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contemporary art world. Typically large meandering canvases tell of complex, yet fundamental, stories of ownership and land rights fused with whimsical stories of creation handed from generation to generation.R E D O T F I N E A R T G A L L E R Y in collaboration with Papunya Tula Artists Pty. Ltd. The Spinifex artists continue to paint traditional stories and document kinship responsibilities and these works have become widely knownpresents in the fine art world as some of the most important modern contemporary Indigenous art pieces being produced today. This growing reputation is also gaining international acclaim and the works are now housed within major art and museum collections both in Australia and overseas, with recent acquisitions by the British Museum making headlines and a major show in Germany in 2013. This exhibition showcasing works by old master such as Fred Grant, Ned Grant, Roy Underwood, Estelle Hogan, Tjaruwa Woods and Lawrence Pennington, to mention but a few, opens on Wednesday, 14th May and runs till Saturday, 21st June 2014 and it is a must-see for anyone interested in following the development of modern contemporary Indigenous art, from one of the Aboriginal art movements most remote, refreshing and innovative art centres.

Bobby West Tjupurrula & Katarra Butler Napaltjarri

Giorgio Pilla Director ReDot Fine Art Gallery

29 th October - 29 th November 2014

For a high resolution, downloadable, PDF version of the this catalogue, with pricing, please send us an email to info@redotgallery.com Thank you.

c o n t e m p o r a r y

f i n e

i n d i g e n o u s

a r t


Ngami Image Matt Frost, Courtesy of Papunya Tula Artists


Bobby West Tjupurrula & Katarra Butler Napaltjarri ReDot Fine Art Gallery proudly invites you to an exhibition of exceptional works from Australia’s foremost Aboriginal owned art centre, Papunya Tula Artists Pty. Ltd. This exhibition represents the 11th annual showing in Singapore of the stunning work by these gifted artists from Australia’s Western Desert. This year we will be hosting dual solo shows, simply titled after the participating artists, Bobby West Tjupurrula & Katarra Butler Napaltjarri. Bobby West Tjupurrula is the son of Freddy West Tjakamarra, one of the founding shareholders of Papunya Tula Artists, and comes from an impressive family of established Papunya Tula painters. Born at the rockhole site of Tjamu Tjamu, east of Kiwirrkura, around 1958, Bobby’s family was met by Jeremy Long’s welfare patrol in 1963. He commenced painting for Papunya Tula Artists in the late 1980s, but it wasn’t really until 1993 that he began painting regularly. Since then he has become an integral part of the company not just as an artist but also as the company Chairman on several occasions. Bobby is a strong advocate and voice of the Western Desert Dialysis unit, an organisation close to his heart given he too suffers renal failure and receives regular dialysis.

Ngami Image Matt Frost, Courtesy of Papunya Tula Artists


Katarra Butler Napaltjarri in contrast has only recently burst onto the Papunya Tula artistic map, though records show she first painted for the company in 2001. Born near the current location of the Tjukurla Community in Western Australia in circa 1946, she was the second wife of Anatjari Tjakamarra, another pre-eminent member of the original group of painters who started the Central Desert painting movement in Papunya in 1971. Whilst she has extended family ties with the Tjukurla area, Katarra also spends considerable time in Kintore and Kiwirrkura where she accesses the Papunya Tula Artists studio. Whilst their respective styles could not be more opposing, Bobby’s traditionally inspired and firmly encamped in the style of his fore-fathers and Katarra’s more modern, whimsical and abstract, they very much represent the Papunya Tula art movement of today. This will be Katarra’s first solo exhibition, and comes just months after being nominated as a finalist in ths year’s NATSIAA awards meanwhile this will be the 2nd solo show for Bobby, who has earnt enormous appeal in the NATSIAA’s over the many years he has painstakingly produced complex, important, works for the company. The exhibition opens on Wednesday, 29th October and runs till Saturday, 29th November 2014 and it is a must-see for anyone interested in following the recent developments of Papunya Tula Artists, one of the Aboriginal art movements most important art centres. The show will be attended by Mr. Paul Sweeney, General Manager of Papunya Tula Artists Pty. Ltd.

