Avenue April 18

Page 1

CITY| LIFE| STYLE| CALGARY

BEST

DRESSED

2018 GREG FRASER AND 10 MORE CALGARIANS WITH STANDOUT STYLE

CHINESE FOOD IN CALGARY What to know and where to go

BEAR WITH US

Can bears and people just get along?

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F E AT U R E S avenue

CITY| LIFE| STYLE| CALGARY

contents APRIL 2018

APRIL 2018 | $4.95 AVENUECALGARY.COM

APRIL 2018

Best Dressed List | Chinese Food Guide | Bear With Us

BEST

DRESSED

2018 GREG FRASER AND 10 MORE CALGARIANS WITH STANDOUT STYLE

CHINESE FOOD IN CALGARY What to know and where to go

BEAR WITH US

PM# 40030911

Can bears and people just get along?

ON T H E C OV ER

Greg Fraser, co-owner of Dade Loft, shares his signature style as one of our 2018 Best Dressed List. PAGE 37. PHOTOGRAPH BY COLIN WAY

52

Stylish Stuff A roundup of decor pieces from Calgary retailers that will bring the current Canadiana, Scandinavian and tropical home-decor trends into your living space. By Kait Kucy

Dr. Diana Monea, in a lemon dress, gloves and hat by Michelle Roberts; shoes by Manolo Blahnik, glasses from Eye Health Centres; jewellery from Hillberg & Berk.

56

Bear With Us Last summer saw numerous closures due to bear activity in the mountain parks, leading wildlife experts to ponder where the balance lies in keeping both bears and humans safe from each other. By Fabian Mayer

Avenue’s Best Dressed 2018

Our annual list of super-stylish Calgarians showcasing eye-catching ensembles from their own closets.

37 By Shelley Arnusch, Aldona Barutowicz, Andrew Guilbert, Shiva Jahanshah and Käthe Lemon

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Chinese Cuisine in Calgary A breakdown of the four major types of Chinese food available in Calgary and top picks on where to find each. By Vincci Tsui


AvenueCalgary.com

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D E PA RT M E N T S

contents APRIL 2018

22 EDITOR’S NOTE 26 CONTRIBUTORS 90 WORK OF ART

74

81

An abridged guide to the flavour and textural nuances of salt, plus four musthave salts that can be found in local grocery stores and artisan markets.

Despite his struggles with symptoms related to fetal alcohol syndrome, teenager Warren Collins has become an elite-level archery competitor.

70

77

84

The reasons why Napa wines are in a class of their own.

What to eat, where to stay and what to do in the Parksville-Qualicum Beach area of Vancouver Island, a popular summer vacation destination for Alberta families looking for some ocean time.

A down-to-the-studs renovation of an Elbow Park century home gives a couple a brand-new canvas for their love of traditional decor.

Eat This

29

Workout

Detours Meet the local artist who created a book to inspire empathy for refugees, the story behind the new disc-golf course being constructed alongside the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway, a look inside the mind of an Escape Room creator and highlights from 15 years of the Calgary Underground Film Festival.

The Pour

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Getaways

Decor


AvenueCalgary.com

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LUMINOUS VOICES AND M O U N T R OYA L U N I V E R S I T Y PRESENT

avenue RedPoint Media & Marketing Solutions 100, 1900 11 St. S.E. Calgary, Alberta T2G 3G2 Phone: 403-240-9055 Toll Free: 1-877-963-9333 x0 Fax: 403-240-9059 info@redpointmedia.ca AvenueCalgary.com Facebook: Avenue Magazine — Calgary Twitter: @AvenueMagazine Instagram: @AvenueMagazine

Publisher Joyce Byrne, jbyrne@redpointmedia.ca Editor-in-Chief Käthe Lemon, klemon@redpointmedia.ca Executive Editor Jennifer Hamilton, jhamilton@redpointmedia.ca Senior Art Director Venessa Brewer, vbrewer@redpointmedia.ca Executive Editor, Digital Content Jaelyn Molyneux, jmolyneux@redpointmedia.ca Senior Editor Shelley Arnusch Associate Art Director Sarah McMenemy Assistant Editor Andrew Guilbert Assistant Editors, Digital Content Alyssa Quirico, Alana Willerton Staff Photographer Jared Sych Production Designer Rebecca Middlebrook Editorial Intern Victoria Lessard

THE TALLIS SCHOLARS A CHORAL EXPERIENCE UNLIKE ANY OTHER

APRIL 24

S U B S C R I P T I ON S

Fact Checkers Jennifer Friesen, Fraser Tripp

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Contributors Karen Ashbee, Aldona Barutowicz, Joanne Black, Kara Chomistek, Jade Davis, Tom Firth, Christina Frangou, Shiva Jahanshah, Pablo Iglesias, Lisa Kadane, Kait Kucy, Jessie Li, Fabian Mayer, Kelly Streit, Sue Thompson, Vincci Tsui, Colin Way, Katherine Ylitalo Print Advertising Coordinator Erin Starchuk, production@redpointmedia.ca Sales Assistant Robin Cook, rcook@redpointmedia.ca Director, National Sales Lindy Neustaedter Account Executives Elsa Amorim, Melissa Brown,

A DV ERT I S I N G I N QU I R I E S

Jocelyn Erhardt, Deise MacDougall, Caren Mendyk,

Phone: 403-240-9055 x0 Toll Free: 1-877-963-9333 x0 advertising@avenuecalgary.com AvenueCalgary.com

Elyse Murphy, Chelsey Swankhuizen, Sheila Witt

Published 12 times a year by RedPoint Media & Marketing Solutions. Copyright (2018) by RedPoint Media & Marketing Solutions. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher.

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Production Manager Mike Matovich Digital Advertising Specialist Katherine Jacob Pickering Audience Development/Reader Services Manager Rob Kelly

Distribution City Print Distribution Inc.

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EXCLUSIVE D E S I G N E R FA S H I O N . EXPERT ST YLE ADVISORS . D E S T I N AT I O N DINING.

Now open CF Chinook Centre

AvenueCalgary.com

23


avenue

CITY| LIFE| STYLE| CALGARY

APRIL 2018 | $4.95 AVENUECALGARY.COM

APRIL 2018

EDITOR’S NOTE

Best Dressed List | Chinese Food Guide | Bear With Us

BEST

DRESSED

2018 GREG FRASER AND 10 MORE CALGARIANS WITH STANDOUT STYLE

CHINESE FOOD IN CALGARY What to know and where to go

BEAR WITH US

PM# 40030911

Style to Spare

G E T AV E N U E O N YO U R TA B L E T! To get the tablet edition, go to avenuecalgary.com/tabletedition.

Confident and stylish people make a confident and stylish city.

24

avenueAPRIL.18

B E AR T HI S I N MI N D

Because of last year’s increased bear activity in our mountain parks, Fabian Mayer took a look at what that means for both us and them in his story on page 56. Käthe Lemon Editor-in-Chief klemon@redpointmedia.ca

I’m not sure any of us can say for sure whether or not our clothing choices build or reflect our confidence. Certainly, all of us have clothes that we feel most comfortable in — not just in the way of feeling physically unrestricted in sweatpants, but psychologically unrestricted in clothes that we feel reflect some truth about who we are. Sometimes clothes are like armour, deflecting attacks and making us feel protected. Sometimes our clothing is about expression, revealing our inner self to an outside world. Sometimes clothing is about demonstrating allegiance — setting us apart

as well as marking us as part of something larger. And sometimes, dressing up is just about having fun. Our 2018 Best Dressed honourees demonstrate all of those choices and more. But beyond this list of stylish individuals is the sense that Calgary as a city also seems to be stepping out with more confidence these days. While we have individually and collectively weathered some ups and downs lately, this is a city that is becoming increasingly comfortable in its own skin. Whatever your style, I hope you find something in this issue that suits you.

Photograph by Jared Sych; jewellery supplied by Brinkhaus. For information turn to page 55.

T

he Calgarians on this year’s Best Dressed list are stylish individuals, no doubt. But lots of people dress well, so what’s the difference between a well-dressed Calgarian and a Best Dressed Calgarian? In selecting this year’s Best Dressed we brought together a panel of fashion insiders to help determine the criteria for selection. The panel included street-style photographer Aldona Barutowicz, PARK president Kara Chomistek, model Jade Davis, and Mode Models president and CEO Kelly Streit who all helped choose this year’s list from a pool of suggested names. What the panel looked for was not only that the honourees clearly thought about their clothing and had a strong sense of their own personal style, but that they represented a greater sense of what fashion and style means for the city. This didn’t necessarily mean they were part of the fashion industry, but that they were elevating the city as a stylish place to live and work, regardless of what they did.

Can bears and people just get along?


TOWNHOMES VILLAS SINGLE FAMILY

Homes from the mid $200s to over $1 million

ESTATE CUSTOM ESTATE

Your Own Piece of Quiet

17

Showhomes to View

Enjoy an outdoor lifestyle with Riverstone’s network of pathways, closeness to the river and Fish Creek Park – while being minutes away from every modern convenience.

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AvenueCalgary.com

25


NEXT ISSUE

May

2018

CONTRIBUTORS PABLO IGLESIAS Pablo Iglesias is an Argentinian illustrator currently living in Toronto. Primarily an editorial illustrator, Iglesias focuses on creating smart, graphic illustrations with a distinct vintage quality that is heavily influenced by nature. His work has appeared in Adweek, The Washington Post, Village Voice, Variety, Scientific American and Hollywood Reporter. When he’s not drawing he loves to spend his time camping, fishing or just exploring the beauty that the Canadian wilderness has to offer. See more of his work at pabloi.com.

FABIAN MAYER Fabian Mayer is a Calgary-based writer whose work has appeared in Monocle, The Globe and Mail and WestJet Magazine. He got into journalism through the University of Calgary student newspaper, but tries not to hold it against them. Mayer enjoys travelling, skiing, hiking and generally being outdoors.

H E R I TA G E F U S I O N BUILDINGS We look why several “new” office

VINCCI TSUI

buildings have chosen to incorporate

Vincci Tsui is a registered dietitian and certified intuitive

heritage elements.

eating counselor who helps people untangle their messy relationships with food and their bodies using a non-diet

Families are changing and family homes are changing as well. Fortunately, there are now many more options available for the different sizes and shapes of families in this dynamic city.

THE KILLER IN YOUR BASEMENT

approach rooted in Health At Every Size® and intuitive eating paradigms. She is passionate about helping people rediscover the joy of food and eating and feel empowered in their body and life. Born in Hong Kong and raised in Calgary, Tsui is a proud Chinese-Canadian who loves Chinese food, making her the ideal writer for this month’s story on Chinese cuisine in the city. Follow her latest food adventure on Instagram @vinccird.

COLIN WAY

You may never have heard of radon,

Photographer Colin Way has been shooting commercially

but it’s the number-two cause of lung

in Calgary for more than 10 years. Since graduating from

cancer in Canada. We’ll tell you what

the Alberta College of Art + Design, he has shot photos

you need to know about testing and

for a varied client list that includes The New York

mitigation in your home.

Times, Chatelaine, SportsNet and Canadian House & Home. His work has been recognized in Communication Arts, Applied Arts and at the Alberta Magazine Awards. See more of his work at colinway.com.

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Biscuit Block photograph courtesy of Abugov-Kaspar

CITY ARCHITECTURE


ON THE WEB

MADE IN C A LG A RY From fashion accessories to food products, we highlight some of Calgary's best locally made goods. AvenueCalgary.com/MadeInCalgary

/avenuecalgary @avenuemagazine @avenuemagazine

Subscribe to our weekly Food, Style and Weekender newsletters to get the latest restaurant and store openings, advice on what to eat and where to shop and our picks for the best things to do in Calgary.

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DETOURS

Drawing Strength

Photograph by Jonathan Lagore

W

hile waiting to board a flight out of Greece in 2016, Calgary artist Nicole Wolf checked her phone and learned a boy living in a refugee camp she had volunteered with had died in an explosion. Though she didn’t know him well, she felt compelled to draw him in her sketchbook and reached out to people at the camp for photos. “I drew his portrait because he embodied something I wanted to talk about,” Wolf says. That drawing is one of many that eventually became part of Drawn Abroad, a book of Wolf ’s illustrations and writing from her year-long 2016 trip. Over the course of her journey, she backpacked across 16 countries, volunteering with various non-profits. She helped those affected by Nepal’s earthquake,

witnessed the attempted coup in Turkey and worked in refugee aid centres and refugee camps in Turkey and Greece. While Wolf says she intended the book primarily as a thank you to the friends and family who funded her trip, it has taken on new purpose as a starting point for a conversation about refugees. “What I’m trying to say is to meet [refugees] before you make judgements,” Wolf says. “Get to know them.” In addition to publishing her work, Wolf has also had one of her drawings — a pair of Hermes-like wings — tattooed on her ankles on her last day in Greece. “I felt like I got my wings on that trip,” says Wolf. “There’s a passage in the Old Testament that says something like, ‘I will make your feet walk on paths that don’t exist.’ That’s something I internalized for

Artist Nicole Wolf with images from her book Drawn Abroad.

