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ISSUE 201 OCTOBER 2011 $4.50 (inc. GST)


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16 For wine lovers Keeping local kids active and healthy 20 28 Balancing business and sustainability Toast to the Coast comes of age

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Why Green is Good

05 Biz News 10 Appointments 34 Special Report 40 Tech Guy 42 Arts 48 After Hours 51 What’s On

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EDITOR

Making sense of conflicting times By the time you are reading this, dear readers, the Grand Final will be over (unless Saturday’s match is a draw again – please no, Footy Gods, we can’t take another one!) and the end of the year is looming. After months of seismic economic and political power shifts, it can be hard to find some clear perspective on where we, here in Australia, really are. And rather than give you my poor take on the state of play (and no, that is not a football reference), I present instead the thoughts of much wiser minds. The following is an extract from a speech given by Ai Group National President, Lucio Di Bartolomeo, at the Ai Group's Annual National Dinner in Canberra a few weeks ago, and it makes for interesting reading: As the Chinese proverb suggests - We live in interesting times. While the rest of the world deals with revolution, economic despair, and social dysfunction, Australia is doing many things right. We are experiencing economic growth. We have a strong national balance sheet. Geographically we are in the right place at the right time and we have a lot of the right things to sell… [Yet] we are an economy of paradoxes: a boom and gloom economy. We have record prices, production and investment in our resources sector. Against this there is a slowing of activity and an absence of confidence in large parts of the rest of the economy. This is particularly so in the non-mining trade exposed sectors. As a nation we have reasonably solid income growth and low unemployment. At the same time, we have ongoing consumer caution. … In the current climate, manufacturers in particular face the potentially deadly mix of a strong currency,

the historical surge of industrial capacity in the emerging economies - particularly China - rising energy costs, growing wage pressures and flat-lining productivity. Over the year to the end of August, the manufacturing workforce fell by almost 54,000 - a drop of around 5.4%... In the end, when responding to these challenges, all roads lead to productivity. Right now we are paying for a lack of emphasis and effort given to lifting productivity over many years. … Our mineral resources are a huge advantage for Australia and their exploitation should be embraced. But we run the risk of putting too many eggs in the one basket. We could end up with an economy reliant on the sale of a handful of commodities to a handful of countries. It needs to be remembered that we have had 20 years of virtually uninterrupted economic growth, but only around six of them have been driven by the resources boom. The industries now under stress - manufacturing, education and tourism - were the drivers of the so-called miracle economy of the nineties. … In short, if we are going to adapt our economy to the new realities we need not only to develop our natural resources. We need to keep investing in and developing our skills and capabilities. We need to reinvent existing industries and build new ones. … We also need to take action in a number of critical areas. This includes tax reform, industrial relations, building capabilities, and regulatory reform… The fundamental challenge for us all is to look beyond the boom, to look over the horizon and firmly decide what sort of economy and nation we want to be.

ISSUE 201 OCTOBER 2011 Geelong Business News, an Adcell Print Group publication, is mailed to more than 5000 businesses in the G21 region. If you would like to receive Geelong Business News at your business please contact us. Publisher Maureen Tayler manager Caroline Tayler editor Davina Montgomery editor@geelongbusiness.com.au

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BIZNEWS

5

Building for the future

Cruising towards tourism boost The Victorian Regional Channels Authority has begun investigating options for more cruise ships to visit Geelong, including the identification of a suitable route to the proposed new Yarra Street Pier. City of Greater Geelong Mayor and the holder of the Central Geelong Looking Forward portfolio, Cr John Mitchell, said the work was an important step in the bid to attract more cruise ships to Geelong. "The work the Victorian Regional Channels Authority has begun is an important next step in achieving our twin aims of building Geelong’s appeal as a cruise ship destination and of advocating for State funding for a new Yarra Street Pier,” said Cr Mitchell. The original pier was destroyed by fire in 1988 which has meant Geelong has lacked a publicly owned pier. The Mayor said the Council has been advocating for a State Government contribution to build a new pier that would provide amongst other things a suitable berth for cruise ships. Chief Executive of the Victorian Regional Channels Authority Captain Peter McGovern said the authority was investigating several aspects relevant to the cruise ship project. “The Victorian Regional Channels Authority

is working with the Port Philip Sea Pilots to identify a suitable route for cruise ships to access Yarra Street Pier which would link with the existing Channel,” said Captain McGovern. “At the same time the authority is analysing the seabed in the vicinity of the old Yarra Street Pier and assessing what work might be required to enable cruise ships to berth beside the pier site, to create a turning circle north of the pier and a link to the City Channel,” he said. Two cruise ships will anchor in Corio Bay this summer. The Spirit of Adventure will visit on 20 December 2011 and the Regatta will visit on 12 February 2012. The City of Greater Geelong has received inquiries for three more cruise ships that wish to visit Geelong in the 2013 and 2014 seasons, said Mayor Mitchell. In July this year Minister for Regional Cities, Denis Napthine, announced the Victorian Government would contribute $30,000 towards a business case into attracting cruise ships to Geelong. The City of Greater Geelong, Geelong Otway Tourism and Tourism Victoria have also provided additional funding towards the business case.

Spring Specials

The long-awaited development of a new Geelong Library and Heritage Centre received a major boost last month with granting of $10 million in federal government funding towards the construction of the $45 million project.  Federal Minister for Regional Australia, Simon Crean, made the announcement that funding will be provided to the City of Greater Geelong as part of the first round of the Regional Development Australia Fund (RDAF). “The newly designed facility of 7,000 square metres over six levels will provide a range of facilities including community reading areas, child, youth discovery and multimedia zones, community IT areas, library collections, community meeting rooms, and an auditorium,” Mr Crean said. “It will also strengthen access to information and learning for a projected population of 500,000 by 2059.” The project is expected to create an additional 299 positions during construction and 17 fulltime positions on completion in December 2014. A government statement notes the project is expected to generate $7.46 in economic benefit for every $4.23 invested. 

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6

BIZNEWS

Is Regional Australia worth persisting with? This is the topic of the Sustainable Economic Growth for Regional Australia (SEGRA) think-tank, which will present a stellar line-up of speakers for its annual conference in Geelong, on 25-27 October. Amongst the highlights of the event will be addresses by the Hon. Simon Crean, Minister for Regional Australia, and Senator Barnaby Joyce, Shadow Minister for Regional Australia; Socom Chairman, David Hawkins on How to Get $1 Billion and Your Own Minister; rural entrepreneur Claire Penneceard on the future of regional and rural industries; and the Chief Information Officer from City of Chattanooga in the USA detailing how that city has turned its economy around by taking advantage of high-speed fibre optic technology such as that being rolled out with the NBN. SEGRA is the only national forum dedicated to the conversation about regional Australia and celebrates its 15th year in Geelong, itself a remarkable case

study of regional reinvention.

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“For too long policy frameworks and funding arrangements have been an ad hoc patchwork, preventing regional Australia from realising it’s full potential,” said Ms Kate Charters, SEGRA Convenor. “We believe the National Broadband will present some stunning opportunities for regional Australia. We are also very interested in discussion about the role of regional cities and the investment needed to build a network of cities that can support towns and communities across regional Australia,” said Ms Charters.  Dedicated to vibrant and viable regions, SEGRA seeks to draw the political and public agenda to the pressing issues stressing regional and remote Australia, as well as the raft of opportunities that are embedded in non-metropolitan communities. The full SEGRA conference program is available at www.segra.com.au

McColl's drives home award win McColl’s Transport’s innovative truck Driver Simulator training program has been recognised at the 2011 Australian Freight Industry Awards, taking out the Promotion and Careers category. McColl’s Transport CEO, Simon Thornton, said the win had generated keen interest in the Driver Simulator and its ability to create safer, more fuel efficient driving practices. “Our vision is to be an industry leader in safety management and compliance, so it is rewarding to see our efforts being recognised by our peers in the transport industry,” Mr Thornton said.   McColl’s Transport is one of the first privately owned transport companies in Australia to purchase a truck Driver Simulator. It was launched in February of this year in conjunction with the Victorian Transport Authority (VTA).  The simulator is not only playing a vital role in improving heavy vehicle road safety. Mr Thornton said ‘green’ driving tips acquired through simulator training had also dramatically reduced the fleet fuel bill. “McColl’s spends around $20 million on fuel each year so any savings we can make on our fuel expenditure have a significant impact on our bottom line,” he said. “Equally importantly we’ve been able to reduce our carbon footprint.” More than 200 McColl’s truck drivers have now used the world-class technology following a recent national training tour. Mr Thornton said feedback from drivers had been very positive. “Even those drivers who have been behind the wheel for decades have told us they are learning new skills as result of their simulator training,” he said. “The simulator allows them to practice their reactions to a range of incidents that don’t occur every day, like steer tyre blow outs.”

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BIZNEWS Small business holds a super key The National Institute of Accountants issued a statement last month calling for greater awareness of the integral role small business plays in the national economy, describing the small business sector as ‘a key constituent in policy development’. “However, it is often overlooked by governments when announcing big ticket policies, like the Stronger Super reforms.  Downplaying the role of small business and the impact such changes will have on the sector is of grave concern to the Institute of Public Accountants,” the statement read. The Institute’s chief executive officer, Andrew Conway said, “Minister Shorten has publicly acknowledged the contribution of the big end of town represented by ACCI and the union movement, yet leaves to the end a short statement of being ‘mindful of the implementation’ problems being faced by small business. This is not good enough.  Small business is this nation’s biggest employer yet the administration impact falls squarely on the shoulders of struggling small business.” The Institute stated that the concerns of small business needed to be front of mind to the Government when developing policies, in particular, ones that place an additional administration burden.

Women returning to stores While Australian males are switching to online shopping in ever-increasing droves, their female counterparts appear to be heading back the other way, for a bit more retail therapy. Those are the latest – and most startling – findings of the 2011 Australian survey from the World Internet Project, which point to an intriguing gap opening up between the sexes in shopping habits.

online slightly – but they are clearly purchasing cheaper things and spending less money doing it.” Mr Ewing said explanations could include the famed aversion of the Aussie male to ‘shopping’, or a growing tendency by men to shop for items like gadgets, music, books or movies online.

“It’s quite remarkable; we’re not entirely sure what to make of it yet,” says researcher Scott Ewing of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation (CCI) at the Swinburne Institute. “Between 2007 and 2011, the average bloke increased his online spending by about one third, from $180 a month to $242. Women, on the other hand, actually reduced it from $179 to $165 – which is quite noteworthy when you consider that almost all other Internet data continue to show strong or steady positive growth,” he says. Males also doubled the number of items they bought online from 1.5 a month to 3 - while women showed a much smaller 41 per cent increase, from 1.5 to 2.2. “When we first examined online shopping habits by gender, back in 2007, the two sexes were pretty much identical in amount spent and number of items purchased. By 2009, men were spending 17 per cent more than women on Internet purchases and in our 2011 survey this has grown to 46 per cent. Women have increased the number of items they buy

“It may also be that women are much choosier when shopping, and prefer to examine the item and handle it before buying. Whatever the factors driving it – and there are probably several – it undoubtedly points to trends which both the retail and online sectors will need to take account of in their marketing strategies.” Mr Ewing said CCI would further explore the trend in future surveys. 
The latest results of the survey are contained in a submission to the Productivity Commission inquiry into the retail industry.

