collect patient data for more than 150

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diseases. The effort was so successful that Korngut and his colleagues began getting requests for their expertise for other patient registries. They launched Lumiio to help patients suffering from all kinds of rare diseases around the world. Today, the company has seven full-time employees and operates in 18 countries. It recently expanded into wearable integration — using data from things like smart watches — and overlaps this information with clinical and patient-reported data. CEO Blaine Penny’s son was born with a rare mitochondrial disease that went undiagnosed. It contributed to a brain injury that left him unable to walk and talk. Penny says he hopes Lumiiio’s work will help families like his. “We’re going to be able to help prevent a lot more of what happened to my son and many others,” he says.

ANDROMEDA MEDICAL IMAGING When someone has a stroke, every second matters — two million neurons are lost every minute following a stroke — so UCalgary researchers developed a technique to shave minutes off the time needed to diagnose them. A stroke happens when blood flow to the brain is interrupted by an obstacle in a blood vessel. The current method to find the blockage requires three main steps: a CT scan, a CT angiogram and CT perfusion. The last two require dye to be injected into the blood vessels. Dr. Philip Barber, an associate professor of neurology and radiology, Dr. Christopher d’Esterre, a former adjunct

professor, and Connor McDougall, a postdoctoral associate in the Department of Radiology at the Cumming School of Medicine, created an imaging technique, known as SPIRAL, that can identify the blockage in a more streamlined way. With SPIRAL, a patient only needs one scan, and it does not need to be analyzed by a specialist. This means that clinicians in rural areas can make treatment decisions without having to send a patient to a larger centre. SPIRAL not only shaves minutes off stroke treatment decisions crucial for saving brain cells, but permits essential diagnostic technology for making these decisions to be available to all stroke patients at community hospitals in Alberta with a CT scanner. Barber, d’Esterre and McDougall launched Andromeda Medical Imaging Systems Inc. in 2020. Now under the leadership of Barber and McDougall, the company is moving toward regulatory approval for SPIRAL.

SYANTRA INC. In the early 2010s, Dr. Kenneth Fuh (Avenue’s Top 40 Under 40 Class of 2022) and colleagues at UCalgary identified a molecular signature for breast cancer that could be picked up in a blood sample. They founded Syantra in 2016 with the hopes of scaling the technology to provide cancer testing to patients around the world. The company’s flagship product, the trademarked Syantra DX Breast Cancer test, is a molecular assay for detecting an active breast cancer signature from a blood sample. It’s currently available to women in 120 cities across Canada for $499. By this summer, Syantra DX will be available to patients in the United States, and, the company hopes, in Europe and the Middle East before year’s end.

SOLIS The beauty industry has a dirty secret: makeup brushes take ages to clean properly, but failing to do so can spread diseases like herpes and pink eye. Enter Rana Hyatt, a professional hair and makeup artist with a degree in sociology and chemistry from UCalgary. In 2018 Hyatt had the idea for a portable waterless brush sanitizer that cleans all powdered products and kills germs in a 60-second blitz, using UVC-LED technology. Stuck at home during the first waves of the COVID pandemic in 2020, she decided to bring her idea to life. Retailing for $499, the Airdrie-made product sold out of pre-sales at the end of 2022 and is now available for purchase again.

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B Y S E A N P. Y O U N G

arry Woolliams is the type of farmer that wants to yield a bumper crop every season. That’s not unique, every farmer wants a bumper (an exceptionally large harvest). But Woolliams leaves little to chance when going after his goal. “I’m always looking at what I need to do to take my business to the next level and technology definitely helps me do that,” he says. Woolliams is a fifth-generation farmer. His family homesteaded in the Calgary area in 1890 and he and his wife now run Woolliams Farms Ltd., a 9,000-acre plot in Rocky View County growing wheat, yellow peas, canola and malt barley. His family has a long history of innovation, whether by adopting new farming methods, dabbling in crop experimentation or seeking out technology. In addition to being a shrewd farmer, his dad was an astute businessman, looking to harness the latest technologies to improve his chances of success. “Dad was actually one of the first people in Alberta to ever use yield mapping and variable rate technology for fertilizer,”

“Farming used to be just farming. It was a lot simpler. But now you’re running a multimillion-dollar business. You can’t just go off on a whim anymore.” LARRY WOOLLIAMS, GRAIN FARMER

Woolliams says. “He had a big old computer that was bolted in the combine.” Farming has become a complex business, but the goal has always been the same: The more you can crop out of a piece of land (or “yield”) using the least amount of “inputs” (mainly seed, fertilizer, chemicals, water and labour), the more money you make. And technologies like yield mapping, a technique that uses GPS data to show precisely how fields are performing each season, is helping balance out the equation for farmers. It has evolved drastically since Woolliams’ father first adopted it in the mid ’80s. Woolliams now uses

a suite of precision agriculture tools that record his yields as they are being harvested. Sensors on his combines measure the quality and amount of grain along with the exact GPS coordinates where it was harvested. These data points autonomously produce yield maps, showing Woolliams’ high- and low-performing areas. “The long-term goal is better the ground for growing, or start saving inputs on the bad parts of the land,” Woolliams says. “You don’t want to fertilize or spray those low-lying areas or hilltops that won’t produce anything.” Woolliams uses these maps the next time he plants, feeding in more historical data for the software to use regarding his inputs. Every year he uses these tools, the stronger and more precise the analysis and predictions become. GPS technology and map data also help for more precise planting. A common money suck for farmers during seeding is overlap, when rows of seed are planted too close together, wasting a portion of a crucial input. Autosteer, as the name suggests, automatically steers the tractor along straight lines, curves or concentric circles to sub-inch accuracy, making planting, spraying and harvesting way more exact than a human driver could achieve alone. “I used to budget for 10 per cent overlap when seeding, now it’s down to two per cent. That’s a huge difference,” Woolliams says.

FUTUREPROOF 38

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In Canada, costs of inputs, particularly fertilizers, are on the rise, yet the prices farmers fetch for their products continue to fluctuate according to the market. For this reason, Woolliams says embracing technology is a necessity for farmers in Canada. “Grain farmers, we’re not price makers, we’re price takers,” he quips. Political influences like the federal goal of reducing fertilizer emissions by 30 per cent from 2020 levels by 2030, part of the government of Canada’s overall climate change plan, add more pressure, he says. “Farming used to be just farming. It was a lot simpler. You had this many acres that produced this many bushels, you sold it for this, and here’s what it cost. But now you’re running a multi-million-dollar business. You can’t just go off on a whim anymore,” Woolliams says. Around 150 kilometres to the north of Woolliams, second-generation dairy farmer Dave Haefliger is using automation to maximize the efficiency of his operation today, in anticipation of impending challenges. “Using robotics is a hedge against future inflation on labour,” says Haefliger. “The amount of information I get is unbelievable. I could have never dreamed of knowing this much about each cow.” Haefliger’s father immigrated from Switzerland 40 years ago and started the family dairy farm outside of Lacombe. After high school, Dave worked

as a mechanic for nearly a decade before joining the family operation five years ago. One of the first orders of business was to upgrade the barn and install two automatic milking units from Dutch agritech company Lely, a $450,000 investment. The milking units are basically big boxes that the cows walk into to feed. The unit automatically milks the cow, cleans it and applies balm to the udders when it is finished feeding. It dumps any of the off-colour milk automatically and measures how much the cows are feeding and other vital stats, using connected sensors worn around their necks. Dairy farmers have been using machines to milk cows for more than a century, but the process for previous generations, like that of Haefliger’s father, required a fair bit of elbow grease. Whereas farmers from his father’s generation wrangled the cows, hooked up the machines, monitored, disconnected and cleaned up after milking, Haefliger says almost all of his cows walk into the Lely units on their own so there’s no chasing them around. Because the Lely machines automate those formerly manual steps for milking, Haefliger says the units save him at least four hours of labour each day and that his cows are yielding 10- to 15-per cent more milk, on average, using the robots. “There are all kinds of cost savings involved. It’s unbelievable,” he says. “I really think a smaller farm

FARMING avenuecalgary.com

that embraces these robots can be more efficient than a large farm.” Yet, getting farmers in Alberta to embrace the latest ag-tech can be a challenge when some practices have been around for hundreds of years. Woolliams recalls several years ago at Christmas dinner when he was trying to convince his uncle of the merits of adding autosteer to his tractor. “My uncle’s comment was basically, ‘What am I going to do? I don’t see the value in this.’ So, we sat down at the table after dinner and ran the numbers. It paid for itself, but he couldn’t see it at the time. Now he wouldn’t go without it,” Woolliams says. Not all farmers have someone like Woolliams who is willing to help them alleviate their tech trepidation. But several government initiatives and private innovation hubs are trying to keep Alberta agriculture on the vanguard. In May 2022, the Alberta government announced a $3.2 million investment to support 10 projects that enhance food production through digital solutions and automation. The funded projects include a hand-held blood analysis device that can predict sheep pregnancy and litter size using AI, robotics to enhance pork and beef grading, and the use of machine learning to predict agricultural impacts on soil health.

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SMART E ATING

“farming is a business with razor-thin margins. nobody wants to be the guinea pig.”

P H O T O C O U R T E S Y O F N A K A H E A LT H Y F O O D S

We’ve all been there: Lunch rolls around, and, with limited time and choices, you wind up grabbing fast food, or spending $20 on a salad or smoothie. What if, on those busy days, a healthy, reasonably priced, even locally sourced option was within reach and didn’t require you to pack it yourself? Enter Naka. On a mission to make healthy food convenient and affordable, this Calgary-based company’s refrigerated automatic stores are popping up in office buildings and co-working spaces around the city. Stocked with fresh, nutritious products from Alberta companies, including Inspired Go, Nutri-Go, Well Juices and Rviita Energy Tea, the smart fridges are accessible via an app. Simply browse the menu and select the item you want in the app, then scan the QR code on the fridge to open it; once you grab your salad, chia pudding or cold-pressed juice, you’re charged for it through the app, too. Choosing something good for you has never been so simple. –D.L. nakahealthyfoods.ca

Non-profit tech accelerator crop disease are just a few of Platform Calgary also recently the innovations being explored announced a partnership with through applied research SVG Ventures Thrive, the leadprojects. ing global agrifood investment “Many people don’t realize and innovation platform from that agriculture isn’t just your Silicon Valley. The strategic traditional primary production collaboration will launch the farm. The tech side of it has just Agrifood Innovation Digital exploded in the last decade,” Hub for Canada in the heart of says Stacy Felkar, Co-Manager Calgary to support Canadian of AgSmart, an educational DR. JOY AGNEW startups and technologies that expo hosted by Olds College OLDS COLLEGE offer a more secure, sustaineach August that focuses on able or efficient future for the data and technology in the national agriculture sector. agriculture industry. “The activity and the number of options The Smart Farm communicates all of its in terms of technologies and tools and pracnon-proprietary research and findings for free tices that are being thrown at producers is just to thousands of Alberta farmers online; through tremendous,” says Dr. Joy Agnew, associate vice facts sheets, newsletters and magazines; and in president of Applied Research at Olds College. person through community engagement events, Agnew was recruited to Olds College in meetings and conferences. The litany of outreach 2018 to lead the research division and the is to help farmers narrow in on proven technolodevelopment of the Olds College Smart Farm. gies that can be adopted on their farms. The 3,600-acre plot of fields acts as a proving “When you look at ag-tech adoption rates, ground for ag-tech companies and is also a it’s slow and steady for good reason because it’s place for Agnew’s team to research novel inso risky. Farming is a business with razor-thin novations in farming. margins. Nobody wants to be the guinea pig. In its first five years, the Smart Farm and Nobody wants to be the first to try something,” applied research program attracted more than says Agnew. $50 million in external investment and engaged While agritech may be a lucrative opportunity 108 Alberta-based small and medium-sized for upstarts and entrepreneurs, it’s essential for enterprises. Face-recognition AI that can identify Canadian farmers’ survival. animals within herds from pictures and video, “It’s a very competitive industry,” Woolliams drones that can classify hail-damaged areas says. “You have to be progressive right now or within fields, and a mobile app that can assess you won’t be around in the future.”

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may/june 2023


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may/june 2023


BY CAROL PATTERSON

INNOVATINGWITH

TRADITION How a Telus Spark exhibit about Indigenous parenting is changing the conversation around ways of knowing. ack in March, a permanent stories into its programming, but it also demexhibit devoted to Indigonstrates an innovative approach to learning at enous teachings and stories Calgary’s premier science-education institution. on child-rearing practices “I don’t know of any other science centre in opened in the Creative Kids Canada that is talking about this particular facet Museum at Telus Spark. of Indigenous sciences,” says Zack Anderson, Visitors to The Moss Bag Spark’s director of group experiences. Project learn how moss bags keep babies snugly “As part of the Truth and Reconciliation wrapped in a warm, womb-like environment, Commission [Calls to Action], we’re all tasked and hear Elders sharing traditional teachings with doing our part to take our reconciliation or stories, while mothers and journey,” Anderson says. “So, Indigenous parents can use the Spark has undertaken that work space to share, too. and started that process. [The The exhibit is a collaboration Moss Bag Project exhibit] is part between Spark and The Moss of that.” Western science is one Bag Project (TMBP), a nonway of knowing, he adds, but it’s profit founded by Indigenous not the only way. “It’s really imeducation and organizational portant to us at Spark, because consultant (and a member of we are located on the traditional Avenue’s Top 40 Under 40 Class lands of Niitsítapi (Blackfoot of 2022) Jessie Fiddler-Kiss. Confederacy), the Tsuut’ina TMBP supports Indigenous First Nation, the Îethka Nakoda mothers and Two-Spirit parents First Nation and Métis Nation of ZACK ANDERSON through creating and sharing Alberta Region III, to be able to TELUS SPARK moss bags and by providing share these contexts.” scholarships. TMBP also offers Fittingly, the process of bringeducational sessions about traditional parenting. ing the exhibit to life did not follow a path typical With the exhibit, all visitors are welcome of a Western science display. Spark reached out to experience this traditional way of knowing. to TMBP with Indigenous protocol, offering “What we have set up there together is a space kindness and reciprocity. That step of being for moms and children to interact with moss invited in, in a way that was familiar, resonated bags and learn what [they] are and how they are with Fiddler-Kiss, who is a member of Métis used from an Indigenous perspective, because Nation Region III. “Not to have to come in and sometimes when things are presented about us teach first about what we need before we even without actually understanding the teachings, it begin, it feels welcoming,” she says. doesn’t always align because our paradigms are so different,” Fiddler-Kiss says. For more information about The Moss Bag Project The Moss Bag Project is in line with Telus exhibit visit, sparkscience.ca/indigenous-ways-ofSpark’s goal to bring more Indigenous voices and knowing-science/moss-bag-project

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BY JA E LY N M O LY N E U X

KNOWLEDGE IS POWER

New ways to teach financial literacy are creating opportunity for those who have been previously excluded. t’s estimated that, by 2028, women will control almost $4 trillion in Canadian financial assets. That’s nearly double what that number would have been 10 years earlier. But, while women rack up financial power, access and education (the other side of the coin) aren’t necessarily keeping pace. A growing number of organizations are changing the way we learn about money, however, and, in the process, increasing the financial potential of groups who have been overlooked or alienated by traditional financial education. The filling of this knowledge gap means more equal participation in finance. The non-profit sister organization of The51, a feminist financial investment platform that brings women into venture capitalism, Movement51 emerged in 2021 to target women and gender-diverse earlystage investors and founders. As The51 began attracting investors, it was clear there were plenty of other women who were interested in investing but needed a toolkit to get started. Movement51 facilitates investing labs in partnership with the University of Calgary. Female investors learn everything from how to decide what to invest in, to negotiating term sheets. The information is developed and delivered by experienced entrepreneurs, venture capitalists and academics.