Giorgio Pilla Director ReDot Fine Art Gallery


Bobby West Tjupurrula Painting Image Courtesy of Papunya Tula Artists


Bobby WEST TJUPURRULA

Birth Date Language Place of Birth

circa 1958 Pintupi Tjamu Tjamu, east of Kiwirrkura

Bobby is the son of Freddy West Tjakamarra, one of the original shareholders of Papunya Tula Artists. He was born at the rockhole site of Tjamu Tjamu, which is east of Kiwirrkura, around 1958. Bobby’s family was met by Jeremy Long’s welfare patrol in 1963. At the time his family was camping at Willi rockhole, slightly east of Kintore. Bobby appears with his family in the book ‘The Lizard Eaters’ by Douglas Lockwood, which documents the 1963 patrol. He commenced painting for Papunya Tula Artists in the late 1980s. In 1999 Bobby contributed to the Kiwirrkura men’s painting as part of the Western Desert Dialysis Appeal.

Awards 2011 General Painting Award, 28th Telstra National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award

Collections National Gallery of Victoria. Charles Darwin University. Cornell University New York. Griffith University Art Collection. Charles Darwin University. Hood Museum of Art, USA.

Selected Solo Exhibition 2002 William Mora Galleries, Melbourne,Victoria, Australia.


Selected Group Exhibitions 2000 Utopia Art Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Framed Gallery, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. ‘Pintupi Men’, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia 2001 ‘Papunya Tula 2001’, William Mora Galleries, Melbourne,Victoria, Australia. ‘Art of the Pintupi’, Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. ‘Kintore, Kiwirrkura’, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne,Victoria, Australia. ‘Aboriginal Art 2001’, Scott Livesey Art Dealer, Melbourne,Victoria, Australia. ‘Six Painters From Papunya Tula Artists’, Utopia Art Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ‘Pintupi Exhibition’, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia. ‘Spirituality and Australian Aboriginal Art’, Comunidad de Madrid touring exhibition, Spain. 2002 ‘Paintings From Our Country’, Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne,Victoria, Australia. William Mora Galleries, Melbourne,Victoria, Australia. 19th Telstra National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award, Darwin, Northern Territory Australia. ‘Pintupi Artists’, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia. 2003 ‘Pintupi Art 2003’, Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. ‘Kintore-Kiwirrkura 2003’, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne,Victoria, Australia. ‘Pintupi Art From The Western Desert’, Indigenart, Subiaco, Western Australia, Australia. Framed Gallery, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. ‘Papunya Tula Artists - A Gift From The Desert’, Utopia Art Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ‘Pintupi Artists’, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia. 2004 ‘Pintupi Art 2004’, Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. ‘Papunya Tula Artists - 2004’, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne,Victoria, Australia. ‘Talking About Abstraction’, Ivan Dougherty Gallery, College of Fine Arts - The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. ‘Aboriginal Art 2004’, Scott Livesey Art Dealer, Melbourne,Victoria, Australia. ‘Looking Closely At Country’, Ivan Dougherty Gallery, College of Fine Arts - The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. ‘Pintupi Artists’, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia. 2005 ‘Rising Stars’, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne,Victoria, Australia. ‘Papunya Tula - New Paintings From The Kintore Kiwirrkura Region’, John Gordon Gallery, Coffs Harbour, New South Wales, Australia.