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8

COMMENT

The Footy Stimulus Package  It’s been a big year economically for Queensland, especially given the devastation of the floods and the cyclones, not to mention the tragic events in Japan that have affected one of Queensland’s key markets. Fortunately some domestic stimulus spending has helped at state and federal levels. Queensland has also been helped by its overall comparative advantage in being a major mining and agribusiness state, which places it well globally in terms of demand from Asia, Latin America and the emerging markets. However, Queensland has also had some help from an expected quarter. In 2011, we saw the entry of the Gold Coast Suns into the AFL competition. This has now enabled the AFL to grow overall attendances in Queensland from 329,264 in 2010 to 446,769 this year, which has helped overall AFL attendances rise to a record 6,525,071 in home and away matches alone. Even the first week of the finals attracted 270,145 fans. The entry of the Suns means that Queenslanders also have a local rivalry between

Brisbane and the Gold Coast. Whilst not quite matching the epic ‘derby’ in the West between the Sandgroper rivals West Coast Eagles and the Fremantle Dockers, or the ‘showdown’ in South Australia between the Crows and Port, the ‘Q clash’ did draw a record audience for Pay TV, since Foxtel started covering AFL a decade ago, with an average of 345,000 viewers. The presence of the Suns on the Gold Coast has also boosted physical attendances too, with over 130,000 patrons attending games at the Sun’s home at Metricon Stadium. In a bad year for inbound tourism on the Gold Coast, due the floods and the high exchange rate, footy tourism has helped a lot too. The visits of AFL superpowers Collingwood and Geelong to Metricon attracted 6,000 interstate visitors, each helping boost the region in terms of transport and accommodation. Gold Coast tourism will also be boosted by the hosting of the international rules match, where Australia plays Ireland in an amalgam of Aussie Rules and Gaelic football, in which strong crowds are anticipated - given local support for AFL and a strong Irish backpacker presence in Australia

(heightened by some struggling times for the once ‘Celtic Tiger’). The entry of the Gold Coast Suns in 2011 and the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Giants in 2012 has certainly done its bit to boost the contribution that the AFL makes to the domestic Australian economy, which even last year was worth around $3.9 billion. The industry provides over 12,000 jobs and is attracting record memberships, attendances and has been a major boost in an otherwise tough year for domestic tourism. AFL Membership is now at record levels of just over 650,000, there are now a record number of participants in AFL football across the country of more than 780,000; and then there is the recently announced record $1.25 billion broadcast rights deal, which will see the game shown on more platforms to more people across Australia from 2012. What is surprising though, is that even events off the field are now lucrative. For instance, the AFL has announced that the next three national Continued next page

The State of Play for Footy Inc. - the economics of the AFL Australian football as an industry was worth $3.9 billion to the Australian economy in 2010. The industry employs nearly 12,000 jobs. 7.4 million people attended AFL matches in 2010. The total estimated economic contribution of interstate and finals series AFL matches in 2010 was $385.7 million, including $38.2 million for the Grand Final and Grand Final replay. Melbourne hosted 45 interstate and finals matches (including 2 Grand Finals) with a total estimated economic contribution of $157 million.

AFL announced the record $1.25 billion broadcast rights deal, which will see the game shown on more platforms to more people across Australia from 2012. In 2000 AFL Total Revenue was $110 million. In 2010 it was $335 million. In 2000 AFL broadcast revenue was $33.5 million, last year it was $142m. In 2000 AFL sponsorship revenue (excluding clubs) was $12 million. Last year it was $36 million (excluding clubs).

Perth hosted 24 interstate matches with a total estimated economic contribution of $76 million.

In 2010 a record 7.1 people attended AFL matches. The AFL is now the third highest attended sporting competition in the world, behind only the NFL and German Bundesliga - based on average attendances per game.

Adelaide hosted 20 interstate matches with a total estimated economic contribution of $54 million.

The average major sponsor value for AFL in 2010 was $3.1 million. This was up on 2009.

Sydney hosted interstate matches with a total estimated economic contribution of $39 million.

Seven of the top 10 and 12 of top 20 club sponsors across AFL, NRL, ARU and A-League - according to value generated by exposure - were from AFL.

Brisbane hosted interstate matches with a total estimated economic contribution of $31 million.

The top four in order were:

AFL Membership now at record level of just over 650,000.

Emirates (Collingwood) - $6.3 million

Record number of participants in AFL football across the country of more than 780,000.

Aussie (Collingwood) - $5.7m

For the first in VFL/AFL history, six games attract 80,000 people or more during the home and away season.

QBE (Sydney Swans) - $5.3m

Mission Foods (Western Bulldogs) - $5.6m [Source: Street Ryan, Report, Repucom, (courtesy of the AFL).]


COMMENT

9

The economy according to the lipstick index Leonard Lauder, chairman of the board of Estee Lauder, coined the term the lipstick index to explain the increased sales of cosmetics during the early 2000’s recession. Lauder’s claim was that lipstick sales were inversely correlated to economic health and could be used as an economic indicator. His observation was that during times of economic distress, women shift from buying more expensive items, like shoes or a dress, to lipstick and other cheaper cosmetics. The 2009 recession in the US disproved this, with sales falling during the recession and growing during periods of economic growth. Commentators later pointed to the rise of ‘celebrity’ as the driving force behind the heightened focus in 2001 on cosmetics. However, it has been suggested that nail polish could be the new lipstick with sales booming in the midst of the recent economic recession in the US, up 14.3% and the only cosmetic product to post a double-digit increase. While we don’t have the data on nail polish sales during the most recent period of market turmoil here in Australia, let’s have a look at retail growth rate trends in general. CoreData’s analysis on growth in Australia’s retail trade sector shows that since the sharp decline experienced during the GFC and a subsequent bounce in January 2009, the Q3 growth rate is now back at levels not seen since the last quarter of 2008.

Looking at the growth rate from the September 2003 quarter through to the April 2011 quarter, it has been a rocky road for retail over the past eight years. There is a clear downward trend since early 2004, with considerable dips in June 2005, December 2008 and April 2011. Retail sales have continued to fall, with large retailers including JB Hi-Fi and Myer reporting falls in profit mid 2010/11 financial year and David Jones announcing a 10.3% decline in sales in the fourth quarter of 2011. David Jones attributed this sales fall to turmoil in the Australian financial marketplace and a continuing decline in consumer confidence. Unfortunately, the bad news continued for retailers in 2011, with CoreData’s latest investor sentiment index for Q3 plummeting 34% since Q2 on the back of concerns over the US and European debt crises. The question remains over what extent this decline in retail growth is due to Australian consumers’ spending less versus the recent increase in online offshore shopping, which has been attributed to Australia’s strong dollar, the ease of shopping on mobile devices and the prevalence of these devices, increased awareness of shopping online and improvements in the online shopping experience. [The articles on this and the facing page come from the insightful minds at burning-pants.com. Burning Pants is a product of CoreData.]

Continued from previous page drafts from 2012 will be held on the Gold Coast. In 2010, the hosting of the national draft was worth $10 million in media coverage alone to the Gold Coast, in an industry where there are three times the numbers of media representatives than the press gallery in Canberra! No wonder the competition to attract sports events has almost become a bodycontact sport between states!

in 2012 will be very exciting for AFL followers in Sydney, NSW and the ACT. There will the excitement of having a new team, a new club facility at Blacktown and a bunch of talented youngsters inspiring the locals in the vast area of western Sydney and beyond.

For example, even the hosting of the Brownlow medal is now worth bidding for. Victorian Premier Ted Baillieu had to dig deep to keep the traditional AFL night of nights at the Crown Casino in Melbourne, after a strong push to bring the iconic event to Sydney.

There has also been a real buzz about the ‘Sheedy effect’ that has been building economically in both corporate and media circles in Sydney and nationally. Kevin Sheedy, the inaugural GWS coach, apart from being a legendary premiership player and coach, is well known for his media presence, lateral thinking and passion for the game at national and international levels.

But Premier Baillieu hasn’t managed to keep everything out of New South Wales, as this year, after the finals series, NSW will be hosting the draft in Western Sydney to highlight the entry of the GWS Giants in 2012. Of course, GWS entry

Sheedy has been anywhere and everywhere in the Sydney media and on November 3, is even fronting a headline business event for the Australian China Business Council to talk about Australia’s business, cultural and sporting links

with our number one trading partner. With Sheedy in town, I anticipate a lot of interest in the GWS and AFL from corporate and diplomatic circles in Australia’s international business capital. We know that in the history of our federation, State Premiers fight tooth and nail at Premiers’ conferences (or Council of Australian Governments or COAG meetings, as they are now called). So it looks like major events in the great Australian game are now going to be keenly contested by our political leaders from coast to coast in the interests on getting their fiscal share of the footy stimulus.

Tim Harcourt is the Chief Economist at the Australian Trade Commission (Austrade)


10

APPOINTMENTS Creative

Legal

The Adcell Group welcomes back Justin Abrams to our team. Justin oversees the overall creative direction of the business. With over eighteen years industry experience, Justin has worked for such companies as AFL Publishing, Quiksilver and successfully started Red Onion Creative (A division of the Adcell Group). Justin has extensive industry experience and holds qualifications in advertising/ marketing and graphic design.

Tom Lynch joined Coulter Roache Lawyers  litigation team in September 2011. Since being admitted to practice in 2008, Tom has gained considerable experience in both commercial litigation and criminal law. Tom regularly appears in court for his clients. He has appeared in courts in Victoria, NSW, ACT and in the Federal jurisdiction, providing him with an in depth understanding of court practice and procedure.

Human Resources

Wine

Stephen Filby commenced with Gforce as the Regional Manager: Work, Health & Safety in August. Stephen was previously employed by the SKILLED Group’s Maintenance, Projects and Shutdown division over the past 12 years in various Senior Occupational, Health and Safety roles as well as 20 years experience in the Engineering and Manufacturing industry.

Leura Park Estate delighted to welcome Darren Burke to the winemaking team. Darren has been the driving force behind the creation of a plethora of fine, multiple award-winning wines for wineries across Australia including the Western Australian Frankland River region, the Barossa Valley and Geelong. Darren’s impressive career has also included time as Assistant Winemaker in Tuscany, Italy.

Human Resources

Human Resources

AGB is very pleased to announce the appointment of Maryanne Baljak as Student Administration Officer. Maryanne brings over 10 years case management and customer service experience from the employment industry into her role. In her new position, Maryanne assists clients in selecting the most appropriate course/s to suit their needs and helps them through the enrolment process.

Katie Kirsopp has recently joined the team at AGB group as a business development representative. Katie has worked in Job Services Australia and Private Recruitment Business Development where she has managed to build strong relationships with local businesses. Working for both the YCM and HR division of AGB group she will be continuing to build and grow client relationships in the Geelong area.

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APPOINTMENTS

11

Real Estate

Community Services

Kristy Larkins first commenced her career in Real Estate in Commercial and Industrial Real Estate and went on to work in Commercial Sales, Leasing and Property Management while studying to become a fully-licensed agent. After taking time out to start a family, Kristy is enthusiastically returning to the industry. Kristy’s honesty, integrity and commitment are welcome additions to the Ray White Geelong West team.

April Grenfell has joined Gateways Support Services as Promotions and Fundraising Officer. April is a journalist with experience writing for a number of newspapers in Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland. She has also worked in media and communications for the corporate sector. April is looking forward to her role at Gateways and working on their major campaign, The Brighter Futures Fundraising Appeal.

Real Estate

Community Services

With more than 20 years of extensive real estate experience, Michael Kerr has joined Ray White Geelong West. Combining his vast real estate knowledge in the established market with major residential subdivisions and commitment to the local builders is a vital link in his business. Complimented by a banking background, Michael is readily aware of buyer’s demands.

Dawn Condon has recently joined Gateways Support Services as a Human Resources Officer. Dawn is an experienced Human Resource Generalist. Dawn has previously worked in Local Government and the Education Sector in the UK. This is Dawn’s first role in the not for profit sector and she is excited to be involved in helping to shape Gateways’ future.

Human Resources

Education

Your Complete Management is very pleased to announce the appointment of Wally Rickard to the role of OH&S Consultant. In this role Wally will assist our clients to ensure their compliance to the new government standards and continued safety of all of their workers, thus ensuring no fines for the business. Wally has 40 years of experience within the food manufacturing industry

Bill Hartshorne has joined The Gordon as Business Development Manager for their Smart Technologies Enterprise. With a double degree in Marketing and Human Resources, Bill brings strong business development, relationship building, project and contract management capabilities to the role having worked most recently as a Business Development Consultant for Workskil.


12

COMPETITION

What a way to spend a weekend! What does the combination of 200 wonderful wines from 25 superb wineries, mouthwatering food and live music all spread over two days add up to? One fantastic weekend! This year, Geelong’s food, wine and music festival will be bigger and better than ever, as Toast to the Coast returns for its 10th anniversary. And this month, you have another chance to win double passes to the event. For your chance to win, simply enter your details on the competition page of our website at www.adcellgroup.com.au. Geelong Winegrowers Association (GWA) marketing executive Lyndsay Sharp said Toast to the Coast, held Melbourne Cup weekend – 29th and 30th October - had evolved into a premium event for the Geelong region and a highlight of the Victorian major event’s calendar. Mrs Sharp said Toast patrons would get the opportunity to sample and enjoy rare back vintages, vertical tastings as well as eagerly anticipated new releases, including some of the intriguing new and emerging alternative wine varietals emanating from our region and contributing to Geelong’s status as a dynamic and innovative winemaking force. Trevor Cooke Photography

Entry to all Toast to the Coast venues is free and a $30 ticket provides patrons with a tasting glass – an unlimited passport to wine tastings across all venues for the weekend. Tickets, programs, maps and bus schedules available at www.toasttothecoast.com.au.

This month we will take an indepth look at this premier event in our cover story. Read on, wine lovers all.