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“It’s really about democratizing access to finance and providing programs that have academic rigour and also have a gendered lens,” says Movement51 executive director Danielle Gifford. That common female-driven view creates a supportive community that underpins everything Movement51 does. “There’s an energy and vibrancy that you can feel. People are excited,” says Gifford. “They want to meet people with similar motivations and learn more. It is a safe space. You don’t have to be worried about asking a question that you might feel is silly. There is inclusivity and accessibility that isn’t that traditional old voice. That’s really important.” Calgary-founded Flahmingo also sees itself as an alternative to that traditional old voice. The DIY investment app allows Canadians to create their own portfolios by investing in stocks and exchange-traded funds (ETFs). It uses fractionalized stocks, which means investing can happen with as little as $1 and its target audience is millennials and gen-Z members who want to learn, but often feel alienated by legacy banks. “The majority of our users come to the application knowing nothing or knowing very little about investing,” says Flahmingo’s co-founder and CFO Kunal Seth. “They want to learn from people who look and feel like them. They don’t want to learn from somebody wearing a suit that’s talking in a specific way and using words that they don’t understand.”

Along with its clever pies-and-slices approach to investing, education is a big part of what attracts younger people to the app. Its Flahmingo Central is a collection of videos of experts speaking directly to the camera, explaining concepts or answering questions in three minutes or less. The tone is casual and the content is vetted by trusted and reliable sources — unlike a lot of other investing-related content on social media. Flahmingo is, after all, regulated by the Alberta Securities Commission. The videos, along with the ability to start investing with a smaller amount of money, reduces the barrier to entry and offers hands-on learning to empower new investors. Financial empowerment facilitator Theodora Warrior Healy developed a series of workshops on financial wellness for Indigenous communities in Treaty 7 territory. Warrior Healy is Blackfoot and her by-

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4 C ALG ARY FI NTECH STARTUPS SOLVI NG EVERY DAY PROB LEMS

FI L L I P This one is for the truck drivers. The digital payment platform allows drivers belonging to a fleet to pay for fuel and maintenance expenses with a secure digital wallet. Real-time spending makes it easier for owners to keep tabs on spending and everyone saves time submitting receipts and reconciling expenses. fillipfleet.com

ON EV EST OneVest is Canada’s first Wealth-as-aService (WaaS) platform. Financial institutions embed OneVest into their products so customers can seamlessly invest, create personalized portfolios and more. It’s a service that was previously only available to legacy banks. Current users include Calgary-based Neo Financial. onevest.com

“There is inclusivity and accessibility that isn’t that traditional old voice. That’s really important.” –DANIELLE GIFFORD, MOVEMENT51

Indigenous-for-Indigenous approach was designed to create a supportive space where teaching and learning comes from a shared background — one that includes a difficult relationship with Canada’s banking system. Indigenous communities tend to be 50 to 60 years behind when it comes to financial literacy, Warrior Healy says. Stack on the harmful myths and stereotypes related to money that Indigenous peoples come up against and it’s no wonder they aren’t comfortable seeking financial advice from the banks. “We’ve been traumatized our whole lives and we’re hypersensitive to any kind of

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unwelcoming,” she says. By gaining knowledge of credit products, TFSAs, and other financial tools, Indigenous community members are able to ask questions and advocate for themselves. “When they have the information, they are more confident in going forward and creating a wealth plan for themselves and their children and grandchildren,” Warrior Healy says. “It ripples out into the community. If everyone has financial wellness, the poverty level goes down and there is less stress. There are so many benefits to financial literacy.”

R E AC H This payment platform makes crossborder e-commerce easier for buyers and sellers. With Reach, transactions can be done in a local currency with localized processing so it’s familiar to a shopper and they don’t get bumped over to a third-party checkout they might not trust. It’s the kind of smooth experience big companies like Amazon can deliver but small- and medium-sized companies have previously found challenging. withreach.com

Z E N BA SE Zenbase provides its users flexibility with rent payments. It pays rent in full to landlords when it is due and then the renter pays Zenbase back in smaller amounts throughout the month. The flexible schedule can align better with users’ cash flow and, as such, relieve financial stress. myzenbase.com

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BY TSERING ASHA

THETRANSITION

TOTECH

Meet three Calgarians who shifted their careers into the technology sector and find out how they navigated that change. MI KK I GA R DN E R SUPPORT TE AM LE AD, SHOWPASS hile studying for a bachelor’s degree in anthropology, Mikki Gardner worked in a variety of client and customer-facing roles. Eventually, she landed at Arts Commons and spent several years working at the box office. When she decided it was time for a change, Gardner took a mental inventory of what she was looking for in a job, both at the time and five years down the road. She knew she wanted to stay in the events industry because of her passion for theatre arts, but she didn’t want to be pigeonholed into one role. Gardner wanted a smaller hybrid workplace where she’d have the opportunity to transfer between different departments to find her niche, and a culture that valued individualism, celebrated diversity and had a casual dress code that would be accepting of her eclectic style. “I was really looking for something [where] I could be myself,” she says. She reviewed her resume and interests to put together the puzzle pieces of a new career, identifying her most transferable and enjoyable skills, like working with the public, managing and mentoring younger employees, and working with spreadsheets and data, and matched these to job descriptions for other event and ticketing companies. Gardner knew the tech industry was growing and that it was being supported in Alberta. Plus, she had heard that tech companies were known

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for encouraging more personal and professional growth and opportunities for their workers in a short amount of time. So, she turned her focus to the tech world, using sites like LinkedIn, Indeed and even Instagram. “I found that a lot of times, when I was looking at tech companies, they tended to have these cultures that were built around collaboration and around hiring the right people, instead of hiring people with the right experience who [checked] all these boxes,” she says. In early 2022, Gardner applied to work at Showpass, a Calgary-based virtual box office and event management company, after seeing a job posting during one of her LinkedIn searches and doing her obligatory deep-dive into the company’s social media profile and news articles. “You can’t judge a book by its cover, but you can absolutely try to judge a company by its website,” she says with a laugh. Going from working at a physical box office to a virtual one was, in many ways, a lateral move. “I basically moved from a role at one company into a role that was fairly similar in another company,” she says. The new job, however, came with options such as a hybrid workplace, a workout benefit and chef-prepared lunches and snacks at the on-site kitchen, while her new managers explicitly supported and outlined a career plan for Gardner as the company grew. Six months later, she was promoted into a managerial role. “The difference is I feel like I get more bang for my buck,” she says.

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“You can’t judge a book by its cover, but you can absolutely try to judge a company by its website.” MIKKI GARDNER

Bryce Brandford (right) with tech community builder and networking pro Zachary Novak.

B RYC E B R A N D F O R D JUNIOR SOF T WARE DEVELOPER , NEO FINANCIAL n his spare time, Bryce Brandford was always a “computer guy,” working with 3D printers, building his own PC and gaming. For 15 years, he also worked a day job as a Red Seal journeyman bricklayer, a career he started right out of high school. Though it provided a good salary and comfortable lifestyle, in 2021, Brandford started to question the idea of doing physically demanding work into his late 30s, 40s and beyond. A friend recommended he look into careers in coding and software development. Since he was still working as a bricklayer, his career transition didn’t happen right away. For six months, Brandford taught himself coding using free resources. He then challenged himself to code for 100 days in a row, just to see if he could (and to make sure he still liked it afterwards). Then, suddenly, his bricklaying safety net disappeared. “I got laid off a week before Christmas [2021], and I decided that was the time where I needed to commit and push myself to really go at it,” says Brandford. “So, I signed up for a full-time coding bootcamp, which was a three-month coding crash course with Lighthouse Labs.” Founded in 2013 by a team of software developers, private training institution Lighthouse Labs offers coding education online and in six Canadian cities, including Calgary. “They taught us how to learn new things, and efficient ways of implementing new technology or different coding languages,” Brandford says.

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Four months after completing the bootcamp, however, Brandford was still out of work, even with post-grad career support from Lighthouse. The training wasn’t the issue, rather, the problem was that he lacked a local network or community in tech, and was now competing with thousands of other graduates for the same jobs. “I realized that cold-applying on LinkedIn for job postings wasn’t really working,” says Brandford. “I went on meetup.com and searched for anything for technology, and I ended up going to every single event, every week, for about three months to try and meet people and get my name out there.” Eventually, he met Zachary Novak, founder of Careers In Technology and Innovation (CITI), a local networking and mentoring community in Calgary that helps people transition into tech industry jobs through hosting informational events with tech companies. From there, Brandford landed his first three-month software position; afterwards, he applied to Neo Financial. The first time, he didn’t land a job, but the second time he was referred internally from a connection he’d made and received a permanent offer as a junior software developer. “There are so many applicants that companies kind of get overloaded,” says Brandford. “That’s where networking comes in and getting a referral to a company, like I did here at Neo. “It’s one of the biggest things when trying to find that first position.”

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A NC A DAN FOUN DER AND CEO, SINGLEPARENTLIFE . APP nca Dan’s foray into tech mirrors the origin stories of many other tech company founders. She encountered a problem that, for one reason or another, had become relatively accepted. She envisioned a way to solve it. And, ultimately, she decided to build the solution herself. For Dan, the problem was the lack of community for single parents. One evening, shortly after she became a single parent, Dan’s child care fell through before a networking event. As a business owner and human resources consultant, such events are vital to her career and income, and, naturally, Dan was upset. But her frustration was based in something even deeper: Dan had immigrated to Canada on her own as a young woman, had no family in the country and her status as a single parent was sudden, unexpected and new. “I was distraught,” says Dan. “In that moment, I had nobody to come and help me.” Dan decided to do some research. She discovered most organic, online forums or groups for value- or identity-based communities weren’t set up to provide actionable support. On the other hand, most apps meant for human connection that Dan looked into were solely focused on dating or sexual relationships. She reached out first to a mentor for advice and shortly after, she came up with her

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may/june 2023


BY DOMINIQUE LAMBERTON

“My advice would be to revise your thoughts and mindset.” ANCA DAN

TOAST OF THE TECH WORLD How a Calgary-based talent organization is helping

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY J A R E D SYC H

Canadian women find their dream roles in tech — and solution, the SingleParentLife.App, which she incorporated in 2021 to provide supportive and safe communities for people like her. SingleParentLife.App uses your location, interests and goals to connect you with other single parents in the area with similar interests and children within the same age bracket. Like many dating apps, users can connect anonymously with one another by swiping to the right, or pass on a connection by swiping left. When two users connect, they can message each other within the app. Just as it takes a village to raise a child, it also takes investors to fund a startup. So far, Dan has bootstrapped her way into making SingleParentLife.App a reality, pitching at events like Innovation Rodeo (where she took the third-place prize), and she’s currently looking for a CTO and developer to get the app live. It’s a major shift from her other work as a consultant for corporate human resource departments, but Dan draws from her own coaching techniques and training to switch her mindset into that of a tech company founder. And she advises other would-be founders to do the same. “My advice would be to revise your thoughts and mindset,” she says. “Transitioning from one profession to another is always challenging, because you [might have] imposter syndrome. Getting rid of those limiting thoughts is really important and paramount in your success.”

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building a tight-knit community along the way. hen April Hicke and Marissa involves removing bias from the selection process: Toast McNeelands met as board creates candidate profiles that include highlights around members for Young Women work experience, education and accomplishments, but in Business, they quickly leave out school and company names, as well as the connected over similar name, photo and other identifying information of the issues they’d seen and candidate. “I truly believe that if we’re pushing diversity, experienced in their maleequity and inclusion into organizations, it has to start in dominated tech workplaces hiring,” says Hicke. “We need to remove some of those — things like a lack of women and diverse talent, salbiases to get the right people in the door that are hired ary disparity, getting left out of technical discussions based on their qualifications.” and perennially being the ones asked to plan the team Before signing on partners, Toast vets companies parties. These persistent problems were part of the to ensure their values align; currently, that’s completed reason the two had each sought camaraderie outside by Hicke, but eventually they’d like to utilize artificial of their full-time roles, including intelligence as part of the 360 review their board positions. process (McNeelands is currently workAs Hicke and McNeelands grew ing towards a Master’s of Management the women-centred community in Artificial Intelligence at Queen’s Unithey lacked in their workplaces, versity; Hicke is completing her MBA something larger began to take via Royal Roads University). “There are shape. “People tended to lean on a lot of organizations that have splashy Marissa and I and ask questions; we DE&I pages, but they’re not great places were coaching women on the side, to work,” says Hicke. She and McNeetalking openly about salary and lands envision a future where the gold negotiating their worth,” says Hicke. standard for a top-tier workplace is a “We kind of made a name for ourpartnership with Toast: “Women could MARISSA MCNEELANDS selves as mentors in that way. And look and say, ‘Oh, they partner with we were like, ‘Wait a minute, can we Toast? Then 100 per cent,’” Hicke says. just do this for a living?’” In addition to placing women in custom-fit roles at So, they did: In 2022, Hicke and McNeelands joined trusted tech organizations, Toast offers a paid monthly forces to create Toast, a talent organization and membership, which provides admission to regular virtual membership-based collective aimed at increasing gender and in-person events and workshops, as well as access diversity in tech. By partnering with companies that to a dedicated community in Slack, an online messaging want to build more diverse and equitable workplaces, platform where members can connect on different topespecially in the lead up to federally mandated ESG ics, share job hunt resources, chat with Toast’s in-house reporting by 2024, Toast is able to place the women in legal and HR expert, plan meetups, share experiences its network into high-quality roles, both full-time and and vent. There are currently more than 100 members contract, with the compensation to match. “Our mission across the country, and over 3,000 people in Toast’s is to help women get the work they want, for the pay candidate roster. they deserve, with a community that supports them,” “We had someone tell us recently that she’s gotten says McNeelands. Toast has partnered with more than 27 more value out of being [a member of] Toast for two organizations since its launch, including Helcim, AltaML days than she did being in another organization for aland PurposeMed, with more signing on all the time. most two years,” says Hicke. “It’s been so rewarding, and Part of Toast’s white-glove job placement formula validating [to tackle] a problem that needs to be solved.”

“our mission is to help women get the work they want, for the pay they deserve.”

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BY KENDALL BISTRETZAN

OPENING DOORS Calgary Economic Development has been pushing our city as a sound bet for tech companies to set up shop. Here are some recent developments.