29 AvenueCalgary.com


this trip, because I was doing things that there was no handbook for.� One such task was creating a security system for a Greek refugee camp. Human traffickers were sneaking in and kidnapping women, and Wolf proposed creating photo IDs to differentiate the refugees from the traffickers. “At first they were worried the Greek police would not like it, but then in one night 80 women were stolen. Eighty,� she says. “I was like, ‘I’ll take the hit.’ If I get arrested for taking photos inside a camp, it’s fine. Can we just do something?� With the help of a refugee who convinced the women to be photographed, Wolf created an ID system that volunteers use to this day. Wolf hasn’t yet decided whether she’ll return to the places she’s visited. “I didn’t want to go back unless I knew I could do something, I didn’t want to be a voluntourist,� she says. “Now I’ve realized I can do something. I can tell more stories. I’ve realized there’s a community that wants to listen to this. I’m pretty serious now, because I realize I can do some good.�—Andrew Guilbert

Matter of Course

T

reasure Richardson was at a Christmas party in 2015 when she found herself talking to then head of the Parks Foundation Calgary, Myrna DubĂŠ. Richardson was sharing the story of how her husband David had drowned the previous summer while swimming on Vancouver Island. When DubĂŠ said to let her know if there was anything she could do, Richardson, whose husband was an avid disc golfer, had an idea. “I said it would be awesome if I could do a memorial in David’s name and do a disc-golf park,â€? says Richardson.

A week later Richardson got a call from DubĂŠ saying disc golf, a sport where players attempt to throw specialized frisbees into a basket in as few tosses as possible, might be the perfect sport for a certain patch of land along Calgary’s Rotary/Mattamy Greenway. That patch of land is now set to open in June as the 18-hole, David Richardson Memorial Disc Golf Park. The 27-acre course will have two artificial-turf tee pads and multiple target baskets for every hole, allowing a variety of skill levels to play. Construction will cost roughly $700,000, all raised through donations and sponsorships. Calgary disc golfer and Canadian distance record-holder Rob McLeod says the sport is steadily growing in Calgary and the new course will take pressure off crowded courses such as Baker Park. It might also allow the city to host the Canadian National Championships by 2019. “This course, from what we know, is the most funded course in Canada, potentially one of the most well-funded in the world. $700,000 is unheard of in disc golf,â€? says McLeod, who helped with marketing for the course and is also involved with programming. Wade Horrocks of Ground Cubed Landscape Architects handled the course’s design, using

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DR. WENDY TINK & DR. PATRICIA CONNICK 803, 10 DISCOVERY RIDGE HILL SW

( ( $ '( & ! !

Disc-golf renderings by Matt Hedges, Ground3

DETOURS

Rendering of the David Richardson Memorial Disc Golf Park.


“DISC GOLF IS VERY DEMOCRATIC AND AFFORDABLE, WHEREAS BALL GOLF ... IS EXPENSIVE AND TAKES A LONG TIME TO PLAY.”

#BTFE PO UIF HSBDFGVM TIBQF PG B UVMJQ JO CMPPN

—Wade Horrocks, Ground Cubed Landscape Architects

his considerable experience designing courses for what disc golfers like to call “ball golf.” After completing the David Richardson Memorial course (his first disc-golf course) Horrocks is convinced the sport has a bright future. “[It’s] very democratic and affordable, whereas ball golf has some challenges introducing people to the sport because it’s expensive and takes a long time to play,” he says. Horrocks says what really makes this course special is what it means to those involved. “Hearing the story, you can’t help but be motivated to do something special.” Richardson says David would have been incredibly proud to have the park built in his honour. “He was a businessman and had quite a hectic schedule. Playing disc golf was his Zen moment,” says Richardson. “He’d just find so much excitement in it. When we went to a course and he saw the parking lot full disc golfers he’d say, ‘how awesome is this?’” —Fabian Mayer

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Custom aracde games at CUFF 2015.

DETOURS

Insider

15 Years of CUFF

T

he Calgary Underground Film Festival (CUFF) celebrates its 15th anniversary this month. A lot of cool things have happened in that time, some of which you might have missed, so here are some highlights from the festival’s history, according to festival director and programmer Brenda Lieberman. MOVING MOVIES The first CUFF took place in 2004 in a bar called The Venue — or at least, it would have taken place there if the bar had received its liquor license. “The AGLC shut us down on the first night, so the patrons, board of directors, everyone had to figure out, in a moment of panic, where we could move the festival to, and walk the audience there,” says Lieberman. “We ended up moving to Emmedia and did it all there.” TIRE TALK In honour of the 2011 screening of Rubber, a film about a tire that goes on a rampage, CUFF set up a Q & A with a mystery guest who turned out to be the round, silent type. “We had a tire up on stage with a microphone and a moderator,” says Lieberman. “We kept it serious, had a 15- to 20-minute Q & A, and the audience just went with it. It was amazing.” SATURDAY MORNING SUGAR In 2011, curator Kier-La Janisse brought a threehour package of retro cartoons and commercials to CUFF. Since then, the Saturday morning all-you-caneat-cereal cartoon party has brought pyjama-clad audiences together for classic ’toons and endless sugar cereal, something Lieberman says they take

ABOVE All-you-can-eat cereal buffet at the Saturday morning cartoon party. RIGHT The star of the film Rubber taking audience questions in 2011.

great pains to procure. “We make several trips to the U.S. and we try to buy as many of the wacky, cool kinds [of cereal] as we can fit into our office,” she

GAME ON

says. “Last year we had 85 varieties.”

In 2015, CUFF created custom arcade cabinets to showcase independent video games.

DEATH COMES TO CALGARY

“One of the [game creators], he never in a million

In 2013, the festival screened A Band Called Death

years imagined watching his game get played by

about a little-known punk band from Detroit that

a bunch of kids and adults, seeing them lining up to

never “made it,” only to experience a resurgence

play it,” says Lieberman. “He was emotional about it,

in popularity decades later. CUFF secured not only

so I think that was really cool.” —A.G.

the documentary but also a performance by the band afterwards at the Palomino. “The theatre had a standing ovation after the movie and the band was amazing” says Lieberman. 32

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The 2018 Calgary Underground Film Festival runs April 16 to 22. For information, visit calgaryundergroundfilm.org.

Anyone who has spent an hour or more trying to solve puzzles in an escape room knows that the series of tests and challenges can often be mystifyingly complex. But, as Eric Boudreau, founder of Escape Capers explains, there’s a rhyme and reason to every room. “I start with a story, and that depends on the location, (though the inverse is true as well) because everything in the escape room should make sense in the story. Then it’s building the puzzles, so I ask, what are expected tropes people want to see? For the private-eye room, [the character’s] probably a drunk, so I built puzzles around him and his drinking problem. Other things that are important are flows. There’s the flow of the room, the layout, so people feel they’re always finding something new, and puzzle flow. You don’t want three easy puzzles, then a really hard puzzle and another really hard puzzle, you want to have some easy, to medium, to hard, to easy again, to keep the momentum going. Planning how it ends is also very important. What’s the moment someone is working really hard for? And when that big thing happens it’s rewarding for guests to get there.” —A.G. For more information, visit escapecapers.ca

CUFF photography courtesy of CUFF

ESCAPE CAPERS’ ERIC BOUDREAU ON CRAFTING ESCAPE ROOMS


AvenueCalgary.com

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DETOURS GAME S HOW THE PRICE IS RIGHT LIVE!

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this month

while watching the show. Now, put your

APRIL 16 TO 22

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Now in its 15th year, this festival

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DA N C E MIMIC

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APRIL 19 TO MAY 5

Alberta Theatre Projects presents the world premiere of a truly Canadian story.

APRIL 14, 18 AND 20

show has the local dance company

Set against the backdrop of the Great

Calgary Opera presents a three-show

teaming up with the Old Trout Puppet

Depression, four Canadian women

run of the classic Italian opera featuring a

Workshop and the Nick Fraser Ensemble

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dramatic love triangle between an opera

for a night of jazz dance and puppetry

of hockey.

singer, a painter and the chief of police.

set to live music.

Martha Cohen Theatre, Arts Commons,

Southern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium,

DJD Dance Centre, 111 12 Ave. S.E.,

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403-262-7286, calgaryopera.com

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APRIL 3 TO 21 In the final show of the current season,

PRAIRIE WOOD DESIGN AWARD 2018

34

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Decidedly Jazz Danceworks’ spring

Glory photograph by Erin Wallace

Morgan Yamada and Arielle Rombough in Alberta Theatre Projects’ Glory.


Gerry Dee photograph courtesy of Alberta Jubilee Auditoria; Yoga Nova photograph by Shannon Yau Photography

Openings MUS ICAL THEATR E LEGALLY BLONDE: THE MUSICAL

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queso fundido at this new Latin

topped with soft-serve ice cream in

The stage-musical adaptation of the

Fans of sci-fi, animation, comics and

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Asian-inspired flavours at this new

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more don their best cosplay get-ups

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version of Anne of Green Gables.

this new East Village boutique, which

of yoga classes, plus a full-service

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APRIL 27

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latest stand-up comedy tour.

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AvenueCalgary.com

35


Frida Kahlo: Her Photos Until May 21, 2018 glenbow.org

FocusOnFrida AtGlenbow

Banco de Mexico Fiduciario en el Fideicomiso Museos Diego Rivera y Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo by Lola Álvarez Bravo, ca. 1944 ©Frida Kahlo Museum

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Glenbow_Avenue_Frida_5.1875x4.8125_FINAL.indd 1

2018-02-22 10:48 AM


C A L G A R Y ’ S

Our annual Best Dressed list paints a picture of a city full of confidence, perhaps even swagger, all across the style spectrum. Chosen by our panel of fashion and style experts, the list emphasizes those Calgarians whose dress impressed the most because they dress to express themselves. JUDGES Aldona Barutowicz, Venessa Brewer, Joyce Byrne, Kara Chomistek, Jade Davis, Käthe Lemon AND Kelly Streit PHOTOGRAPHY BY Colin Way • STYLING BY Kara Chomistek AND Jessie Li MAKEUP BY Joanne Black • HAIR BY Sue Thompson WORDS BY Shelley Arnusch, Aldona Barutowicz, Andrew Guilbert, Shiva Jahanshah AND Käthe Lemon

37 AvenueCalgary.com


Nam DangMitchell

N

am Dang-Mitchell’s wardrobe choices are much like the homes she crafts as a sought-after interior designer. “The foundation of my style is classicism and then there’s an element that contrasts it, that makes it feel relevant,” she says. Whether she is dressed for a meeting, a work site or an evening out, Dang-Mitchell’s style seems so much a part of who she is that each biographical revelation makes you think, “Oh, of course.” Of course she was born in France and moved to Calgary at the age of six — that must have influenced her natural elegance and her use of clothing as both a communication tool and a shield. Of course she has a fine arts degree from the University of Calgary — that must have influenced her sense of the emotional power of texture, colour and line. Her background as a designer may have given her an appreciation for pedigreed brand names, but she credits her mother with her love of bargains. “I love a deal. I love the hunt. I’m an Olympic-level shopper,” she says. “I don’t know why people would hire a personal shopper — it’s like hiring someone to go to a party for you.” —K.L. Main image: Top from COS; pants from Zara; earrings from BaubleBar; bracelet from Bird; vintage 1970’s watch by Rolex; Chloé bag from Holt Renfrew. Inset images (clockwise from top): Dress by Zimmermann; shoes by rag & bone; bag from personal collection • Earrings from BaubleBar • Chelsea28 sweater and Tibi dress both from Nordstrom; bag by R&Y Augousti.