COMPETITION

13

Beauty and grace in a full arena spectacular

This October, lose yourself in all the colour, skill and grace of El Caballo Blanco: The Dance of the White Stallions as the magnificent white stallions of Spain dance their way to Geelong in a true arena spectacular. To win a family pass of four tickets to the show at 2pm on October 15, simply enter your details on the competition page of our website, www. adcellgroup.com.au. The show is led by world-renowned riding master Rene Gasser who, with the experiences of seven generations, has recreated an event only previously seen at the famous riding schools in Vienna and Spain. The horses of Spain are some of the most celebrated in history, favoured for centuries by European royalty, equestrian riders and bullfighters and this performance will celebrate the tradition, athleticism and grace of these revered creatures. Along with the magnificent stallions, Spanish flamenco dancers will feature in authentic vibrant costumes accompanied by the mellow notes of a guitar to bring the sights and sounds of Spain a heartbeat away.

In the south of Spain, the tradition of flamenco dancing is rivalled only by the tradition of breeding fine Spanish horses and Rene Gasser says the breeds have been featured in portraits with European royalty, used in multiple movies and are extremely popular among riders. El Caballo Blanco: The Dance of the White Stallions will feature a number of performances involving the Andalusian, Friesian, Lipizzaner and Arabian breeds and the event is dedicated to showing off the amazing beauty and manoeuvres these horses are capable of. "We're going to have horses dancing alongside some tremendous flamenco dancers, and I think people are really going to be excited about watching this," Rene says.

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Saturday 15 October at 2:00pm & 7:30pm Ticket sales: Ticketek, 13 28 49 www.ticketek.com.au Booking details and information visit - www.elcaballoblanco.com.au

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16

COVER STORY


COVER STORY

17


18

COVER STORY

Great Geelong Wine Pour In an extended celebration of our region’s fantastic

Black Bull Tapas Bar & Restaurant, Geelong Cafe Botticelli, Geelong West

wines, throughout October and November local

Cafe Silk, Geelong

restaurants will showcase premium Geelong wines

Chris's Beacon Point, Apollo Bay

by putting them 'on the pour’ - selling them by the

Clyde Park Vineyard & Bistro, Bannockburn

glass to patrons. It's a great way for foodies and wine lovers to sample a range of award winning wines from our highly rated wineries located

Elephant and Castle Hotel, Geelong Elkhorn Roadhouse, Wallington

across the Bellarine, Moorabool Valley and Surf

Empire Grill, Geelong

Coast sub regions. 



Jack Rabbit Vineyard, Bellarine

The Great Geelong Wine Pour runs throughout

Mr Hyde, Geelong

Geelong’s festive period, which includes the AFL

Oakdene Vineyards Restaurant & Cellar Door,

Finals, Geelong Cup, Toast to the Coast wine and

Wallington

food festival, and the pre-Christmas celebration ‘crescendo’ period. 

 Participating restaurants in the 2011 Great Geelong Wine Pour: 2 Faces Restaurant, Geelong Alto Cucina Lounge & Bar, Highton Athelstane House, Queenscliff

Parkers Steakhouse, Geelong Sandstone Cafe, Grovedale Scorched, Torquay The Dive Bar & Coffee House, Geelong Vue Grand Hotel, Queenscliff Waterfront Restaurant & Bar at Four Points by

Baveras, Geelong

Sheraton, Geelong

Bellarine Estate, Bellarine

Winchelsea Larder, Winchelsea




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20

FEATURE

Keeping local kids active and healthy resulted from their participation and draws key developmental learning back into classroom settings and into their lives”. It seems to be working in Geelong, with students and teachers participating in a pilot programme in the northern suburbs, enthusiastically supporting the Bluearth Approach. Students report that they feel “calmer”, “know more about persistence”, “remember things better” and enjoy working as part of a team in a non-competive environment. “The diversity of the activities allows children to participate, challenge themselves, set goals and reflect upon what they’ve achieved, “ says a coordinator at a Lara primary school. More than 1200 students from 11 northern suburbs’ primary schools will get active and help to ward off the diseases of a sedentary lifestyle as Shell Refinery Geelong and the Bluearth Foundation work together over the next three years to deliver the renowned Bluearth Approach physical activity programme. The programme, which has been running since 2002, has been delivered to children in over 1,000 Australian schools and is currently operating in 236 schools Australia wide. Its aim is to engage children in movement and help them develop a lifelong love of activity. Participation in the programme has been shown to improve health, behaviour, selfesteem, confidence and academic performance.

According to Bluearth, over the last 20 years Australians’ level of daily physical activity has dropped and our sedentary lifeystyles contribute to a range of health concerns such as poor cardiovascular health, cancer, diabetes and mental health.

“Since becoming involved in Bluearth at the start of 2011, we have watched children who may not usually participate and ‘succeed’ in physical activity become active. Children and staff are energised by the sessions; they leave with smiles on their faces.”

In particular, the level of physical activity in primary school children has decreased, with up to 75% of children not getting the recommended minimum time of daily activity.

A major aspect of the programme is having professional coaches train and accredit teachers to lead the Bluearth Approach, meaning schools can continue to offer the program once funding support concludes.

The Bluearth Approach hopes to change this disturbing trend “by using movement, motivation and learning to support, encourage, enable and challenge active living. This not only teaches children the enjoyment and fun of being physically active, it also draws on their feelings, reactions and thoughts that

Speaking at the Geelong launch of the programme in July, Professor Richard (Dick) Telford, Research Director of the LOOK (Lifestyles of our Kids) Project, said Australian and international research revealed physical activity programmes such as Bluearth were important because of the intimate relationship

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FEATURE

21

physical activity and its link to wellbeing in school aged children. Today, Bluearth has 45 coaches teaching the Bluearth Approach in schools and communities throughout Australia, and approximately 20,000 students will participate in 2011. Part of Shell’s involvement with the Bluearth Approach will be to help expand the programme in Geelong and there is room for other businesses and organisations to be involved as well, with opportunities to sponsor a local school in delivering the programme or to make a fully tax-deductible donation. To find out more, visit www.bluearth.org between the developing body and mind of every child. “Well designed physical activities programmes not only benefit the physical health of children, but can help children feel better about themselves generally and assist with learning processes in the classroom,” he said. Speaking at the launch, Acting CEO of the Bluearth Foundation, Richard Corbet, said the not for profit organisation is delighted to link with Shell in delivering the Bluearth Approach. “Affiliations such as this ensure that young people in Geelong are getting active, helping prevent the effects of disease which can occur from a sedentary lifestyle. It also enables them to develop skills including teamwork, concentration, self-confidence and selfawareness, all of which can be taken back and applied within the classroom,” he said. Shell Geelong Refinery General Manager, Mark Schubert, said Shell was attracted to the

programme due to the clear links the Bluearth Approach has in improving education outcomes. “The results of the Bluearth pilot programme Shell supported in two local schools were astounding, with 88% of teachers reporting Bluearth had a positive impact on students’ academic performance and 100% reporting an increase in students’ self-perception and positive behaviour,” said Mark. “These pilot results, coupled with the preliminary findings of Professor Telford’s research, convinced us to increase our support significantly.” The Bluearth Foundation was established in 2000 by Australian businessman and philanthropist Malcolm Freake. Concerned by the long-term health effects of sedentary lifestyles, he gathered together experts in human movement, education, psychology, elite sport and health to discuss the need for

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22

SMALL BIZ

Are we at generation Z yet? With all these names and numbers it gets confusing to know what to call the different age groups. When I first started in business in the 1970 it was called a chaotic age, because the normal and dependable marketing rules had less and less effect. People were unable to predict the business future. The business dudes were claiming that the world had become chaotic and were preaching gloom, doom and the end of the known world. Of course, we can look back with the power of hindsight and see that it was a generational shift mixed with the early stage of globalisation. The turmoil was an artefact of the new rules still being sorted and stabilising. Now we are seeing this happening again. Today, the chaos in the market is similar to the 1970’s but more extreme. The boomers are backing out of the business world; global competition is a reality; technology is morphing; and the centre of the economic world as we know it - the US economy - is very shaky. There are three major reactions to this confluence of tides. There is the group of businesses who have been to the Tony school of the sky is falling down and are seen running around in ever decreasing circles with loud and strident voices predicting the end of the world - they see a dark future. There is the group who can’t cope and will be soon burying their heads in the sand and pretending that they are bicycle racks. And finally, there are the ones who actively embrace change and with a big slab of optimism are grabbing the opportunities. We have a fine example of one of the latter group of businesses that is happily right in the thick of the ever-changing world. ‘Hotshots’ is a skirmish field – paintball. Surrounded by rolling hills and hidden amongst the rocky outcrops of Anakie is one of the largest and most exciting paintball fields in Australia. Mel and Steve Cauchi, the owners, are busy people. An hour with them is exhausting as they tell you their plans – lots of plans. Each of these projects is being actualized and is underway. I imagine that time spent with Walt Disney would have been as exciting. Mel and Steve have a vision. A big and bold vision and they are step by step making it happen. A few years back, in the time of the first Global Financial Confusion, Steve looked at businesses that were tumbling and locked into a death spiral and realised that many of these businesses had been successful but had codified systems. Perhaps their attempt through these tied down systems was to lock in efficiency, but the net effect was to lock out flexibility and adaptability. Mel and Steve, who are regular world travellers, saw that some

businesses were grasping the opportunities and adapting to the new world order. Money was not destroyed in the GFC, but it rapidly shifted to different businesses, different people and different countries. Their overseas observations lead them to bring the lessons back home and make substantial change in their business. They energetically threw three things out the window: the status quo, fear of the world economic meltdown, and the attitude of “don’t fix it if it ain’t broke”. The internet has bought the world into the lounge room and office of almost every Australian. We know what businesses in Germany, Japan and Brazil are offering. We won’t settle for the tired offerings of our local businesses. We know some fantastic products are being produced in South Africa, and have a YouTube of a training program in British Columbia. We aren’t fooled by the lazy businesses that have had it easy for decades in regional Australia. We live in a big wonderful world of opportunity – either learn to play on the world stage or get out. It sounds cruel, but it is the truth. Customer power has never been greater. But you know, the reverse is also true. Some businesses that can’t embrace change are crying foul and demanding that the government protects them; marching to the inevitable wall with the mantra of “jobs will go, if you don’t prop up our inefficient businesses”. Back to Steve and Mel… The clients of today are more like an audience demanding that a business must entertain them or else. Or else they will leave and take their purchases elsewhere; they know from their research the vast array of options; they keep informed by Twitter and MMS about the alternatives; they collect reviews from Facebook. Mel and Steve were recently successful in getting a government grant not to shore-up a weak business, but to accelerate their fantastic

business and support them to become a world leader. Their logic in this is simple. Why would customers who have a vast sea of alternatives choose a tired business that is propped up with assistance, or why would a customer even choose an ordinary business, when they could go to a world leading business? Lead the world or struggle. As an example of the direction these guys are going – soon they will commence construction of two new fields. One is to emulate Egypt complete with a pyramid or two - and the other is to recreate the pacific theatre. Steve and Mel bought many of the props from the movie Pacific that was shot locally. Landing craft and things that look like tanks and a beachfront will provide a re-enactment of Saving Private Ryan. These changes are bold, but necessary to ensure that these generation Z customers are excited by the facility. Hotshots already use multi-platform marketing (Facebook and the other things) so, with the addition of interactive customer experience, they are at the cutting edge. The proof is the international attention that they have gained. There are not many Geelong businesses that are attracting patronage from the USA at the level that Hotshots is doing. This is an excellent achievement – but Mel and Steve have only just started. You might get the picture that I think that Mel and Steve are great business operators, but the magic here is the way that they have embraced the various generations. They plan the activities and market to match the vastly different expectations for each of their market segments. A common economic term being used is the “two speed economy”; Mel and Steve have learnt to play on the high side and they are having fun! Clint Jennings Australian Business Development Centre www.abdc.com.au