INFOSYS In September 2022, this global consulting and IT services company announced a new commitment to bring 1,000 jobs to Calgary over the next two years and double its Canadian workforce to 8,000 by 2024. 1800, 401 9 Ave. S.W., infosys.com

MPHASIS The IT solutions provider specializing in cloud and cognitive services was named in 2021 as a partner in the University of Calgary’s Quantum City quantum computing learning space. It established a Calgary office last summer and anticipates creating 1,000 jobs within five years, with a focus on hiring local talent. 2000, 411 1 St. S.E., mphasis.com

SIDETRADE A global fintech firm that offers a unique AI-powered platform for order-to-cash operations, Sidetrade opened its North American headquarters in the Ampersand North tower in Calgary’s downtown last fall, with plans to invest $25 million here over the next three years. 140 4 Ave. S.W., sidetrade.com

IBM CLIENT INNOVATION CENTRE Open in February 2023, the IBM Client Innovation

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Centre (CIC) in the IBM Beltline office is the first of its kind in Western Canada. The purpose of a CIC is to help businesses with digital transformations and provide greater sustainability. The IBM CIC projects it will create 250 to 430 new jobs in the city in the next five years in the areas of AI, hybrid-cloud, 5G and security. 227 11 Ave. S.W., ibm.com

GARMIN CANADA EXPANSION Last February, Garmin Canada announced a major expansion to its Cochrane campus. The company creates cutting-edge GPS, fitness and outdoor technologies, and has a long history in the area: precursor Dynastream Innovations Inc. began as a Cochrane-based startup before being acquired by the multinational Garmin. The expansion is projected to create nearly 200 STEM jobs. Unit 124, 30 Bow St., Cochrane, garmin.com/en-ca/

APPLEXUS TECHNOLOGIES The global company announced in February that it had chosen Calgary for its Canadian headquarters. Applexus provides business consulting services to help manage the usage of SAP software. The move brings an investment of $3 million into downtown and a plan to create more than 100 jobs in the next five years. applexus.com

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BY JACQUIE MOORE PHOTOGRAPHY BY JARED SYCH

DRESSING FOR

WEHAVE What does one do with a background in engineering and fashion design? If you’re Nina Kharey, you make antiviral garments for health-care workers and do right by the planet while you’re at it. et’s get the whole Meghan Markle thing out of the way. On July 17, 2018, the Duchess of Sussex attended an event in London wearing a blush-pink sleeveless trench coat dress. Every fashion magazine from Vogue to Harper’s Bazaar immediately posted photos of Markle accompanied by headlines such as, “Meghan Markle Is Pretty In Blush Pink” and “Meghan Markle is Obsessed with Trench Coat Dresses and So Are We,” and, hilariously understated in Fashionista, “Meghan Markle Wore a Thing.” Meanwhile, in a Calgary suburb, Nina Kharey was pinching herself to make sure she wasn’t dreaming: one of the world’s most-watched women was wearing a dress she’d designed. “It was unbelievable, and she looked amazing in it,” says Kharey, whose luxury womenswear line, Nonie, blew up with orders for the stretchy-soft cotton-blend dress (it can be yours, in pink or black, for $1,085). Already a success in Canada with a long list of devoted clients — including a friend of Markle’s who, Kharey presumes, is how the dress made its way to the Duchess — Kharey became an international fashion star overnight. She was

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thrilled. Until she wasn’t. The Markle moment was, in a way, the beginning of the end of Kharey’s long-held passion for the high-end fashion industry. Kharey was born and raised in northeast Calgary and went to high school in Chestermere. Her parents are from Punjab, India, where they were joined in an arranged marriage before immigrating to Canada in the 1970s. Both were soon employed in the textiles industry: Kharey’s mom made men’s suits, and her dad managed a factory that produced knitwear. She recalls the day her dad showed her a sketch of a sweater and, soon after, the completed sweater itself. Magic. “I was amazed at how someone’s thoughts could be made to be worn by people,” she says. Ironically, that moment lit Kharey’s fire for fashion design — ironic because her parents were not supportive of her new interest in their work as a career choice for their daughter. “They said, ‘we didn’t come here all the way from India for you to do what we do,’” says Kharey. “They were very clear that they wanted more for me.” By “more,” her parents meant doctor, lawyer or engineer. Kharey considered the first but ultimately pursued the latter, enrolling in the engineering program at the University of Calgary in 2001 (a decision she appreciates more now than she did at the time) and graduating in 2007.

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I was amazed at how someone’s thoughts could be made to be worn by people.

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– “My husband Sandeep and I had a conversation back then about how everything is engineered, even the trees around the campus,” says Kharey. “I realize now how much engineering has helped me understand life, and how a lot of this world we live in is cause and effect.” Maybe, she adds, smiling, “that’s all life really is and free will is just an illusion.” Belying Kharey’s lighthearted existential musing is years of intense emotional distress growing up in a volatile home. From about the age of 10, Kharey was thrust into a role of peacekeeper and caretaker in her family, while her brother Jaspreet was a constant source of angst and anger for their rigidly traditional parents. “My brother was always getting into trouble,” says Kharey, who remembers Jaspreet as loving and fiercely protective of her. “He was labelled as ‘trouble’ and that’s what happens — you’re labelled, and you grow up to fulfill that, and then you don’t know how to get out of the situation you’re in.” Afraid for their son’s future and ill-equipped to help navigate his thorny path, Kharey says her parents did their best in their capabilities, though their coping strategies often involved screaming and physical violence. Now a mother herself to two young children, including a six-year-old boy who looks uncannily like Jaspreet, Kharey says it’s achingly apparent to her what her brother needed to thrive. “From about Grade 6, Jaspreet really needed an arm around him telling him he was doing alright,” says Kharey. “He didn’t get that kind of support — our parents let him down, teachers let him down, friends let him down and, eventually, the police let him down.” Kharey says that even as her brother encouraged his sister’s dream of a career in fashion, he lost the plot in his own story. “Jaspreet was keen on going into law — he was very smart in school, much smarter than me, and he loved the book To Kill a Mockingbird.” Instead, an adolescent Jaspreet got heavily involved with drugs and gang life. On Jan. 4, 2005, at the age of 25, he walked out of a northwest Calgary fitness club and was shot to death. Kharey’s parents have scarcely uttered their son’s name since. They turned to religion to save them, while Kharey, who was mid-degree when her brother died, “went the other way — I went into self-discovery.” She became acutely grateful for her life and

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NINA KHAREY IN FOLDS ANTIVIRAL SCRUBS.

for what she learned from her brother who, she says, “pushed me to do what I love.” The circumstances of her brother’s death also instilled in her a strong resolve “to always try to figure out the truth of things, because I saw how much easier it is to live with honesty rather than with lies.” She routinely speaks to youth about her brother’s final tragic years, and about the horrors of gang life. Following her Markle moment and subsequent rise in the fashion world, Kharey was invited to New York Fashion Week and other couture shows and events. Privy to a closer look at couture design, manufacturing and marketing, she became increasingly appalled at the waste, consumerism and ego

she saw. At one elaborate New York show she witnessed a truckload of food that had been used merely as decor thrown into the trash. “I couldn’t believe what some brands will spend on a 10-minute show,” she says. The advent of the pandemic brought yet more clarity. Suddenly, her Nonie clients weren’t interested in buying expensive dresses nor, Kharey discovered, was she interested in creating them. Instead, early in lockdown when there was a shortage of personal protective equipment for healthcare workers, she created a medical-grade mask that her company produced at a rate of upwards of 2,000 per week. “I loved being able to provide masks, and I wanted to help

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I realize now how much engineering has helped me understand life.

more,” says Kharey. “That’s when I decided to just stop what I’d been doing with Nonie and do something better for the earth and for people — I wanted to make something that was needed.” In 2021, Kharey’s technical savvy, fashion pedigree and commitment to meaningful work converged in the creation of her company, Folds, which develops “disruptive” techwear for medical professionals. Modern medical attire hasn’t had a shining moment since the 1970s. That’s when female nurses stopped wearing white dresses and caps, and surgical greens — a.k.a. the “scrubs” worn by male nurses and surgeons — became the norm across the medical community. It was a practical, unifying step. Oddly, however, aside from the introduction of colourful patterns and some moisturewicking fabrics, the look and feel of scrubs has remained immune to sartorial and technological advancements. When COVID put health-care professionals in the spotlight, Kharey decided she could do better for them. While white-collar professionals can clothe themselves in designer suits, “health-care professionals, who are so dedicated to their work, have to wear uniforms that haven’t been updated in decades.” Nurses, doctors, and other professionals in scrubs should have their own version of a Prada suit, she says. With a Star Trek-meets-Lululemon aes-

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thetic, Kharey’s line of scrubs are as practical as they are, dare we say, sexy. The tops are tailored rather than boxy, and the pants are joggers with a drawstring and elasticized ankle cuffs. The uniforms come in juicy colours with names like Mars, Neptune and Ocean. While the company’s official word on the intention of the clothing line is that “Folds is for health-care professionals … anyone who needs protective, performancebased medical techwear which is also good for our planet,” Kharey says the scrubs are popular among chefs. The Folds fabric has been Kharey’s happiest point of pride. For a moment, she had considered using fabric made antibacterial via a DuPont product. But then: “A friend pointed me to the documentary The Devil We Know [a 2018 film that explores health hazards and coverups by the chemical company] and I was like, ‘no way.’” Soft and stretchy, the fabric Kharey landed on instead is a feat of innovation that called for a deep dive into her engineering mind. Working in partnership with a Spanish tech company and a lab that is also in Spain, Kharey developed a protective, breathable, naturally hydrating fabric, made from recycled material, that has antiviral, antimicrobial and antibacterial properties. It uses silver technology and a carbon compound to inhibit the growth of bacteria and viruses.

Basically, viruses can’t live on the material and, so, as Kharey explains, the scrubs reduce risk of infection by not releasing polluted microfibers into the air. Testing by the Doherty Institute (an academic research institute in Melbourne, Australia) shows that the antiviral technology eliminates more than 99 per cent of viruses tested, including staphylococcus and SARS-CoV-2. Dr. Robin Gallardi, an oral and maxillofacial surgeon in Chicago, was an early fan of Folds. “I’ve tried many scrubs, and these are the most comfortable and durable — they withstand laundering and look brand new every time I put them on,” she says. “Considering the current climate, I’ve been especially impressed with their antimicrobial technology.” Folds also reflects Kharey’s move to reduce environmental harm. “The textile industry is responsible for four per cent of global solid waste — it’s the third-most polluting industry,” says Kharey. She and her team of five are working toward B Corp. certification, the highest level of environmental and social responsibility a company can achieve. The scrubs follow a “circular” model of production that leaves no waste; when your uniform wears out (Kharey says that should take about two years of regular wear, which is twice as long as a standard, frequently worn set of scrubs) they can be returned to the company where they will be melted, turned into pellets, and re-woven into new fabric. The Nonie label abides as an occasional playground for Kharey when she has time and inclination to dip back into couture. But what fills her up is her ongoing disruption of the medical-uniform industry. Kharey has not only dramatically elevated the comfort, safety and sustainability of medical wear, but her contemporary, fashion-forward approach gives health-care professionals tacit permission to look and feel stylish. That’s a bold shift that could only have been imagined in a rare mind under extraordinary circumstances — an engineer, global fashion star, and entrepreneur with an urgent commitment to transparent social and environmental responsibility. Perhaps what makes Kharey most remarkable is that she innovates with people in mind. Her brother. Her children. And the ones who take care of all of us.

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TRANSFORMING CALGARY INTO A HUB FOR FINTECH INNOVATION The Digital Commerce Calgary Fintech Award helps local fintech companies get the jumpstart they need to succeed. Launching and growing a new business is difficult. Entrepreneurs often struggle to raise funds, build connections, and get exposure for themselves and their product or services. That’s why the Digital Commerce Calgary Fintech Award proves to be a game changer — and the inaugural winners of the award demonstrate that. Two financial technology startups took home a grand total of $310,000 last year to accelerate their businesses. Fillip Fleet and

Woveo (formerly called Miq), the first place and runner-up competitors, respectively, won North America’s largest fintech award. The award and program is a partnership between Digital Commerce Group of Companies — including DC Bank — headquartered in Calgary and Platform Calgary, a hub for Calgary’s tech ecosystem that supports founders from ideation to scale. Jeffrey Smith and Susan Anderson, co-founders of DC Bank, support the Calgary Fintech Award as a way to help local fintech founders and ensure talent stays in Calgary. When they started their original fintech business in Calgary in 1997, they found it challenging to find investment, resources and support. Through

the award, Smith hopes that other local fintech companies can access what they need to launch and grow their companies in Calgary. Digital Commerce Group of Companies has committed more than $1 million over four years to support fintech startups through the Calgary Fintech Award, and it’s off to a fruitful start. Fillip, a digital-first payment platform for business fleets that allows drivers to pay for fuel and maintenance expenses through a secure digital wallet, made huge strides in growth as a result of winning the top prize. “It’s $250,000 of non-diluted funding, and it had great impact on our business,” says Alice Reimer, Fillip’s CEO. “We’ve been able to recruit, train and retain some amazing folks. Winning the Calgary Fintech Award has allowed us to add incremental headcount to our organization so we can actually work to capture leads not only through inbound sales, but build our growth strategy through outbound sales.” For Reimer, winning the award also validated the work Fillip is doing to bring a digital-first, mobile-first experience to a traditional industry. “The fuel card industry has not changed in 40 years,” she says. “We're really leading the digital transformation of the fleet fuel card industry to enable the energy transition.” She adds that VISA took notice of the fact that they won the award

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ALICE REIMER AND JEFFREY SMITH

and were very supportive in sponsoring Fillip. In just over a year since launching, the company is already serving hundreds of small businesses across Canada including clients in Yukon and Newfoundland and Labrador. Plans to expand to the United States will unfold later this year. Jonah Chininga, CEO and co-founder of Woveo, can relate. Woveo earned $60,000, in second place, for its community banking platform that allows newcomers to Canada to build credit history. “We started the business from lived experiences,” he says. “Me and my co-founders, we are all immigrants to Canada and our biggest challenge settling in Canada was our access to credit.” Woveo offers newcomers an alternative to build credit, without getting into debt that leaves them vulnerable to creditors and lenders. Currently, it’s in beta testing with 1,000 users and has a waitlist of 16 communities with more than 14,000 users. A public launch is scheduled for May. “We have been building momentum since we won the Digital Commerce Calgary Fintech Award and moving to Calgary has been really great for the company,” affirms Chininga. Woveo was founded in PEI but relocated to Calgary last fall, drawn to the expertise in Calgary’s business community, especially in the fintech space. Beyond the cash prize, the award gave Woveo visibility and credibility that Chininga says was instrumental to one of their biggest outcomes: securing a bank sponsorship. “Winning the award helped us with the resources to do our rebranding, SOC2 compliance [an industry standard framework prerequisite for bank

partnership] and securing partnership with a bank,” says Chininga. Both Reimer and Chininga attest to the benefits of participating in the Digital Commerce Calgary Fintech Award program, beyond the monetary rewards. Over six weeks, participants have access to workshops and coaching to connect with advisors, mentors and judges, and learn valuable skills for accelerating their startups. “Starting a business is hard; starting a tech business is harder, but starting a fintech

“We have been building momentum since we won the Digital Commerce Calgary Fintech Award and moving to Calgary has been really great for the company.”

business is way harder because you have to deal with so many things,” says Chininga. “You benefit from the education and mentorship.” Chininga says the workshops gave his team better understanding of the fintech industry and insights on everything from compliance to financial services and legal matters. Reimer points out that Calgary has all the right components to build leading, globally competitive fintech companies, because of its educated workforce, opportunities and available capital — and the award offers an additional critical boost. “We are not yet established, but we are way past emerging,” she says. "We have the right ingredients and now we're putting in the work — I'm bullish on what the future holds.” JONAH CHININGA

Jonah Chininga, CEO and co-founder of Woveo Apply now for the 2023 Digital Commerce Calgary Fintech Award. Application deadline is June 5, 2023. The awards ceremony will take place in October. 25 startups will be selected, 10 will advance and a final five will pitch for the cash prize. Three winners will split $300,000+ in non-dilutive cash. To learn more and apply, visit CalgaryFintechAward.com.


