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REDOT FINE ART GALLERY in collaboration with Papunya Tula Artists PTY. LTD. presents

Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Solo A Collection of Fine Papunya Tula Indigenous Art

8 Nov – 2 Dec 2017

Gallery 1

For a high resolution, downloadable, PDF version of this catalogue, with pricing, please send us an email to info@redotgallery.com Thank you.

c o n t e m p o r a r y

i n d i g e n o u s

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Johnny Yungut Tjupurrula at Jupiter Well, WA, Australia Source: © Paul Sweeney, courtesy Papunya Tula Artists Pty Ltd


Foreword The ReDot Fine Art Gallery is extremely honoured to present our annual Papunya Tula Artists exhibition. This year’s show will be dedicated to the last remaining works of the late Johnny Yungut Tjupurrula. This will be Tjupurrula’s fourth and final solo show and will mark the end of a stunning 30 year career during which he achieved great international success. Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA – a collection of 26 recently released works from Papunya Tula Artists and the late artist’s estate. He was born north-east of the Kiwirrkura Community circa. 1930 at the soakage site of Tjangimanta, one of the most remote parts of the Australian outback. The works in this exhibition are a visual representation of the sacred soakages and waterholes of the Gibson Desert, including the western fringes of Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). These sites also have great ceremonial significance and the related stories have been passed down through countless generations via song, dance and painted imagery.


Tjupurrula was has been an integral part of Papunya Tula Artists for his entire artistic career, as well as being a highly respected cultural figure within the Pintupi Community. He was a shareholder of the Company from the early nineties and painted consistently up to his death in Alice Springs 18 months ago. During his career he was represented in over one hundred and twenty exhibitions around the world, a truly staggering output of work that earnt him the highest respect among the Australian Indigenous art community. Along with three highly successful previous solo exhibitions, Tjupurrula was also a finalist four times in the prestigious National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award, Australia’s premier Indigenous art award held annually in Darwin, Northern Territory. Tjupurrula typified the resilience of Pintupi life in the Western Desert, one of the harshest environments on the planet. He was born traditionally and roamed with his family as a nomad until having contact with Europeans in the 1950’s. Following this he moved to the Papunya settlement before later returning to his traditional country during the homeland movement of the early 1980’s. From then on Tjupurrula spent his time between the Pintupi communities of Kintore and Kiwirrkura where Papunya Tula Artists had established studios to service the painters. The exhibition runs from Wednesday 8th November - Saturday 2nd December 2017 and is a fitting tribute to one of Papunya Tula Artists most enduring personalities. Johnny passed away in Alice Springs in February 2016, but his legacy will remain through the stunning art works he produced, including those in this exhibition. His work is held in virtually every major collection of Australian Indigenous art world wide, making this exhibition a must see event for anyone interested in the very best Indigenous art from Australia’s Western Desert.

Giorgio Pilla Director ReDot Fine Art Gallery

Johnny Yungut Tjupurrula Drinking from a Rockhole at the Site of Mukula, WA, Australia Source: © Paul Sweeney, courtesy Papunya Tula Artists Pty Ltd


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Birth Date Deceased Place of Birth Language