VECCI

23

The tourists, a visiting they will come… After a successful inaugural event last year, Victoria Tourism Week was again held this year, from September 5-10. Victoria Tourism Week, a joint initiative between industry organisations Victoria Tourism Industry Council (VTIC) and Destination Melbourne, featured events throughout the state for tourism operators, industry employees and the public, including forums, workshops, information exchanges and open days at Visitor Information Centres. All events are designed to show Victorians the economic and social value of the industry. The showcase of year’s event was a three day Tourism and Events Excellence Conference held at the MCG. Over the three days, around 200 delegates heard from industry leaders, policy makers and thought leaders on the current state of the tourism and events industry, future challenges and the way forward. The message from Chris Richardson of Deloitte Access Economics was, it won’t get better overnight for the tourism industry… but it will get better. It seems that China is the catch-cry of the tourism industry at the moment. There has been much talk about the burgeoning markets of China and one could be forgiven for thinking that the Chinese market will be the silver bullet that is the answer to the tourism industry’s woes. As it turns out, it may well be – but according to Richardson, we’ll have to wait a while. The rise and rise of China is being closely observed with great interest around the globe. Mass urbanisation and industrialisation in China (part and parcel of Australia’s mining

boom) is stimulating growth of the Chinese middle-class and thus increasing the travel potential of the Chinese markets. According to futurist, Daniel Levine of the Avant-Guide Institute, travel is just one way that the ‘newly rich’ Chinese signify their recently acquired wealth. Levine also notes that travel is one way for members of this new generation of middle class to see and learn what ‘being middle class’ is all about. The Aussie mining boom has been created by the industrial revolution taking place in China. More importantly for the tourism sector, it is also responsible for the high Aussie dollar that is currently inflicting exchange rate pain on the Australian tourism industry. It really is a case of short term pain for long term gain. But when will we see the real impacts? The Chinese markets loom like a huge wave making its way to our shores. When will it crest, break and finally reach our beaches? Tourism Australia’s China 2020 Strategic Plan gives us a clue. But for tourism operators currently suffering from exchange rate pressures, slow domestic visitation and low consumer confidence, this timeframe is too long. Encouragingly, we are already seeing significant increases in Chinese market visitation and certainly their expenditure already exceeds that of our traditional markets – the United Kingdom, New Zealand and the United States. But most commentators agree – we ain’t seen nothin’ yet. If one looks at the industry as it stands now, it’s fair to say we are not yet fully ready for the

onslaught of visitation from China and other Chinese markets. So the notion of the long slow rise of China could actually work in our favour, giving us the time we need to refresh existing product, innovate and create new product, acquire the appropriate language and crosscultural communication skills and learn the needs and expectations of visitors from the Chinese markets. This is a key learning point imparted by keynote speaker Bernie Brookes, CEO of Myer. Mr Brookes demonstrated how investment in Myer when it was arguably at its lowest point helped to position the company so that it was ready to pounce and capitalise when the economy picked up. He also emphasised that investment in people – often cheaper than investing in infrastructure – and an unwavering focus on improving the customer experience is paying dividends now.  The tourism industry could certainly do worse than take a leaf out of Myer’s book.

James Gulli VECCI Regional Manager South West region


Notice the difference a NOT FOR PROFIT financial service provider can make to Geelong and surrounds, their families & friends. The Australian Public Service Benevolent Society (APS Benefits) is a not for profit organisation that provides a wide range of financial services to all government departments, their families and friends. Having been in existence for over 105 years, the APS family has earned the trust of over 27,000 members offering the following financial services listed below: APS Tax & Accounting Alfred Mallia at APS Tax, Accounting and Business Services has 24 years’ experience. Whether it is setting up a business, managing your superannuation fund or just obtaining better service and lower fees, Alfred can help you. APS Financial Planning Timothy Foster provides access to advice and information on the important financial decisions we all face, whether it be superannuation, investments, pre and post retirement planning, life insurance, gearing, managed funds or savings plans. APS Mortgage Broking Sam Athans treats every mortgage as if it were his own. He has access to 20 mortgage lenders and over 40 years’ experience in banking. APS Insurance (General Insurance Broking) Danielle Rowe heads up our insurance broking team and is a salaried employee of APS Benefits. With 15 years experience in the industry, you can be assured of receiving unbiased advice that meets your insurance needs. We have access to products that include Home and Contents, Motor Vehicle, Boat/Caravan, Landlord, Public Liability, Income Protection, Life, Disability & Trauma insurance. The next time you receive your insurance renewal notice from your current insurer or want insurance for the first time, call Danielle on 1300 131 809. APS Personal Loans The APS Benefits’ personal loans team can assist members to obtain an unsecured loan, or they can apply online at www.apsbs.com.au. Either way, loans can be approved within 24 hours. APS Funeral Cover APS Benefits’ Membership Coordinator Jesse Clarke can assist members to gain immediate funeral cover up to $15,000 and protect their loved ones in times of need. Do you have cover in the greatest time of need? Call us on 1300 131 809. Independence is important to APS. Our key advisors are employees of APS, and therefore have no personal bias towards any supplier. Further to this, APS is owned by its members, so any profits are channelled back to members. APS would also like to assist you and your family and friends in making available our wide range of not for profit services. Help spread the word by introducing new members and APS will send you, your nominated charity or your staff social club $50 for each new member you nominate.

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TAX

25

Research & development claims post 1 July Investing in research and development (R&D) can increase returns for your business and create a competitive advantage for Australia. The R&D tax concession has been in place for over 20 years. Despite this, many organisations still misunderstand the breadth of R&D activity eligible for this tax concession. After repeated delays, the new R&D Tax Incentive finally received Royal Assent in September 2011. The new R&D program applies from 1 July 2011. Broadly, a refundable tax offset based on 45% of eligible expenditure will be available for entities with an aggregated turnover of less than $20 million. A 40% non-refundable tax offset will be available for all other R&D entities. The following example taken from the Explanatory Memorandum highlights the improved assistance that may be available to innovative SME companies under the new incentive: NuStart Enterprises produces organic fertilisers. The company has an annual turnover of $10 million, but is currently in a tax loss situation. The company incurs $1 million of expenditure on eligible R&D activities in 2010-11. Under the old law, NuStart would only have been able to claim the 125% R&D Tax Concession on its expenditure, allowing it to add $375,000 to its tax loss: $1,000,000 x 125% x 30% = $375,000 The potential benefit of this tax deduction will only be enjoyed when the company has sufficient profits to start paying income tax. Under the new R&D Tax Incentive, the company will be able to receive a refund of $450,000 when it lodges its tax return for the income year: $1,000,000 x 45% = $450,000 The definition of R&D activities has also been amended to provide a more targeted (i.e. restricted) definition under the new R&D Tax Incentive. R&D activities are separated into two categories, being core R&D activities and supporting R&D activities. A Clearer But Tighter Definition of Core R&D Activities The revised definition of core R&D that requires that you need to be seeking new information (to solve a problem, develop a new product or improve a process) and that you need to perform an experiment to uncover that knowledge. To qualify as core R&D, the experimental activities must use the ‘scientific method’. This method will employ a systematic progression of work based on scientific principals and using an approach that proceeds from hypothesis to experiment, observation and

multinational companies carrying out contract R&D on behalf of a foreign parent. Many organisations still misunderstand the breadth of R&D activity eligible for this tax concession. After repeated delays, the new R&D Tax Incentive finally received Royal Assent in September 2011. The new R&D program applies from 1 July 2011.

evaluation and leads to logical conclusions. By requiring both innovation and significant technical risk for an activity to be eligible, the proposed amendment tightens the eligibility criteria.

Documentation Whilst R&D plans are no longer formally required under the new R&D Tax Incentive, a company’s business records must be sufficient to verify the nature of the business activities, the amount of expenditure incurred on R&D activities and the relationship between the expenditure and the R&D activities. Like the previous R&D Tax Concession, companies will be required to register annually with Innovation Australia before being able to claim the tax offset.

Supporting R & D Activities Supporting activities are activities directly related to core R&D activities. A new requirement is that certain supporting activities can only qualify as R&D activities if they are undertaken for the dominant purpose of supporting core R&D activities. No Cap There is no upper limit on the expenditure that may be incurred by companies in order to claim the tax offset, provided the expenditure and activities meet the eligibility requirements. Software Research & Development Changes Other welcome changes to the R&D tax incentive from 1 July 2011 include the relaxation of rules relating to R&D claims for software development, and the repeal of the rule requiring resultant intellectual property to be held in Australia. These changes will result in significant new benefits for in-house and commercial software development companies, as well as for the Australian subsidiaries of

Wendy Maloney, Principal, WHK Geelong Office


A $30 Tasting Pass (includes your commemorative Geelong Wine tasting glass valued at $10) is your passport to enjoy wine tastings from all participating wineries across the whole weekend!

Geelong Wine provides a range of ways for you to safely ‘toast’ during the festival weekend. Toast to th e Coast Shuttl e Bus Toast to the Coast shuttle buses will run from Geelong Railway station to the Moorabool Valley, Surf Coast and The Bellarine. Shuttle buses will make regular loops around each sub region. Hop on & off in safety and style as you tour the wineries with ease. We’ll also be providing a drop off service to Geelong Railway Station – be sure to be at your final pick up point on time to catch a bus!

More than 200 wines… new releases, award winners, rare back vintages… Live music, local produce, entertainment, cooking demonstrations and much more… To book festival tickets, read more about shuttle buses and for Toast updates, visit the website at

www.toasttothecoast.com.au

For timetables and booking details www.toasttothecoast.com.au Limited seats available. Privat e Tours

Geelong Winegrowers Association thanks our wonderful Toast to the Coast 10th Anniversary sponsors

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1 Austins Austins Wines Wines

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3 del del Rios Rios of Mt of Mt Anakie Anakie Winery Winery

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2290 Ballan 2290 Ballan Road,Road, Anakie Anakie

520 Great 520 Great OceanOcean Road,Road, Bellbrae Bellbrae

10am 10am – 6pm– 6pm

10.30am 10.30am – 5.30pm – 5.30pm

10am 10am – 5pm– 5pm

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2270 Po 22 10am 10 –4

W i nW E G u EG sT u EWs iTn W E Ri n i EEsR i E s Experien Ex Experience Experience a Spanish a Spanish fiesta fiesta weekend weekend of wine, of wine, food and foodlive and live • Barwon • Barwon RidgeRidge Toast to To music.music. Located Located at the at delthe Rios delof Rios Mt of Anakie Mt Anakie winerywinery and cellar and cellar • Dinny • Dinny Goonan Goonan WinesWines W i nW E inE Locally Loi door where door where the family the family philosophy philosophy of great of wine, great wine, food and foodfriends and friends• Gosling • Gosling Creek Creek matched m Now in Now our in 5th our year, 5thAustins, year, Austins, with our with guest our guest winerywinery Darriwill Darriwill comescomes together together in a wonderful in a wonderful settingsetting only 20 only minutes 20 minutes drive from drive from• Waybourne • Waybourne Winery Winery Geelong. Relax Relax and indulge and indulge with fabulous with fabulous sweeping sweeping views views to the to the Farm,Farm, have stepped have stepped it up aitnotch. up a notch. Saturday Saturday 29th October 29th October is full is full Geelong. F O O FDO W i n W E i n E You Yangs You Yangs and Geelong and Geelong while while enjoying enjoying our many our many awardaward winning winning of tutored of tutored wine tastings, wine tastings, special special guestsguests and good and food. good food. Locally Lo Bellbrae Bellbrae EstateEstate & Longboard & Longboard wineswines reflectreflect the cool themaritime cool maritime wines.wines. F O O FDO O D climate climate of the of surf thecoast surf coast and surf andculture surf culture for which for which it is famous. it is famous. F u n F u F O O FDO O D • Saturday • Saturday – Gourmet – Gourmet Local Local LambLamb rolls with rollscondiments with condiments by by • Local • Contemporary Contemporary wineswines styledstyled to compliment to compliment fine food fineand foodtoand to • The•menu The menu will include will include delicious delicious Spanish Spanish paellapaella and tapas. and tapas. Darriwill Darriwill Farm.Farm. Frenc emulate emulate the ‘life theon‘life theon beach’ the beach’ philosophy philosophy that inspires that inspires them. them. • Bookings • Bookings required required for restaurant. for restaurant. • Maste • • Sunday • Sunday – Gourmet – Gourmet BBQ with BBQmany with many delicious delicious options options for food for food • Lamb Join us Join at Bellbrae us at Bellbrae EstateEstate on Toast on Toast to the to Coast the Coast weekend weekend for for • Lamb spit roast spit also roastavailable also available on decking on decking area. area. from our from Farmers our Farmers Market. Market. delicious delicious wine, wine, a tastyaarray tasty of array local ofproduce, local produce, live music live music & great & great Winem F u nF u n • A Pet • company! company! F u nF u n • Latin • band Latin and bandsalsa and dancing salsa dancing on Sunday on Sunday only 1-4pm. only 1-4pm. grabs F O O FDO O D • Serenity • Serenity Childrens Childrens Animal Animal Farm,Farm, band, band, helicopter helicopter rides. rides. Designa De • Sunday: • Sunday: The Farmer’s The Farmer’s Market Market is full is of full festivities of festivities for all for theall the • A tasty • Aarray tasty of array local ofproduce, local produce, 12 – 4pm 12 – 4pm 4 4 VirginVi F family,family, very much very much a weekend a weekend festival! festival! F u nF u n 74 Burrows 74 Burrows Road,Road, Lethbridge Lethbridge Designated Designated DriverDriver – one –complimentary one complimentary tea, coffee tea, coffee or softordrink. soft drink. • Live• music, Live music, 1 – 4pm 1 – 4pm 9 9 10am 10am – 4pm– 4pm Designated Designated DriverDriver - One -complimentary One complimentary tea, coffee tea, coffee or softordrink. soft drink.1400 Po 14 W i nW E inE • Darriwill • Darriwill Farm Farm – local–produce local produce