N O R M A L LY B U SY 9 T H AV E N U E S . E . , E N G U L F E D BY R I S I N G F LO O D WAT E R S IN JUNE 2013.

In June 2013, flooding in Calgary caused $2 billion in damages. Since then, the City has taken steps to be more resilient than ever.

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BY DREW ANDERSON

T

he water came so fast on June 20, 2013, that the man in charge of monitoring the flow for the City of Calgary wasn’t sure he could believe what he was seeing. Before long, he truly couldn’t believe what he was seeing because so much of the monitoring infrastructure — from gauges to radar — was damaged by the flood itself. Frank Frigo, a hydrologist and now the manager of environmental management for the City of Calgary, says, at one point, they were sending staff out with cellphones to monitor the gauges and relay rising water levels. “There were several points where the sheer awe at the power of nature made it difficult to accept that what we were seeing was, in fact, occurring,” Frigo says. Much of the city was also in awe and disbelief: streets, houses and commercial buildings flooded; events were cancelled; entire neighbourhoods, including downtown, were evacuated; one person died; and it’s estimated over $6 billion worth of property and infrastructure was damaged in southern Alberta. Calgarians from across the city rushed into the worst affected areas, muddying boots and rolling up their sleeves to help fill sandbags, and then to help clean up. Now, 10 years on, a period that has been overseen by six premiers, three provincial governments under three different parties and two mayors; and has had countless public staff turnovers; the lesson of just how quickly things can change has stuck.

A Look Back For three days in June 2013, the sky opened up, drenching Calgary and surrounding areas with

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around 250 millimetres of precipitation in the hardest hit areas, a deluge that mixed with spring snowmelt from the Rockies to heave rivers in the Bow Valley five or six metres over their usual summer levels. Without much notice, the City scrambled to react, lowering the Glenmore Reservoir to its minimum level before the surge hit on the Elbow. On the Bow, reservoirs operated by TransAlta also emptied to make way for the coming flood waters. Those actions prevented an even bigger disaster, but were not enough to contain the torrents. Water was soon roaring over the Glenmore Dam’s walls and swamping the downstream neighbourhoods. Soaked earth couldn’t absorb any more water. Overwhelmed sewers couldn’t handle the flow. One of the worst-hit communities was the inner-city neighbourhood of Sunnyside, just north of the Bow, which drowned in runoff from higher ground and backup from outdated sewers. In all, the flood impacted 32 communities across Calgary. Homes were ruined. Lives were torn apart by stress. It’s estimated the losses within the city were $2 billion — including $409 million worth of City of Calgary infrastructure, earning it the title at the time of being Canada’s costliest natural disaster. “[The flood] took out portions of the LRT, it took out major pieces of infrastructure, a number of bridges, it shut down major transportation networks, which not only complicated the recovery and response efforts, but also impacted the economy in far-reaching ways for not just days, but weeks and in some cases, months down the road,” says Frigo. But, even then, in the midst of a rapid and chaotic response, there was remarkable collaboration, he says. City officials across departments gathered in the new Calgary Emergency Management Agency centre and were joined by representatives from utilities, including Telus, ATCO and Enmax in order to deal with a cascading set of crises and responses.

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E A U C L A I R E PAT H WAYS S I N C E 2 0 1 3 I N C L U D E F LO O D M I T I G AT I O N F E AT U R E S TO B E T T E R P ROT E C T D O W N TO W N .

According to Daniel Henstra, a professor of political science at the University of Waterloo, who is researching governance of flood responses in Canada, the scale of it all created what’s known as a focusing event. “There’s a sense of urgency to do something about the problem, at least in the short period after a major event like this happens,” Henstra says. The challenge then becomes maintaining that sense of urgency once the waters recede.

The Response Henstra says one thing that stands out about the response is how the City realized the broad scope of the issue it was facing. This wasn’t one crisis, but a reminder of the city’s — and the region’s — complex relationship to water. As the climate crisis takes hold, that relationship is increasingly marked by unpredictability: flood and drought. Not only was the City looking long-term, it also brought together a diverse group of experts — sociologists, engineers, designers and others — to form the Expert Management Panel and advise the City on how best to tackle the issues. “What works in terms of the stickiness around the focus on flooding, is if you can create an institutional structure that 60

“‘FLOOD’ IS AN ISSUE THAT IS BIGGER THAN JUST ‘FLOOD,’ IN A LOT OF WAYS. IT IS ABOUT TOTAL WATER MANAGEMENT.” FR ANK FR IG O, CITY O F CALG ARY

keeps it on the agenda,” Henstra says. The Expert Management Panel’s recommendations formed the backbone of the City’s Flood Resilience Plan, which established guiding principles and measurable milestones in order to track progress as the years ticked by and attention spans wavered. It also established a holistic view of the water the city uses and attempts to control. “What our senior leadership did and our politicians did, was after the flood, they realized that ‘flood’ is an issue that is bigger than just ‘flood,’ in a lot of ways,” Frigo says. “It is about total water management.” Flooding, drought, safety, environmental impacts, social impacts, recreation, history, drinking water supply and quality, and regional collaboration: all of those factors came to bear on the City’s response to the floods. Centred around the confluence of the Bow and the Elbow, Calgary’s relationship to these rivers has been key to its identity since its inception, and well before that when First Nations gathered here. The Bow and Elbow Rivers are rich with culture and are important to Calgarians, who see them as important aesthetic and recreational assets. Today, rafters dot the waters during hot summer days, while tourists come from around the world to fly fish in the Bow. The banks of both rivers are lined with pathways and parks that are some of the most cherished public spaces in the city. Frigo says a big part of the success of the response is due to public engagement. The City reached out to groups and individuals, but it was also held to task by determined locals including the Calgary River Communities Action Group (CRCAG). “Having that consistent voice, knowing that elected folks can sometimes focus just on the term in front of them rather than the long term, we think was really critical,” says Tony Morris, who serves as co-president of the group alongside Brenda Leeds Binder. CRCAG worked hard to ensure the Springbank off-stream reservoir, a key barrier for the Elbow, moved ahead, despite changing political whims and fierce opposition. It also pushed back against regulations the Province wanted to bring in for homeowners rebuilding after the flood, and focused on the critical but often overlooked process of developing land-use bylaws. “One thing we’ve always said is that we don’t want that policy to undo the good work of good infrastructure, and bad policy can absolutely do that,” Morris says.

Where We Stand There are some big-ticket items in Calgary’s water management and flood protection. The Springbank may/june 2023

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IMAGE COURTESY OF 02 DESIGN

Off-Stream Reservoir is being built west of the city to divert and hold water in the event of flooding. The Government of Alberta is investing a total of $744 million into the construction of the Springbank OffStream Reservoir, while the Government of Canada contributed $168.5 million to the project. There are also defences that moonlight as great place-making initiatives. Examples include the treelined Eau Claire pathways near the Peace Bridge, which include a flood wall being built to protect downtown, and the unique Dale Hodges Park, a public art project that doubles as a stormwater treatment area. There are also all of the unsexy bits and pieces that fit into the larger whole, such as storm sewer upgrades and the agreement between the Province and TransAlta to manage the company dams, not just for power, but for drinking water and flooding, as well. Frigo, in addition to having his improved monitoring, can now also access an extensive database that shows the economic impacts of different flood levels in order to measure costs, benefits and outcomes. It’s what allows him the precision to say the flood risk has diminished by 54 per cent — a figure that will climb to 70 per cent once the Springbank Reservoir is complete. “The entire City of Calgary water group is very proactive and forward-looking,” says Kim Sturgess, PhD, the CEO of environmental consulting company WaterSMART. “So, when it comes to the things they needed to do, quite a few of them are done.” That’s not to say the work is complete. More dams on the Bow River upstream of Calgary are in the exploratory phase and are likely years from construction. Morris and Leeds Binder are still working hard to ensure the Springbank off-stream reservoir moves forward and on schedule. There’s also a lot of work to do on natural infrastructure that maintains a healthy environment, clean water and helps with flood and drought, says Sturgess. And there are more policy pieces that need to be in place before some decisions are made and some impacts known. Updated flood maps from the Province are expected this year and that could have repercussions for where, and how, the City builds into the future. A berm slated for Bowness is on hold while other options along the Bow are explored.

The Calgary Factor Henstra says one of the difficulties in studying cities is that “when you look at various factors that could be considered as determinants of certain behaviours, it often comes down to one avenuecalgary.com

B E A U T Y A N D F U N C T I O N : B U I LT O N T H E S I T E O F A F O R M E R G R AV E L P I T, D A L E H O D G E S PA R K D O U B L E S A S A STO R M WAT E R T R E AT M E N T SYST E M .

“THE ENTIRE CITY OF CALGARY WATER GROUP IS PROACTIVE AND FORWARD-LOOKING. WHEN IT COMES TO THE THINGS THEY NEEDED TO DO, QUITE A FEW OF THEM ARE DONE.” KIM ST URG ESS , CEO O F WAT ER SMART

or two people who are just particularly astute, are champions of something, who are able to not only have the technical knowledge, but also the capacity to sell it to decision-makers.” It could also come down to something as basic as a solitary City worker who’s particularly adept at writing grants. For flood mitigation, that could mean the difference between a riverfront walkway, a dirt berm or a giant gap in a city’s armour. In Calgary, there were — and are — people like Frigo, who, 10 years on, still talks excitedly about flood mitigation and how far the city has come. There’s the Calgary River Communities team, still working to ensure governments don’t get distracted, despite the fact Morris swore it wouldn’t become his retirement project (it has). The crisis formed collaborative bonds that have lasted, thanks to that continued energy. They’re needed as the City and the Province continue to think about how we manage river basins as a whole, in the face of a changing climate. Frigo and his team have more time to prepare for a coming flood thanks to improved forecasting and monitoring. There is now an emergency response plan in place that considers everything from the Calgarians sleeping rough by the rivers to commu61


I N 2 0 1 3 , C A LG A R I A N S F RO M A L L O V E R T H E C I T Y C A M E TO H E L P W I T H C L E A N U P E F F O RT S I N H A R D - H I T CO M M U N I T I E S .

FLOOD OF PROGRESS The City of Calgary’s Flood Resilience Plan includes three areas of work: upstream flood protection, community level protection and property level protection. In addition to building and partnership planning, better monitoring and updated emergency response plans also help protect the city against flooding in the future. These are some of the building projects at various stages of completion for flood mitigation. GLENMORE DAM GATES (complete). New 2.5-m-high steel gates on the dam double the reservoir’s storage capacity.

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THE REAL STORY OF HOW THE REGION RESPONDED, AND HOW IT NOW MANAGES ITS WATER, HAS MORE TO DO WITH THOSE NEIGHBOURS RUSHING IN TO HELP.

BOW RIVER RESERVOIR OPTIONS The Province is currently assessing three options for a reservoir on the Bow. GHOST LAKE RESERVOIR OPERATIONS AGREEMENT The Province and TransAlta have an agreement to keep the Ghost Lake Reservoir levels low during flood season in order to help control the river’s flow. PERMANENT FLOOD BARRIERS Barriers in Downtown, West Eau Claire, HillhurstSunnyside, Inglewood, Bowness, Heritage Drive and the Bonnybrook Water Treatment Plant are in various states of completion. SUNNYSIDE STORMWATER LIFT STATIONS (complete). Pump Station #1 has a new lift station and Pump Station #2 has been improved. SANITARY LIFT STATIONS (complete). Both the Sunnyside and Roxboro sanitary lift stations have been completed. may/june 2023

P H OTO BY J A R E D SYC H

nity evacuations and bridge closures. “We realized that, in the same way that the Bow and Elbow River catchments that provide the water to Calgary are so much bigger than the municipal jurisdiction of Calgary itself, the solutions need to be much bigger than just the geographic landscape or the political and social landscape of the local municipality,” Frigo says. His department now has the tools it needs; sewers have been upgraded; flood walls, a dry dam, berms and more have been constructed from the outskirts of the city right to its core. There has even been some room for beauty, integrating flood mitigation with public spaces along the river’s edge. But the real story of how the region responded, and how it now manages its water, has more to do with those neighbours rushing in to help than it does any of the bricks, mortar, earth, bits, bytes and radars that reduce the city’s flood risk. It’s about collaboration. And it’s about people. “I can tell you that many of the relationships internally that I built in responding to the flood remain important to carrying on the work that we’ve done since then, in terms of recovery and resilience,” Frigo says. “I’m happy to say we’re in a really, really different place today.” This story has been updated to correct errors in the budget for the Springbank Off-Stream Reservoir.

SPRINGBANK RESERVOIR (under construction). When complete, this reservoir, combined with the extra capacity at Glenmore, would protect Elbow River communities from flooding at the level seen in 2013.


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and information security. Another challenge is keeping graduates current with the latest knowledge through continued learning, such as short courses, bootcamps and updating credentials. “You can’t just assume that once you’ve graduated, what you have will be the only thing you rely on for the rest of your career,” says Wood. She emphasizes how SAIT’s innovative approach to ensuring its program Collaborative learning at SAIT’s School for Advanced Digital Technology outcomes meet the needs is empowering future tech leaders. of today’s workforce — which includes students working directly with industry — helps meet the needs of Calgary’s economic diversification. As different businesses consider Calgary as a place to expand or set up shop, “we make sure we are tied into what competencies are required by companies, whether they are a startup or a large corporation,” says Wood. “There are so many different levels of talent needed throughout SAIT’s innovative approach helps students and graduates acquire the breadth of the types of industries and maintain the technology tools they need for success. and corporations we work with. We’re building on the foundations of programs on a yearly basis, or setting Preparing post-secondary students for individuals who have previous work Calgary’s ever-evolving economy means up new programs every two years. experience or education as well as “A program that is a couple of years embracing innovation and challenging helping new students coming out of old runs the risk of becoming outdated traditional boundaries. That’s just what Grade 12.” at a time when technology is advancing Dr. Raynie Wood, Dean of School for SAIT’s work-integrated learning or accelerating at a pace we’ve never Advanced Digital Technology (SADT), opportunities help students and seen before,” Wood says. “Innovation and the SAIT team do. businesses coming to Calgary share for us means challenging the status For the institution to be innovative, experiences, working collaboratively to quo and always looking to be the best, Wood says it’s about having a solve challenges. It’s a win/win, ensuring but also recognizing there are going to heightened level of awareness around students are prepared for career be the foundations of technology and inflection points on the technology success and industry has the talent media. So how do we make sure our landscape — being mindful of what’s they need. graduates have the problem solving, happening and changing. “Organizations don’t want to move critical thinking and power skills to “More importantly,” she adds, “it’s the somewhere they don’t have access to adaptation and acceleration of updating continue to adapt and grow?” talent so we take our responsibility really To address this need for new a program to ensure we meet the needs seriously, making sure the workforce is innovative options tailored for today’s for graduate preparation and direct here,” affirms Wood. “Give someone the workforce, SADT introduced four new transition to working.” skills and opportunities to continually programs in 2023 — two focusing on One of the traditional boundaries upgrade their knowledge, and they will information technology as well as one higher education has had to overcome carry that with them forever.” on data analytics, and another on cyber is the established method of updating

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CUTTING-EDGE APPROACHES TO CITY-BUILDING In just 15 years, Calgary Municipal Land Corporation has completely transformed Calgary’s east end — and there’s more on the horizon.