2005 ‘Strong and Stately’, Red Dot Gallery, Singapore. 2006 ‘Land Marks’, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne,Victoria, Australia. ‘Rising Stars’, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne,Victoria, Australia. ‘A Particular Collection’, Utopia Art Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. 2007 ‘Master Works From Papunya Tula’, Birrung Gallery, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2008 ‘Papunya Tula Artists 2008’, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne,Victoria, Australia. ‘Pintupi Art 2008’, Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. 2009 ‘Icons Of The Desert: Early Aboriginal Paintings From Papunya’, Herbert F. Johnson Museum Of Art, Cornell University, New York, USA. ‘Prelude’, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT, Australia. 2010 ‘Wilkinkarralakutu - Journeys To Lake Mackay’, Cross Cultural Art Exchange, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. ‘Ngurrakutu - Going Home’, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia. 2011 ‘Pintupi Art 2011’, A P Bond Gallery, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. ‘28th Telstra National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award’, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair, Darwin Convention Centre, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. ‘Recent Pintupi Works’, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia. 2012 ‘Forty Years of Papunya Tula Artists’, Harvey Art Projects USA, Sun Valley, Idaho, USA. ‘Crossing Cultures’ – The Owen and Wagner Collection of Contemporary Aboriginal Australian Art, Hood Museum of Art, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. ‘Tjukurrpa Ngaatjanya Maru Kamu Tjulkura - Dreaming In Black And White’, ReDot Gallery, Singapore. ‘PTA 40th Anniversary Show’, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia. 2013 ‘Crossing Cultures’ – The Owen and Wagner Collection of Contemporary Aboriginal Australian Art, Toledo Museum of Art, Ohio, USA. ‘Recent Works’, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia.


Bobby WEST TJUPURRULA

Palipalintja Acrylic on Belgian Linen 183 x 153cm BW1401046

This painting depicts designs associated with the swamp and rockhole site of Palipalintja, just west of Jupiter Well. In ancestral times a large group of Tingari men travelled to this site from the west. After camping at this site the men continued their travels east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkura and then north-east to Tarkul and Lake Mackay. The lines in this painting depict the sandhills in the area in which the Tingari men travelled. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature, no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Bobby WEST TJUPURRULA

Ceremonial Sites in Kiwirrkura and Wilkinkarra Acrylic on Belgian Linen 153 x 122cm BW1407068

This painting depicts a series of important ceremonial sites in the area around Kiwirrkura and along the southern side of Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). These sites include Ngamurru, Tingaritjarra,Tjutalpi,Wilkinkarra,Tarkul and Malparringya. All these sites have a water source either in the form of a rockhole or soakage. The painting is essentially a Tingari map of the mentioned sites and dominant land features in the area. All these sites were visited by the Tingari people who moved through the area after travelling from the west. Generally, the Tingari are a group of mythical characters of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari Men were usually followed by Tingari Women and accompanied by novices and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These mythologies form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Bobby WEST TJUPURRULA

Tarkul Acrylic on Belgian Linen 122 x 122cm BW1403076

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Tarkul, north of Mt. Webb in Western Australia. In ancestral times a large group of Tingari Men, both young and old, came to this site where they were burnt in a large fire. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature, no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Bobby WEST TJUPURRULA

Mantja (Moon Rock) Acrylic on Belgian Linen 122 x 122cm BW1403101

This painting depicts designs associated with the site of Mantja, also known as Moon Rock, close to Kiwirrkura in Western Australia. Mantja is integral to the Moon Dreaming. In ancestral times a group of Tingari Men, came to this site. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature, no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Bobby WEST TJUPURRULA

Pinari Acrylic on Belgian Linen 122 x 91cm BW1311089

This painting relates to the spring water found at the lake site of Pinari, north-west of the Kintore community. The jagged lines depict spring water emerging from its underground flow. In ancestral times a large group of Tingari Men travelled east through Palipalintja,Yarruyarru and Tarkul to this site. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature, no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Bobby WEST TJUPURRULA

Palipalintja Acrylic on Belgian Linen 122 x 91cm BW1407071

This painting depicts designs associated with the journey of a group of Tingari men, through Nyaru and on to the claypan site of Palipalintja, just west of Jupiter Well. In mythological times a large group of Tingari Men travelled this route. After camping at Nyaru and Palipalintja, the men continued their travels east passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkura and then north-east to Tarkul and Lake Mackay. The lines in this painting depict the sandhills that the Tingari men passed as they travelled. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature, no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of mythical characters of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari Men were usually followed by Tingari Women and accompanied by novices and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These mythologies form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Bobby WEST TJUPURRULA

Palipalintja Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 91cm BW1404106

This painting depicts designs associated with the swamp and rockhole site of Palipalintja, just west of Jupiter Well. In ancestral times a large group of Tingari men travelled to this site from the west. After camping at this site the men continued their travels east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkura and then north-east to Tarkul and Lake Mackay. The lines in this painting depict the sandhills in the area in which the Tingari men travelled. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature, no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Bobby WEST TJUPURRULA