Lethbridge Lethbridge Wines Wines

Le

2

2 Clyde Clyde Park Park Vineyard Vineyard & Bistro & Bistro

10am 10 –6 If wineIfis wine yourispassion your passion then Lethbridge then Lethbridge WinesWines shouldshould be your be your 7 7 G u EG s destination. destination. 2010 winners 2010 winners of the of Best theWine Best at Wine Geelong at Geelong Wine Wine 10am 10am – 5pm– 5pm Show Show and finalist and finalist in the in Australian the Australian Gourmet Gourmet Traveller Traveller Winemaker Winemaker • Barrg • 125 Larcombes 125 Larcombes Road,Road, Modewarre Modewarre of the of Year the Award Year Award 2009. 2009. At Lethbridge At Lethbridge Wines Wines you will you have will a have a • Curlew • W i nW E inE – 4pm– 4pm wine focused wine focused experience experience wherewhere you can youmeet can the meet winemaker, the winemaker, 11am 11am • Fines • Wine tasting Wine tasting with resident with resident experts experts DavidDavid William William Duffy Duffy and Terry and Terry are you looking are looking to get to offget theoff beaten the beaten track, track, a visitatovisit Brown to Brown participate participate in a vertical in a vertical tastingtasting or justor taste just our taste award our award winning winning If you If • Jack •R Jongebloed. Jongebloed. Toast Toast to the to Coast the Coast CellarCellar door specials door specials available. available. wineswines Magpie Magpie WinesWines is justis the just thing. the thing. Our vineyard Our vineyard is nestled is nestled in the in the matched matched with Meredith with Meredith Dairy Dairy Cheese Cheese and Antipasto and Antipasto • Ponda • platters. platters. Surf Coast Surf Coast Hinterland Hinterland just a just few a minutes few minutes from the from pretty the pretty township township ThreeThree Troopers Troopers Tasting Tasting Table Table – The –full The range full range of the of local the local • Waya • of Moriac. of Moriac. Try our Try wines, our wines, warm warm yourselves yourselves near the near wood the wood fire fire (Beaufort) (Beaufort) micro-brewery; micro-brewery; Pilsner, Pilsner, Pale Ale, PaleAmber Ale, Amber Ale onAle on F O O FDO O D W i nW E oven, oven, enjoy enjoy a sausage a sausage and listen and listen to great to music. great music. tastingtasting and sales and with salesexpert with expert commentary commentary by brewer by brewer and owner and owner • Meredith • Meredith Dairy Dairy Cheese Cheese and Antipasto and Antipasto Platters Platters New rel Ne Marion Marion Troop.Troop. W i n W E i n E Designated Designated DriverDriver – One –complimentary One complimentary soft drink soft or drink espresso. or espresso. Australi Au F O O FDO O D Full tasting Full tasting of wines of wines including including past vintages past vintages Six wond Six • Clyde • Clyde Park Regional Park Regional menu menu – Owner – Owner and Chef andSue Chefand Sueher and her F O O FDO O D 5 5 F O O FDO team in team the in kitchen the kitchen will source will source the best theinbest local inproduce local produce to to • Sausage • Sausage sizzle sizzle 37 Spiller 37 Spiller Road,Road, Lethbridge Lethbridge Delectib De produce produce the rich, thehome rich, home style menu. style menu. • Wood • Wood fire cooking fire cooking demonstration demonstration • Stunn • 10am 10am – 6pm – 6pm • Artesian • Artesian BreadBread – Bread – Bread produced produced from grape from grape skin cultured skin cultured F u nF u n • Brillia • W i nW E inE yeast.yeast. Chard • Saturday • Saturday - Jason - Jason CoghillCoghill from Jfrom Band J Band • Tasting • Tasting of Istra ofMeats Istra Meats Small Small goodsgoods Experience Experience excellent excellent awardaward winning winning wine and winequality and quality olive olive • Sunday - Guthrie - Guthrie Pastiche, Pastiche, acoustic acoustic artist from artistthe from Surf theCoast Surf Coast • Salt•& • International • International Cheese Cheese Tasting Tasting including including local favourite local favourite products products amongst amongst the tranquillity the tranquillity and beauty and beauty of the of Moorabool the Moorabool • Sunday • Home • Designated DriverDriver – One –complimentary One complimentary drink or drink sausage or sausage Meredith Meredith Dairy Dairy cheese. cheese. Valley.Valley. Get away Get away from the from crowds the crowds and hassles and hassles and relax and with relaxawith a Designated • Hot•‘n wine and winecheese and cheese platterplatter on theon terrace the terrace at Moorabool at Moorabool Ridge.Ridge. F u nF u n • Wicke • • Saturday • Saturday 12am 12am – 4pm:– Jesse 4pm: Jesse Reid to Reid perform to perform soulfulsoulful acoustic acousticF O O FDO O D F u nF u • Light • lunches, Light lunches, cheese, cheese, coffeecoffee and cakes. and cakes. • Sunday • Sunday 12am 12am – 4pm:– Angie 4pm: Angie HiltonHilton and friends and friends • Test• P F u nF u n with t • Eulung • Eulung Day Spa Day– Spa complimentary – complimentary 5 minute 5 minute massages massages and and • Unique • Unique tranquil tranquil environment environment next tonext the to Moorabool the Moorabool River. River. • Halle • expertexpert adviceadvice – Sunday – Sunday only 11am only 11am – 5pm– 5pm Guests Guests can walk canamong walk among the vines the or vines ramble or ramble along along the river the river • Local • Designated Designated DriverDriver – One –complimentary One complimentary tea, coffee tea, coffee or softordrink soft drink with the with wildlife. the wildlife. Designa De

Brown Brown Magpie Magpie Wines Wines

2490 Midland 2490 Midland Highway, Highway, Bannockburn Bannockburn

Moorabool Moorabool Ridge Ridge


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90 McAdams 90 McAdams Lane, Lane, Bellarine Bellarine T

10am 10am – 5pm– 5pm Great Otway

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nk. oft drink.1400 Portarlington 1400 Portarlington Road,Road, Curlewis Curlewis 10am 10am – 6pm– 6pm

G u EG sT u EWs iTn W E Ri n i EEsR i E s

• Barrgowan • Barrgowan Vineyard Vineyard • Curlewis • Curlewis Winery Winery • Finesse • Finesse WinesWines own • Jack • Rabbit Jack Rabbit Vineyard Vineyard in the • Ponda • Ponda EstateEstate Vineyard Vineyard ship township • Wayawa • Wayawa EstateEstate od fire W i nW E inE

11

SH

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11 McGlashan’s McGlashan’s Wallington Wallington Estate Estate

10am 10am – 5pm– 5pm

W i nW E inE

0

10

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Location Map

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BASS STRAIT

Winchelsea

A1

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C151

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Torquay Anglesea

C155

Designated Designated DriverDriver - One -complimentary One complimentary tea or tea coffee. or coffee.

13 Oakdene Oakdene Vineyards, Vineyards, Restaurant Restaurant & Cellar & Cellar Door Door 13

F O O FDO O D

F u nF u n

Oakdene Oakdene Restaurant Restaurant

• A classic • A classic car exhibition car exhibition will bewill held bethroughout held throughout the weekend the weekend • on theon grounds the grounds in front inof front the of cellar the cellar door featuring door featuring sportssports cars, cars, historic historic racingracing cars and carssedans and sedans from the from 60s, the70s 60s, and 70s80s. and 80s. • • Automotive • Automotive and maritime and maritime memorabilia, memorabilia, outdoor outdoor games, games, • lots oflots fun!! of fun!! •

Designated Designated DriverDriver – One –complimentary One complimentary soft drink. soft drink.

Designated Designated DriverDriver – one –complimentary one complimentary tea, coffee tea, coffee or softordrink. soft drink.

GRASSY

NGTON

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255 Grubb 255 Grubb Road,Road, Wallington Wallington McGlashan’s McGlashan’s Wallington Wallington EstateEstate is a premium is a premium wine producer wine producer on on – 6pm– 6pm the Bellarine the Bellarine Peninsula. Peninsula. Taste Taste our award our award winning winning Chardonnay, Chardonnay, 10am 10am E inE Pinot Noir, PinotShiraz, Noir, Shiraz, Pinot Grigio, Pinot Grigio, Rose and RoseSparkling and Sparkling wineswines whichwhichW i n W

• Test• Pilot TestMolly. Pilot Molly. Rock on Rock to the on to best theofbest the of 60’s, the70’s 60’s,and 70’s80’s and 80’s with this with awesome this awesome cover cover band. band. 12 – 6pm, 12 – both 6pm,days. both days. • Halleleura • Halleleura Olive Oil Olive & Verjus Oil & Verjus tastings tastings • Local • Local Produce Produce – come – come load your loadlarder! your larder!

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B100

225 Swan 225 Swan Bay Road, Bay Road, Wallington Wallington

F u nF u n

S

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Point Lonsdale

Six wonderful Six wonderful guest guest wineries wineries join usjoin thisus year thisas year well! as well!

Delectible Delectible edibles, edibles, all day, alleveryday. day, everyday. • Stunning • Stunning Cheese Cheese Platters Platters • Brilliant • Brilliant BBQ –BBQ Handmade – Handmade Portarlington Portarlington Chicken Chicken & & Chardonnay Chardonnay sausages sausages Pepper & Pepper Calamari Calamari ConesCones rf st Coast • Salt•&Salt • Homemade • Homemade Curry Curry Pots Pots ge • Hot•‘nHot Spicy ‘n Spicy Wedges Wedges • Wicked • Wicked Mini Dutch Mini Dutch Pancakes Pancakes

th

Lorne BASS

60 Soho 60 Road, Soho Road, Drysdale Drysdale 10am 10am – 5pm– 5pm

• • • • • • •

SWAN BAY

B110

B110

Torquay Anglesea

Apollo Bay

Surf Coast

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will bewill available be available throughout throughout the weekend the weekend in a friendly, in a friendly, relaxed relaxed Visit Oakdene Visit Oakdene Vineyards Vineyards on theon Bellarine the Bellarine Peninsula Peninsula over the over the annual annual Toast Toast to the to Coast the Coast weekend weekend for a unique for a unique food and foodwine and wine atmosphere. atmosphere. experience. experience. Oakdene Oakdene cellar cellar door will door bewill open be from open10am from 10am – 5pm– 5pm F O O FDO O D all weekend, all weekend, for anfor informative an informative tastingtasting of our of award our award winning winning • A selection • A selection of Gourmet of Gourmet Tasting Tasting Platters Platters will bewill available be available all all wines.wines. The team The will team bewill offering be offering visitors visitors a preview a preview of our of Pinot our Pinot weekend weekend featuring featuring abalone abalone and local andseafood. local seafood. GrigioGrigio and Sauvignon and Sauvignon BlancBlanc basedbased wineswines from the from 2011 thevintage, 2011 vintage, • Local • Local produce produce cooking cooking demonstrations, demonstrations, tastings tastings and displays and displays plus an plus opportunity an opportunity to revisit to revisit some some back vintages back vintages of Chardonnay, of Chardonnay, Pinotand NoirShiraz and Shiraz that have that long havebeen long sold beenout. sold out. including including abalone, abalone, local seafood local seafood and olive andoil. olive Guests oil. Guests include includePinot Noir Lonimar Lonimar Australia, Australia, WhiteWhite Fisheries Fisheries and Bellarine and Bellarine Golden Golden Olive. Olive. F O O FDO O D

New release New release premium premium wine tastings wine tastings – be spoilt – be spoilt as theas first theinfirst in Australia Australia to sample to sample and savour. and savour.

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VirginVirgin French French Cocktails Cocktails available. available.