A TEAM OF INNOVATORS AND CHANGEMAKERS

Transforming an area that was once considered by many to be stagnant into a lively part of Calgary requires a powerhouse team dedicated to creativity and change. At the helm of the CMLC team is Kate Thompson, the corporation’s president and CEO. Thompson spent years working as an architect before joining CMLC in 2013. Now, she oversees more than $1 billion in development projects and steers a team that has earned a reputation for thinking outside the box and making big things happen.

“Our team is very ambitious and goaloriented. Given the opportunity to at eT ho reach beyond the mp son norm, we all take it — and that means we sometimes take risks and try different things,” says Thompson. “Our goal is to create exceptional spaces and experiences for people in new and exciting ways.” CMLC sees opportunities to innovate in all aspects of its work. That bold thinking is the reason Calgary is home to a 1-kilometre cross-country ski loop in the heart of downtown, a natural oasis in the middle of the Bow River called St. Patrick’s Island, and a combined parkade and innovation centre that can evolve into a mixed-use development as the need for parking subsides. K

Founded in 2007, Calgary Municipal Land Corporation (CMLC) has more than delivered on its mission to bring East Village back to life. The change started with the Rivers District Community Revitalization Plan — a public infrastructure program for a 504-acre stretch of Calgary’s east end that leveraged a unique funding model. Add in CMLC’s innovative approach to city-building, and the result is a vibrant and sought-after community.

CONTINUED INNOVATION FOR THE CITY’S FUTURE

CMLC is 15 years into its work and “the results speak for themselves,” says Thompson. “The area feels different. The goal was to make East Village feel like a

special and unique spot in our city.” To date, more than $400 million has been invested in infrastructure in East Village, including much-loved spots like the Simmons Building, Jack & Jean Leslie RiverWalk and the award-winning Central Library. This work has attracted over $3 billion in private investment to the community, and CMLC’s work is not done yet. Currently, CMLC is energizing The Culture and Entertainment District in east Victoria Park, where there is already $600 million in innovative city-building projects underway. The BMO Centre expansion, the Victoria Park/Stampede Station rebuild, the 17th Avenue extension and the Stampede Trail project will only continue to enhance how liveable Calgary is and how enticing it is for visitors. “These projects will shift how people use our city. The 17th Avenue extension across Macleod Trail will change people's perception of that area by expanding the footprint of downtown,” says Thompson. CMLC’s reimagination of existing spaces is what helps to make the city great. The BMO Centre expansion project, scheduled for completion by the summer of 2024, will double the centre’s capacity for hosting and put Calgary on the map as an international convention destination. CMLC’s leadership is also stewarding the Arts Commons Transformation project, currently in the design phase, which will see a major expansion with the construction of a new building and a 1,000-seat theatre. To learn more, visit calgarymlc.ca.


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THE MAKINGS OF AN INNOVATIVE EDUCATION Mount Royal University uses innovation and real-life experiences to foster confidence in its students.

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Be bold, curious and take risks you’ve never considered. This is what being innovative is all about. That’s what Chad London encourages Mount Royal University (MRU) students to do. Innovation is nothing new for MRU students or staff. The post-secondary institution offers several futurefocused programs that help foster an innovative mindset, including the Alberta Inclusive Innovation Initiative, CityXLab, the Innovation Sprint and the LaunchPad Lab. “There is a practical element to offering courses that are future-focused and incorporate emerging tools and technology,” says London, MRU provost and vice-president, academic. “If a student has used extended reality in a course, for example, this is knowledge they bring to their dL

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careers and it makes them comfortable with exploring new solutions and technology we don’t have in front of us yet.” Having such an innovative mindset means incorporating many tenets of higher education, but what stands out at MRU is how students are encouraged to examine their perspectives through critical thought. They’re constantly asked what it means to challenge the status quo while considering other ideas and perspectives. “The job of a provost at a university is to help define and implement academic priorities and align our resources to make it happen,” says London. “I can only do this by building and nurturing relationships across MRU to ensure I understand how best to support the incredible, vibrant academic culture we have here.” One of those academic priorities is equipping students with the in-the-field skills and confidence they need to succeed and be innovative in the workforce. “Mount Royal is proud to provide students with experiences that complement what they learn in their courses through work-integrated learning opportunities that cover a wide range of fields,” London explains. More than 70 per cent of the degrees offered at MRU include workintegrated learning, such as co-op

placements, internships, practicums and work experiences. Also known for its smaller class sizes, MRU’s faculty and students develop strong working relationships, where instructors interact directly with students and invest in their success. “Students are given space to use their voice in the classroom, share ideas with peers and get access to their professors as they work on class assignments and overcome obstacles,” says London. “This is what builds confidence in future graduates and lets them know they are ready to contribute to the workplace, and that what they bring to the table is of value to an organization.” Such confidence is being exhibited by students long after graduation, and the innovative mindset being encouraged by MRU faculty carries over to the workforce. “I have often heard from employers that Mount Royal graduates bring new ideas from their studies that spur innovation in their organizations,” says London. “The goal is to have students leave us being able to face challenges with courage and uncover new capabilities.” The journey of an innovative education is ongoing, and for London, one that shouldn’t end at graduation. “I challenge myself to remain open and curious, similar to our students. I don’t pretend to have all the answers,” he says. “The learning doesn’t stop once you graduate and that’s what makes life so fulfilling.”

To begin or continue your innovative learning experience, visit mru.ca/Innovation.


Make your summer menu sweeter with cool, creamy treats Explore the Lactan tia Ice Cream and Milkshake M ix Portfolio

Let’s connect TM

WWW.LACTALISFOODSERVICE.CA @LACTALISCANADAFOODSERVICE


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BY CARMEN CHENG AND CHANRY THACH

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JARED SYCH

FOOD STYLING BY CHRIS LANDRY

2023

30Best thingsto Eat & Drink

F O O D W R I T E R S C A R M E N C H E N G A N D C H A N RY T H A C H O N C E A G A I N T E A M E D U P T O TA S T E T H E I R WAY A R O U N D C A L G A RY, C R E AT I N G A N E W L I S T O F T H E M O S T D E L I C I O U S F O O D A N D D R I N K P RO D U C T S T H E C I T Y H A S TO O F F E R R I G H T N O W.

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RICE ROLLS From Hung’s Noodles One of my favourite ingredients to include in a hot pot spread is Hung’s Noodles’ rice rolls. These soft, chewy rolls from the long-time noodle and wrapper maker come plain, or studded with green onions. I love to slice and pan fry them to create a crispy crust. —C.T. Multiple retailers, including Lucky Supermarket and T&T, hungsnoodles.com, @hungs.noodles

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STEAK, STOUT & GRUYÈRE PIE From Pie Junkie The classic steak pie gets an upgrade at Pie Junkie, which adds Gruyère and rich, malty stout to the meaty mix inside its legendary buttery crust. This indulgent and hearty pie was originally created for Canmore Brewing Company to feature its Mineside Stout, but became so popular that it’s now sold at all Pie Junkie locations. —C.C. Four Calgary locations, 403-452-3960 piejunkie.ca, @piejunkieyyc

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BEURRE NORMANDE From Mari Bakeshop Biting into Mari Bakeshop’s flaky Beurre Normande is a heavenly experience. Croissant dough is wrapped around a small stick of butter that has been rolled in a mixture of sugar and salt. It’s then sprinkled with Turbinado sugar just before baking, resulting in a decadent treat that’s slightly sweet, salty and buttery with a light, crunchy texture. —C.C. 103 St. Matthew Sq. N.E., 403-214-0629 maribakeshop.ca, @maribakeshop

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UBE QUESO ICE CREAM From Abbey’s Creations If you’re a fan of ube desserts, this ice cream is a must-try. Ube, a purple yam, is creamy and nutty with hints of vanilla and coconut; in this flavour, it’s swirled with queso, a popular Filipino ice cream variety made with cheddar cheese, which adds a touch of salty-savouriness. Created by Abbey Claro, who moved to Calgary from the Philippines in 2009, Abbey’s Creations offers a huge lineup of house-made ice creams, many of which nod to Asian flavours. —C.C. Multiple Calgary locations, 403-452-3299 abbeys.net, @abbeys.yyc

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GLUTEN FREE BISON LASAGNA From Soffritto The bolognese for this rich, cheesy lasagna starts with a base of onions, carrots and celery (known as soffritto), before ground bison, tomatoes and a generous glug of red wine join in. The slow-simmered sauce is then layered with corn and rice pasta sheets, as well as Alberta mozzarella cheese, for a comfort meal that’s easy to heat up from frozen any night of the week. —C.C. Four Calgary locations, 403-278-2728 soffritto.ca, @soffrittocalgary

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AJEBUTTER WING RUB By The Spice Bar Spice up your wing game with this savoury combination of black pepper, curry, thyme, ginger, onion powder, paprika, salt and cayenne. Whether you’re grilling, roasting or tossing your wings in the air fryer, this rub adds an incred-

ible depth of flavour. And don’t stop at chicken wings — we love it on turkey wings, roasted veggies and chicken thighs, too! You’ll be licking your fingers and reaching for more. —C.T. spicebaryyc.com, @spicebaryyc

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GINGER BEEF JERKY By Pioneer Butchery & Charcuterie Born on a hunting trip in Kananaskis, Pioneer was created by Taylor Gant and brothers Allan and Greg Dixon to fill a gap in the market for ethically raised and locally sourced meats. The thick-cut Ginger Beef Jerky is a perfect example of this mission: Made with grass-fed beef and bursting with juicy flavour from fresh ginger and garlic, it’s a far cry from the dry, tasteless gas station variety. I eat mine the Cambodian way, with sticky rice and a crispy fried egg. —C.T. Multiple retailers, including Blush Lane and Bridgeland Market, pioneeryyc.com, @pioneeryyc

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DADDY C’S JAMAICAN JERK SAUCE By Daddy C’s Scotch bonnet peppers, warm spices and a touch of acidity combine in this robust sauce that’s great with meat, vegetables, even eggs. I like to marinate chicken thighs in it overnight, throw the pan in the oven and serve with rice and vegetables. Vindel Chang, also known as Daddy C, is a chef from Jamaica and co-owns the business with his partner, Yvonne. Daddy C’s Jamaican Jerk Sauce is available at retailers across the province in hot, mild, and vegan varieties. —C.C. dcjerk.ca, @daddycsjerksauce 71


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BANH MI BAGUETTE From Lucky Supermarket As soon as you bite into one, you can instantly tell that Lucky bakes its baguettes fresh every day. They are light on the inside with the perfect eggshell-thin crust on the outside. Just thinking about them takes me back to my mom’s village in Vietnam, where the neighbourhood baker would ride around on a bicycle with fresh loaves, shouting “banh mi Saigon!” I love mine with a fried egg and a few splashes of Maggi sauce, or warmed up slightly in the toaster with a drizzle of condensed milk. Pick up the baguettes at Lucky Supermarket’s Sunridge location. —C.T. 3333 Sunridge Way N.E., 403-717-0770 luckysupermarketcalgary.ca @luckysupermarket_calgary

CHENG (RIGHT).

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COCONUT QUINOA PUFF BAR From Going Nuts As an avid farmers’ market shopper, Going Nuts is my go-to for nuts and nut butters. But the nut emporium also makes a selection of granolas, energy bites and bars, including its Coconut Quinoa Puff Bar. This packaged organic puffed rice and quinoa bar with creamed coconut, cocoa and brown-rice syrup is like an elevated version of the humble puffed wheat square; it’s a great treat to keep on hand. —C.C. Calgary Farmers’ Market South, 510 77 Ave S.E.; and Calgary Farmers’ Market West, 25 Greenbriar Dr. N.W., goingnuts.ca, @goingnutsyyc

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BASIC BUN By The Big Buns Club If you’re after a classic cinnamon bun, look no further than The Big Buns Club! Its Basic Bun is soft and fluffy, filled with buttery brown-sugar-cinnamon spread and topped with a generous cloud of cream cheese frosting. And, in case you feel like switching it up, the Club offers a variety of feature flavours every month, like raspberry crumble, matcha and salted pecan. Pre-order online for pickup or delivery on Fridays and Saturdays, or grab one at Lukes Drug Mart, Mini MRKT or Pocket Coffee. —C.T. thebigbunsclub.com, @bigbunsclub

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MOONCAKES From Thai Siam Restaurant Thai mooncakes are a hidden gem in the dessert world, and it’s time they get in the spotlight. Trust me: These delicate filled pastry balls deserve just as much praise as their Chinese counterparts. Thai Siam chef Sawanya Clarke perfected her recipe during her culinary training in Thailand — her mooncakes are sweet, savoury and flaky in each tiny bite. Whether you prefer the earthy taste of mung bean or the creamy flavour of the salted duck egg, just be sure to pre-order in advance. —C.T. 702 41 Ave. N.E., 403 680-0366 thaitakeout.ca, @thaisiammarket

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SHORTY'S GARLIC HOT HONEY By Monster Sauce Embrace your inner monster and add this crowd-pleasing topping to your next meal. Shorty’s Garlic Hot Honey doesn’t pack too much heat — it’s more a balance of sweetness and garlicky goodness. Whether you’re drizzling it over pizza (like my husband loves to do), wings (like me) or tacos, this honey will bring some serious flavour to the party. —C.T. Multiple retailers, including The Cookbook Co. Cooks, monstersauce.ca, @monstersauceco

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PEROGIE CASSEROLE By Back of the Spoon Back of the Spoon owner Erin Chromik has been making her hearty and delectable Perogie Casserole for years. In 2017, after a friend suggested it, she started selling them at markets. Made up of handmade cottage cheese perogies smothered in a creamy mushroom-dill sauce, the casserole is a love letter to both the beloved Eastern European dumpling and Chomik’s grandmother Julia, whose rule when making perogies was to stir with the back of the spoon. You can order the frozen casseroles in various sizes online, or pick one up at Prairie Farms Local Market. —C.T. backofthespoon.ca @backofthespooncanada

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HUMMUS From Green Cedars Food Mart My favourite hummus in Calgary is from Green Cedars Food Mart, a Mediterranean grocery store on International Avenue that has been operating for almost 50 years. Brothers Rochdi and Mike Sarout took over the business from their parents in 2019, and, when asked what the secret to their creamy, well-balanced hummus is, Mike says: “It comes down to one very secret ingredient: Her name is Mariam, she is my mother and an absolute wizard with food.” —C.C. 4710 17 Ave. S.E., Unit M, 403-235-9983 facebook.com/GreenCedarsFoodMart

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MOUNTAIN JOE By Park Distillery Originally served as a “Shaft on Draft” cocktail at Park Distillery in Banff, Mountain Joe is now produced in a ready-todrink, 250-mL can. Combining vodka, cold-brew coffee, oat milk and a subtle hint of honey, this creamy, plant-based pick-me-up cocktail is perfect for mountain getaways and picnics. Mountain Joe is available in four-packs at Park Distillery in Banff, as well as multiple liquor stores across Alberta. —C.C. drinkmountainjoe.com, @drinkmountainjoe

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HARD CANDY From Volio’s Confections Growing up, my mom always carried Werther’s Original hard candy in her purse. I’ve picked up the habit myself, except my pockets are usually lined with hard candy from Volio’s Confections. It is one of the few candy shops in Canada that still makes its hard candy by hand. From flavours like Black Cherry Vanilla Cola to Sour Strawberry Guava, or, my favourite pack to pick up, 20 Fruit Mix, which allows you to try a variety of flavours, Volio’s has something for every candy lover. —C.T. 704 8 Ave. S.W., 403-324-0743 voliosconfections.com, @voliosconfections

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VENEZUELA PASTELITO From Unimarket I wholeheartedly believe anything that’s shaped and stuffed like ravioli is guaranteed to be delicious. Take UniMarket’s Venezuelan pastelitos: These small, circular pastries are loaded with fillings including potato and cheese, chicken and beef, then fried to perfection. I always go home with one (or two) of each. Don’t you dare leave the bakery counter without the green garlic sauce — it goes hand in hand with these pockets of gold! —C.T. Two Calgary locations unimarket.ca, @unimarket_inc

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DHAL MAKHANI From Deepak’s Dhaba Dhal makhani, a dish often found at dhabas (roadside eateries in India serving fresh and fast dishes), is made with black urad lentils, ginger, tomatoes and a touch of butter and cream. At Deepak’s Dhaba, Chef Deepak and his team start this creamy and fragrant dish by roasting and grinding the spices in house.