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Greg Fraser

T

o say Greg Fraser is living a “curated life” is putting it mildly. Fraser is one half of the duo behind Dade Loft, a boutique design firm, art gallery and furniture and decor retailer run out of the industrial-chic Inglewood loft he shares with his partner, Dade co-owner Darcy Lundgren. Essentially, the couple’s condo is a live-in model for the Dade lifestyle concept. “It’s a living showroom,” Fraser says. Fraser’s personal style is as eye-catching as the objets d’art he brings into the loft. He’s not shy about bright colours or unconventional cuts, accessorized with big-and-bold eyewear. When the weather warms you’ll see him sporting the abbreviated jumpsuit also known as the “man romper” — and pulling it off, too. That said, Fraser harbours an appreciation for the classics, as well. “I love tuxedos,” he says. “People are getting a lot more casual, which is not a bad thing, but I think it’s nice to take that opportunity to dress up and put on a crisp, white shirt.” —S.A.

Main image: Mr Turk romper from Dade Loft; jacket by Club Monaco; shoes by Parker and Sky; Stolen Riches shoelaces and Steamline Luggage suitcase both from Dade Loft; Ksubi glasses from The Uncommons. Inset images (left to right): Mr Turk romper from Dade Loft; sandals by Diesel; Fat Frames glasses by Walker McKinley • Pants by Mr Turk; Luca Del Forte shoes from Browns • Back detail on Club Monaco jacket from main image.

AvenueCalgary.com

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Todd Hirsch

A

s one of the public faces for ATB Financial, chief economist Todd Hirsch is used to having all eyes trained on him. Whether he’s hosting an event, giving a presentation or appearing on television, Hirsch is one numbers guy who likes to dress to the nines. Though he’s always been fashion conscious, his style has evolved over the years from dark, solid colours to his current preference for classic pieces, like suits from local retailer Supreme Men’s Wear, bright colours and quirky patterns, like those in his shirts by French brand Coton Doux. “Economics can be a difficult topic to understand — a lot of economists talk in a language that people don’t really connect with,” Hirsch says. “In my presentations and writing I try to make it easier to connect with [people]. I like to think of my style as being friendly, interesting and accessible. That’s the way I would like my economic presentations to come across.” —A.G. Main image: Jacket by Roberto P Luxury, butterfly shirt by 7 Downie St., both from Supreme Men’s Wear; jeans by AG, belt from Hudson’s Bay; shoes by Cruyff; pocket square by Roberto P Luxury; 007 Stool supplied by Limitless. Inset images (left to righ): Pal Zileri suit jacket from Holt Renfrew; Coton Doux shirt and Biedermann vest both from Supreme Men’s Wear; pocket square from Simons; flower lapel pin from Supreme Men’s Wear; watch from Bulova • Pants by Biedermann; shoes by John Fluevog • Biedermann suit jacket and shirt, and Robert Talbott Estate tie all from Supreme Men’s Wear; custom shell lapel pin by chef Liana Robberecht; Liberty of London pocket square; watch by Bulova; custom cufflinks from Barneys New York.

40

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Whitey Kirst

T

here aren’t too many things a consummate rock ’n’ roller could have on their resumé more impressive than a decade of playing lead guitar for the inimitable (some might say infamous) Iggy Pop. No matter what local musician Whitey Kirst is wearing, it’s the aura of having toured with Iggy that truly makes him stand out. Born in Calgary to expat-American parents who named him after Mount Whitehorn near Lake Louise, Kirst is an iconic figure here in the nightclubs of his hometown, easily recognized for his rock ’n’ roll style that he says hasn’t changed all that much from when he was a youngster. Though Kirst has toned things down somewhat from the blue-andwhite-striped leather bellbottoms he recalls wearing for his first major gig with Iggy, his look is still outlandish enough to turn heads in Calgary. It’s not deliberate on his part; Kirst says he just dresses how he likes. “You gotta feel comfortable in what you’re wearing,” he says. “I don’t think I’d be terribly comfortable wearing a lot of things that other people wear.” —S.A.

Main image: Printed shirt from Kenny Rogers Western Collection; red pants by Serious Clothing; T-shirt, sunglasses, belt and custom-made rings are all his personal collection. Inset images (left to right): Rings and chain bracelet all custom-made from personal collection • Leather vest by Branded Garments; printed shirt by Mach II by Arrow, white pants by Blue Threads; boots custom made by Flip of Hollywood • Leather jacket by Brimaco; printed top by Patron Cito; Rock n Roll High School T-shirt and custom frayed denim are personal collection; hat by Mega USA.

AvenueCalgary.com

41


Diana Monea

T

hose who visit any of Dr. Diana Monea’s three Eye Health Centre optometry clinics in Calgary and Regina will see her personal style mantra displayed on a plaque on the wall: “Don’t try so hard to fit in when you were born to stand out.” Originally from Saskatchewan, Monea began practicing optometry in her home province in 1978 before moving with her family to Calgary in 2000. Although her profession can be fairly conservative, Monea’s look is bold and theatrical. She favours fitted gowns, dramatic head wear and, of course, colourful glasses, for nights out on the town — and on a daily basis as well. It’s a look that’s in line with Monea’s belief that we should embrace our inherent uniqueness. “I think we should live who we really are inside; not be obstructed by what someone else dictates within fashion, let it be colour, style or anything else,” she says. “Life should be fun and an expression of who you really are. I dress however I feel like dressing. For me, normal is boring.” —A.B.

Main image: Dress by Paul Hardy (custom-created in support of the #NotInMyCity campaign against human trafficking); glasses by Gucci from Eye Health Centres; shoes by Manolo Blahnik; jewellery by Hillberg & Berk; hat by Julie Hanratty; watch by Rolex. Inset images (left to right): Dress and hat by Michelle Roberts; jewellery by Hillberg & Berk; glasses by Dolce&Gabbana from Eye Health Centres • Lemon dress by Michelle Roberts; shoes by Manolo Blahnik • Hat by Jag Moussa from JagHed Couture; glasses by Francis Klein from Eye Health Centres; scarf by Snowflake.


Reese Nguyen

F

ashion blogger Reese Nguyen’s style is all about juxtaposition. “Sometimes I’m very girly and I’ll wear a floral print, but I’m also a bit of a tomboy,” she says. “I try to find a happy medium, and I like to be comfortable. Fashion-meets-function is very important to me!” Last year, while working a corporate job in the energy industry, Nguyen started the blog Oui to Weekends to share her style and thoughts on beauty, fashion and travel. It didn’t take long for her to learn the digitalmedia ropes and she has since grown her personal brand to the point where she is now working with companies that she believes in and that are in line with her style aesthetic, such as Storets and Premonition Designs. Though the fashion sensibility that has made Oui to Weekends a hit isn’t always in line with the more conventional dress seen in the office towers of the oil-and-gas world, Nguyen continues to push boundaries in the pursuit of her dreams. —A.B. Main image: Roberto Cavalli blazer from Nordstrom, skirt from Topshop, bralette from Aritzia, Fendi bag from Winners, Marni shoes from Holt Renfrew. Inset images (counterclockwise from left): Diane von Furstenberg pants from Century 21; blouse by Premonition Designs; JW Anderson bag from Reebonz; Christian Louboutin shoes from Holt Renfrew • Stelly Clothing top; BDG jeans from Urban Outfitters; bag from Danse Lente; Acne Studios shoes from Holt Renfrew; 007 Stool supplied by Limitless • Details from the Roberto Cavalli blazer, Topshop skirt and Fendi bag seen in the main image.

AvenueCalgary.com

43


Katrina Olson-Mottahed

W

ith her platinum blonde hair, expertly manicured nails and always-on-point makeup, Katrina Olson-Mottahed is an influential fashionista with a look that is polished from head to toe. Often dressed in figure-flattering feminine silhouettes accented by pops of colour and sparkly accessories such as sequined boots, her look is both fearless and elegant. “When I go out, I’m gonna bring it,” she says. As director of the Canadian International Fashion Film Festival (CANIFFF) OlsonMottahed is a leader on the local fashion scene and a strong social-media influencer as well. She is particularly passionate about supporting Canadian fashion designers and often wears Canadian clothing and accessories (such as the dress, blouse and skirt by Montreal’s Unttld seen here in the inset images). “I always find it unfortunate when designers feel they have to leave Canada to ‘make it,’” Olson-Mottahed says. “I hope by buying and wearing their pieces they can continue to create collections in Canada, adding jobs to our own fashion industry.” If this chic mom of two girls has any say, that industry will continue to grow and shine. —S.J.

44

Main image: On Katrina, Maison Marie Saint Pierre jacket and dress from Blu’s; tights by Agent Provocateur; Dries Van Noten shoes from Saks Fifth Avenue; glasses by Victoria Beckham from Chinook Optical; ring, bracelet and earrings all by Dean Davidson from Rubaiyat. On Persia (left), skirt from Zara; top from Forever 21; hat from Justice; shoes from J.Crew; socks from PARKSHOP; glasses from the Brass Monocle. On Tala (right), dress and shoes from Zara, headband from H&M; socks from PARKSHOP. Inset images (clockwise from top left): Unttld dress from Shear Luxury; Gucci bag from Holt Renfrew; bracelet and ring both by Dean Davidson from Rubaiyat • Shoes by Aquazzura • Unttld blouse and skirt from Shear Luxury; earrings by Dean Davidson from Rubaiyat.


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45


Ada Peddlesden

R

aised in an artistic family that frequented the Glenbow Museum, Ada Peddlesden has long been infatuated with days gone by, though her anachronistic style truly blossomed during her years as a student at the Alberta College of Art + Design. “I’ve always been drawn to looks of the past,” she says, with inspirations that range from the Old Hollywood glamour of Louise Brooks to the French New Wave cool of Anna Karina. (Peddlesden even rocked the iconic Brooks bob for a number of years but eventually grew it out as she was starting to find it “pretty drastic.”) Five years ago, Peddlesden’s interests in art and heritage converged when she landed a staff position in the Glenbow’s department of access collections and exhibitions, a workplace that’s conducive to her personal style. “It’s pretty free there; I think because we’re all artists, it’s hard to have a strict dress code,” she says. And while she remains infatuated with the past, her arm tattoos reveal she’s a woman of her own era, as well. “They’re pretty traditional-looking,” she says. “But yes, I do love tattoos. I want to get some more.” —S.A. Main image: Top by Hannah Kristina Metz; trousers by Stella McCartney; vintage ring from personal collection. Rose tattoo on right arm by Nick Luit; left forearm tattoo by Montreal artist Muriel de Mai. Inset images (left to right): Dress by Hannah Kristina Metz; vintage bag and vintage ring are personal collection; shoes by Grenson; tights from Hudson’s Bay • Shoes by Miu Miu • dress by Samantha Pleet; bag by Mansur Gavriel; tights by Gucci; vintage hat and ring from personal collection; 007 Stool supplied by Limitless.

46


Confidence

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AvenueCalgary.com

47


Tonii Roulston

I

n a trial, small details can be telling. The same is true of Tonii Roulston’s fashion choices. She always wears a rectangular jade necklace after a spiritualist told her green would help open her heart chakra, allowing her to connect with people. “Whether it works or not, I don’t know, but it helps remind me to open up to what you’re saying,” she says. “We think too much with our heads and not with our hearts and [that] is where we connect.” As a managing partner at Roulston Urquhart Criminal Defence Firm, Roulston dresses to reflect confidence and personal expression. The former blue-banged, pierced-all-over student is now a sartorially savvy lawyer taking inspiration from British Vogue and Vogue Italia, as well as street style. When Roulston puts on a Dolce & Gabbana suit, paired with Prada shoes and a Gucci briefcase, she exudes the self-assuredness her work requires. Outside of work, whether dining out or attending events like Parkluxe, you’ll see her in a Gucci flare-leg pantsuit, or a Valentino dress with McQueen shoes. —A.G. Main image: Miu Miu dress from Holt Renfrew; clutch, bracelet and ring by Alexander McQueen; glasses by Tom Ford. Inset images (clockwise from top left): Jimmy Choo boots from Holt Renfrew • Dolce&Gabbana dress from Holt Renfrew • Dress, boots, bag and bracelet all Alexander McQueen from Holt Renfrew; Breitling watch from Calgary Jewellery; socks from Simons.