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Lorne Campbell Anglesea B100 G u EG sT u EWs iTn W E Ri n i EEsR i E s MusicMusic and Wine and by Wine theby Sea the– Sea Come – Come with your withfriends your friends and family and family BASS STRAIT Murroon Twelve LO B100 RN as Experience Experience a tasteaof taste France of France at Bellarine at Bellarine Estate Estate as we celebrate we celebrate • Grassy • Grassy Point Wines Point Wines www.toasttothecoast.com.au Apostles E and listen and listen to liveto classical live classical music music while eatingeating lunch lunch and tasting and tasting To Lorne, Apollo Baywhile 0 Apollo Bay via Great Ocean Road Toast to Toast the Coast to the Coast and ten and years ten of years the of Bellarine the Bellarine Estate Estate Restaurant. Restaurant. Gerangamete C151 • Marcus • Marcus Hill Vineyard Hill Vineyard McAdams McAdams Lane wines Lane wines at Terindah at Terindah EstateEstate in our in glass our shed glass and shed and D C154 Locally Locally inspired inspired tastingtasting platesplates will bewill available be available both days, bothRsuperbly days, superbly • Wyuna • Wyuna Park Vineyard Park Vineyard & Garden & Garden Pennyroyal enjoy enjoy our beautiful our beautiful view of view vines of and vinesthe and Port thePhillip Port Phillip Bay. Bay. matched matched with our with estate our estate growngrown and hand and crafted hand crafted wines wines and beers. and beers. W i nW E inE W i nW E inE F O O FDO O D The wine Theprogram wine program will include will include themed themed tastings tastings of Pinot of Noir Pinotand Noir and Tastings Tastings of McAdams of McAdams Lane wines Lane wines including including Pinot Noir, Pinot Pinot Noir, Pinot Locally Locally inspired inspired tastingtasting platesplates 11am 11am – 3pm– 3pm Chardonnay Chardonnay from some from some of the of Bellarine’s the Bellarine’s best vineyards best vineyards and and itime Gris, Chardonnay, Gris, Chardonnay, Shiraz,Shiraz, Piccolet, Piccolet, Zinfandel Zinfandel and Rose. and Rose. wineries. wineries. s. amous. F u n F u n Pinot Noir Pinotand NoirChardonnay and Chardonnay mastermaster classes classes and vertical and vertical tastings. tastings. • Local • Local group,group, Hot Club HotSwing Club Swing will entertain will entertain with their withunique their unique F O O FDO O D to • Lunch • Lunch available available both days both days French French gypsygypsy swingswing style. style. hem. F O O FDO O D • Master • Master Classes Classes – both–days both–days with–our with Bellarine our Bellarine EstateEstate d for F u nF u n • Light • lunch Light lunch will bewill available be available Winemaker and Bellarine and Bellarine Brewing Brewing Co Brewer. Co Brewer. at & great Winemaker • Classical music,music, beautiful beautiful views views F u nF u n • A Petanque • A Petanque Tournament Tournament is open is to open all, to with all,great with prizes great prizes up forup for• Classical • This• year, Thisexciting year, exciting youngyoung opera opera singer,singer, Megan Megan Oldmeadow Oldmeadow will will Designated Designated DriverDriver – One –complimentary One complimentary tea or tea coffee. or coffee. grabs grabs throughout throughout the day. the day. be performing. be performing. Designated Designated DriverDriver – One –complimentary One complimentary tea or tea coffee. or coffee.

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Designated Designated DriverDriver – One –complimentary One complimentary tea or tea coffee. or coffee.

10

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28

SUSTAINABILITY FEATURE

Balancing business and sustainability It’s been a bit of buzzword for a while now and it seems to be something that we’re all trying hard to be – sustainable that is. Hence, we’re building sustainable “green” buildings, attempting to live environmentally sustainable lives, reducing the impact of our businesses and industries on the environment and having endless discussions about more and better ways to keep on being sustainable. And this is despite mixed messages from government. Solar energy is sustainable, but incentives for householders to invest in it are being cut back in several states, including our own, where the feed in tariff for new customers with solar panels has been reduced from 60 cents a kilowatt hour to 25 cents. Then there are the State Government’s reforms to wind farm planning, which have been hailed as a win for communities while simultaneously dealing a blow to investment in alternative energy in Victoria (depending on what side you’re on). However, no matter what the higher levels of government do or don’t do, or say they’re doing in regards to sustainability, at the grass roots, much is being done by businesses, householders and local councils who are moving ahead with building sustainable communities because that’s the type of

community they want to live and work in. Geelong, for example, is home to the first EPA Sustainability Covenant with a regional - rather than single business or industry - focus, which in August was reportedly praised by the Prime Minister as, “a model for the rest of the country”. In July, GBN reported how the covenant between EPA Victoria and the City of Greater Geelong, with co-signatories including the Geelong Manufacturing Council, Chamber of Commerce, Committee for Geelong, Barwon Water and Deakin University, aims to provide opportunities for Geelong to become a more sustainable city while still growing its economy. It encourages business, government and the community to look at ways to work together to become more sustainable in their planning and day-to-day operations. In the words of Councillor John Doull, who holds the portfolios for Climate Change and Environment and Sustainability and has been the champion of the Sustainability Covenant and Future Proofing Geelong: “What if, instead of viewing sustainability as a challenge to be overcome, we viewed it as an opportunity to embrace? Instead of thinking in terms of reductions we thought in terms of growth? Growth in green energy, growth in sustainable

technology, growth in local industries involved in the research, design, manufacture and marketing of sustainable products? “Just as the City itself has introduced its own sustainable practices and policies, many other local organisations are doing great things in areas such as water recycling, emissions reduction, renewable energy use and sustainable design. By coordinating these efforts, by collaborating, we can extend the impact of our individual efforts - through economies of scale, through sharing of knowledge, through joint ventures.” That’s inspiring stuff, but for business owners already struggling with an unpredictable economy, uncertain consumer confidence, mountains of paperwork – all while trying to find some sort of work/ life balance - finding a sustainable balance might just be too hard in practice no matter how good the intentions. Or is it? The sustainability movement, for want of a better term, is not a new one and lots of organisations, many of them government organisations, have already done much of the hard work and research to come up with easy, and quite basic ways, to help businesses be more sustainable while also improving their bottom line. Being known as a sustainable


SUSTAINABILITY FEATURE

business may also help attract more business – there’s plenty of research indicating people like dealing with environmentally friendly organisations, so it’s certainly worth your while to look at how you could save water in the office, improve your waste and recycling processes or simply use less paper.

their carbon footprint. “We feel it is as important as ever to provide a place for businesses to take individual sustainability action, regardless of the legislative position…We encourage businesses to independently reduce their carbon emissions, as even the smallest steps can make a big difference.”

From a local perspective, the Low Carbon Growth Plan for Greater Geelong, an action plan that forms part of the Future Proofing Geelong Project, identifies a range of greenhouse gas abatement opportunities that can be achieved for the lowest cost within Greater Geelong’s municipal boundaries and that businesses and industries can implement now. The plan, which includes case studies of local businesses that have already introduced sustainable practices, is available at futureproofinggeelong.com and climateworksaustralia.org.

As well as allowing users to sign up to a monthly email newsletter that provides ongoing support, hints and tips, ‘What can I do right now’ also lists practical, sustainable actions for businesses. Some of them may even save money, such as downloading signs to remind employees to switch off lights and appliances and put the right rubbish in the right bins, and a checklist to help identify sources of energy wastage. Businesses can also switch to “green power” and “green cleaners” – either a cleaning company with environmental credentials or the use of chemical free cleaning agents – and recycle their e-waste (computers, printers and mobiles phones).

The aptly named ‘What can I do right now’ resource at carboncompass.com.au has been developed by Carbon Down, a partnership between VECCI and Sustainability Victoria, “… dedicated to reducing Victoria's carbon footprint through innovative, practical solutions”, and has a range of ideas for sustainable business practices. According to Carbon Down, “Sustainability is in the long-term interest of business, the broader community and the environment. ‘What can I do right now’ is an initiative that supports existing motivation from businesses who want to take action, but may not know where to start, or who to trust.” VECCI Chief Executive Officer, Wayne KaylerThomson, says research shows there is a huge appetite from SMEs for assistance to reduce

BytebackTM is a free computer recycling service that lets Victorian residents and small businesses dispose of old, unwanted and nonfunctioning computers. After collection, equipment is transported to a specialised electronic recycling and recovery centre where it’s disassembled into its parts (plastic, precious metals, batteries, cathode ray tubes, printed circuit boards, insulated wiring) and recycled, keeping valuable materials and toxic chemicals out of landfill. In the Geelong area there are BytebackTM locations at the Douro Street Resource Recovery Centre and Transfer Station in North Geelong, the Drysdale Resource Recovery Centre and the Anglesea Transfer Station.

29

Then there’s Resource Smart (resourcesmart. vic.gov.au), also an initiative of Sustainability Victoria, which offers the Top 10 Free Sustainability Solutions for Business (all of them, including ‘What can I do right now’ are from Carbon Compass) such as a business carbon footprint calculator, ways to offset and calculate your business’ greenhouse impact and a handy glossary of terms to help decipher the “carbon jargon”. You can also download or order a free copy of Small Business, Big Opportunity: Sustainable Growth commissioned by Sensis and written by Jon Dee, Managing Director of Do Something! (dosomething.net. au) and founder of Planet Ark. Resource Smart also provides information on ResourceSmart Business, a service to “help businesses manage the risks and opportunities presented by climate change” and apply simple solutions to manage their carbon footprint. Businesses can call 1300 363 744 to find out more. Sustainability resources for business: The Low Carbon Growth Plan for Greater Geelong: futureproofinggeelong.com The Low Carbon Growth Plan for Australia: climateworksaustralia.org Sustainability Victoria: sustainability.vic. gov.au Resource Smart: resourcesmart.vic.gov.au Carbon Compass: carboncompass.com.au Small Business, Big Opportunity: Sustainable Growth by John Dee: dosomething.net.au Judy Baulch


Shell Geelong Refinery Our home, our environment Shell has been an integral part of the Geelong landscape for more than 55 years, supplying fuel to around half of Victoria and almost a third of South Australia. We take our corporate social responsibility seriously and aim to deliver positive economic, social and environmental outcomes in the local Geelong community. To find out more, visit www.shell.com.au/geelong

1915 Geelong Business News Shell Ad Chamber of Commerce Ad.indd 1

26/9/11 9:18:19 AM


FEATURE

31

Shell's success with sustainable practices

The Geotube® used at Shell’s refinery reduces significantly the amount of waste that needs to be removed and disposed of from the site. Shell Geelong Refinery’s continued improvement in environmental performance is supported by a number of resource management initiatives designed to help reduce water consumption, minimise waste generation and reduce greenhouse gas emissions through improved energy efficiency. The following is a snapshot of three major initiatives driving sustainability within the refinery and the local community. Saving Water is a Shell Priority While recycled water is a product of waste, it is certainly not a waste product. It is a highly valuable resource that is a key to sustaining water resources into the future. Barwon Water has taken a big step toward meeting this target with construction under way on the $94 million Northern Water Plant since March, this year. The plant, located adjacent to the Shell Geelong Refinery in Corio, will produce high quality recycled water from sewage from homes and industry across Geelong’s northern suburbs. Most of the Class A recycled water will be used by the refinery, but the resource also will be available for irrigating sports grounds at Stead Park. The plant will save five per cent of Geelong’s drinking water, or the equivalent amount of water used by 10,000 homes annually. The plant is expected to be completed in early 2013. How will the plant work? Sewage from northern Geelong homes and businesses will enter the plant in an enclosed area and pass through fine screens to remove solids. The sewage will then be mixed with

Shell’s wastewater and pass through a biological treatment process that uses naturally occurring bacteria and oxygen to break down the waste matter. This treats the water to a Class C recycled water standard. The water will then pass through a process that removes any solids and pathogens before being chlorinated. This produces Class A quality water to a standard accepted by the EPA and the Department of Health. The water will then flow through a reverse osmosis membrane, which desalinates the water by removing dissolved salt, making it fit for Shell Geelong’s refining processes. Shell Links Environment

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Limeburners Link is an initiative of Greening Australia supported by Shell and the City of Greater Geelong that aims to enhance the natural environment of Limeburners Bay, an estuary on the shores of Corio Bay. The programme involves the environmental rehabilitation of Limeburners Bay through the engagement of primary schools in environmental education as well as the training of Geelong northern suburbs residents in a Certificate II in Conservation and Land Management. Greening Australia Victoria Project Coordinator, Danny Reddan, said the Certificate II provides a great foundation for individuals interested in pursuing a career in the environment. “Graduates gain nationally accredited skills and knowledge while achieving real, on-the-ground conservation outcomes at a site of international significance,” he said.

The refinery has supported Limeburners Link for almost six years. Key achievements during this time have included: • 11,000 indigenous plants replanted and 5000 seedlings propagated; • 20 members of the community engaged in Conservation and Land Management Training; • Four community planting days were attended by about 300 members of the wider community; • About 2000 students from 16 schools participated in 42 ‘Schools for the Environment’ days; and, • N umerous government departments, businesses and community organisations including the Marine Discovery Centre, the Wathaurong Co-operative, Geelong Indigenous Nursery, Geelong Grammar School, Neighbourhood Renewal, Melbourne Water, Township of Lara Care Group and Mark Trengove Ecological Services cooperated to deliver environmental education and cultural awareness activities. Bugs Put the Bite on Waste An innovative waste management technology introduced by the refinery has reduced landfill significantly and generated major cost and efficiency gains. The Geotube® is a 35 metre long, 2.5-metre wide bag that treats wastewater taken from the Dissolved Air Flotation unit (DAF 2), a refinery unit that separates oil from the water. The water is pumped into the Geotube® bag and then drains out through small pores. After about 14 days a dry sludge is left behind that can be recycled. Shell’s Environmental Team Leader, Stuart Olsen, says extensive trials of the Geotube® found that it significantly reduced the amount of waste that needs to be removed and disposed of from site, with excellent environmental and financial benefits. The Geotube® has been used for six years now and has fulfilled expectations. “Landfill has been significantly reduced, while green and other wastes have been put to good use to convert hydrocarbon sludge into a soil conditioner and that has been used on the refinery’s buffer zone where 60,000+ trees have been planted. About 3,000 tonnes of compost is spread around trees planted on the refinery’s land. The composting of the trees helped them to survive the recent drought and that means a ‘greener’ environment for the refinery, its visitors and people living nearby. “In addition to all of this, there has been an economic benefit with annual savings of more than $1 million by not transporting waste to landfill. This demonstrates sustainability is not just an environmental ‘nice to have’ but that it can add to the bottom line of businesses.”