Pinari Acrylic on Belgian Linen 122 x 61cm BW1203116

This painting relates to the spring water found at the lake site of Pinari, north-west of the Kintore community. The jagged lines depict spring water emerging from its underground flow. In ancestral times a large group of Tingari Men travelled east through Palipalintja,Yarruyarru and Tarkul to this site. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature, no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Bobby WEST TJUPURRULA

Yunala Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 61cm BW1404108

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole and soakage water site of Yunala, west of the Kiwirrkura Community. In mythological times a large group of Tingari Men camped at this site digging the edible tubers of the Bush Banana Vine (Marsdenia australis). They later travelled east to Kiwirrkura and then further east to Pinari, north-west of the Kintore Community. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature, no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of mythical characters of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari Men were usually followed by Tingari Women and accompanied by novices and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These mythologies form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Bobby WEST TJUPURRULA

Palipalintja Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 46cm BW1401047

This painting depicts designs associated with the swamp and rockhole site of Palipalintja, just west of Jupiter Well. In ancestral times a large group of Tingari men travelled to this site from the west. After camping at this site the men continued their travels east, passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkura and then north-east to Tarkul and Lake Mackay. The lines in this painting depict the sandhills in the area in which the Tingari men travelled. Since events associated with the Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature, no further detail was given. Generally, the Tingari are a group of ancestral beings of the Dreaming who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari men were usually followed by Tingari women and were accompanied by novices, and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These ancestral stories form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths today as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs.


Katarra Butler Napaltjarri Painting Image Matt Frost, Courtesy of Papunya Tula Artists


Katarra BUTLER NAPALTJARRI

Birth Date Language Place of Birth

circa 1946 Pintupi Near Tjukurla Community in Western Australia

Katarra was born near the current location of the Tjukurla Community in Western Australia circa 1946. Katarra is the second wife of Anatjari Tjakamarra who was an important member of the original group of painters who started the Central Desert painting movement in Papunya in 1971. She first moved to Papunya around 1966 but later travelled back to her traditional homelands further west following the establishment of Tjukurla, Kintore and Kiwirrkura. Whilst she has extended family ties with the Tjukurla area, Katarra also spends considerable time in Kintore and Kiwirrkura where she paints for Papunya Tula Artists.

Selected Group Exhibitions 2010 ‘Recent Pintupi Works’, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia. 2013 ‘Painting Now – Papunya Tula Artists’, Utopia Art Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ‘Language Of The Land’, Paul Johnstone Gallery, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. ‘Desert Mob 2013’, Araluen Art Centre, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia. ‘Recent Works’, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia. ‘Papunya Tula Artists – Masters Of The Western Desert Of Australia’, Harvey Art Projects USA, Sun Valley, Idaho, USA.


Katarra BUTLER NAPALTJARRI

Ngaminya Acrylic on Belgian Linen 122 x 91cm KB1310044

This painting depicts designs associated with women’s ceremonies at the rockhole and soakage water site of Ngaminya, just to the south-west of the Kiwirrkura Community in Western Australia. This is the artist’s mother’s country. During ancestral times a large group of women gathered at the site to perform the dances and sing the songs associated with the area. While in the area the women also gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries, represented in the painting by the numerous circles, can be eaten straight from the bush but are sometimes ground into a paste and cooked in the coals to form a type of damper. Upon completion of the ceremonies at Ngaminya the women continued their travels east to Wirrulnga and then on to Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay).


Katarra BUTLER NAPALTJARRI

Tjukurla Acrylic on Belgian Linen 107 x 91cm KB1402070

This painting depicts designs associated with the site of Tjukurla in Western Australia, near where the community now stands. The larger roundels represent the rockholes found at the site. In ancestral times a group of women gathered at Tjukurla to perform the dances and sing the songs associated with the area. While at Tjukurla the women also spun hair with which to make nyimparra (hair-string skirts), which are worn during ceremonies. The women later travelled north towards the Kintore region. As they travelled they gathered large quantities of the edible fruit known as pura (also known in Pintupi as pintalypa), or bush tomato, from the small shrub Solanum chippendalei. This fruit is the size of a small apricot, and after the seeds have been removed, can be stored for long periods by halving the fruit and skewering them onto a stick. The women also collected mangata (quandong) from the small tree Santalum acuminatum, a traditional staple food much sought after throughout this region, as well as the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten straight from the bush but are sometimes ground into a paste and cooked in the coals to form a type of damper. The various bush foods collected by the women are represented in the painting by the numerous small circles.