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Helen & Tamar Zenith

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elen and Tamar Zenith, the mother-daughter co-directors of Newzones Gallery, share a passion for the arts and a love of fashion. The pair curate their ensembles much like the exhibitions in their gallery, beginning with a blank canvas — black clothing in this case — and building upon it for artful effect. Tamar usually starts her outfits with a pair of tights and a tunic, adding asymmetrical layers and fine jewellery pieces and finishing with boots or sandals. Now in her 70s, Helen prefers loose-fitting silhouettes in black paired with exotic jewellery pieces and is never without her signature oversized eyewear and big hair. Tamar credits Helen for inspiring in her a love for abstract beauty in both art and fashion. She can’t recall ever seeing her mother not looking stylish and put-together. “I don’t think she has ever worn a pair of jeans or sweats,” Tamar says. Just as daughter looks to mother for style inspiration, Helen says she often consults Tamar before making major purchases. “I trust Tamar,” Helen says. “Sometimes I’ll send her a picture of something I’ve seen and ask her if I should even go there.” —S.J. Main image: On Helen, Raquel Allegra top from Primitive Culture; vest by Planet from BB1 Culture; arches shoes from Nordstrom; necklaces were purchased at an art gallery in New York; bracelet purchased from an art gallery in Vancouver; glasses by Mykita from the Brass Monocle. On Tamar, Balenciaga dress from Nordstrom; necklace purchased at an art gallery in New York; cuff by Saint Laurent; shoes by Cole Haan; bag by Prada. Inset images (left to right): Closeup view of necklaces on Helen from main image • Marni top from Holt Renfrew; bag by Tom Ford; gold bracelet from Tamar’s personal collection; pink bracelet by Alexander McQueen; purple bracelet by Hermès. On Tamar, Marni top and necklace from Holt Renfrew; bag by Tom Ford; gold bracelet from personal collection; pink bracelet by Alexander McQueen; shoes by Valentino. On Helen, Eileen Fisher top and Alexander Wang shoes all from Nordstrom; shawl by Annette Görtz from Blu’s; necklace from callidas; glasses by Thierry Lasry from the Brass Monocle; braided bracelet by Alor from Holt Renfrew; beaded bracelets by Miranda Morrow; watch by Bell & Ross.

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Canadiana

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A perennial favourite, especially for a casual or country look, Canadiana decor has become even more on-trend since the Canada 150 celebrations. 1 2 3 4 5

Outpost Original cowhide coasters, $99 for a set of four from Interior Living. Blok lamp by Camp & City, $125 (including bulb) from Meraki Supply Co. Plume table runner (18-inches-by-78 inches) by Coral & Tusk, $395 from Inspirati. Pine cone door knocker by Michael Healy, $270 from Banbury Lane Design Centre. Three-peak shelf by Needle & Pine, $75 from Greater Goods.

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Pine cone door knocker photograph supplied by Banbury Lane; Kubus 4 candleholder by Lassen photograph supplied by Kit Interior Objects; Tired Man Chair photograph supplied by Guildhall Home

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Maxime Club Chair photograph courtesy of Jonathan Adler

1 Pineapple shot-glass set by W&P Design, $50 from The Uncommons. 2 Monkey Lamp by Seletti, available in black or white, $391 to $633 (depending on position) from Dade Loft. 3 Light Leaves Boob Pot by Group Partner, $86 from Fieldstudy. 4 Maxime Club Chair by Jonathan Adler, $3,750 from Robert Sweep. 5 Tropical Kokedama, $35 to $228 (depending on size) from Atelier Secret Kokedama.


SOURCE TRENDING NOW PAGES 52 TO 54 CANADIANA Banbury Lane Design Centre 1301 10 Ave. S.W., 403-244-0038, banburylane.com Greater Goods 8, 606 Meredith Rd. N.E., 403-455-0221, greatergoodsco.ca Inspirati 120, 2207 4 St. S.W., 403-244-4443, inspirati.ca Interior Living 1124 10 Ave. S.W., 403-246-6240, interiorliving.ca Meraki Supply Co. 103, 305 10 St. N.W., merakisupplyco.com SCANDI-STYLE The Cinder & Sage Loft 2107B 4 St. S.W., 403-681-0705, cinderandsage.com Guildhall Home 1222 9 Ave. S.E., 403-454-4399, guildhallhome.com Kit Interior Objects 725 11 Ave. S.W., 403-508-2533, kitinteriorobjects.com The Loft By Amanda Hamilton 405 11 Ave. S.E., loft.amandahamiltondesign.com Pomp & Circumstance 1204 12 St. S.W., 403-244-4211, pompandcircumstance.ca TROPICAL Atelier Secret Kokedama 102, 709 11 Ave. S.W., 403-999-8618, kokedama.ca Dade Loft 104, 1212 13 St. S.E., 403-454-0243, dadeartanddesignlab.com Fieldstudy 102, 1812 4 St. S.W., 587-356-2134, fieldstudyshop.com Robert Sweep 808 16 Ave. S.W., 403-262-8525, robertsweep.com The Uncommons 1325A 9 Ave. S.E., 587-353-9337, theuncommons.ca

EDITOR’S NOTE PAGE 22 Black diamond ring set in 18kt rose gold, $7,205; 18kt yellow-gold chain, $3,760; and 18kt yellow-gold link bracelet, $6,585; all from Brinkhaus, 823 6 Ave. S.W., 403-269-4800, brinkhaus.com

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Bear With Us Last summer, bear activity in the regional mountain areas resulted in several extended trail closures and one high-profile bear fatality, leaving wildlife experts wondering what measures may be required going forward to keep both bears and humans safe from each other. BY Fabian Mayer ILLUSTRATIONS BY Pablo Iglesias

O

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f the roughly 5,000 days guide Barry Blanchard has spent in the mountains, only a couple are scorched into his memory. Runins with grizzlies are not so easily forgotten. Though it occurred back in the early ’90s, Blanchard says one particularly vivid incident in the mountains of Banff National Park still feels like it happened yesterday. Blanchard recalls he was delivering instruction to two clients when one of them mentioned there was a bear nearby. “He said it so casually I thought I’d look up and see a little black bear ambling along the ridge a kilometre away,” Blanchard recalls. “But no, there was a grizzly coming onto our snow slope.” As the bear closed in, the mountaineers attempted to create a distraction by throwing their packs down the slope. “The bear took a glance at the packs and kept coming. He was only three metres away and I just had to assume he was going to make contact with us,” says Blanchard. “I just yelled ‘slide!’ And I sat on my butt and held my ice axe in the air and accelerated down the snow slope and went launching off a 25-foot snow drop.” After his clients dropped in behind him the trio scrambled down into a ravine and up the other side. From there, they watched

the bear tear apart their packs. “Yeah, it was scary,” says Blanchard. “It was also amazing to watch this magnificent animal just play for an hour.” Though more dramatic than the majority of human-bear encounters that take place in Alberta every summer, this one ended in standard fashion: hikers with a story and a tough decision for authorities — in this case the park wardens — who must weigh both bear and human safety against the public’s ability to enjoy the national parks (which, in essence, belong to all Canadians) and make the call as to whether trails in the area should be closed. Trail closures are just one part of the answer to the much larger question of how humans and bears can safely share the landscape. But it’s a question that has taken on added urgency in the mountain parks near Calgary, which have seen high visitor numbers in recent years. Banff National Park recorded its highest visitation numbers ever in 2017, with approximately 3.8 million visitors through its gates. The numbers were up 2.5 per cent compared to 2016, which works out to approximately 95,000 additional individuals. The increase was due in part to the federal government’s decision to waive park fees as part of the Canada 150 celebrations,

but visitation has been growing regardless, with the 2.5 increase between 2016 and 2017 consistent with recent year-over-year increases prior to that. Regular users of areas like Kananaskis Country, a patchwork of provincial parks southeast of Banff National Park, have also witnessed trails getting busier every year. “We’re seeing parking lots constantly overflowing with people,” says Alberta Parks ecologist John Paczkowski. “We’re seeing an increase in bike traffic, in boat traffic, in paddleboard traffic, in hiking traffic. All across the board we’re seeing an increase of human use in Kananaskis Country.” The Rockies’ appeal is undeniable; the allure of clear air, adrenaline and panoramic splendour is hard to resist. A one-hour drive westward from Calgary is all that’s required to enjoy world-class hiking, biking, canoeing, camping and other outdoor activities. Healthy tourist numbers are, by and large, something to celebrate — the tourism industry in Alberta generates over $8 billion in annual expenditures and employs over 127,000 people. However, humans invariably bring with them consequences for the landscape and the creatures that inhabit it. “It’s a great place to come and recreate, but that high-intensity recreation may have impacts


3.8

MILLION VISITORS CAME INTO BANFF NATIONAL PARK IN 2017.

AvenueCalgary.com

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“SHE BELONGS HERE AND ON OUR LANDSCAPE, THE ONLY HOME SHE KNOWS, AND SHOULD NOT BE EXECUTED FOR SIMPLY BEING A BEAR. SHE IS SURROUNDED BY MILLIONS OF PEOPLE YEARLY AND DOES A PRETTY GOOD JOB OF AVOIDING THEM.” –PETITION IN SUPPORT OF BEAR 148

and potential conflicts with wildlife,” says Paczkowski. “If we’re seeing different levels of human use in wildlife habitat the chances for conflict go up.” Last summer was a busy one for wildlife officials, who implemented several lengthy and high-profile closures. Even for Canmore, a town used to bears in its backyard, the summer of 2017 was exceptional. A particularly significant incident was when an 18-year-old woman walking her dog near the reservoir just west of the town was attacked by a black bear. Woman and dog both survived the attack, though the woman required hospital treatment. Paczkowski says that when it comes to deciding whether or not to issue a trail closure due to bear activity, authorities look primarily at the potential risk to public safety based on the frequency bears are observed in the area, the nature of bear attractants, and, in some cases, the species, age and class of bear. Officials had closed the area around the reservoir two weeks prior to the attack on the 18-year-old woman as numerous bears had been spotted there feeding on berries. The vast swath of popular recreation spots encompassing the area around Quarry Lake, Grassi Lakes and the Canmore reservoir was closed from late July until early September. While ignoring trail closures can incur a penalty, the woman was spared a fine because authorities deemed she had wandered into the area inadvertently. 58

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are recreating on trails, so there was more Hilary Young is the Alberta program conflict,” says Young. manager for the Yellowstone to Yukon After a few encounters with people around Conservation Initiative, a Canmore-based Canmore, Bear 148 was relocated to Kootenon-profit. She says a number of factors nay National Park in early July, but she quickcombined to make last summer particularly ly returned to the Canmore area. Though eventful. “It was especially epic because of she would bluff-charge trail users, she never the number of visitors we had in the Bow actually made physical contact with anyone. Valley,” says Young. “The bumper berry crop Following a week of near daily encounters last summer also meant that bears were with hikers and joggers, the question about drawn to the southwestern edge of Canmore what should be done with the curious and for berries, bumping into human infrastructroublesome bear took on more urgency. ture and people on trails.” There were rumblings that if Bear 148 were You don’t need to read about bear attacks involved in another serious incident, Alberta in the news to know that encountering a Fish and Wildlife officers would be required bear is dangerous; it’s understood viscerally. to euthanize her, prompting Banff residents Besides observing trail closures, those who Bree Todd and Stacey Sartoretto to start enjoy spending time in bear country know a petition urging the government to leave to take safety precautions such as travelling the bear alone. “She belongs here and on our in groups and making lots of noise to lower landscape, the only home she knows, and the chances of an encounter. In the event should not be executed for simply being a that a human-bear encounter can’t be avoidbear. She is surrounded by millions of people ed, having bear spray readily accessible (and yearly and does a pretty good job of avoidknowing how to use it) is considered the ing them,” read the petition, which has since best defense. been signed by more than 37,000 people. That the bears are also in danger during “I think it really tugged at people’s heartsuch encounters is less obvious, but somestrings and they felt an attachment to her,” thing Canmore residents were tragically says Young. “The feeling was that [the bear] reminded of last summer. Bear 148 was a was doing what she could; she was giving six-year-old female grizzly who spent the people warning. She was just unlucky enough majority of her time in Banff National Park. to end up in a territory that She was habituated to was filled with people.” people, meaning she had Eventually the governlost her fear of humans, ment decided to trap Bear but generally left them 148 and relocate her to the alone. Things changed, remote Kakwa Wildland however, when Bear 148 Provincial Park northwest started moving eastward of Jasper. Survival rates toward Canmore, drawn after such translocations to the area because of the are generally low, but Bear great berry crop. “She was 148 seemed to be doing attracted to heavily popuEVERY YEAR IS okay in the weeks following lated areas where people HUMAN RELATED.

#1

CAUSE OF GRIZZLY BEAR DEATH

Photography by A. Taylor, courtesy of Parks Canada

Bear 148.