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Clean and green made easy Clean Energy Systems has been providing Solar solutions in Geelong and the coast for the last 2 years. During this time, they have seen the popularity of Solar continually increase, as customers become more aware of the environmental benefits of solar, along with the significant energy savings that come with a quality operational Solar System. “The biggest concern on our customer’s minds at the moment is how to protect themselves against the ever increasing power bills,” says Sales Director, Tony Zareie. Solar is definitely a great solution to tackling rising energy costs for most households and commercial businesses. But what else can be done? By looking at the total solution, there are additional ways to reduce your electricity bills even further, protect yourself from maintenance costs, and transform your home or workplace by increasing it’s Energy Efficiency Rating (EER). Geelong Milk has recently installed a 20kW system solar system designed and installed by Clean Energy Systems. The owner, Ron, was extremely happy with the workmanship and the professional manner in which the install was completed. So much so that Clean Energy Systems are now designing the layout and fitting requirements for all of Geelong Milk’s factories to be replaced with LED.ms. LED Lighting is now becoming the most talked about product in the energy savings market. Although we are used to seeing regular breakthroughs in technology, only very occasionally

do those advances make a truly great impact on our everyday lives. LED lighting will save between 64% and 88% per cent of your lighting electricity costs. So, by refitting your premises with LED lighting, you can reduce around a third of your entire energy bill (and even more in commercial properties). Used in conjunction with a solar system, LED Lighting will significantly reduce your power bill, and in some cases, wipe it out completely. Adam Dragic, CEO of Clean Energy Systems says, “LED lighting is surprisingly still the most untapped avenue to reduce your carbon footprint and decrease that headache that comes along when you get your electricity bill. It has the most significant reduction in your energy output compared to the financial outlay. Businesses can expect to have the total cost of an LED full fit out throughout their office or warehouse paid back to them by the savings on their energy bill within 12-18 months.” The quality of LED lights has come a long way in recent times. What once was a novelty has now become a key industry, with millions of dollars invested in research and design. Most top tier LED lamps now have a 3 year replacement guarantee and are designed to last up to 50,000 hours or 20 years. For example, traditional Halogen downlights have no replacement guarantee and are likely to last around 2,000 hours. An LED lamp replacing a standard Halogen will use 90% less 10% of the energy an equivalent Halogen lamp would use. Customers will see additional benefits saved on air conditioning costs; as LED lamps produce

The installed solar system on the Geelong Milk factory

little heat, the air conditioning load is reduced. This actually results in significant additional savings. With it being so cost effective, a full LED fit out is a fantastic investment. The other big factor to consider is that LED lights are far safer than traditional bulbs. There are no hazardous substances, they are 100% recyclable, contain no lead, no argon, no mercury, and no gas emission. They are not hot to touch and they do not flicker, unlike the flickering of traditional lamps that can result in headaches. Replacement of your current lights to LED isn’t as straightforward as some would think. There are a range of different light fittings that may be required, the color of the lights varies depending on their use, the conversion from the current watts to the new LED watts needs to be calculated so it lights up the area correctly and, if there are transformers in place, then these may need to be replaced. Clean Energy Systems Industry experience has shown that if you don’t get a qualified assessor to provide you with an accurate replacement guide, the typical mistakes that can be made can result in not getting the full reduction in energy savings, not to mention blown bulbs and not having the correct ambience throughout your property. Clean Energy Systems recommends that customers make an appointment with us to see one of our qualified assessor who can make the selection criteria easy, and can arrange for the full installation.


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FEATURE

A special editorial feature by Harwood Andrews Lawyers

Loan security and credit changes THE IMPORTANCE OF REVIEWING & REVISING BUSINESS PROCEDURES & DOCUMENTATION: The practical implications of the new Australian Consumer Law & Personal Property Securities regime.

clauses, thereby including most dealings by businesses which supply goods on credit. 4. The supply of goods on commercial consignment. 5. Loan agreements. 6. Various types of secured finance. What is the Effect of Registration?

Arguably not since the introduction of GST has there been a more urgent need for businesses to review and revise their business practices, procedures and documentation than now. With the recent changes to national consumer law and the impending implementation of the Personal Property Securities Act (PPS Act), businesses need to take proactive steps to protect their businesses.

Registration, if completed correctly, will have the effect of “perfecting” a party’s security interest, giving the secured party a legally enforceable acknowledgement of their interest over that property. Perfection by registration will improve the priority status the security interest has relative to other security interests in the personal property and ensures that a security interest survives the bankruptcy or insolvency of the grantor.

This article provides a summary of the impact of certain aspects of the Australian Consumer Law and the PPS Act and provides recommendations about the proactive measures businesses should be considering now. Importantly, businesses will need to review the documents that they provide to customers, including credit applications, invoices and terms and conditions. PERSONAL PROPERTY SECURITIES ACT What is Personal Property Securities Reform? The PPS Act is scheduled to commence in January 2012 and will make fundamental changes to secured finance in Australia. It will establish the Personal Property Securities Register (Register) - a single, national database of all personal property security interests. It will affect nearly all businesses, particularly: • financial institutions that take an interest in a customer’s property as security for a loan or other obligation; and • manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers who commonly supply goods to customers on credit terms. Why is the PPS Act so important? At the moment it may be possible to register an interest in personal property on one of the 70 odd registers that exist throughout Australia (e.g. ASIC charge). In most cases, registration is not possible or necessary for an interest in personal property to be registered in order to protect that interest. However, with the introduction of the PPS Act, the multitude of registers will be replaced by one single national register where lenders and businesses will be able to register their interest (which will become known as a “security interest”), in personal property (defined by the PPS Act as “collateral”). While this, in theory, is intended to introduce uniformity throughout the country and provide for a simpler and more efficient means of registering a security interest, the most relevant aspect of the PPS reform for

lenders and businesses may in fact be the potentially dire consequences of failing to adopt and utilise the new regime. With the commencement of the Register, mere ownership of personal property won’t offer the same protection it does now. Possession may trump ownership. If a party fails to register their security interest in personal property, including those interests that cannot under the current regime be registered, they could lose their entitlement to that property regardless of ownership. What is a security interest? A security interest is an interest in personal property that secures payment of a debt or other obligation regardless of the form of the transaction. Personal property is all forms of property other than land. It includes both tangible and intangible property. A security interest is created through agreement between a “grantor” (i.e. the party giving the security interest) and a “secured party” (i.e. the party obtaining the interest). A variety of transactions can give rise to a security interest that is registrable on the Register: 1. Financing/hire purchase agreements, where the lessee can acquire ownership in the property leased. 2. Leases of personal property for a term exceeding 12 months, or 90 days in the case of motor vehicles, boats or aircraft (PPS Lease). 3. Sale of goods agreements, usually comprised in quotations or as terms and conditions on invoices, which include retention of title

The PPS Act sets out the basis upon which priorities are dealt with amongst competing secured parties. So, in summary: • a perfected security interest takes priority over an unperfected security interest; • priority between two or more perfected security interests is determined in favour of an earlier perfected security interest over a later one, and • priority between two or more unperfected security interests is determined in favour of an earlier security interest over a later one. The PPS Act also recognises a “Purchase Money Security Interest” (PMSI), which is a special type of security interest. A PMSI differs from other security interests in that it has “super-priority” over most other interests in the same collateral group, even pre-existing security interests. A PMSI can be created where: 1. funds are provided by a financer or other lender to a grantor for the purchase of the personal property; 2. the secured party advances personal property and all or part of the purchase price remains outstanding (typically through a retention of title arrangement); or 3. a secured party enters into a PPS lease or consignment transaction. Special priority rules also apply to agriculture – priority in crops is given to financiers who provide credit to enable the crops to be produced, and priority in livestock is given to financiers who provide credit to enable the livestock to be fed and developed. This is regardless of whether or not another security interest has been registered beforehand. Relevant Examples While the operation of the PPS Act will have far reaching consequences for many businesses, not the least because many banks may require businesses to be “PPS Act” compliant before


A special editorial feature by Harwood Andrews Lawyers

providing credit, it is worth mentioning a number of common business transactions which will be significantly effected by the commencement of the PPS Act. Sale of Goods on Retention of Title Terms Many manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers supply goods to customers on a ‘retention of title’ basis (meaning that the seller retains legal ownership in the goods, even after delivery to the purchaser, until payment in full is received). This is usually accomplished by the inclusion of a retention of title clause in the supplier’s standard terms and conditions of trade. Today, as a supplier on a retention of title basis, the supplier’s right to be paid is ‘secured’ by the fact that they hold legal title in the property. Upon the default or insolvency of the purchaser, a well-drafted retention of title clause will entitle the supplier to enforce their interest against the purchaser and other creditors by repossessing the property that they own. However, once the PPS Act comes into operation, retention of title suppliers will become secured parties with a security interest in the property and, as such, the security interest will need to be registered to preserve priority against other secured creditors. If registration of such a security interest does not occur, the supplier could lose their interest in the property: • on a sale of the property to a third party buyer; or • upon the insolvency of the purchaser. In this situation the supplier would have no entitlement to its property. The Manufacture and/or Supply of Component Parts or Raw Materials Currently, a business involved in the manufacture and/or supply of component parts or raw materials has difficulty recovering their property once it is mingled with other property. However, with the commencement of the Register, businesses will be able to register their interest in those component parts or raw materials and, in the event of the purchaser’s default or insolvency, the secured party could

receive part of the proceeds from the sale of the end product or commingled product. PPS Leases Similar to the sale of goods on a retention of title basis, any equipment leases or hiring agreements that fall within the definition of a PPS lease and create a security interest will have to be registered in order to give a lessor protection against other secured creditors and on insolvency. Failure to do so could mean the lessor will lose priority or simply lose their property altogether, being left to claim any loss as an unsecured creditor. This has particular relevance to leasing arrangements between related entities. Loan Agreements Financial institutions or other businesses that lend money generally obtain security over certain assets of the borrower. Where the security is in the form of a charge over personal property, it will be necessary for the lender to register their security interest in order to avoid a third party obtaining a superior security interest over that property. Searching the Register The Register will also be a handy tool for prospective lenders and purchasers of personal property. There will be an ability to search the Register to determine whether there is a preexisting security interest registered over personal property. For example, a purchaser would be well advised to search the Register before purchasing a motor vehicle or watercraft to ensure it is not subject to a security interest that could jeopardise the purchaser’s entitlement to the property. What Do Businesses Need To Do? Registration of a security interest on the Register will not be compulsory. However, those businesses that take advantage of the Register will be entitled to powerful protections. Those that opt not to register their security interests will be placed alongside unsecured creditors and will risk losing their interest in their property.