Circa 1930 Feb 2016 Near Tjangimanta Pintupi

Born in the bush in the vicinity of Tjangimanta, northeast of Kiwirrkura, Johnny Yungut was the brother of well-known Balgo artist Donkeyman Lee Tjupurrula (b. circa 1928 1990s) with whom he shared country around Well 33 on the Canning Stock Route. Their parents were Tjititjiti Tjakamarra and Yirtartirri Napaltjarri. In the early 1950s the family made the long trek into Balgo mission, which they had heard about from other Pintupi travelers. Johnny’s brother and sister stayed on at the mission settlement while Johnny went back out with the rest of the family and returned to the Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay) region. In 1956, Johnny was part of a group of young men who walked to Mt Doreen and Yuendumu, meeting a Welfare Branch patrol led by Ted Evans on their way back to Lappi Lappi rockhole near Lake Hazlett. It was here, in 1957, that Johnny encountered Donald Thomson, author of Bindibu Country. This meeting led to the whole party migrating east across the NT border and, in 1958, travelling by camel into Haasts Bluff, where Johnny married his second wife Walangkura Napanangka, daughter of Rartji Tjapangati and lnyuwa Nampitjinpa. In 1959, they were shifted across with 400 other Haasts Bluff residents to Papunya. Johnny and Walangkura had six children -three sons: George Angas (b. 1961), Jonathon and Simon, and three daughters: Deborah (Debra) Angas (b. 1964), Katherine (b. 1968) and Lorraine (b. 1974). Johnny Yungut also helped raise Nosepeg Tjupurrula’s son Richard Nosepeg, who began painting his father’s Dreamings for Papunya Tula in 2004. Johnny also had a son Jeffrey with his first wife Mulykuyanja (Titula) Napanangka. Johnny first appeared on Papunya Tula’s books in 1978 under the name of Johnny Angas. Then he moved away, living at various places and only resumed painting for Papunya Tula Artists in 1991 at Kiwirrkura. He was thereafter referred to as Johnny Yungut, although according to Jeremy Long the correct wording was probably Yultukunpa, the Pintupi name for a species of


Grevillea, and according to David Brooks ‘Yungut’ is simply an Aboriginal spelling of Angas. Johnny was the last surviving man of his generation for his local group area. As befits his age and ritual standing, Johnny Yungut had a large repertoire of Dreaming subjects, including a number of sites in his father’s country around Kiwirrkura: to the west, the sandhill site of Ngalpurrunya and the Pulyulnga soakage waters just out of Kiwirrkura; Tjuntulpul rockhole and Tilunga rockhole and rocky outcrop just east of Kiwirrkura; to the south, the rockhole and soakage site of Ngaminya; and, to the north, the claypan and soakage water of Tjutalpi. His work also depicted Tjangimanta, a soakage water site set in amid stony hills and rocks; Ngalurrilyingya, north of Walawala in the Pollock Hills; and Wirrulnga rockholes east of Kiwirrkura. He also painted the Watanuma (Flying Ant) Dreaming for a claypan site to the northwest of Kintore. He produced classical Pintupi grids of circles and connecting lines, dotted with infinite care. Since 1999, his style loosened considerably due to failing eyesight, market pressures or reasons of his own, but he was one of the last few who continued to paint the classical designs and dotted infilling which has characterised the Pintupi style from the beginning. In 1999 Johnny contributed to the Kiwirrkura men’s painting as part of the Western Desert Dialysis Appeal. Significantly, his works feature in collections such as the National Gallery of Victoria, the Griffith University Art Collection and the Aboriginal Art Museum in the Netherlands. His new style found rapid acceptance in the marketplace and in 2003 he had his first solo exhibition at William Mora Galleries in Melbourne, with a follow up solo in 2014 at Utopia Art in Sydney. He would not have another solo show until 2013 when Papunya Tula Artists held an exhibition in their Alice Springs gallery. He was a gentle, unassuming man with a calm inner strength, who was devoted to his wife, Walangkura. His second ‘mother’ lived at Yuendumu and he had connections with Balgo where he


lived for a time prior to the establishment of Kiwirrkura in the mid-1980s. Several of his relatives including Donkeyman Lee Tjupurrula were among the leading group of painters at Warlayirti Artists in Balgo but Johnny chose to live mostly at Kintore with Walangkura’s extended family. Johnny passed away in Alice Springs in February 2016. © Lives of the Papunya Tula Artists – Vivien Johnson (2008) Revised/Updated in 2017 by ReDot Fine Art Gallery

Collections National Gallery of Victoria (NGV), Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Art Gallery of New South Wales (AGNSW), Sydney, NSW, Australia. Griffith University Art Collection, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. Museum of Contemporary Aboriginal Art (AAMU), Utrecht, Netherlands. Hood Museum of Art, Hanover, NH, USA. Araluen Art Collection, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge, MA, USA. Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, OH, USA. W. & V. McGeoch Collection, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Peter & Agnes Cooke Collection, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. The Arthur Roe Collection, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Awards 2014 Highly Commended, ‘The 38th Alice Prize - Araluen Art Centre, Alice Springs, NT, Australia.