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PICKING OUT PERFECT PA ST E L I TO S AT U N I M A R K E T.

The dhal makhani is available frozen at all three Deepak’s Dhaba locations, and fresh at the Centre Street restaurant. —C.C. Three Calgary locations deepaksdhaba.ca, @deepaksdhaba

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LAPIS LEGIT From Nila’s Taste of Indonesia A true labour of love, Nila’s Lapis Legit (Thousand Layer Cake) features 20 thin layers of tender cake made with egg yolks, condensed milk and spices. No wonder it takes approximately five hours to create! Lapis legit is often eaten during special occasions, such as Lunar New Year and Eid, but you can get a slice of the original or pandan flavours anytime at Nila’s Taste of Indonesia in Crossroads Market. (Call ahead to order a whole cake.) —C.C. Crossroads Market, 1235 26 Ave. S.E. 403-681-1223, facebook.com/nilastofin @nilastasteofindo

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ICE CREAM SANDWICHES By D’Served Alberta-churned ice cream is snuggled between two homemade cookies in this dreamy handheld goodie that comes in a

variety of flavours, from mint chocolate chip to birthday cake. My favourite is the classic: a scoop of vanilla sandwiched between soft, crumbly chocolate cookies. The ice cream sandwiches are available at multiple retailers and restaurants, but, when the sun is shining, grab a friend and head down to the Peace Bridge for a sammie from D’Served’s pushcart. —C.T. dserved.ca, @dservedicecreamsandwiches

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CROISSANT SWIRLS From Sucre Patisserie and Cafe If you’ve drooled over the viral cream-filled Croissant Suprême from New York’s Lafayette bakery on TikTok, you’ll want to head to Sucre Patisserie & Cafe to taste its version, stat. Flaky croissant dough is swirled into a circular shape, filled with flavoured cream, drizzled in chocolate and sprinkled with toppings. The swirl flavours change regularly, but have included Turtles, Biscoff, Oreo and strawberry rose. You’ll want to plan ahead, though: These trendy treats are only available Friday to Sunday at the Centre Street and 8th Street locations (preordering online is recommended). —C.C. Three Calgary locations, 587-352-5505 sucrecafe.com, @sucrecafeyyc 75


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POTATO BUREK From Erina Bakery I always look forward to biting into a warm potato burek from the family-run Erina Bakery. These long cylinders of crispy, handmade phyllo are stuffed with a tender, seasoned potato filling. The meat-filled burek and chevapi (grilled hand-shaped, caseless sausages served with pitalka bread, onions and sour cream) are also popular items at the Balkan bakery. —C.C. 28, 2835 37 St. S.W., 403-686-2900 erina-bakery-ltd.business.site, @erina.bakery

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TRADITIONAL BARCA From Spolumbo’s Fine Foods & Deli It’s known for sausages, but did you know that Spolumbo’s also carries a wide selection of prepared meals? The Traditional Barca, a hand-rolled pork roulade featuring Italian ham, provolone, chili flakes and oregano, is quick to cook in the oven or on the stovetop or grill. It’s delicious on its own, or simmered in marinara sauce. Find it at the Spolumbo’s location in Inglewood and select Calgary Co-op locations. —C.C. 1308 9 Ave. S.E., 403-264-6452 spolumbos.com, facebook.com/spolumbos

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RÖK GLACIER SPARKLING WATER By rök Glacier Water Attention, Bubly lovers: You need to know about this locally sourced canned sparkling water. A partnership with Calgary’s Rapid Ascent Brewing Co., rök Glacier Water comes from a natural stream that flows from a rock glacier 70 metres beneath Fortress Mountain in

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Kananaskis, making it some of the purest water available anywhere. The classic sparkling water comes in a 355-ml can, and there are five fruity flavours available in tall cans, too. Find them in stores across Calgary and at the Rapid Ascent Brewing taproom. —C.C. rokglacier.com, @rokglacierwater

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THAI PEANUT SATAY SAUCE From Hearts Choices Beloved vegan business Hearts Choices opened 11 years ago at the Calgary Farmers’ Market, and its Thai Peanut Satay Sauce, made with natural peanut butter, coconut milk and Thai red curry paste, is a staple. The lip-smacking sauce is featured in Hearts Choices’ signature peanut satay rice bowl, and conveniently available frozen in containers to pair with stir-fries or skewers at home. —C.C. Three Calgary locations heartschoices.com, @heartschoices

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CURRY BUN From First Avenue Corner Store Make a point of popping by First Avenue Corner Store at 11 a.m. on a Friday or Saturday for a hot, crunchy-fried curry bun. Containing the perfect ratio of house-made dough and curry beef filling, these addictive buns are coated with panko crumbs of various sizes and deep fried. Offered in two varieties (OG Beef Curry and Spicy Beef Keema Curry), the buns sell out quickly, but are also available frozen to heat at home. —C.C. 824 1 Ave. N.E. shikimenya.ca, @firstavenuecornerstore

BOTANICAL BEER VINEGAR By Marigold MFG Timothy Houghton, owner of Marigold MFG, takes leftover beer from local producers, including Common Crown Brewing Co. and Cabin Brewing Company, combines it with botanicals (like dill, coriander, tangerine marigold and basil) grown on his farm in Mossleigh, Alta., and ferments it into specialty vinegars. I love it in salad dressings, sauces and pretty much anything I want to amp up! —C.T. Multiple retailers, including Neighbour Coffee and The Cookbook Co. Cooks, marigoldmfg.com @marigoldmfg

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PIENORMOUS From Chunk’D Hold onto your sweet tooth, because you might lose it over this Kensington cookie shop’s Pienormous. The 25-cm pie has a soft and chewy chocolate-chip-cookie crust that’s filled with caramel cream, Nutella, Twix and KitKat White. Invite some friends over and dig in — this over-the-top treat feeds a crowd. (Individual slices are available, too.) —C.T. 330 10 St. N.W., 403-764-7558 chunkd.ca, @chunkd TA B L E WA R E S O U R C E P.60 Large yellow plate, $125, and small clay and blue dish, $40, from Husted Ceramics; teal and white plate, $150 (set of eight), and purple and white bowl, $150 (set of eight), from Britannia Kitchen & Home; speckled plate, $50, from nanao kimono; pizza peel, $44, and casserole dish, $19, from The Cookbook Co. Cooks. P.63 Blue napkin, $30 (set of four), green bowl, $14, green and white plate, $150 (set of eight), pepper grinder, $55, and black serving spoon, $30 (set of two), all from Britannia Kitchen & Home. P.64 Large white plate, $60, smaller white plate, $20, and yellow flower plate, $18, all from nanao kimono; yellow printed bowl, $20, and green and white bowl, $150 (set of eight), from Britannia Kitchen & Home; yellow napkin, $20 (set of three), and wood serving board, $120, from The Cookbook Co. Cooks. P.67 Hammered cake server, $21, from Britannia Kitchen & Home. Britannia Kitchen & Home 816 49 Ave. S.W., 403-2434444, britanniahome.ca The Cookbook Co. Cooks 722 11 Ave. S.W., 403-265-6066, cookbookcooks.com Husted Ceramics 915 9 Ave. S.E., husted.ca nanao kimono 215 10 St. N.W., nanaokimono.com may 2022

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C OF RED CINNAMALT SWIRL By Foothills Creamery My favourite part about attending events at the Scotiabank Saddledome is the Cinnamalt soft serve available from the Foothills Creamery locations throughout the concourse. But this Flames game staple is now available for your home freezer: Foothills Creamery has made a hard ice cream version that can be purchased in 500-ml tubs at Calgary Co-op locations. The C of Red Cinnamalt Swirl is a blend of cinnamonchocolate and vanilla ice cream, and tastes just like its arena counterpart. —C.C. Multiple Calgary locations, calgarycoop.com


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hen the time came for Dan Hapton’s parents to downsize from their home of roughly 30 years, two needs were top of mind for the couple: Finding the right smaller space, and then transforming that space into a home that would allow them to emulate their already established routines. They checked off the first item on their wish list when they found the ideal 1,950-square-foot, two-bedroom unit with near 360-degree city views in an upscale condominium complex in Mission. However, transforming the condo into the right living space for them required significant creative problem solving. This is where it comes in handy to have a son who’s an architect. “There was a desire to map patterns they were familiar with from their old house into this new space,” says Hapton, whose boutique architectural practice, Aitch, specializes in the creative revitalization of existing buildings. “A lot of the design thinking comes from a hybridization of modern architecture met with a newer aesthetic that is a product of this digital generation [of designers].” What started as a dated interior became a space driven by Hapton’s vision and perfectly tailored to his parents’ lifestyle. That transformation is particularly apparent in the main living and dining area. From smart features, such as ample hidden storage, including a pop-out bar, to thoughtful personal considerations, like ensuring his parents’ art collection would effortlessly transfer from their previous residence, Hapton’s design embraces the ideal balance of form and function. “Zen is my word for this place,” says his mother. “There is no noise in my head living here.” A cornerstone of Hapton’s design was reducing unnecessary visual “noise.” He collaborated with various tradespeople, including Rocky Point Custom Homes and Vektra Architectural Lighting Agency, and used 3D modelling and virtual reality gaming software to look at and refine the design, especially when it came to previewing the lighting. His methods created a space for his parents that has an uplifting and comforting effect. “It’s a powerful thing to create an experience that is meaningful and causes emotion,” Hapton says.

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THE CEILING Since the condo building’s original construction featured eight-foot concrete ceilings, architect Dan Hapton faced a challenge when adding a drop ceiling to update the space’s electrical, HVAC and ventilation. To preserve height, he reduced the typical 12-inch drop ceiling to seven inches. “I also went to great efforts to make it feel sculptural and light; like it is framing the space for you,” he says.

P H OTO S BY J O E L K L A S S E N

T H E M U S I C CO R N E R Tucked away behind a partial-height wall, Hapton designed a space within the living room to house his father’s record collection. It’s a space where his mom also sits to take in the view. “It’s like a little lounge area,” she says. “I love sitting here, listening to my Audible and staring out the window.”

A high-rise condo in Mission was transformed into a bright, contemporary space, tailor-made for the homeowners by their architect son. BY SARAH COMBER

avenuecalgary.com

T H E H O M E T H E AT R E Without compromising the westfacing view of the Elbow River and Rocky Mountains, Hapton integrated a home theatre in the living room, using a partial wall to mount the television, and hiding surround-sound speakers behind the ceiling’s drywall. THE ORCHIDS Five spectacular orchid plants live in a built-in planter within the console that separates the living room from the kitchen. Hapton notes that this is another way of dividing and giving purpose to the space without just putting up a wall. 79


Calgary Style

BY MICHELLE MCIVOR PHOTO BY JARED SYCH

HOW TO SUIT UP FOR SUMMER JP CHANNA, FO UND E R O F CU STOM MENS W E AR O UTFI T THE KINGLY, K E E PS THI NGS

You won’t see JP Channa wearing black when the warm weather arrives. “I love dressing for spring and summer because I can play around with so many more colours,” says the founder of The Kingly, a bespoke suiting company known for outfitting NHL players, executives and wedding parties. Channa’s summertime staples include bamboo cotton dress shirts and suits made of wool, linen and silk — natural fabrics that help regulate body temperature. He doesn’t shy away from wearing more casual clothing, but styles the pieces with intention. He’ll dress up a pair of shorts, for example, with a polo shirt and linen loafers. And, to keep his feet from sweating and swelling in the heat, Channa always wears no-show socks. But his ultimate styling move is embracing colour: “What we want is to bring out more flair for summertime.” Jacket and trousers, The Kingly, produced in Japan with material from Italy’s Ariston Fabrics Napoli; shirt, The Kingly, made from a bamboo cotton fabric that the design team curated with a cotton mill; tie, The Kingly, made by Toronto-based Dion 1967; watch, Rolex, from Maison Birks; loafers, The Kingly, made in Almansa, a Spanish town known for artisan shoemaking.

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CO O L AND CO LO UR FUL .


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HOME DESIGN I L L U S T R AT I O N : T E T I A N A G A R K U S H A , C O U R T E S Y i S T O C K

& RENOVATION

Construction season isn’t limited to the city’s roads or surrounding highways. When warmer weather arrives, we all get the itch to renovate or redecorate our homes. After all, we spend a lot more time at home these days, and it only makes sense to invest in making our homes work better for us. Whether you’re considering a from-scratch new build, a whole-home reno or simply sprucing up the bathroom, local experts share ways to do it right. Get pro tips for redesigning your shower or see how a collaborative construction approach that integrates quality design, craftsmanship and architectural products can lead to a healthier, happier home.

READ ON FOR SOME HOME INSPIRATION.