Katarra BUTLER NAPALTJARRI

Ngaminya Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 91cm KB1403078

This painting depicts designs associated with women’s ceremonies at the rockhole and soakage water site of Ngaminya, just to the south-west of the Kiwirrkura Community in Western Australia. This is the artist’s mother’s country. During ancestral times a large group of women gathered at the site to perform the dances and sing the songs associated with the area. While in the area the women also gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries, represented in the painting by the numerous circles, can be eaten straight from the bush but are sometimes ground into a paste and cooked in the coals to form a type of damper. Upon completion of the ceremonies at Ngaminya the women continued their travels east to Wirrulnga and then on to Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay).


Katarra BUTLER NAPALTJARRI

Wirrulnga Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 91cm KB1404037

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Wirrulnga, east of the Kiwirrkura Community in Western Australia. A group of ancestral women camped here performing the dances and singing the songs associated with the area, before travelling north-east to Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). They were following a group of Tingari men. Wirrulnga is associated with birth and while at the site one of the women of the Napaltjarri kinship subsection gave birth. While at the site the women also gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. The larger roundels in the painting represent the rockhole and soakage waters at the site.


Katarra BUTLER NAPALTJARRI

Wirrulnga Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 61cm KB1310030

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Wirrulnga, east of the Kiwirrkura Community in Western Australia. A group of ancestral women camped here performing the dances and singing the songs associated with the area, before travelling north-east to Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). They were following a group of Tingari men. Wirrulnga is associated with birth and while at the site, one of the women of the Napaltjarri kinship subsection, gave birth. The smaller roundels in this work, depict the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale, the women gathered these edible berries as moved through this area. The larger roundels in the painting represent the rockhole and soakage waters found at this site.


Katarra BUTLER NAPALTJARRI

Ngaminya Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 61cm KB1311001

This painting depicts designs associated with women’s ceremonies at the rockhole and soakage water site of Ngaminya, just to the south-west of the Kiwirrkura Community in Western Australia. This is the artist’s mother’s country. During ancestral times a large group of women gathered at the site to perform the dances and sing the songs associated with the area. While in the area the women also gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries, represented in the painting by the numerous circles, can be eaten straight from the bush but are sometimes ground into a paste and cooked in the coals to form a type of damper. Upon completion of the ceremonies at Ngaminya the women continued their travels east to Wirrulnga and then on to Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay).


Katarra BUTLER NAPALTJARRI

Wirrulnga Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 46cm KB1312037

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Wirrulnga, east of the Kiwirrkura Community in Western Australia. A group of ancestral women camped here performing the dances and singing the songs associated with the area, before travelling north-east to Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). They were following a group of Tingari men. Wirrulnga is associated with birth and while at the site one of the women of the Napaltjarri kinship subsection gave birth. While at the site the women also gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. The larger roundels in the painting represent the rockhole and soakage waters at the site.


Katarra BUTLER NAPALTJARRI

Tjukurla Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 46cm KB1403002

This painting depicts designs associated with the site of Tjukurla in Western Australia, near where the community now stands. The larger roundels represent the rockholes found at the site. In ancestral times a group of women gathered at Tjukurla to perform the dances and sing the songs associated with the area. While at Tjukurla the women also spun hair with which to make nyimparra (hair-string skirts), which are worn during ceremonies. The women later travelled north towards the Kintore region. As they travelled they gathered large quantities of the edible fruit known as pura (also known in Pintupi as pintalypa), or bush tomato, from the small shrub Solanum chippendalei. This fruit is the size of a small apricot, and after the seeds have been removed, can be stored for long periods by halving the fruit and skewering them onto a stick. The women also collected mangata (quandong) from the small tree Santalum acuminatum, a traditional staple food much sought after throughout this region, as well as the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries can be eaten straight from the bush but are sometimes ground into a paste and cooked in the coals to form a type of damper. The various bush foods collected by the women are represented in the painting by the numerous small circles.