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2013 2004 2003

Tjupurrulaku – Paintings by Johnny Yungut Tjupurrula - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. New Paintings - Utopia Art Sydney, NSW, Australia. Paintings - William Mora Galleries, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.


Selected Group Exhibitions 2017 Summer Stockroom Show 2017 - ReDot Fine Art Gallery, Singapore. 2015 Papunya Tula Artists – Indigenous Paintings from Australia’s Western Desert Brumby Ute Gallery, Aspen, CO, USA. Annual Pintupi Exhibition - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Tarnanthi – Festival of Contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Art Gallery of SA, SA, Australia. Community VII - Utopia Art Sydney, NSW, Australia. Artist’s Hand: Collectors’ Eye – The Angel Gift - National Gallery of Victoria (NGV), Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2014 The 38th Alice Prize - Araluen Art Centre, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Apmere – Home - Arthouse Gallery, Yongsan-gu, Seoul, South Korea. Salon des refusés - Darwin, NT, Australia. 2013 All-Over Country - Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Crossing Cultures’ – The Owen and Wagner Collection of Contemporary Aboriginal Australian Art - Toledo Museum of Art, OH, USA. Travelling Through Country - Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Painting Now – Papunya Tula Artists - Utopia Art Sydney, NSW, Australia. 30th Telstra National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award - Darwin, NT, Australia. Language of The Land - Paul Johnstone Gallery, Darwin, NT, Australia. Desert Mob 2013 - Araluen Art Centre, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Community V - Utopia Art Sydney, NSW, Australia. Papunya Tula Artists – Masters of The Western Desert of Australia - Harvey Art Projects USA, Sun Valley, ID, USA. 2012 Forty Years of Papunya Tula Artists - Harvey Art Projects USA, Sun Valley, ID, USA. Visual Rhythm - Cross Cultural Art Exchange, Darwin, NT, Australia. Sonic Spheres - TarraWarra Biennial 2012, TarraWarra Museum of Art, VIC, Australia. Desert Mob 2012 - Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Crossing Cultures’ – The Owen and Wagner Collection of Contemporary Aboriginal Australian Art - Hood Museum of Art, Hanover, NH, USA. Tjukurrpa Ngaatjanya Maru Kamu Tjulkura – Dreaming in Black and White - ReDot Fine Art Gallery, Singapore. PTA 40th Anniversary Show - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Unique Perspectives – Papunya Tula Artists and The Alice Springs Community Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Community IV’ – Celebrating Forty Years of Papunya Tula Artists - Utopia Art Sydney, NSW, Australia.