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A COLLABORATIVE APPROACH TO

BETTER LIVING Chalmers Heritage Conservation (CHC) and Marvin Canada bring together the best in architectural window and door products, craftsmanship and service in Calgary’s building market.

e’ve all spent a lot of time at home over the past few years. As a result, it’s become plainly evident how important it is to invest in our homes, and make them spaces where we can happily live, work and play. Having a well-designed home built with quality products can go a long way in improving how we live. Whether you’re looking at renovating an existing home or starting a new home build, a collaborative process with knowledgeable experts using quality products makes all the difference, not only in how much you love the final outcome, but how enjoyable the process of getting there is. A local company that has set itself apart through its service-focused, collaborative and comprehensive approach to construction projects now adds a whole new repertoire of fine architectural products to its offerings. Since Dave Chalmers launched Chalmers Heritage Conservation (CHC) in 2015,

he’s established an exceptional standard of craftsmanship in the heritage building restoration market. Now, CHC is expanding what architects, designers, custom builders and homeowners can expect in the full gamut of home renovation and building projects by providing Southern Alberta with the best of the best in window and door products through a new partnership with Marvin Canada. Not only does the collaboration bring Marvin’s award-winning windows, skylights and doors — with solutions that extend across all areas of the market as well as design styles — but it also brings CHC’s full-service approach and expertise to new contemporary builds and renovations. Together with Marvin’s long-standing dedication to developing innovative quality products that stand the test of time, CHC helps you to create a home that achieves a better way of living. Clients can expect ingenuity and integrity in the design, construction and


ADVERTISING FEATURE

Calgary-area clients to Marvin’s wide range of extraordinary CHC’s team of craftsmen, interior energy-efficient windows, designers, project managers, installers skylights and doors — including and service technicians, along with Marvin a number of collections fit for Canada’s product experts, brings together everything from traditional a wealth of knowledge and experience and heritage homes, to ultramodern high-end homes. that reinforces its ability to collaborate “Marvin has a wonderful with homeowners, architects and builders, set of products that’s given and push the boundary of imagination! us versatility for our heritage Reach out at MARVIN@CHC.works. clients,” Chalmers says. “But they're also constantly innovating with beautiful products that redefine what windows and doors are all about. Marvin’s products can be used in high-end homes, older homes, renovation — anywhere where a high level of craftsmanship, performance and beauty is required.” The partnership with Marvin Canada takes CHC to the next level in promoting quality architectural products craftsmanship that built to last as long as the heritage CHC brings to buildings it works on. In fact, CHC is the table along currently in the process of rebranding this with Marvin’s new partnership, to better reflect the full inventive, range of its business — expect a rebrand solution-oriented and a new full showroom later this year. products that put “As a family-run company, Marvin has people first. After the same values we do of putting people all, a home is only first,” Chalmers says. “Those values have great if it works well for cemented us in the heritage market but the people who live there. have also diversified us into modern and For instance, the award-winning, contemporary spaces for the window and smart Marvin Awaken skylight is the only door market. Providing expertise from skylight with supplemental, programmable both companies means that our clients lighting that mimics natural light to can expect tailor-made solutions, no provide the right amount of light at the matter the project. For us, it all comes right time. Its first-of-its-kind ventilation down to elevating our processes and system has smart sensors that close the sharing our knowledge in order to exceed skylight automatically if it rains and indoor both the project’s expectation and the air quality sensors alert the homeowner if client’s experience.” VOC levels change. Such innovative home products put peoples’ well-being as the top priority. CHC looks forward to introducing

A NATURAL CONNECTION

LEARN MORE AT MARVINCANADA.COM AND CHC.WORKS.


ADVERTISING FEATURE

GROUT EXPECTATIONS:

TILE DESIGNS TO SPRUCE UP YOUR SHOWER Using tiles in your shower is an easy yet impactful way to add colour and interest to the space.

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f you want to dress up or brighten up your bathroom, consider adding shower tiles. On the shower walls or the floor, bright or simplistic, big or small, there’s a nearly endless array of tiling options and styles to choose from. To help narrow down the final look, Brody Haugrud, Business Director at CDL Carpet & Flooring Centre, recommends limiting yourself to no more than three different tiles in a bathroom. Size, however, doesn’t have limitations. “For a full wall tile and bathroom floor tiles, the bigger, the better!” says

BROWSE DIFFERENT TILE SHAPES, SIZES, TEXTURES AND COLOURS AT CDL CARPET & FLOOR CENTRE LTD. VISIT CDLCARPETFLOORING.COM.

Haugrud. While an elaborate design can be tempting, sometimes simpler is better for shower tiles. For example, make creative use of spaces in the shower, such as the use of an accent tile in the back of your shampoo niche or in the front of a shower bench. If you have a minimalistic or clean white bathroom, a small touch in a clever space in a vibrant shade adds just the right touch to liven up the room. Or, for something more dramatic, Haugrud says, “you can’t go wrong selecting one shower wall as a space for a subtle accent tile to add some wow.” If shower walls aren’t your focus, the floors are always an option instead. “We still love a classic mosaic for shower floors. It’s also a good place for simple, clean accents,” says Haugrud, adding that even a few simple tiles around the drain can add some character to your shower.

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Mountains

GETOUT

THERE

A GUIDE TO SUMMER IN THE MOUNTAINS The mountains are calling! If you want to answer, we’ve got ideas for things to do this summer, as well as outdoorsy apparel and accessories (on Mode Models 2022 Search winner Jaden Ostrowski), so you can look good out there, too. FASHION PHOTOGRAPHY JARED SYCH STYLING CARL ABAD HAIR AND MAKEUP PHOEBE HEARD ILLUSTRATION JARRET SITTER

A.P.C. BUCKET HAT, $140, FROM GRAVITYPOPE; PAUL SMITH SUNGLASSES, $425, FROM CHINOOK OPTICAL; CAMP BRAND GOODS HOODIE, $138, CAMP BRAND GOODS T-SHIRT, $54, KATIN SHORTS, $78, AND OKAYOK SOCKS, $18, ALL FROM THE LIVERY SHOP; PLAID SHIRT, $99, FROM L.L.BEAN; VEJA SHOES, $240, FROM LEO BOUTIQUE; BACKPACK, $209, FROM PATAGONIA. avenuecalgary.com

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GOINGDOWN

AFAMILIAR

PATH

Downhill all the way: The SilverStar Bike Park has 69 km of downhill trails for a range of ability levels.

BY SHE L L E Y A R N U SC H

used to ride with a pretty tough crowd. For a time in my 20s, my primary social scene was a group of mountain bikers that lived to push the limits of what could be done on two wheels. Weeknights after work we did “urban assault” rides through the city, making the built environment into our own personal bike park. On weekends, we loaded bikes and camping gear into the boxes of trucks and hit the road in search of steeper terrain, gravitating to spots like the Mount 7 trails in Golden, B.C. During the winter months, we even convinced the administrators of what was then known as Canada Olympic Park (now WinSport) to run the chairlift for us after hours so we could ride our bikes downhill on the snow. It was all very crazy and fun. Until it wasn’t. I can’t recall any specific incident that turned me away from mountain biking. It was more so an encroaching doubt that the reward was worth the risk. I sold my bike, split up with the guy who was my partner in life 86

and in riding. A new guy from a new scene came along. We had a baby. I got older. And one day, I realized that downhill mountai biking was something I used to do. Until last summer, that is, when myself, my partner and our now eight-year-old baby, had the opportunity to ride the bike park at SilverStar Mountain Resort near Vernon, B.C. Carved into the mountain slopes that serve as ski runs during the winter and accessed by chair lift, this world-class bike park has more than 69 kilometres of downhill trails in a range of ability levels, from beginner up to “people ride their bike down that!?!” The three of us started our day getting geared up at the rental shop with full-face helmets, and elbow and knee/shin pads. We then got fitted for bikes equipped with the suspension to absorb all the bumps and the tires with the appropriate traction for coasting around berms. We also had the services of a guide to show us the ropes and show us around. Our first stop was an adjacent lot for a crash course in how not to crash. We learned

how to brake so not to send yourself flying headfirst over the handlebars; how to approach and flow around hairpin corners; how to ride in a crouching stand-up position over the seat to stay balanced and in control. It was all stuff I realized I knew from my past life. Even so, the refresher was refreshing. We did get up on the mountain that day, bagging a handful of dusty beginner runs. At one point, our guide pointed me down an intermediate section of trail that reconnected further along with the beginner trail my kid was riding. I went for it, feeling the familiar rush as I cleared the steeper terrain, but this time it was enhanced by the rush of seeing her get the hang of it. Though the trails we were on would have been laughable to the me of two decades ago, they were delivering a new kind of thrill, and the joy of re-learning something you forgot you once loved. The SilverStar Bike Park is open June 23 to Sept. 17, 2023 (subject to change). For information, visit skisilverstar.com. may/june 2023

TKKT K T K

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Learning to ride a mountain bike is fun, but re-learning can be even better.


TIPS FOR GET TING BACK ON THE BIKE IF YOU HAVEN’ T RIDDEN A DOWNHILL TRAIL FOR A DECADE , HERE ARE SOME WAYS TO MAKE THE RETURN TO FREERIDING A LITTLE SMOOTHER .

1 SIGN UP FOR LESSONS Bikes and bike parks have changed a lot in the past decades, so even beginner-level instruction can offer something new for a formerly experienced rider who has been away from it for a while. Both Fernie Alpine Resort in Fernie, B.C. (skifernie.com) and Kicking Horse Mountain Resort in Golden (kickinghorseresort.com) offer lesson programming through their mountain schools. The Discover Biking lessons are for new riders, while private lessons provide skills training tailored to the rider’s specific needs. All lessons can be combined with rentals.

2 HIRE A GUIDE

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P H O T O C O U R T E S Y O F S I L V E S TA R M O U N TA I N R E S O R T

This is a great idea for riders of all experience levels. A guide takes away the guesswork of whether a certain trail is a good fit with your riding level. This is particularly smart when you’re checking out a new bike park and are riding with a family group of varying abilities (nothing kills a kid’s enthusiasm for an activity faster than ending up on a trail that’s too hard for them). A guide can also encourage you to push your limits without going too far. Most alpine resort bike parks offer guiding services at full or half-day rates, available through their mountain school programs.

Relive the excitement of the first installment of this franchise while the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra performs Ludwig Göransson’s Academy Award-winning score live to picture. 18 + 19 May 2023 / 7:30PM Southern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium Tickets at ticketmaster.ca

3 JOIN A RIDING GROUP Beyond your day at the bike park, you can keep your skills sharp by joining up with a riding group or club such as Spin Sisters, a womenonly mountain bike club for adults (age 18+) in the Calgary region. Sisters is all about finding progression through camaraderie and does weekly rides for all skill levels facilitated by ride hosts. You can find out more about this group, as well as download a questionnaire to determine your skill level, at spinsisters.ca. —S.A. avenuecalgary.com

Calgary Phil film series partner

© Marvel Presentation licensed by Disney Concerts. © All rights reserved.

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The Columbia River near Invermere is a prime spot for paddling.

A PADDLING TRIP FOR THE BIRDS Kayaking on the Columbia River comes with the bonus of great birdwatching. pparently, we encountered a heron, two hawks, an eagle and loads of songbirds over the course of paddling from Invermere to Radium Hot Springs. I know this only because it was reported to me by my friend and kayaking cohort, whom I correctly assumed was paying more attention than I to the ornithological sights along the Columbia Valley Bird Trail. Indeed, this tranquil section of the Columbia River is part of the eastern range of the 15,000-kilometre Pacific Flyway migratory route that stretches from Alaska to Patagonia; its wetlands (the source of the largest river flowing into the Pacific Ocean in North America) are an intensively used nesting, feeding and resting site for more 88

than 260 species of birds every year. That said, if you’re preoccupied, as I was with lunch, snakes and lost sunglasses, the birds are easy to miss. Paddling between mountain towns is among the most marvellous things to do in the Columbia Valley. Last summer, myself and the aforementioned friend did it with four adolescents in tow — six of us in three double-kayaks rented from Columbia River Paddle, whose gear shack sits mere metres from the put-in spot where Lake Windermere narrows into the Columbia River. The company offers a guided wetland tour, but we opted for the DIY-ish route that, most helpfully, comes with a map and a shuttle van back to the parking lot. After a round of instructions and safety tips from a staffer that included directions to stay right, paddle steady in turbulent waters, and watch for the single pull-out spot on the left bank if we needed a break, we set off into an overcast July afternoon. Flanked by the Rocky and Purcell Mountain ranges, the Columbia Valley sits between Canal Flats and Golden; Invermere is the main hub, just under 20 km south of Radium. The short drive along B.C. Highway 93 between those two towns is nice but the view from a kayak is sublime. While some of us (my 12-year-old daughter. Also, me.) approached the afternoon with a little anxiety — would we tip? Take a wrong turn? Arrive at the designated pickup area before dark? — our worries were entirely misguided. The paddling is easy as the current meanders through the wild wetlands, under bridges and, as promised, alongside a sandbar where I was looking forward to disembarking for lunch. In hindsight, I realize I may have been expecting a patio and an Earls server to emerge from the bushes rather than a mucky shoreline and a couple of decrepit Adirondack chairs. I’d only enough time to stretch my legs and set down my sunglasses before my kid yelled “snake!” and I was back in the kayak shrieking at our crew to flee the area. I regret that. And I miss my glasses. But time slips away in the wetlands. Sometime later (an hour? Maybe two?), we reluctantly reached the end of our journey at the well-marked pick-up spot. A handful of others had beat us there to meet the shuttle to Invermere, including a woman who’d paddleboarded with a cat named Killer strapped to her SUP in a mesh kennel. He, too, must have had some regrets about the birds. Columbia River Paddle is open for rentals and guided tours from May through early October (weather permitting). For more information, visit columbiariverpaddle.com. may/june 2023

P H OTO BY M I TC H W I N TO N

BY JAC QU I E M O O R E


VUARNET SUNGLASSES, $855, FROM CHINOOK OPTICAL; CREWNECK SWEATSHIRT, $99, VEST, $99, JEANS, $85, AND BACKPACK, $239, ALL FROM L.L.BEAN; FLEECE, $159, AND WATER CANTEEN, $22, BOTH FROM PATAGONIA; ROYALTIES PARIS SOCKS, $35, AND CAMPER SANDALS, $160, BOTH FROM GRAVITYPOPE.

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FILSON HAT, $115, FROM ELEMENTS OUTFITTERS; TOM FORD SUNGLASSES, $575, FROM CHINOOK OPTICAL; BLACK ZIP-UP, $150, T-SHIRT, $80, SHORTS, $150, AND BACKPACK, $200, ALL FROM ARC’TERYX; BY PARRA JACKET, $325, AND BY PARRA SOCKS, $35, BOTH FROM LEO BOUTIQUE; CARHARTT BAG, $95, FROM GRAVITYPOPE. 90

may/june 2023


BY ANDREW PENNER

LEVEL UP S YOURSUP

ome stand-up paddleboard (SUP) riders are content to meander around a pond, but, for those craving more action, it’s all about going with the flow. Taking a SUP down a river brings the possibility of spills as well as thrills, however, with a little know-how, it’s a total blast. There are numerous spots in

TRIP #1

River Bow Put in Baker Park, Calgary Take out Shouldice Park, Calgary Approximate length 4 km Difficulty level Beginner “A short, straightforward trip to get the feel for paddling on a river,” says Bell. If you want a longer ride, there are many take-outs further along.

TRIP #2

River Bow Put in Banff, below Bow Falls Take out Canmore Boat Launch Approximate length 22 km Difficulty level Intermediate “Although this is a relatively easy stretch of river, there are often sweepers and strainers [wood hazards above and below water] so it’s recommended to have some basic knowledge of how to mitigate them,” says Bell. Once you pass the Banff Springs Golf Course, there aren’t any exit points, so be prepared for a fourto six-hour adventure.