NEWSLETTERS the move (her movements had been tracked by GPS collar since as far back as 2014). By mid-September, however, she wandered across the British Columbia border and the bear’s troubles, which began with human encounters, ended the same way. She was shot by a hunter (legally) mere months before B.C. permanently banned hunting grizzlies in December of last year. Young says that on top of losing a breedingage female, a blow to the province’s threatened grizzly population, the death was upsetting for the many who had followed Bear 148’s story. Young is careful to point out that the various jurisdictions did all that their policies allowed them to do to help Bear 148. But the fact that it still wasn’t enough has cast a spotlight on the issue of bear-human coexistence. “Within the Bow Valley, specifically, I would say coexistence is more visible than it has ever been,” says Young. “Every year the number-one cause of grizzly bear death is human-related in some way or another. Many local Bow Valley residents acknowledge that we need to better understand how our recreational pursuits affect our ability to coexist with wildlife.” Canmore’s roughly 14,000 permanent residents aren’t going anywhere and though the town is taking measures like removing attractants such as fruit trees, that may not be enough to limit conflicts, especially considering further development in the area is all but certain. The subject of limiting how people recreate in bear country is also contentious in the Bow Valley, Young says. Having predictable trail closures during berry season, however, is one measure that could help. “There may be times, such as during berry season, that it’s more important for bears to use those areas and people to stay out of them,” says Young. “People may have to adapt and use different recreational areas and trails while bears are feeding heavily in certain areas.” As part of the response to this past summer’s events, the mayors of Banff and Canmore convened a roundtable of representatives from the Ministry of Environment and Parks, representatives from the towns of Canmore and Banff, federal and provincial parks authorities and conservation and wildlife-education notfor-profit organizations in an effort to reduce human-wildlife conflict in the Bow Valley. The roundtable’s technical working group has since met for five hours every two weeks and

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BE BEAR AWA R E

When heading out for a hike or other activity in a bear-populated area, the best way to deal with encounters is to take steps to avoid them.

“IT ALMOST SEEMED LIKE THIS BEAR COULD COUNT TO SEVEN WHEN YOU LOOK AT HER LOCATIONS ON WEEKDAYS VERSUS WEEKENDS. THAT THE BEARS ARE ADJUSTING TO US IS AN INCREDIBLE THING ... PEOPLE ARE CHANGING WILDLIFE BEHAVIOUR IN A WAY WHERE THEY ARE LEARNING HOW TO NAVIGATE US.” –CHERYL HOJNOWSKI, WILDLIFE RESEARCHER

Observe trail closures.

Travel in groups.

Make noise to announce your presence.

Limit recreation to daylight hours.

Keep dogs on leashes.

Carry bear spray, know how to use it, and have it readily accessible. 60

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the roundtable hopes to have a series of recommendations ready to present to the community by the end of May. Looming over the discussions is the idea that there is a threshold of human use beyond which bears will start to disappear. It’s an idea that is being talked about more and more among Alberta Parks managers and conservation biologists, according to Cheryl Hojnowski. The Canmore resident recently received her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, for her research into wildlife usage of human-dominated landscapes. During the summers of 2014 through 2016, Hojnowski conducted grizzly-bear research in Kananaskis Country as part of her PhD studies. Previous to that, she worked with community organizations conserving tigers and leopards in eastern Russia. While Hojnowski believes such a threshold exists, the challenge is determining what that level of use is before coming up against it. Her own research, conducted in conjunction with Alberta Parks, focused on how grizzlies navigate areas heavily frequented by people. Hojnowski used vehicle counters, trail counters and camera traps to monitor human activity, and collars to track grizzly-bear movements. After sifting through three years of data she was able to conclude that bears adjust their behaviour in response to the

type, timing, location and intensity of human activity. One bear in particular clearly avoided the parts of her home range that incorporated popular campgrounds and recreation areas within Peter Lougheed Provincial Park on weekends, when these areas were at their busiest and most crowded. “It almost seemed like this bear could count to seven when you look at her locations on weekdays versus weekends,” says Hojnowksi. “That [the bears] are adjusting to us is an incredible thing, when you think about how people are changing wildlife behaviour in a way where they are learning how to navigate us.” As impressed as Hojnowski is by the animals’ artful dodging of people, she is concerned about the consequences of increased human recreation in wildlife habitats. If, as her research indicates, bears adapt their behaviour to avoid people, then it helps for them to have predictable quiet times and places where they know they can avoid humans. Restricting recreational trail usage to daylight hours and making sure park visitors stay on marked trails are both measures that Hojnowski believes would go a long way toward helping bears adapt. “These bears are trying to avoid the times and areas with highest human activity and if we allow the whole landscape to become high human activity, we may not have these animals out there anymore,” she says. That is an outcome no one wants; seeing these iconic animals in their element — from a distance — is a universal thrill. But as people continue to flock to the mountains, Hojnowksi believes at some point Albertans will have to make a choice. “I think that we have to decide what we value,” she says, “and if we value wildlife on this landscape then I think we need to accept limits on how we use that landscape.”


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Ginger beef from Golden Central. BY Vincci Tsui PHOTOGRAPHY BY Jared Sych

CanadianChinese

A OF CALGARY Lu. Yue. Chuan. Huaiyang. Those are the names of the four major cuisines in China, representing Shandong in the north, Guangdong (formerly Canton) in the south, Sichuan (formerly Szechuan) in the west and Jiangsu in the east. In Calgary, we arguably have four major Chinese cuisines of our own: Canadian-Chinese, Cantonese, Not-Cantonese and Urban-Modern. Here are their stories and directions on where to get them.

fter the completion of the Canadian Pacific Railway, job opportunities for Chinese men who had immigrated to Canada to work on the railroad were few and far between. Many who stayed decided to open cafés in small prairie towns. At the time, restaurants weren’t frequented often, as most people ate at home, but as owners expanded their menus to include Chinese food, they became more popular because Chinese cuisine was seen as a novelty. While many of the menu items had Chinese roots — for example, sweet-and-sour pork is based on a Cantonese dish, while General Tao chicken has loose ties to Hunan cuisine — they bore scant resemblance to dishes one would find in China. It was likely a combination of ingredient availability and a desire to appeal to local palates that led to the creation of the deep-fried, saucy and strongly flavoured dishes that we are familiar with today. One made-in-Calgary example is ginger beef. Widely accepted to be the creation of George Wong, husband of one of the original owners of Silver Inn, ginger beef is based on a northern Chinese recipe that Wong brought with him to England, where he used to cook in pubs. Wong decided to try coating the beef in batter and deep-frying it before tossing it in a sweet and spicy sauce loaded with ginger and garlic. “Deep fried shredded beef in chili sauce” was thus born, which guests eventually started referring to as ginger beef.

Silver Inn is credited with inventing ginger beef, but Central.

the place that does it best is actually Golden

Here, the lightly battered ginger beef is served hot and crispy with a sticky, sweet and spicy sauce that does not

62 avenueAPRIL.18

overwhelm the beef’s natural flavour.


Dim sum from T.Pot China Bistro.

GET IT Forbidden City and T.Pot China Bistro are both textbook examples of busy Cantonese banquet halls. For a more casual dim sum spot, try U&Me — the XO sauce fried turnip cakes are a must-try. Sun’s

BBQ

makes some of the best Chinese barbecue for take-out and also has an extensive menu for those dining in.

T

he ’80s and early ’90s saw an influx of immigrants from Hong Kong in anticipation of the transfer of sovereignty from the U.K. back to China. As a result, demand for more “authentic” Chinese cuisine, particularly Cantonese cuisine, increased. The most iconic Cantonese dining establishment is the banquet hall or jau lau. Traditionally, during the day, old ladies navigated between the tightly packed tables pushing carts piled high with dim sum. Items included bamboo steamers of har gow, siu mai, beef balls, rice crepes, and steamed

buns, or deep-fried delights such as spring rolls or taro dumplings. Nowadays, most restaurants have retired the carts in favour of ordering sheets — a win for diners as the dim sum is freshly prepared on demand, and a win for the restaurants as it reduces costs and food waste. By night, banquet halls were and still are the place to go for dinner. Usually, Chinese people will dine out with extended family or multiple families — it is rare to see parties of fewer than six people. Cantonese cuisine, like all Chinese

cuisine, is typically served family-style. The meal will often start with soup, then a variety of dishes are served in the middle of the table, which everyone picks from to eat with individual bowls of white rice. Compared to other Chinese cuisines, Cantonese food does not use a lot of spices, instead using ingredients such as ginger, garlic, scallions and cilantro to enhance the natural flavours of the main ingredients. Most dishes are cooked in a wok over high heat, but stewing, braising and steaming are techniques that are often used as well. Because of the region’s close proximity to the ocean, seafood features prominently in Cantonese cooking, as does pork, chicken and beef. Dried seafood, like shrimp and scallop, is sometimes used to add richness and savouriness. Chinese cuisines are not known for desserts. Sweets are generally eaten outside of meal times and are typically not very decadent compared to western desserts. It’s not uncommon to end a meal simply with fresh fruit. “Dessert soups,” or tong sui, are a unique feature in Cantonese cuisine. One of the most well-known is red bean soup, a thick, chunky soup made with adzuki bean, dried mandarin peel and sweetened with rock sugar. Banquet halls are often rented for special occasions like weddings or birthdays. Typically, a multi-course dinner is served, featuring delicacies such as shark-fin soup, abalone and bird’s nest. For more casual dining, smaller restaurants will often serve dishes that can be quickly prepared, like stir-fries or noodles. Some of these restaurants will also serve Chinese barbecue — marinated pork, chicken, duck (and if you’re lucky, goose) cooked rotisserie-style. It’s common for Chinese families to jaam liu (literally, “chop ingredients”), as in purchase some of these prepared meats as part of their groceries to complement other dishes in a home-cooked meal. AvenueCalgary.com

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GET IT Szechuan Restaurant is arguably the best place for authentic Sichuan food in Calgary, if not all of the prairies. Mapo tofu, kung po chicken, dan dan noodles and boiled sliced basa in hot-sauce soup are classic Sichuan favourites. Even if you like things spicy, start with “mild” and work your way up. Although the chefs have toned down the spice in the past few years, you might be surprised by the level of heat. Not a fan of spice? Great Taste serves Shanghai, Sichuan and Cantonese cuisines. The xiaolongbao (or “steamed Shanghai pork dumplings” on the menu) filled with juicy pork and hot broth are the best in the city. The same can be said about the wontons in spicy sauce — pork and vegetable dumplings with lots of extra wonton skin to sop up the light sauce flavoured with Sichuan peppercorns.

Sliced basa in marinated vegetable hot pot from Szechuan Restaurant.

W

ith the rapid growth of China’s middle class, the past couple of decades have seen an increase in immigration to Calgary from mainland China. While Cantonese restaurants have often served versions of dishes from other Chinese cuisines, these dishes may be very different from the original. For example, Sichuan cuisine, known for its spiciness and “numbing” Sichuan peppercorns, is quite distinct from Cantonese food, which is relatively mild. Cantonese versions of mapo tofu, a Sichuan dish, often use ground pork and might add a little bit of hot sauce or chili oil for some heat. By contrast, recipes from Sichuan use ground beef,

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which has a stronger flavour, as well as pixian doubanjiang, a fermented chili-and-bean paste made in a specific region of Sichuan. Other cuisines have more subtle differences. Shanghai cuisine is known for soup dumplings (xiaolongbao), red-cooked pork, steamed buns and stir-fried rice cakes. It is similar to Cantonese cuisine in that it is mild in taste and heavy on the seafood, but incorporates more sweet-and-sour dishes and more noodle dishes. Beijing cuisine, known for Peking duck, hot-and-sour soup and noodles with soybean paste (zhajiang mian) is a bit of a melting pot of different cuisines, as historically chefs travelled from all over China to cook for the emperor.


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Bubble tea from ChaTime.

CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT Bubble teas from ChaTime; hot-dog sweet buns from Rainbow Bakery; an assortment of coconut tarts, sweet buns and wife cakes from Rainbow Bakery.

GET IT Calgary Court is one of the longest surviving Hong Kong-style cafés in Calgary. Owned by the Taste of Asia Group, it has a similar menu to its sister restaurants,

Pebble Street and Café H.K.