2012 Papunya Tula: Works on Paper - Art Gallery of New South Wales (AGNSW), Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2011 Art Karlsruhe 2011, Karlsruhe, Germany. We Paint the Stories of Our Country - Museum of Cultural History, Oslo, Norway. 40 Years of Papunya Tula Artists - Utopia Art Sydney, NSW, Australia. Pintupi Art 2011 - A P Bond Gallery, Adelaide, SA, Australia. Living Water - National Gallery of VIC, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 28th Telstra National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award - Darwin, NT, Australia. Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair - Darwin Convention Centre, Darwin, NT, Australia. Desert Mob 2011 - Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Pintupi Trails 2011 - Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Recent Pintupi Works - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. 2010 36th Alice Prize - Araluen Art Centre, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Tradition & Innovation - Papunya Tula 2010 - Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Aboriginal Art 2010 - Scott Livesey Galleries, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Papunya Tula Artists: Art of the Western Desert - Harvey Art Projects USA, Sun Valley, ID, USA Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair - Darwin Convention Centre, Darwin, NT, Australia. Modern Masters of Aboriginal Australia - National Gallery of VIC, Melbourne, VIC. 27th Telstra National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award - Darwin, NT, Australia. Wilkinkarralakutu – Journeys to Lake Mackay - Cross Cultural Art Exchange, Darwin, NT, Australia. Community - Utopia Art Sydney, Utopia Art, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Ngurra Kutju Ngurrara – Belonging to One Country - ReDot Fine Art Gallery, Singapore. Ngurrakutu – Going Home - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Nyakula Kanyini Piintapalyalpayi Kamu Walytja Tjanampa Lurrtju – Caring for Artists and their Families - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Recent Paintings - Chapman Gallery, Canberra, ACT, Australia. 2009 Pro Community – Papunya Tula Artists - Kunstwerk, Ebergingen-Nussdorf, Germany. Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair - The Chan Building, Bennett Park Darwin, NT, Australia. Desert Mob 2009 - Araluen Art Centre, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Nganana Tjungurringanyi Tjukurrpa Nintintjakitja – We Are Here Sharing Our Dreaming - 80 Washington Square East Galleries, New York, NY, USA. Pintupi 2009 - Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide, SA, Australia.


2009 Pro Community – Papunya Tula Artists - ArtBar71, Berlin, Germany. Pro Community – Papunya Tula Artists - VDMA, Frankfurt, Germany. Pro Community – Papunya Tula Artists - Artkelch, Freiburg, Germany. Community – The Heart of Papunya Tula Artists - Utopia Art Sydney, NSW, Australia. Nganampatju Kanpatja Winki, Nganampatju Yara Winkii – All Our Paintings, All Our Stories - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Tjukurrpa Palurukutu, Kutjupawana Palyantjanya – Same Stories, A New Way - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. 2008 New Paintings from Papunya Tula Artists - Chapman Gallery, Canberra, ACT, Australia. Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair - Convention Centre, Darwin, NT, Australia. 25th Telstra National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award - Darwin, NT, Australia. Ngurra yurru kulintjaku – Always remembering country - Cross Cultural Art Exchange, Darwin, NT, Australia. Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair - Convention Centre, Darwin, NT, Australia. Marrkangku Yara Palyantjaku Ngurrangka – Making Strong Paintings at Home Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Pairs of Paintings - Utopia Art Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2007 Big Paintings - Utopia Art Sydney, NSW, Australia. Recent Paintings 2007 - Cross Cultural Art Exchange, Darwin, NT, Australia. Pintupi Art 2007 - Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide, SA, Australia. Pintupi – Mixed Exhibition - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. 2006 Aboriginal Art 2006 - Scott Livesey Galleries, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. PTA - Utopia Art Sydney, NSW, Australia. A Particular Collection - Utopia Art Sydney, NSW, Australia. Paintings by Papunya Tula Artists - Suzanne O’Connell Gallery, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. Yawulyurru kapalilu palyara nintilpayi - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. 2005 New Ideas - Utopia Art Sydney, NSW, Australia. Aboriginal Art 2005 - Scott Livesey Art Dealer, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. The Desert Mob Art Show - Araluen Art Centre, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Pintupi Artists - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. 2004 Papunya Tula – Selected Paintings - William Mora Galleries, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Pintupi Art 2004 - Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide, SA, Australia. Depth of Field – Anamorphosis - Utopia Art Sydney, NSW, Australia. Works from Kintore and Kiwirrkura - Alison Kelly Gallery, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.