Katarra BUTLER NAPALTJARRI

Ngaminya Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 46cm KB1403089

This painting depicts designs associated with women’s ceremonies at the rockhole and soakage water site of Ngaminya, just to the south-west of the Kiwirrkura Community in Western Australia. This is the artist’s mother’s country. During ancestral times a large group of women gathered at the site to perform the dances and sing the songs associated with the area. While in the area the women also gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries, represented in the painting by the numerous circles, can be eaten straight from the bush but are sometimes ground into a paste and cooked in the coals to form a type of damper. Upon completion of the ceremonies at Ngaminya the women continued their travels east to Wirrulnga and then on to Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay).


Katarra BUTLER NAPALTJARRI

Wirrulnga Acrylic on Belgian Linen 91 x 46cm KB1404039

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Wirrulnga, east of the Kiwirrkura Community in Western Australia. A group of ancestral women camped here performing the dances and singing the songs associated with the area, before travelling north-east to Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). They were following a group of Tingari men. Wirrulnga is associated with birth and while at the site one of the women of the Napaltjarri kinship subsection gave birth. While at the site the women also gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. The larger roundels in the painting represent the rockhole and soakage waters at the site.


Katarra BUTLER NAPALTJARRI

Ngaminya Acrylic on Belgian Linen 61 x 55cm KB1401031

This painting depicts designs associated with women’s ceremonies at the rockhole and soakage water site of Ngaminya, just to the south-west of the Kiwirrkura Community in Western Australia. This is the artist’s mother’s country. During ancestral times a large group of women gathered at the site to perform the dances and sing the songs associated with the area. While in the area the women also gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries, represented in the painting by the numerous circles, can be eaten straight from the bush but are sometimes ground into a paste and cooked in the coals to form a type of damper. Upon completion of the ceremonies at Ngaminya the women continued their travels east to Wirrulnga and then on to Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay).


Katarra BUTLER NAPALTJARRI

Wirrulnga Acrylic on Belgian Linen 61 x 55cm KB1403015

This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Wirrulnga, east of the Kiwirrkura Community in Western Australia. A group of ancestral women camped here performing the dances and singing the songs associated with the area, before travelling north-east to Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay). They were following a group of Tingari men. Wirrulnga is associated with birth and while at the site one of the women of the Napaltjarri kinship subsection gave birth. While at the site the women also gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. The larger roundels in the painting represent the rockhole and soakage waters at the site.


Katarra BUTLER NAPALTJARRI

Ngaminya Acrylic on Belgian Linen 61 x 55cm KB1403047

This painting depicts designs associated with women’s ceremonies at the rockhole and soakage water site of Ngaminya, just to the south-west of the Kiwirrkura Community in Western Australia. This is the artist’s mother’s country. During ancestral times a large group of women gathered at the site to perform the dances and sing the songs associated with the area. While in the area the women also gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries, represented in the painting by the numerous circles, can be eaten straight from the bush but are sometimes ground into a paste and cooked in the coals to form a type of damper. Upon completion of the ceremonies at Ngaminya the women continued their travels east to Wirrulnga and then on to Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay).


Katarra BUTLER NAPALTJARRI

Ngaminya Acrylic on Belgian Linen 61 x 55cm KB1407109

This painting depicts designs associated with women’s ceremonies at the rockhole and soakage water site of Ngaminya, just to the south-west of the Kiwirrkura Community in Western Australia. This is the artist’s mother’s country. During ancestral times a large group of women gathered at the site to perform the dances and sing the songs associated with the area. While in the area the women also gathered the edible berries known as kampurarrpa or desert raisin from the small shrub Solanum centrale. These berries, represented in the painting by the numerous circles, can be eaten straight from the bush but are sometimes ground into a paste and cooked in the coals to form a type of damper. Upon completion of the ceremonies at Ngaminya the women continued their travels east to Wirrulnga and then on to Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay).


Ngami Image Matt Frost, Courtesy of Papunya Tula Artists


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