Rainbow Bakery offers a mix of traditional Chinese treats, like coconut tarts

A

s with many cuisines, Chinese foods, flavours and techniques are constantly evolving. Particularly in urban centres, there is demand for quick, inexpensive meals and snacks, as opposed to the more formal dining experience at a banquet hall or restaurant. Under British rule, Hong Kong was heavily influenced by western culture. Before the Second World War, western food was only available at high-end restaurants that catered to expats. After the war, cha chaan teng (literally, “tea restaurants”) started popping up, serving a mix of Chinese and westernized dishes. Just as most Canadian-Chinese dishes cannot be found in China, many of these “Canto-Western” dishes, like milk tea (strong black tea with evaporated milk), macaroni soup with canned ham and pineapple buns (named for their shape, not for their flavour) would seem strange here. Hong Kong-style cafés draw inspiration from many cuisines, serving their own versions of Indian curries and Japanese noodles or teriyaki. Similarly, Chinese bakeries offer westernized breads, cakes and pastries in addition to moretraditional Chinese treats. Most households in China don’t have ovens, partly because baking is not a technique often used in Chinese cuisine, and partly due to space constraints. Unlike the crusty or grainy breads favoured here, Chinese people like their breads soft, doughy and sweet,

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and wife cakes, alongside cookies, cakes and sweet buns filled with hot dogs, barbecue pork, curry beef or spam and cheese. You can also custom order cakes for special occasions. Cash or

even when a savoury filling is used. Many of the breads are made using a method called tangzhong, or “water roux,” where some of the flour and water are heated together ahead of time, before being mixed in with the rest of the dough. A more recent addition to “Chinese” cuisine is bubble tea, or boba, which hails from Taiwan. The original version is iced milk tea with large, black tapioca “pearls,” though the beverages that the pearls can be added to quickly expanded to include a variety of flavoured teas, fresh fruit juices, powdered mixes and slushes. Aside from pearls, most bubble-tea shops also have a selection of jellies, puddings and exploding/popping pearls (like the Gusher candies of our youth) for customers to choose from. The latest trend is to add a milk or cream cheese-based foam to the top of the drinks. Many bubble-tea shops also sell street snacks, such as curry fish balls, chicken wings and bubble waffles (specially shaped waffles that break off into little balls, or “bubbles”), and desserts such as crepes or shaved ice piled high with jellies, fresh and canned fruit, and simple syrup.

debit only.

ChaTime, an international chain from Taiwan, specializes in bubble tea made from a variety of flavoured teas. Another great bubble tea shop is Try

Again, a little

hole-in-the-wall run by a mother-daughter duo, serving up a dizzying selection of fruit-flavoured drinks.


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The Influence of

A

s food trends continue to evolve, so too does the presence of Chinese cuisine in our city. From hole-in-the-wall momand-pop shops to the hotspots in the heart of the action, chefs and restaurateurs are pushing the boundaries of what is considered Chinese food.

GET IT “Modern Asian” is a booming trend in Calgary these days.

Two Penny Chinese

serves up contemporary takes on recipes and flavours from all over China and pairs them with innovative cocktails.

Eats of Asia at the Crossroads and Calgary Farmers’ Markets does pan-Asian street food. Their hand-pulled dan dan noodles and steamed bao are bursting with flavour, and they will bust out a congee special once in a while, too.

Mi Noodle specializes in Taiwanese-style beef noodle soup but its menu also features noodle dishes and snacks from all parts of China.

ABOVE Beef and broccoli in smokedoyster sauce from Two Penny Chinese. RIGHT Dan dan noodles from Eats of Asia.

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WH ERE TO FIND T H EM

Café H.K. 100, 9650 Harvest Hills Blvd. N.E., 403-532-3982, tasteofasiagroup.ca

Calgary Court 119 2 Ave. S.E., 403-266-7890

ladies’ Consignment

ChaTime

202-12100 MacLeod Trail SE 403-278-0966 expressionscalgary.ca

328 Centre St. S., 587-352-0710, chatimeab.com

Eats of Asia Calgary Farmers’ Market and Crossroads Market; 403-801-9453, eatsofasia.com

Forbidden City 220, 999 36 St. N.E., 403-250-1848, tasteofasiagroup.ca

Golden Central 5016 Centre St. N.E., 403-731-9199

Great Taste

men’s consignment

123 2 Ave. S.E., 403-265-9880,

115-12100 macleod trail se 403-523-0120 manofdistinction.com

greattastecalgary.com

Mi Noodle 910 Centre St. N., minoodle.ca

Pebble Street 220, 999 36 St. N.E., 403-250-1848, tasteofasiagroup.ca

CALGARY PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

Rainbow Bakery 135, 328 Centre St. S., 403-234-9909

Silver Inn 2702 Centre St. N., 403-276-6711, silverinnrestaurant.com

Sun’s BBQ 6, 1423 Centre St. N.W., 403-230-8890, tasteofasiagroup.ca

Szechuan Restaurant 320 16 Ave. N.W., 403-276-8876, szechuancalgary.com

T.Pot China Bistro 100, 9650 Harvest Hills Blvd. N.E., 403-532-3982, tasteofasiagroup.ca

Try Again Beverage’s House 111 3 Ave. S.E., 403-234-0666

Two Penny Chinese 1213 1 St. S.W., 403-474-7766,

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twopenny.ca

U&Me 201, 233 Centre St. S.W., 403-264-5988

C A L G A R Y P H I L .C O M | 4 0 3 . 5 7 1 . 0 8 4 9 AvenueCalgary.com

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THE POUR

PAI RI N GS

BY Tom Firth PHOTOGRAPHY BY Jared Sych

JOEY (CHINOOK) Cabernet Sauvignon and Burgers Sure, you could enjoy a beer with Joey’s hand-pressed burger, but it is also an excellent pairing with the Edge cabernet sauvignon ($74). The smooth, classic cab brings the fruit and pepper to your burger party. STARBELLY Syrah and Striploin Any resident of Calgary’s southern communities knows about Starbelly. Match up the lush and flavourful Truchard syrah ($65) with an expertly cooked 10-ounce striploin or the rich mushroom risotto. MURRIETA’S BAR AND GRILL Viognier and Appetizers Popping downtown to catch a show or do a little shopping? Try matching one of the great, underappreciated grapes with appetizers for the table. Stags’ Leap Viognier ($64) is almost over the top with peach, spice and mineral, and pairs well with

on the menu

crab cakes, mussels or even Murrieta’s duck rillettes.

Stags’ Leap viognier and mussels at Murrieta’s Bar and Grill.

Napa Valley Wines It may be the new world but the wines are old souls.

P

eople have been planting vines in California for a long time, though the emergence of Napa as a wine region really begins with Robert Mondavi in 1966. Mondavi was convinced — and rightly so — that premium wines to rival those of Europe could be made California, setting in

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motion Napa’s culture of innovation, quality and pride of place. In 1976, the famous wine tasting known as the Judgement of Paris, organized by wine expert and former merchant Steven Spurrier (a Briton), pitted California’s premium wines against some of the finest French wines. Nine judges blind-tasted

Napa chardonnays and white Burgundies, Napa cabernets and classed-growth Bordeaux. In the end, somewhat controversially, Stags’ Leap 1973 cabernet sauvignon and Chateau Montelena 1973 chardonnay (both from the Napa Valley) came out on top. Like it or not, Napa’s wines were emerging on a world stage that had long been dominated by


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THE POUR PICKS

France, and the quality of the wines, not to mention bottle prices, would continue to rise. The Napa Valley is about 100 kilometres north of San Francisco. The Mediterranean-like climate is well-suited for growing grapes, with hot, dry summers and cooler, wetter winters. Flanked by mountain ranges, the valley’s proximity to the San Pablo Bay causes the famous nightly fogs, cooling the grapes before the next day’s heat. The wine appellation is only about 45,000 acres, accounting for approximately four per cent of California’s wine production. The American Viticultural Area (AVA) of the Napa Valley is split further into 16 sub-appellations, each with slightly different soils, aspects and advantages for the more than 30 different grapes planted there. When they do appear (rarely) on the real-estate market, vineyards command six-figure prices per acre. Given numbers like those, winemaking in the Napa Valley is rarely undertaken by the hobby farmer, but rather by well-heeled owners who focus on making world-class wines, rather than inexpensive weeknight bottles. The story of wine in the Napa Valley is essentially a story about cabernet sauvignon. Approximately 47 per cent of vineyard acreage is devoted to growing the grapes and the resulting wines are some of the best in the world. Chardonnay and merlot are also well represented with sauvignon blanc, pinot noir and zinfandel rounding out the top six. (If I could offer a criticism of American wine, it’s that for a U.S. wine to name a single grape on the label — a significant marketing advantage — it only needs to contain 75 per cent of that varietal, while most other wine countries require 85 per cent of the primary grape to list a single varietal on the label.) Given the premium nature of the region’s wines and the desire to protect their long-term viability, the Napa Valley has an impressive commitment to sustainability. Napa Green, coupled with the Napa Valley Agricultural Preserve (which protects approximately 90 per cent of the valley set aside for agriculture) sets goals for reducing carbon footprints, environmental compliance and waterways protection and shows continual improvement and environmental stewardship, year after year. Though wines from the Napa Valley are rarely inexpensive, there is no doubting their quality. It’s a whole new world. 72

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SEQUOIA GROVE 2013 CABERNET SAUVIGNON, NAPA VALLEY Intense and almost smoky on the nose, the Sequoia Grove cabernet is packed with graphite, cassis, bell peppers and sweet licorice root. Black fruits dominate the palate with plenty of acidity and tannin for balance. Looking for a classic cab? This is it. $59

BONANNO 2014 CABERNET SAUVIGNON, NAPA VALLEY A classically styled, new-world cabernet ROBERT BIALE 2015

sauvignon with rich, ripe fruits of cherry

“BLACK CHICKEN” ZINFANDEL,

and cassis and soft touches of olive,

NAPA VALLEY

bell pepper and blueberry preserves.

This zin kicks ass. Brambly, spicy

Tight, grippy tannins, just softening up,

fruits of wild berries, blueberry and

make this a solid partner for meaty,

a little raspberry with pepper spice

saucy dishes or a beef tenderloin. $49

and a touch of earth on the nose, it’s mouth-filling and tasty, no doubt. But the best part? All that acid balancing it out. Think barbecue, duck or even a great pepperoni pizza when it comes time to plan your dinner match. $62

BLACKBIRD 2014 ARISE, NAPA VALLEY A Bordeaux-style blend of mostly merlot and cabernet sauvignon, this is the right way to do a fruit-driven, full-bodied wine that tastes good now. It’s smooth, with

ST. SUPERY 2014 VIRTU WHITE MERITAGE, NAPA VALLEY A blend of semillon (51 per cent)

black fruits, black licorice, spices and a bit of earthy, rooty depth. Bring on the steaks! (Medium-rare of course.) $70

and sauvignon blanc, it’s mostly barrel fermented, bringing rich, buttery and vanilla bean-like characteristics to the guava, peach and pear flavours. Don’t serve too cold, or you’ll mute the flavours. Try matching with

TREFETHEN 2016 DRY RIESLING,

roasted poultry or even lobster. $32

OAK KNOLL DISTRICT, NAPA VALLEY One of my favourite whites from a recent trip to Napa, this stylish and mineralladen riesling is quite dry, with flavours of pressed lime, apple, quince and slate. It’s so delicious and, with a bare kiss of sweetness, an extremely refreshing bottle. Grilled seafood, Thai or Vietnamese cuisine would work very well here. $31


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E AT T H I S

M A L D O N S E A S A LT F L A K E S Light and flaky sea salt from England,

BY Jennifer Hamilton PHOTOGRAPHY BY Jared Sych

it adds a salty crunch to finished dishes like seared meats. About $10 for 240 grams, widely available.

Salt A primer on the world’s most essential seasoning.

S

alt is one of the five basic tastes that humans are hard-wired to experience (along with bitter, sweet, sour and umami). Salt helps intensify the flavour, aroma and appearance of any dish and is also fundamental for making meat juicier (through brining) and for preserving food. How salt affects flavour is far more complicated than simply adding, well, saltiness and a person could get lost for days nerding out about the science of salt. But here is a basic primer on the salts a home cook should know. There are two main types of salt: rock salt, which is mined from the earth, and sea salt, which is harvested from the ocean. Most salt is 97.5-per cent sodium chloride, with a variety of minerals and additives accounting for the remaining 2.5 per cent. While these minerals and additives do affect the flavour of each different salt in subtle ways, texture and appearance are arguably more important in informing your salt choices. That is especially true regarding the salt you put on your food to finish the dish, versus the salt you put in your food while cooking it. From finely ground crystals to coarse, irregular chunks, having a variety of salts in your pantry allows you to tailor your choice to each dish and desire.