2004 Papunya Tula Artists – 2004 - Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ma Yungu/Pass It On - Framed Gallery, Darwin, NT, Australia. Pintupi Artists - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. 2003 Pintupi Art 2003 - Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide, SA, Australia. Ab Op 2 - Exploring the Visual Intensity of Contemporary Aboriginal Art - Utopia Art, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Jan Murphy Gallery, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. The Desert Mob Art Show - Araluen Art Centre, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Kintore-Kiwirrkura 2003 - Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Pintupi Art from The Western Desert - Indigenart, Subiaco, WA, Australia. Masterpieces from The Western Desert - Gavin Graham Gallery, London, UK. Framed Gallery, Darwin, NT, Australia. Papunya Tula Artists - A Gift from The Desert - Utopia Art, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Pintupi Artists - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. 2002 Paintings from Our Country - Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide, SA, Australia. Lines 2 - Fireworks Gallery, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Pintupi Mens’ and Womens’ Stories - Indigenart, Subiaco, WA, Australia. Art Born of The Western Desert - Framed Gallery, Darwin, NT, Australia. Saluting Papunya - Chapman Gallery, Canberra, ACT, Australia. Pintupi Artists - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. 2001 Art of the Pintupi - Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide, SA, Australia. Kintore, Kiwirrkura - Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Aboriginal Art 2001 - Scott Livesey Art Dealer, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Six Painters from Papunya Tula Artists - Utopia Art, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Pintupi Exhibition - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. 18th National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award, Darwin, NT, Australia. Size Doesn’t Matter - William Mora Galleries, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2000 Aboriginal Art Select Works - Kozminsky Gallery and Fine Art Dealers, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Aboriginal Art 2000 - Scott Livesey Art Dealer, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Utopia Art Sydney, NSW, Australia. Papunya Tula Genesis and Genius - Art Gallery of New South Wales (AGNSW), Sydney, NSW, Australia. Pintupi Men - Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. 1999 Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 1998 Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.


1998 Art of The Aborigines - Centre for Contemporary Art, Ujazdowski Castle, Warsaw, Poland. 1997 Papunya Tula Artists Pty. Ltd., Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Utopia Art, Sydney, NSW, Australia.


Johnny Yungut Tjupurrula at Mukula, WA, Australia Source: © Paul Sweeney, courtesy Papunya Tula Artists Pty Ltd


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Soakage Site of Wanaritjarra Acrylic on Belgian Linen 183 x 153cm JY1102081

This painting depicts designs associated with the soakage site of Wanaritjarra, north of Winparku (Mt Webb) in Western Australia. This is the artist’s father’s country. In ancestral times a large group of Tingari men camped at this site before continuing their travels north to the swamp site of Tingaritjarra and then Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). Eventually the men split into two groups, one group continuing further north and the other heading towards the west. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Tingari Site of Wilkinkarra Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 153cm JY0408252

This painting depicts designs associated with the Tingari site of Wilkinkarra or Lake Mackay. In mythological times a pilkati (poisonous snake) travelled to this site from far in the east. When the snake arrived at Wilkinkarra it went into the lake resurfacing on the western side. It later continued towards the west eventually reaching the rockhole site of Nyinmi, just to the east of Jupiter Well , where it was killed in a huge bushfire. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given . Generally, the Tingari are a group of mythical characters of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari Men were usually followed by Tingari Women and accompanied by novices and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These mythologies form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Designs Associated with Tjulnga Acrylic on Belgian Linen 122 x 91cm JY1003011

This painting depicts designs associated with Tjulnga, a rockhole site east of the Kiwirrkura community in Western Australia. The roundels in this painting depict the rockholes at the site. In ancestral times a large group of Tingari men came to this site from the west on their travels toward Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further¡ detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites: The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Designs Associated with Tjulnga Acrylic on Belgian Linen 122 x 91cm JY1201054

This painting depicts designs associated with Tjulnga, a rockhole site east of the Kiwirrkura community in Western Australia. The roundels in this painting depict the rockholes at the site. In ancestral times a large group of Tingari men came to this site from the west on their travels toward Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Tingari Ceremonies at Wilkinkarra Acrylic on Belgian Linen 122 x 91cm JY1006022