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY R O BY N B E L L

TRIP #3

River Lower Kananaskis Put in Canoe Meadows (use the eddy below the race course) Take out Seebe, just past the railway bridge Approximate length 8 km Difficulty level Intermediate “A great trip for intermediate paddlers,” says Bell. “The difficulty doesn’t exceed Class II, however, there are plenty of wood hazards on this run.” Always check TransAlta river flows (transalta.com/river-flows) first to ensure the water is on. avenuecalgary.com

TRIP #4

River Bow Put in Lake Louise Village (near the old train station) Take out Castle Junction Approximate length 5 km/28 km Difficulty level Advanced for the first five; intermediate afterward This trip offers an initial advancedlevel section of rapids, mostly fun, rolling waves, though in high water the final rapid near the bridge over the Trans-Canada Highway, just south of Lake Louise, can be as high as Class III. “Be aware of the log jam just after this rapid,” says Bell. If you’ve had enough, there’s a take-out spot at the 5-km point. Otherwise, you can continue at a more leisurely pace all the way to Castle Junction.

the region — some are right in our city — that offer superlative SUP experiences. Here are five riveting river rides, as recommended by Robyn Bell, a Canmorebased Paddle Canada SUP instructor. Not ready to do a self-guided river adventure? Look up Aquabatics Calgary (aqoutdoors.com), a provider of lessons, guided paddling trips, gear and more.

Lower Kananaskis River (start of trip).

TRIP #5

River Kootenay Put in Kootenay River Day-use Area, Kootenay National Park Take out Various locations Approximate length 1-4 days Difficulty level Advanced This beautiful and remote stretch of river features numerous springs and waterfalls along its banks. “With many take-out options, it’s a bit of a ‘choose your own adventure’ trip,” says Bell. “There are quite a few riverside campsites along the way.” Although the rapids can be challenging, Bell says the most difficult part can be navigating the active logging roads to set up a shuttle — there’s no cell service and flat tires are common. And she recommends investing in quality dry bags: her favourites are by NRS and jaylife13.

Bow River, Lake Louise to Castle Junction.

Lower Kananaskis River.

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BY ANDREW PENNER

MOUNTAIN GOLF THREE WAYS

O BECOME A

ne of the greatest things about golf (besides the beverage cart) is that you can play a ragged, run-of-the-mill course and have the time of your life, or you can play a worldfamous course and have the time of your life — the fun factor doesn’t necessarily correlate with the price. Mountain golf courses have an elevated appeal based on location alone. Here are three to play this summer.

MEMBER TODAY!

LOW B UDG ET: WATERTON L AK ES G O L F CO UR S E

Caption TK

A visit to the century-old Waterton Lakes Golf Course is like stepping into some sort of funky golf course time machine. Year after year, decade after decade, not much seems to change here. And, to be honest, the “relic” qualities and vintage feel make for a pretty cool overall experience, while the jaw-dropping scenery is worth the price alone. lakelandgolfmanagement.com

MED IUM B UDGET: C ROWS N EST PA SS G O L F C L UB Price $99 to $129; includes cart and driving range admission Course 6,659 yards, Par 72 In the heart of the Crowsnest Pass in Blairmore, Alta., the Crowsnest Pass Golf Club features eight new holes by talented Alberta architect Gary Browning and a stunning new-ish clubhouse (it opened in 2020), overlooking the action. The new additions give this historic club a contemporary vibe for a mountain golf experience that exceeds expectations. crowsnestpassgolf.com

B IG B UDGET: FAIR M ONT BANFF S PR IN G S G O L F CO URSE

FIND OUT MORE avenuecalgary.com /membership 92

Price $229 to $369; includes cart and practice facilities; Alberta resident discounts available Course 6,938 yards, Par 71 Designed by the legendary Stanley Thompson in the 1920s, the Fairmont Banff Springs Golf Course remains the gold standard for mountain golf: views of the historic castle hotel, amazing par-3’s, challenging riverside holes, eye-popping bunkering; the sum of all the parts equals a phenomenal day in a phenomenal setting. banffmountaingolf.com may/june 2023

W AT E R T O N L A K E S P H O T O B Y J O S H O B E R I K ; C R O W S N E S T PA S S P H O T O B Y A N D R E W P E N N E R ; F A I R M O N T P H O T O C O U R T E S Y O F F A I R M O N T B A N F F S P R I N G S G O L F C O U R S E

Price $59 (walking) Course 6,120 yards, Par 71/72


By Horton Foote A spirited old woman finally summons the courage to escape the crowded city apartment she shares with her son and his sharp-tongued wife to return to her childhood home town of Bountiful—a place of wildflowers and freedom. But will she make it?

Finding Home Again

NOW OPEN! THE ONLY PREMIUM RETIREMENT RESIDENCE, WITH CUSTOMIZABLE SUPPORT WHEN YOU NEED IT, IN CALGARY’S BEST NEIGHBOURHOOD FOR SENIORS Be part of the vibrant Mission/4th St. District. Steps away from parks & river pathways, seconds from unique dining and shopping experiences, and brimming with 5-star amenities. It’s the perfect location for a retirement residence that combines lifestyle + life. We believe in individualized support, with lifestyple options that include Independent Living, Assisted Living and Memory Care.

For more information, or to request an appointment, call (403) 271-7244 or visit www.riverwalkretirement.com

March 31 – May 20

Music by Richard Rodgers • Lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II Book by Howard Lindsay & Russel Crouse • Suggested by “The Trapp Family Singers” by Maria Augusta Trapp

A young nun is sent off to be governess to seven mischievous children. She teaches the children to sing, bringing a fleeting moment of happiness in the shadow of the rise of the Third Reich. A summer musical for the whole family!

The Beloved Family Musical

June 2 – September 2

INSPIRED SENIOR LIVING WITH

528 25 Avenue SW, Calgary

Book Now! RosebudTheatre.com 1-800-267-7553

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BY ANDREW PENNER

COASTING INTO SUMMER Avenue’s writers and editors are occasionally invited to experience dining or adventure experiences as a guest, including some of the experiences in this section. Neither complimentary experiences nor advertising are required for coverage in Avenue. Neither companies that advertise nor those that provide other incentives are promised editorial coverage, nor do they have the opportunity to review or approve stories before publication.

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hat’s a mountain coaster? Basically, it’s a gravity-fuelled ride along a metal pipe secured to the ground. Riders sit in individual cars and control their speed via a hand-braking system, pushing forward to go faster, or pulling up to slow down. The popularity of mountain coasters is flying high right now and they are popping up at many mountain destinations and resorts throughout North America. Here are three to try this summer in Western Canada.

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P IP E M O U NTA IN COASTER ,

R AIL R IDER MO UN TAIN

R E V E LSTO K E , B .C .

COASTER

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This coaster at Revelstoke Mountain Resort first opened in 2016, and, due to its off-thecharts popularity, a second pipe coaster track will open this season. The original is 1.4 kilometres long, while the second coaster is just over 2 km. Both offer twists, turns, and tunnels. This is a family-friendly experience (children aged three and up who are 3’2" or taller can ride the Pipe with a driver who is 16 or over, provided the passenger is no taller than the driver’s shoulders when seated), but even gut-hardened thrill-seekers will get a rush from “The Pipe.” Open May to late-September, 2023 (weather dependent); $35 revelstokemountainresort.com

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G O L DEN , B.C

When it officially opens this month, the Railrider at the Golden Skybridge will become the largest mountain coaster of its kind in Canada. Reaching speeds up to 50 km/hour and plunging more than 650 metres down the mountain, it promises to be a hair-raising thrill ride through the forest. (Maybe eat your snack after your ride.)

Open May 12 to Oct. 9, 2023; adult admission $79 (includes all Skybridge activities in addition to the coaster, as well as general admission)

C AN YO N COASTER

3

R ED DEER , ALTA .

Located at the betterthan-you-think Canyon Ski Resort, Alberta’s first and only mountain coaster, which opened in August of last year, is a hoot, and a scream (and, hopefully, not more than that). This pipe coaster is nearly 1.5-km long, and descends more than 130 metres to the canyon floor. Not surprisingly, it’s mega popular. On weekends, especially, it’s best to reserve your tickets in advance.

Open May 20 to Oct. 8, 2023; $25 canyonski.ca

P H OTO BY TO M P O O L E

Thrill Ride: The Pipe Mountain Coaster at Revelstoke Mountain Resort.

banffjaspercollection.com

may/june 2023


TRUCKER HAT, $49, AND PANTS, $189, BOTH FROM PATAGONIA; FLEECE, $159, AND BOOTS, $229, BOTH FROM L.L.BEAN; WINDRIVER RAIN JACKET, $100, FROM MARK'S; FILSON LOG CARRIER, $263, FROM ELEMENTS OUTFITTERS.

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Introducing Avenue’s First-Ever Digital Decor Issue

Better together. Join us at our events:

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR HOMES & REAL ESTATE NEWSLETER AND GET A COPY DELIVERED TO YOUR INBOX TODAY

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nominations May 1 to 15 2023

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voting June 8 to 30 2023 96

may/june 2023


AMERICAN OPTICAL SUNGLASSES, $425, FROM CHINOOK OPTICAL; WINDRIVER HENLEY SHIRT, $45, FROM MARK'S; WINDBREAKER, $95, FROM L.L.BEAN; FILSON JACKET, $465, FROM ELEMENTS OUTFITTERS; GRAMICCI PANTS, $140, FROM LEO BOUTIQUE; DANNER SHOES, $310, FROM GRAVITYPOPE; OKAYOK SOCKS, $18, FROM THE LIVERY SHOP.

FA SH ION S OUR CE Arc’teryx 150, 815 17 Ave. S.W., 587-392-3135, arcteryx.com Chinook Optical 813 49 Ave. S.W., 403-252-1961, chinookoptical.com Elements Outfitters Two Calgary locations, elements2002.ca Gravitypope 1126 17 Ave. S.W., 403-209-0961, gravitypope.com Leo Boutique 810-B 16 Ave. S.W., 403-410-9236, leoboutique.com L.L.Bean 700, 8180 11 St. S.E., 403-776-2548, llbean.ca Mark’s Multiple Calgary locations, marks.com Patagonia Calgary 135 8 Ave. S.W., 403-266-6463, patagoniaelements.ca The Livery Shop 119 10 Ave. S.E., 403-453-7711, theliveryshop.com

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You Are Here

ILLUSTRATION BY JARETT SITTER

2 4 5

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1st Street and 9th Avenue S.W. N 51º 2' 41.0", W 114º 3' 56.0" 1

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Emergent This work by visual artist Jill Anholt takes inspiration from the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), complete with blackened rails and wooden ties, resulting in both a notable sculpture and a functional seating area. Its mirrors reflect the nearby Calgary Tower, creating an intersection of the past and the present at one of the city’s most historic intersections. Visit at night to see it lit up in CPR red.

The Edison Formerly the Pan Canadian Tower, this 30-storey skyscraper was converted to The Edison in 2017. The tech-friendly building is home to tenants such as Reach and MobSquad, and, in addition to workspaces, has a dog park, golf simulator and basketball court. It’s also the temporary location of the Glenbow during renovations: Glenbow at the Edison is open Wednesday to Sunday and admission is free.

Fairmont Palliser Since its opening in 1914, the Palliser has remained one of Calgary’s most grand and storied addresses. Originally a Canadian Pacific Hotel, the Palliser became a Fairmont property in 1999. The Edwardian-style building’s 407 guest rooms are complemented by multiple event spaces and ballrooms, which recently received a refresh, plus the Hawthorn Dining Room & Bar, a health club, spa and pool.

Grain Exchange Building Upon its completion in 1910, the six-storey Grain Exchange was the tallest structure in Calgary — and it contained the city’s first passenger elevator, too. The sandstone building was originally a hub for the businesses that set the grain prices across Alberta; now, you’ll find studios, offices, retail and streetlevel restaurants, including Meat & Bread sandwich shop and Thai Thien Vietnamese subs.

Alberta Hotel Building Another iconic sandstone building, the Italiante-style Alberta Hotel Building operated as a — you guessed it — hotel from its opening in 1890 to 1916. It was popular among the day’s ranchers who came to the city to do business; today, it remains in the centre of the action, located within the Stephen Avenue National Historic District, and home to Murrieta’s West Coast Bar & Grill. —Dominique Lamberton

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may/june 2023


Photos by Michel Gibert, Baptiste Le Quiniou, for advertising purposes only. (1) Conditions apply, contact store for details.

French Art de Vivre

Fabrics by

Mah Jong Outdoor. Modular seating system, designed by Hans Hopfer. Upholstered in Jean Paul Gaultier outdoor fabrics, Autour du Monde collection. Base in metal openwork, lacquered, in black-color satin finish. Bilboquet. End table, designed by Kateryna Sokolova.

CALGARY - 225 10th Avenue SW - Tel. 403-532-4401 VANCOUVER - 716 West Hastings Street - Tel. 604-633-5005

In-store interior design & 3D modeling services.(1)

Made in Europe.

avenue calgary.com

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P H O T O G R A P H BY T K T K T K

W OR K O F A RT

10 0

january/february 2023


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Articles inside

1st Street and 9th Avenue S.W.

1min
pages 98-99

COASTING INTO SUMMER

2min
pages 94-97

MOUNTAIN GOLF THREE WAYS BECOME A MEMBER

1min
pages 92-94

LEVEL UP YOUR SUP

2min
pages 91-92

A PADDLING TRIP FOR THE BIRDS

2min
pages 88-90

GOING DOWN A FAMILIAR PATH

3min
pages 86-87

GETOUT THERE

1min
pages 85-86

GROUT EXPECTATIONS:

1min
pages 84-85

A COLLABORATIVE APPROACH TO BETTER LIVING

2min
pages 82-83

HOME DESIGN & RENOVATION

1min
page 81

HOW TO SUIT UP FOR SUMMER

1min
page 80

NEW HEIGHTS

1min
pages 78-80

30Best thingsto Eat & Drink

13min
pages 71-78

THE MAKINGS OF AN INNOVATIVE EDUCATION

2min
pages 68-71

CUTTING-EDGE APPROACHES TO CITY-BUILDING

2min
page 67

EMPOWERING TOMORROW'S TECH TALENT

2min
page 66

FLOOD OF PROGRESS

1min
pages 62-64

TRANSFORMING CALGARY INTO A HUB FOR FINTECH INNOVATION

12min
pages 56-62

I realize now how much engineering has helped me understand life.

3min
page 55

DRESSING FOR WE HAVE

4min
pages 52-54

OPENING DOORS

1min
pages 50-52

TOAST OF THE TECH WORLD

2min
pages 49-50

THE TRANSITION TO TECH

5min
pages 46-49

KNOWLEDGE IS POWER

3min
pages 44-46

TRADITION

1min
pages 43-44

FARMING

3min
pages 39-43

FUTUREPROOF

1min
pages 38-39

ADVANCING OUR HEALTH CARE

6min
pages 34, 36-38

HOUR

6min
pages 31-34

APPROACH AN

2min
pages 29-31

TURNING INNOVATION INTO OPPORTUNITY TURNING INNOVATION INTO OPPORTUNITY

1min
page 28

Detours dish it A TUBBY DOG DECONSTRUCTED

1min
pages 26-27

COUNTRY IDOL

2min
pages 24-25

CALGARY IN BLOOM

1min
pages 22-23

Detours PLANTING A LEGACY

1min
pages 21-22

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

3min
pages 17-19

THE INNOVATION STORY

1min
page 16

THE FUTURE OF CANCER CARE STARTS HERE.

1min
pages 15-16

Ready to Build?

2min
pages 9-11, 13-14

THE SCHO OL OF YES, AND...

1min
pages 6-8
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