CY P R U S BLAC K

VA N C O U V E R IS L A N D

LAVA S ALT

S A LT C O. CA N A D IA N

Gorgeous as a finishing

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S E A S A LT

FLEUR D’OLIVE SEL AU P IME N T D ’E SPE L E TTE Finish salads or desserts

salt on fish, it also has

Unrefined and hand-

(especially chocolate

the detoxifying effects

harvested off the B.C.

mousse) with this sea salt

of activated charcoal.

coast, locavores will

flavoured with Espelette

$11.99 for 80 g at The Silk

love this on their table.

pepper for a little kick.

Road, 1403 9 Ave. S.E., 403-

$8.29 for 227 g at

$7.99 for 110 g at The Little

261-1955, silkroadspices.ca

Community Natural Foods,

French Market, 2505 17 Ave.

three locations in Calgary,

S.W., 403-452-8356,

communitynaturalfoods.com

thelittlefrenchmarketyyc.com


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G E TA W AY S BY Lisa Kadane

Parksville AND Qualicum Beach

Photograph by Shawn Talbot, courtesy of Beach Club Resort

Blessed with some of B.C.’s best stretches of sand, these neighbouring towns on the east side of Vancouver Island are a natural pick for a family vacation.

Parksville Beach.

B

ordered by beaches that stretch to the horizon during low tide, only to transform into placid wading pools after the water rushes back in, the small city of Parksville and the neighbouring town of Qualicum Beach (a.k.a. “PQB”) have become magnets for families seeking sand time on Vancouver Island’s tamer east coast. “We get a lot of Alberta families,” confirms Jim Powell, a guide with Adventuress Sea Kayaking. “They come for the west coast lifestyle.”

That lifestyle extends beyond the standard summervacation pursuits of swimming and beachcombing. There’s plenty more to do in this wedge of coastal paradise located about 30 minutes north of Nanaimo, or two hours from Victoria. From paddling and hiking to tide-pool exploring and sampling local culinary delights, here are a few ideas for how to spend your island time.

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G E TA W AY S

THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM RIGHT Little Qualicum Falls Provincial Park; Little Qualicum Cheeseworks products at the Farmgate Store at Morningstar Farm; Adventuress Sea Kayaking tour; Salish Sea Tidepool Tour.

What to Do Salish Sea Tidepool Tour

Pacific Rainforest Adventure Tours’ Salish Sea Tidepool Tour takes place in the intertidal zone at Beachcomber Regional Park near Parksville. Guided by naturalist Gary Murdock, you’ll explore the eroded mudstone chasms and shallow rocky depressions where seawater collects. When the tide recedes, the pools harbour a staggering array of marine life, from leathery purple sea stars and skittish shore crabs, to dainty neon-green sea anemones and giant spotted sea slugs called nudibranchs. Kids and adults love getting hands-on with the creatures while learning about their constantly changing environment. rainforestnaturehikes.com Little Qualicum Falls Provincial Park

env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore/parkpgs/little_qualicum_falls/

Adventuress Sea Kayaking

Adventuress offers a range of sea-kayaking outings, including a scenic two-hour tour. (The exact launch location depends on the tide and time of day.) After you’re settled in with your spray skirt properly fastened you’ll paddle out to look for harbour seals frolicking in the swells, spot moon jellyfish floating alongside the kayaks and enjoy the view of the glacier-capped Coast Mountains across the Strait of Georgia. adventuress.ca

Qualicum Beach Farmers’ Market

Qualicum Beach is packed with boutiques and cafés, but the town really comes to life during the weekly farmers’ market on Saturday mornings. You can browse for artisan-crafted souvenirs that run the gamut from hand-carved wooden cutting boards to hand-made fishing flies. You can also stock up on local honey, jams, fresh fruit and baked goodies. There are even local spirits there, such as Unruly Gin from Comox Valley producer Wayward Distillation House.

Morningstar Farm and Little Qualicum Cheeseworks

qbfarmersmarket.com

morningstarfarm.ca

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Kids love the self-guided tour to see the bunnies, goats, sheep, pigs, cows and donkeys on this working farm near Parksville. Parents, on the other hand, will love the tour’s terminus inside the Farmgate Store, where you can sample the delicious artisan cheeses (brie, bleu, feta, cheese curds and other varieties) made with milk from the farm’s herd of dairy cows. You can chase the cheeses with samples of fruit wines from the on-site MooBerry Winery.

Salish Sea Tidepool Tour photographs courtesy of Pacific Rainforest Adventure Tours; Adventuress Sea Kayaking photograph by Jan Kretz

Located 20 minutes from Parksville, this park was established to protect an old-growth forest of Douglas Fir trees. Most visitors will agree, however, that the park’s wow factor comes not from these towering behemoths, but from watching the Little Qualicum River surge down a rocky gorge that cuts through the forest in a series of dramatic waterfalls. A network of trails and bridges makes for an easy, shaded walk to the best spots for viewing the upper and lower falls, as well as swirling eddies and deep pools of emerald water.


CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT Pacific Prime Restaurant at Beach Club Resort in Parksville; a “goats-eye view” of Taqueria at The Old Country Market in Coombs; indoor pool at Tigh-Na-Mara resort.

Where to Eat

Where to Stay

Breakfast at Courtyard Café in Qualicum Beach

Beach Club Resort

Everything on the from-scratch menu at Courtyard Café can be made gluten-free (owner Peter Tryon is celiac), including the gooey cinnamon buns and the delicious crepes in sweet and savoury options such as mixed fruit or “crepe Benny.” There’s often live music on the pretty patio on Saturdays, making this an idyllic spot to savour coffee and brekky before strolling over to the farmer’s market.

A wooden boardwalk is all that separates this delightful resort from Parksville Beach, where you can spend your days chasing the tide out or running toward shore as it creeps back in. Beach Club’s bright, modern, well-appointed rooms and suites offer panoramic views of the ever-changing water level and distant Coast Mountains across the Salish Sea. While it’s tempting to luxuriate on your private patio, be sure to hit the beach to look for sand dollars or go stand-up paddleboarding (the hotel can arrange for a rental), depending on the tide. There’s also an indoor swimming pool and fitness centre, and, conveniently for those travelling with kids, the Parksville Community Playground is a quick walk from the resort.

673 Memorial Ave., Qualicum Beach, 250-752-4152 Lunch at Taqueria at The Old Country Market in Coombs

You can feast on tender chicken, pork or beef tacos rolled up in house-made tortillas at this casual, open-air restaurant in Coombs, a quirky community south of Qualicum Beach. Taqueria is part of the busy Old Country Market in Coombs, which is famous for the goats that live on the green roof. After lunch, cool down with an ice cream from the nearby Billy Gruff Creamery.

181 Beachside Dr., Parksville, 250-248-8999, beachclubbc.com Tigh-Na-Mara

Chef Rick Davidson sources humane beef from ranches in the Okanagan Valley, along with seafood from the Vancouver Aquarium’s Ocean Wise program and, as a trained sommelier, expertly pairs his creations with B.C. bubbles and wines. Grab a spot on the beachfront patio just off the Parksville Beach Boardwalk and dig into sautéed mussels and clams, followed by the catch of the day or a juicy steak. Be sure to stay for sunset when the sky turns the most outrageous shades of orange, fuchsia and violet.

Many vacationers make the pilgrimage to Tigh-Na-Mara, just east of Parksville, every summer to stay in one of the resort’s comfortable log cabins on a bluff overlooking Rathtrevor Provincial Park. The sprawling resort, which also offers traditional guest-room accommodations, covers 22 wooded acres, making it feel a bit like family camp — but with an upscale flair. Tigh-Na-Mara has an award-winning spa, tennis courts and an indoor pool. There’s also a kids club where parents can drop off children for programs such as birdhouse building, or the popular dinner-and-a-movie nights, which free up mom and dad to have a cocktail in Cedars Lounge or indulge in a beach picnic of seasonal fruit, local cheese and charcuterie, smoked salmon and crackers (plus a bottle of Okanagan wine) while watching the tide change.

181 Beachside Dr., Parksville, 250-248-8999, beachclubbc.com

1155 Resort Dr., Parksville, 800-663-7373, tigh-na-mara.com

2326 Alberni Highway, Coombs, 250-248-6272, oldcountrymarket.com Dinner at Pacific Prime Restaurant at the Beach Club Resort in Parksville

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Long in the Tooth? Receding gums are not just a normal part of aging

Ever heard the expression “long in the tooth”? Although it originally referred to horses, whose teeth continue to grow throughout their lives, it’s often applied to people. And it is not exactly a compliment. If your teeth look longer, it’s not only an aesthetic issue. It means your gums are receding — a telltale sign of possible gum disease. If left untreated, gum disease can cause swelling and bleeding, loosening or shifting teeth, poor chewing function and, eventually, tooth loss. Gum disease is also associated with other medical conditions including heart disease and diabetes. If you’ve noticed puffy, red, tender or bleeding gums while brushing or flossing, a persistent foul taste or odour, or changes in how your teeth fit or bite together, it’s time to seek the expert help of a periodontist.

Canadian Academy of Periodontology

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Periodontists are specialists in treating gum disease, and they have a full understanding of the foundation structures that support teeth and implants. When you are advised to get treatment for a gum disease issue, you need the kind of expertise that a periodontist can provide.

Find a periodontist today by visiting the Alberta Society of Dental Specialists at asds.ca More information: Canadian Academy of Periodontology, cap-acp.ca

2018-02-22 1:46 PM


WORKOUT

BY Christina Frangou PHOTOGRAPHY BY Jared Sych

Warren Collins

The Cochrane teen has become an elite-level archery competitor in under three years, winning silver at last summer’s North American Indigenous Games.

A

rchery is a sport that prizes unflappable focus, perfect hand-eye coordination, flexibility, strength and, of course, aim. So the odds that a teenager who suffers from joint pain and other symptoms of fetal-alcohol syndrome would become an AvenueCalgary.com

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WORKOUT

“LIFE OUTSIDE OF ARCHERY CAN BE BUSY. WHEN I’M SHOOTING, IT’S CALMING.”

elite-level archer within three years of first firing a bow seem about as unlikely as, well, William Tell shooting an apple off his son’s head. But unlikely or not, that has been the speedy trajectory of 15-year-old Warren Collins’ course into the world of competitive archery. “I want people to believe that anything is possible,” says Collins, tucked in a stairwell away from the sounds of the busy shooting range at Jim-Bows Archery in northeast Calgary. “You don’t have to listen to anybody; just prove them wrong.” Collins was born in Calgary in 2002 and was diagnosed with fetal-alcohol syndrome. When he was 10 days old, Jayena and Wayde Collins of Cochrane took him in, making him one of more than 100 foster children the couple (along with Jayena’s parents) have cared for over the past four decades. But there was something special about the way they and their four biological kids bonded with this baby, who had such severe withdrawal 82

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symptoms family members had to take turns rocking him in their arms. When he was two, Warren was put under the Collinses’ private guardianship (his full adoption will be completed later this year). At first, his physical progress was slow — he didn’t crawl until he was 18 months and didn’t walk until he was three — but he grew quickly and sports became his forte. By the time he was 11, he towered over classmates on his football and lacrosse teams. When Warren turned 13 in the summer of 2015 he received a bow as a birthday present. He first started using it that September when he went hunting with his father, uncle and grandfather. Immediately, his talent was obvious, says Wayde, who is now almost always outshot by his youngest son. In November, 2015, within a few months of firing his first bow, Warren Collins qualified for the 2016 Alberta Winter Games, using a borrowed bow since he had already outgrown his first one.