This painting depicts designs associated with Tingari ceremonies at Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). In ancestral times a large group of Tingari men came to this site carrying the Fire Dreaming. Once the fire was lit at Wilkinkarra it quickly became out of control and chased the men west towards Kiwirrkura. Wilkinkarra is also associated with Larularunya, a species of snake who had travelled from Mt Wedge to the lake, where it escaped the fire by travelling underground to Nyinmi. This snake was assisted in his escape by clouds of water which dampened the full force of the fire. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Soakage Water Site of Ngaminya Acrylic on Belgian Linen 122 x 91cm JY1104134

This painting depicts designs associated with the soakage water site of Ngaminya, just to the south-west of the Kiwirrkura Community. A group of Tingari men, followed by a group of Tingari women, travelled to this site. While at Ngaminya the women gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten direct from the bush but are sometimes ground into a paste and formed into a type of damper. This ancestral story forms part of the Tingari Cycle. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Tingari Ceremonies at Wilkinkarra Acrylic on Belgian Linen 122 x 91cm JY1210009

This painting depicts designs associated with Tingari ceremonies at Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). In ancestral times a large group of Tingari men came to this site carrying the Fire Dreaming. Once the fire was lit at Wilkinkarra it quickly became out of control and chased the men west towards Kiwirrkura. Wilkinkarra is also associated with Larularunya, a species of snake who had travelled from Mt Wedge to the lake, where it escaped the fire by travelling underground to Nyinmi. This snake was assisted in his escape by clouds of water which dampened the full force of the fire. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Soakage Water site of Ngaminya Acrylic on Belgian Linen 107 x 91cm JY1108095

This painting depicts designs associated with the soakage water site of Ngaminya, just to the south-west of the Kiwirrkura Community. A group of Tingari men, followed by a group of Tingari women, travelled to this site. While at Ngaminya the women gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten direct from the bush but are sometimes ground into a paste and formed into a type of damper. This ancestral story forms part of the Tingari Cycle. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Tingari Ceremonies at Wilkinkarra Acrylic on Belgian Linen 153 x 61cm JY1203112

This painting depicts designs associated with Tingari ceremonies at Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). In ancestral times a man of the Tjakamarra kinship subsection travelled to this site from the west carrying the Fire Dreaming. Wilkinkarra is also associated with Larularunya, a species of snake who had travelled from Mt Wedge to the lake, where it escaped the fire by travelling underground to Nyinmi. This snake was assisted in his escape by clouds of water which dampened the full force of the fire. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Tingari Ceremonies at Wilkinkarra Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 91cm JY1303010

This painting depicts designs associated with Tingari ceremonies at Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). In ancestral times a man of the Tjakamarra kinship subsection travelled to this site from the west carrying the Fire Dreaming. Wilkinkarra is also associated with Larularunya, a species of snake who had travelled from Mt Wedge to the lake, where it escaped the fire by travelling underground to Nyinmi. This snake was assisted in his escape by clouds of water which dampened the full force of the fire. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, The Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Soakage Water Site of Ngalpurrunya Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 91cm JY0812115

This painting depicts designs associated with the soakage water site of Ngalpurrunya, situated in sand hill country to the north-east of the Kiwirrkura Community. In ancestral times a large group of Tingari Men visited this site during their travels east to Tarkul and later Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of mythical characters of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari Men were usually followed by Tingari Women and accompanied by novices and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These mythologies form patt of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Tingari Ceremonies at Wilkinkarra Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 91cm JY1205070

This painting depicts designs associated with Tingari ceremonies at the site of Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). In ancestral times a large group of Tingari men came to this site carrying the Fire Dreaming. Once the fire was lit at Wilkinkarra it quickly became out of control and chased the men west towards Kiwirrkura. This site is also associated with a poisonous snake ancestor who had travelled from Mt Wedge in the east. At Wilkinkarra it escaped the fire by travelling underground towards the west to Nyinmi. The snake was assisted in his escape by clouds of water which dampened the full force of the fire. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Tingari Ceremonies at Wilkinkarra Acrylic on Belgian Linen 122 x 61cm JY1302036