He went on to win gold in compound archery in the 12-14 male age group. (Compound archery uses a bow with a system of cables and pulleys to bend the limbs). Since then, Collins has been on the podium in almost every archery competition he has participated in, taking top honours in approximately 80 per cent of them. Last summer, he won a silver medal in his age group at the 2017 North American Indigenous Games in Toronto. Collins says his toughest challenge in archery is mental. He has learned to focus on each shot, to neither grow cocky after a great one nor beat himself up for a bad one. His mantra while shooting is: “Every arrow is your first arrow.” Almost every day after school, Collins spends two to three hours firing arrows on the family farm. Each time he pulls back on an arrow is the equivalent of lugging 60 pounds of weight, and he sometimes shoots up to 100 arrows in a day. It’s physically exhausting, even for a 280-pound


teen who stands just over six-foot-two (and is still growing). Outside of school-based workouts and some cross-fit, the majority of his fitness training comes from doing physically demanding farm work — what his family calls “eye-of-the-tiger training.” Jayena Collins says the family makes a point of trying to eat healthy, though Warren eats like most teenage boys. (He sums up his eating habits as: “I eat a lot.”) The family often cooks wild venison from the hunting harvest and Warren supplements his diet with Juice Plus+ products. Unlike archery, school has been difficult for Collins. He has dyslexia, which makes math a struggle — his archery teammates often assist him with calculating his scores. He is currently enrolled in the Building Futures program, which allows him to earn high-school credits building homes alongside trade professionals, while still completing core academic subjects. “Life outside of archery can be busy,” he says. “When I’m shooting, it’s calming.” At the Saturday-afternoon shoot last winter at Jim-Bows, Collins passes his heavy bow to his dad after winning his division and discreetly tucks between the aisles of bows and archery accoutrements. Displaying growth as both a mentor and motivator, he takes time to console a younger teammate, who is frustrated by shots gone awry. “For older guys, teenagers are the future of sport. But the youth below us — 13, 12 and below — is the future of [teens]. We try to take care of each other,” he says. Right now, Collins has his eye on two big goals: competing at the 2020 Olympic Games if compound archery becomes a demonstration sport and securing a spot in the invitation-only tournament of the Organization of Professional Archery. He credits his successes to date to the members of the local archery community, who are essentially like his teammates, and to JimBows, which helps sponsor him (a competition bow and its extras cost in the range of $3,500). Collins also gives credit to his family. His siblings, in particular, have inspired him by participating in sports despite their own health issues, like his brother Karson, who didn’t let cystic fibrosis stop him from riding bulls. “They showed me anything is possible,” he says.

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The dining room exemplifies homeowners Kale Bandura and Rod Leonard’s ability to effectively mix styles and price points. They’ve paired an antique table with chairs from Bondars and a rug from HomeSense. The Thibaut Isabelle floral-patterned wallpaper and matching drapery complete the traditional feel.

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DECOR BY Karen Ashbee PHOTOGRAPHY BY Jared Sych

Maximum Decor

This Elbow Park home joyfully declares that sometimes more is, in fact, more.

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rom the first step through the front door into Rod Leonard and Kale Bandura’s artfully decorated home it’s obvious the reining decor trend here is not minimalism. In every room, carefully composed details call for the eye’s attention: the handcrafted La Cornue range in the kitchen, the reclaimed brass sink shaped like a puzzle piece in the powder room, the many dazzling chandeliers overhead, the variety of accessories and artwork lining the shelves and walls. In other hands, the profusion of finds, in addition to the mix of traditional and modern, might have overwhelmed the space. However, Leonard, who

The living room is defined by soothing neutral tones punctuated by hits of bright blue. A painting by homeowner Rod Leonard hangs over the custom-made marble mantel.

owns Leonard Development Group, and Bandura, a realtor and co-founder of Charles Real Estate, have been in the business of creating beautiful spaces for a combined total of 30 years and knew exactly what they were doing when they designed and furnished their home. Built in 1911, the two-storey house in Elbow Park was originally a 1,900-square-foot warren of small rooms. It was definitely not love at first sight, especially for Bandura. “It was tired, and the ugliest house on the street,” he recalls. But Leonard saw potential in what he agrees was, at the time, a “diamond in the rough.” A gut renovation and addition were the first steps in making this the dream home it is now. Starting from the ground up allowed the couple total freedom in the design. Leonard, who loves decorating and has a natural affinity for it, finally had a canvas of his own. “We took the house down to the studs, made the exterior walls thicker, thereby adding more insulation, changed the boiler, put in forced-air furnaces, increased the floor space to 3,000 square feet and then put the whole thing back together the way we wanted it,” he says. “The only thing left from the original house is the crown moulding in the dining room.” When it came to decorating, the couple wanted to stay true to the look of an estate Elbow Park home. In order to achieve their desired style, they incorporated a blend of traditional elements, such as floral-patterned wallpaper with matching drapes and un-lacquered brass fixtures alongside modern touches such as Carrara marble counter tops and classic clean-lined seating. AvenueCalgary.com

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DECOR

ABOVE Homeowners Kale Bandura and Rod Leonard completed a gut renovation of their Elbow Park home to take it from dreary to dreamy.

The handcrafted La Cornue range was brought over from the homeowners’ previous residence and inspired the honed black granite-topped island. 86

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The couple’s dogs Carlos and Bella await their return. Both the oversized gold mirror and vintage chandelier were purchased online.

The pair have a knack for discovering oneof-a-kind finds. They also like to pair big-ticket items, like the handcrafted Le Cornue stove and Hermès china, with more budget-conscious pieces such as the colourful rugs from HomeSense. A restrained palette of white walls throughout helps to unify the space, while allowing Bandura and Leonard to showcase their ever-expanding collection of art. The resulting rooms are elegant, yet warm and inviting. All is beautiful but nothing screams “precious” or “out of place,” as there is a nod to both practicality as well as durability in things such as the sturdy fabrics covering the sofas and the honed granite on the kitchen island, which has the look of soapstone without the troublesome porousness. “The overall floor plan of the house is also super practical for everyday living, as it flows well,” says Leonard. “And the floor colour was chosen to hide the dog scratches. After all, we live in our house, we love to entertain and we have pets. Our home fits the stuff we’ve collected over the years, so it fits us well. I think we’ll stay put for a while.”


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DECOR T IPS F OR GETTING A T RADI T I ONAL LOOK I N A MODERN BUILD Done right, the juxtaposition of traditional aesthetics with modern building practices results in a space that’s warm and inviting without looking cluttered. 1. Preserve architectural details. Elements such as coffered ceilings, wainscotting and crown mouldings can restore an older home’s original grandeur, while adding these elements can create grandeur in a new home. 2. Use heritage techniques with new materials. The herringbone pattern used for the kitchen backsplash lends a vintage feel to the contemporary tile, while the crisp white cabinets with black accents keep the overall look fresh. 3. Carry finishes and materials through different rooms. The hardware you choose for kitchen cabinets and cupboard doors should speak to the heritage of the house, says homeowner and designer Rod Leonard of Leonard Development Group. “We chose crystal knobs to match the crystals in the many chandeliers.” 4. Strike a balance by mixing modern furnishings with antique pieces. The antique dining-room table paired with new chairs preserves the character of the home without making it look too fussy. 5. Add bold colour and natural textures throughout the home to give it life. An unexpected hit of colour in either paint or upholstery can instantly modernize an antique piece.

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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT The vivid Thai teal in the powder room was a custom colour that took several tries to get just right. Elegantly retro, it brings life to the brass accents and marble countertop. The unusually shaped sink was a takeaway from a client’s renovation. The emerald-green colour on the front door was inspired by the couple’s travels in Europe, where vibrant door hues are a common sight. Brass accents, like the doorknocker and kick plate from Banbury Lane Design Centre, add polish. The couple’s knack for combining just the right elements continues in the bedroom with an antique table and chairs, paired with a modern king-sized bed, crisp linens, and a painting by local artist Daniel Culcea purchased through ArtMatch. The bench is another HomeSense find.


SOURCE DECOR PAGES 84 TO 88

Dining-room wallpaper and drapery in Thibaut Isabelle pattern from DWA Interiors, 501 36 Ave. S.E., 403-245-4014, dwainteriors.com Dining-room art by Janet Mitchell from Masters Gallery Ltd., 2115 4 St. S.W., 403-245-2064, mastersgalleryltd.com Dining-room chairs from Bondars, 6999 11 St. S.E., 403-253-8200, bondars.com; table from Junktiques (now closed). Dining-room rug from HomeSense, multiple Calgary locations, homesense.ca Chandelier over dining-room table from Circa Vintage Art Glass, 1226A 9 Ave. S.E., 403-290-0145, circa5060.com Vase from Purple Orchid, 810 16 Ave SW, 403-228-2140, purpleorchidflowers.ca Living-room chairs from McArthur Fine Furniture, 67 Glenbrook Pl. S.W., 403-246-6266, mcarthurfurniture.com Blue ottomans fabricated by homeowner Rod Leonard, Leonard Design Group, with custom-made pattern from Chintz & Company, 1238 11 Ave. S.W., 403-245-3449, chintz.com Coffee table from McArthur Fine Furniture; flower arrangement by Rod Leonard Fireplace mantel designed by Rod Leonard; fabricated by Prestige Granite, 5511 6 St. S.E., 403-243-1003, prestigegraniteandstone.com Art above fireplace by Rod Leonard Living-room custom drapes by Chintz & Company Kitchen millwork by M&L Custom Cabinet Construction, 515 36 Ave. N.E., 403-277-8108, mandlcustomcabinets.com La Cornue stove from Jerome’s Appliance Gallery, 7152 Fisher St. S.E., 403-255-6050, jeromesappliancegalleryinc.ca Backsplash tile from Saltillo Imports Inc., 1212 26 Ave. S.E., 403-287-2100, saltillo-tiles.com Kitchen countertops by Prestige Granite Kitchen-sink fixtures from The Ensuite, 224 61 Ave. S.E., 403-214-1503, ensuitecalgary.com Hardware from Banbury Lane Design Centre, 1301 10 Ave. S.W., 403-244-0038, banburylane.com Rug in kitchen from HomeSense Hallway rug from HPR Gallery, 1206 20 Ave. S.E., 403-262-5323, hprgallery.com Banister by Artistic Stairs, 3504 80 Ave. S.E., 403-279-5898, artisticstairs.com Doors throughout the home from Lux Windows, 6875 9 St. N.E., 403-276-7770, luxwindows.com Powder-room paint colour custom-mixed by Benjamin Moore, multiple locations, benjaminmoore.com Art in powder room from HomeSense Vanity by Prestige Granite Newport Brass sink fixtures from Empire Kitchen & Bath, 5539 1 St. S.E., 403-252-2458, empirekitchenandbath.com Bed and night stands in bedroom from Bondars Emerald-green front-door Benjamin Moore paint colour mixed by West Hillhurst Paint & Design, 321 19 St N.W., 403-270-9696, westhillhurstpaint.com Front-door hardware from Banbury Lane AvenueCalgary.com

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WORK OF ART CURATED BY Katherine Ylitalo

TITLE: Mythopoet, 2011 ARTISTS: Bee Kingdom MEDIUM: Glass SIZE: 58.4 centimetres high; 22.8 cm in diameter

B

right and colourful, this perky glass sculpture from the City of Calgary’s public art collection is installed in the Calgary Foundation’s light-filled reception area. Three elements are stacked: a head-like base, a central rocket-bomb and a spruce tree. The forms are fluid — even a little wonky — revealing the enjoyment the artists take in working with molten glass and their particular, playful aesthetic. “We are the Nintendo of glass,” says Ryan Fairweather of Bee Kingdom, the artist collective that created the sculpture. Fairweather, along with Bee Kingdom cofounders Phillip Bandura and Tim Belliveau, each contributed elements drawn from their individual interests as artists and storytellers. Fairweather’s mythological “Jooba” characters are cute, post-apocalyptic robots that clean up our mess. Bandura’s repurposed bombs disseminate goodness in the world, while Belliveau’s concern for the environment finds form in sculpture. Their method of joining disparate bits is akin to the collaborative drawing game, cadavres exquis, popular with surrealist artists. The result was an unexpected concoction: could the Jooba’s bombshell idea be to plant trees? Bee Kingdom burst onto the scene after the founders graduated from the Alberta College of Art + Design in 2005 with fresh ideas about art and collaboration. The Studio Glass Movement, especially Dale Chihuly’s exuberant projects, had brought artistic glass workshops into the spotlight in North America. (Calgarians can enjoy Chihuly’s Chandeliers in the Winter Garden of Jamieson Place, an office tower just south of Eau Claire). Bee Kingdom was feted with the Lieutenant Governor’s award for emerging artists and the trio were part of Avenue Top 40 Under 40 class of 2010 (they were featured on the cover).

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NOTE: Gifted by Bee Kingdom to the City of Calgary public art collection.

In recent years, Bee Kingdom has exhibited in Berlin, Germany and at the Pictoplasma Festival in Monterrey, Mexico, as well as locally at the Glenbow museum. They offer open houses, demonstrations and classes at their

Mount Pleasant studio and have a series of glass-blowing “ride-along” videos on YouTube. With the support of the Beakerhead Festival, they have also extended their imaginative reach into inflatables.

Photograph courtesy of the City of Calgary

Mythopoet

LOCATION: Calgary Foundation offices, 1180, 105 12 Ave. S.E.


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