This painting depicts designs associated with Tingari ceremonies at Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). In ancestral times a man of the Tjakamarra kinship subsection travelled to this site from the west carrying the Fire Dreaming. Wilkinkarra is also associated with Larularunya, a species of snake who had travelled from Mt Wedge to the lake, where it escaped the fire by travelling underground to Nyinmi. This snake was assisted in his escape by clouds of water which dampened the full force of the fire. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Two Snake Dreaming - Soakage Water Site of Karrilwarra Acrylic on Belgian Linen 122 x 61cm JY0908062

This painting depicts designs associated with the Two Snake Dreaming which travelled to the rockhole and soakage water site of Karrilwarra, situated in sandhill country west of the Kiwirrkura community in Western Australia. The snakes travelled from the east, passing through Lake Mackay, where they went underground. They resurfaced at Karrilwarra, where they formed the rockhole, and later continued deep into Western Australia. This ancestral story forms part of the Tingari Cycle. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Soakage Water Site of Ralyalnga Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 91cm JY0412095

This painting depicts designs associated with the soakage water site of Ralyalnga, north of the Kiwirrkura Community in Western Australia. During ancestral times a large group of Tingari Men camped at this site before continuing their travels east to Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature, no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Tingari Ceremonies at Wilkinkarra Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 46cm JY1106038

This painting depicts designs associated with Tingari ceremonies at Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). In ancestral times a large group of Tingari men came to this site carrying the Fire Dreaming. Once the fire was lit at Wilkinkarra it quickly became out of control and chased the men west towards Kiwirrkura. Wilkinkarra is also associated with Larularunya, a species of snake who had travelled from Mt Wedge to the lake, where it escaped the fire by travelling underground to Nyinmi. This snake was assisted in his escape by clouds of water which dampened the full force of the fire. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Tingari Ceremonies at Wilkinkarra Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 46cm JY1111044

This painting depicts designs associated with Tingari ceremonies at Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). In ancestral times a large group of Tingari men came to this site carrying the Fire Dreaming. Once the fire was lit at Wilkinkarra it quickly became out of control and chased the men west towards Kiwirrkura. Wilkinkarra is also associated with Larularunya, a species of snake who had travelled from Mt Wedge to the lake, where it escaped the fire by travelling underground to Nyinmi. This snake was assisted in his escape by clouds of water which dampened the full force of the fire. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Tingari Ceremonies at Wilkinkarra Acrylic on Belgian Linen 107 x 28cm JY1309001

This painting depicts designs associated with Tingari ceremonies at Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). In ancestral times a large group of Tingari men came to this site carrying the Fire Dreaming. Once the fire was lit at Wilkinkarra it quickly became out of control and chased the men west towards Kiwirrkura. Wilkinkarra is also associated with Larularunya, a species of snake who had travelled from Mt Wedge to the lake, where it escaped the fire by travelling underground to Nyinmi. This snake was assisted in his escape by clouds of water which dampened the full force of the fire. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Tingari Ceremonies at Wilkinkarra Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 46cm JY1303016

This painting depicts designs associated with Tingari ceremonies at Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). In ancestral times a man of the Tjakamarra kinship subsection travelled to this site from the west carrying the Fire Dreaming. Wilkinkarra is also associated with Larularunya, a species of snake who had travelled from Mt Wedge to the lake, where it escaped the fire by travelling underground to Nyinmi. This snake was assisted in his escape by clouds of water which dampened the full force of the fire. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Tingari Ceremonies at Wilkinkarra Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 46cm JY1106073

This painting depicts designs associated with Tingari ceremonies at Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). In ancestral times a man of the Tjakamarra kinship subsection travelled to this site from the west carrying the Fire Dreaming. Wilkinkarra is also associated with Larularunya, a species of snake who had travelled from Mt Wedge to the lake, where it escaped the fire by travelling underground to Nyinmi. This snake was assisted in his escape by clouds of water which dampened the full force of the fire. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Soakage Water Site of Tjangimanta Acrylic on Belgian Linen 107 x 28cm JY1010151

This painting depicts designs associated with the soakage water site of Tjangimanta, north-east of the Kiwirrkura Community. In ancestral times a large group of Tingari Men visited this site during their travels east to the rockhole site of Tarkul slightly north of Winparku (Mt Webb). The men later continued their travels north to Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Tingari Ceremonies at Wilkinkarra Acrylic on Belgian Linen 107 x 28cm JY1302013

This painting depicts designs associated with Tingari ceremonies at Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). In ancestral times a large group of Tingari men came to this site carrying the Fire Dreaming. Once the fire was lit at Wilkinkarra it quickly became out of control and chased the men west towards Kiwirrkura. Wilkinkarra is also associated with Larularunya, a species of snake who had travelled from Mt Wedge to the lake, where it escaped the fire by travelling underground to Nyinmi. This snake was assisted in his escape by clouds of water which dampened the full force of the fire. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Tingari Ceremonies at Wilkinkarra Acrylic on Belgian Linen 107 x 28cm JY1211047

This painting depicts designs associated with Tingari ceremonies at Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). In ancestral times a man of the Tjakamarra kinship subsection travelled to this site from the west carrying the Fire Dreaming. Wilkinkarra is also associated with Larularunya, a species of snake who had travelled from Mt Wedge to the lake, where it escaped the fire by travelling underground to Nyinmi. This snake was assisted in his escape by clouds of water which dampened the full force of the fire. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Designs Associated with Tjulnga Acrylic on Belgian Linen 61 x 55cm JY0806072

This painting depicts designs associated with Tjulnga, a rockhole site north-east of the Kintore community. The roundels in this painting depict the rockholes at the site. In ancestral times a large group of Tingari men came to this site from the east on their travels toward Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Tingari Ceremonies at Wilkinkarra Acrylic on Belgian Linen 61 x 55cm JY1209056

This painting depicts designs associated with Tingari ceremonies at Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay).In ancestral times, a large group of Tingari men came to this site carrying the Fire Dreaming. Once the fire was lit at Wilkinkarra, it quickly became out of control and chased the men west towards Kiwirrkura. Wilkinkarra is also associated with Larularunya, a species of snake who had travelled from Mt. Wedge to the lake, where it escaped the fire by travelling underground to Nyinmi. This snake was assisted in his escape by clouds of water which dampened the full force of the fire. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature, no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Rockhole Site of Wirrulnga Acrylic on Belgian Linen 46 x 38cm JY0902059

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Wirrulnga, just to the south west of the Kiwirrkura community in Western Australia. The roundel in this work represent the rockholes at this site. In ancestral times a group of Tingari men travelled to Wirrulnga from the west and continued their travels east to Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Rockhole Site of Wirrulnga Etching on Paper - Edition of 40 33 x 25cm PR15-18/40

This etching depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Wirrulnga, just to the south west of the Kiwirrkura community in Western Australia. The roundels in this work represent the rockholes at this site. In ancestral times, a group of Tingari men travelled to Wirrulnga from the west and continued their travels east to Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature, no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny YUNGUT TJUPURRULA Soakage Water Site of Tjangimanta Etching on Paper - Edition of 40 33 x 25cm PR16-18/40

This etching depicts designs associated with the soakage water site of Tjangimanta, north-east of the Kiwirrkura Community. In ancestral times, a large group of Tingari Men visited this site during their travels east to the rockhole site of Tarkul slightly north of Winparku (Mt Webb). The men later continued their travels north to Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature. no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Johnny Yungut Tjupurrula Painting at Jupiter Well, WA, Austra


Source: © Paul Sweeney, courtesy Papunya Tula Artists Pty Ltd

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Johnny Yungut Tjupurrula Solo  

ReDot Fine Art Gallery is extremely honoured to announce our annual Papunya Tula showcase, with the focus this year on the last remain works...

Johnny Yungut Tjupurrula Solo  

ReDot Fine Art Gallery is extremely honoured to announce our annual Papunya Tula showcase, with the focus this year on the last remain works...

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