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With the “Go Live” date for the Register recently being postponed until January 2012, businesses have been given something of a reprieve – an extra 3 months to prepare their business for the operation of the PPS Act. Accordingly, businesses are advised to: Review existing contracts to identify existing security interests that will need to be registered once the PPS Act becomes effective. Revise documentation (particularly contracts, terms and conditions of invoices and quotations) to: • e nsure that they are worded in such a way as to clearly establish a security interest that is capable of registration; • contract out of those provisions of the PPS Act that are not mandatory so as to minimise the PPS Act obligations of the business. Review trading activities to identify when security interests are established in favour of the business. Review existing internal policies and procedures to ensure that the registration of security interests occurs in an efficient and accurate manner. Train staff in the operation of the new regime. Carefully consider all contractual documentation provided by third parties to ensure that any PPS Act provisions are acceptable and manageable by the business. AUSTRALIAN CONSUMER LAW On 1 January 2011 the Australian Consumer Law (ACL) was introduced, giving Australia one national law for fair-trading and consumer protection. The ACL replaces existing consumer protection legislation contained in the Trade Practices Act 1974 (Cth) (now renamed as the Competition and Consumer Act 2010) and in certain State and Territory acts. Unfair Contract Terms One of the major reforms of the consumer protection legislation has been the introduction of unfair contract term provisions. The legislation provides that a term in a standard form consumer contract is void if it is determined by a court to be unfair. It is therefore essential that all businesses consider their existing contracts to determine whether any of the terms in those contracts are at risk of being deemed unfair and, therefore, void. What are standard form consumer contracts? The unfair contract term provisions only apply in circumstances where a contract: • is in standard form; and • is a consumer contract. A standard form contract is generally one that has been drafted by one party and is not


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FEATURE

subject to negotiation with another party. Terms of trade are typically standard form contracts. Factors that a court may consider when determining whether a contract is in 'standard form' include: • the relative bargaining power of the parties; • the opportunity to negotiate the terms of the contract; and • whether the contract was prepared specifically for the transaction or prepared before discussions between the parties took place. In order to be a consumer contract, a contract must be for: • the supply of goods or services (including financial products and services) or the sale or grant of an interest in land; and • to an individual who acquires it wholly or predominantly for personal, domestic or household use or consumption. It follows that a term in a standard form contract may be considered unfair so far as it applies to a particular individual, but not where it applies to a corporate entity. When is a term unfair? Under the provisions in the ACL, a term is unfair if all of the following conditions are met: • the term would cause a significant imbalance in the parties' rights and obligations arising under the contract; • the term is not reasonably necessary in order to protect the legitimate interests of the party who would be advantaged by the term; and • the term would cause detriment, whether financial or otherwise (this could include delay or distress), to a party if it were to be applied or relied upon. What types of terms might be unfair? The ACL lists examples of what could amount to an unfair term. It is not an exhaustive list. Contracts can still include the terms included in the list as they are not prohibited, but when used in certain circumstances they could be unfair. Examples of potentially unfair terms are terms that: • allow a business to make unilateral changes to important aspects of a contract with no right for the consumer to cancel the contract without penalty; • avoid or limit the liability of a supplier, its employees or agents for a breach of the contract; • require consumers who breach the contract or end it early to pay an excessive amount in compensation or cancellation charges; • permit only one party to avoid or limit performance, terminate, vary the terms, or renew or not renew; • penalise only one party for a breach or termination;

A special editorial feature by Harwood Andrews Lawyers

•p  ermit one party to vary the upfront price payable without the right of the other party to terminate; • permit one party unilaterally to vary services to be supplied; • permit one party to determine whether the contract has been breached or to interpret its meaning; • limit one party’s vicarious liability for its agents; • let one party assign the contract to the detriment of another party without consent; • limit one party’s right to sue the other; • limit the evidence one party can use in proceedings relating to the contract; • impose the burden of evidence on one party in proceedings about the contract; and • are prescribed by the regulations (there are none as yet). Contract terms excluded from the unfair contract term provisions The new law does not apply to: • terms that describe the main subject matter of the contract; • terms that set the upfront price payable under the contract, provided the price is disclosed before the contract is entered into; and • terms required/expressly permitted by law.

have a clause that is fair and enforceable, with more limited protection, than no clause at all because a clause that on its face provides significant protection to the business could be found to be unfair and therefore ineffective. CONCLUSION The day-to-day demands of running a business often see the development of business processes and documentation fall by the wayside. The introduction of the ACL and the PPS Act means that the failure to conduct a thorough review of such practices and revise documentation could be the downfall of many businesses. In taking steps to ensure compliance with the ACL and the PPS Act, businesses are advised to take the opportunity to review their entire documentary (credit application forms, privacy statements, guarantees etc.) and contractual processes so as to produce a seamless process for conducting their day to day trade in a relatively risk free manner. For more information about the Personal Property Securities Act or advice on how it will affect your business, please contact:

Exempt contracts The unfair contract terms do not apply to the following contracts: • constitution of a company, managed investment scheme or other kind of body; • certain shipping contracts; • contracts covered by the Insurance Contracts Act 1984 (Cth); and • contracts entered into prior to the commencement of the law. However, once these contracts are renewed, the new law applies. What are the consequences of a finding that a provision is unfair? The consequences of a finding that a contract term is unfair can be significant. The courts have the power to: • deem contract terms void or vary the terms; • require the offending party to give a refund or return/repair property; • impose pecuniary penalties of up to $1m for corporations and $220,000 for individuals); • order the offending party pay compensation to an aggrieved party. What do businesses need to do? It is extremely important that businesses review their terms of trade, most frequently contained in invoices, quotations and credit applications, and consider whether any of the provisions in those terms could be considered unfair under the ACL. If so, the offending provisions should be deleted or revised to ensure fairness to all parties. It is clearly preferable for a business to

Rod Payne Principal & Accredited Specialist in Business Law 03 5226 8541 rpayne@harwoodandrews.com.au

Joanne D’Andrea Special Counsel & Registered Migration Agent 03 5226 8567 jdandrea@harwoodandrews.com.au


LEGAL

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More perils for staff using social media This time last year we wrote about the perils of social media in the workplace. Back then, many businesses had a limited understanding of how an employee’s private use of online social media sites could have an adverse effect on the business’ brand, reputation and even generate internal workplace disputes between employees. There has also been a noticeable increase in employees being dismissed from their employment following inappropriate use of social media, even if the conduct occurred in the employee’s own time. Last year’s article referred to the dismissal of a hairdresser who was terminated by her employer after she posted a comment on her Facebook page that related to grievances about her job. In this case, the dismissal was held to be harsh and unreasonable on the basis that the employee’s comments merely reflected her dissatisfaction with the hairdressing industry and did not directly relate to her employer. Recently, an employer’s dismissal of an employee for comments made on the employee’s Facebook page has further demonstrated how an employee’s conduct outside of work hours can lead to the dismissal of his or her employment.

Jim Rutherford, Principal and Accredited Specialist in Workplace Relations and Criminal Law

In this particular case, an employee of the Good Guys franchise in Queensland was terminated for serious misconduct after he posted the following comment on his Facebook page:

Fair Work Australia was also particularly concerned about the threatening nature of the employee’s comments and considered that the employer was justified in terminating the employee’s employment.

“Wonders how the f--k work can be so f--king useless and mess up my pay again. C--ts are going down tomorrow.”

Deputy President Swan stated that, “The separation between home and work is now less pronounced than it once used to be.”

The employee challenged the dismissal and argued that his Facebook page was only able to be read by 70 of his Facebook friends due to his privacy settings.

The employee’s comments did not specifically name his employer however it was held that the comments were clearly directed against his employer, whereas the hairdresser’s comments referred to above were deemed more broadly to be a passing shot at the hairdressing industry in general.

A key flaw in the employee’s claim was that his Facebook friends included co-workers and subsequently the comments were relayed back to the employee’s superiors who notified the franchise’s director and the employee was then dismissed. Fair Work Australia upheld the employee’s dismissal on the basis that the employee’s outburst was not excused by the fact it was made on his home computer and outside of work hours. Plainly, the turning issue was that the employees’ comments were read by fellow employees and that it could not be accepted the employee would be unaware of the consequences of his actions in these circumstances.

This decision reaffirms the developing principle that an employee’s actions outside of the workplace can directly affect his or her employment. Employers ought to have well drafted social media policies, which clearly set out the limits of social media in the workplace, as well as the consequences to employees of inappropriate use of social media that could impact on the workplace and the employer.

Rohan Kux, Lawyer


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RECRUITMENT

How popular is your workplace? The federal, state and local government tops the list of the most popular sectors jobseekers ideally want to work in, according to recruiting experts Hays.

doing business. In our research, 50 per cent of companies said they are already taking steps to create a favourable employment brand in order to help combat the skills shortage.

In a survey conducted on Hays’ website 408 jobseekers were asked, without prompting, to name the sector or organisation where they would ideally love to work. The top six sectors named were:

“A definable and communicable Employee Value Proposition (EVP) is critical to your employment branding. In essence, an EVP communicates a company’s values and culture, as well as the rewards, opportunities and experience of working for your company.

1. Federal, state or local government 2. IT&T 3. Resources & mining 4. Not-for-profit 5. Big 4 accounting firms 6. Banking Employers who received multiple mentions included: Google, Rio Tinto, BHP Billiton, KPMG, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Apple, Virgin, NAB and Westpac. According to Hays’ recently released Bridging the skills gap white paper, these organisations have strong and recognisable employment brands, giving them an advantage in the race for the top talent. “Promoting your employment brand is one of our six strategies for bridging the skills gap,” says Nick Deligiannis, Director of Hays in Geelong. “By promoting your employment brand you will attract like-minded candidates who will be aligned with your values and way of

“In short, an EVP communicates what it’s really like to work for your company. By communicating what you stand for and the experience of working at your company, you’ll attract like-minded candidates who are a natural fit with your company and the way you do business.” Identify your EVP Defining the essence of your company is not a simple matter of sitting down with your marketing team and crafting a catchy strap-line or captivating image. Here are Hays’ tips: •F  irstly, identify the essence of your company – what it stands for, its culture, values, beliefs and vision. This can be done through various internal and external surveys, as well as looking at staff policies, marketing materials, your website and the organisation’s history. •O  nce you collate this data you will realise that, whether intentional or not, you already have an employment brand. In other words,

potential employees already have a perception of your company as an employer based on your communication messages, customer service and all contacts with the company. This is your default employment brand, and you likely want to make alterations. •T  o do this, extract the common core values evident in your research and write these core values in succinct and uncomplicated language. This is your EVP. But consider that it is more than just decorative sentences. It needs to be based in truth, and should represent the sum of the working experience at your company. •Y  ou can then build your employment brand upon the foundation of your EVP in order to attract the right type of candidate that shares your company’s values and is attracted to what your company stands for. •C  onsistency is the key when communicating your EVP and building your employment brand, both internally and externally. Keep the messages consistent not just during the recruitment process, but during every interaction your business makes. For example, if you claim to support work/life balance or ongoing development, but do not provide ongoing training, study leave or flexible rosters, the reality of your workplace does not match your promised values.


RECRUITMENT Social media’s impact Nick warns that social media is also having a huge impact on employment branding. “Social networking gives candidates the opportunity to share their interview and job search experiences with a global audience. So if you fail to make a good impression, such as not getting back to candidates with interview feedback or have a lengthy recruitment process, expect candidates to share their experience of the recruiting process at your company on social networking sites, which will have a crushing impact on your employment brand.� Stand out from the crowd to work for top employers To stand out from the crowd when applying for a job with a top employer, candidates need to think outside the square at the skills they can bring to increase their value. There are a number of benefits to be gained by working for a top employer. According to Hays, candidates are often exposed to opportunities that may otherwise not be available to them. This includes industry-leading training and development programs, overseas secondments and internal promotion paths. So how do you win that coveted role with a top employer? “If you are seeking a job with a top employer you must still do all you can to stand apart,� says Nick. “Most importantly – it’s vital that you are knowledgeable in your field. For example, External Auditors need to be qualified and possess proven experience helping businesses move forward; Estimators need strong trade links and good relationships with

subcontractors; and Occupational Health and Safety professionals need to be aware of changes in legislation. A lot of candidates have matching technical skills and experience, so when applying for your next job, you need to think outside the square regarding the skills you bring which increase your value to a top employer. “Candidates should highlight one or two key unique selling points to differentiate themselves. For example, have they increased profitability for their current employer through increased sales or business development or are they one of the highest achievers in their university degree? Employers need to be made aware of this so mention these unique selling points in your CV and in an interview. "However, candidates don't necessarily need a university qualification to get a foot in the door with a top employer. While it depends on the individual role, many employers are willing to consider unqualified candidates who can bring different skills and abilities to a role, particularly at the entry level. They want new hires who will fit in with co-workers and into the workplace, and are essentially able to get the job done. “If you do get an interview, don’t forget to prepare; research the company and make sure you are up to date with industry trends and changes. Also, candidates need to realistically compare their experience to their expected salary. Great opportunities are available with top employers, so avoid pricing yourself out of contention with over-inflated salary expectations. Instead, focus on finding a role with a top employer to add to your suite of skills.

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“For graduates, work experience will add considerable value to resumes. Most employers prefer to hire new graduates who have some work experience, whether it may be voluntary or through an internship. Graduates who take this path will already have an edge over their peers by having the opportunity to develop their skills in a real workplace environment. It also demonstrates a good work ethic to potential employers.â€? Some tips on how to land a job with a top employer: •F  ind out what opportunities are currently available or upcoming by speaking with your recruiter to help you stand the best chance of getting the job you want when it arises. • L ook good on paper. Make sure your resume is relevant for the position you are applying for and provide appropriate examples that match the specific job requirements. Highlight the value that you will bring to the organisation. They have a reputation as a top employer for a reason. •D  on’t give up. If you don’t succeed in winning a role with a top employer when you first apply don’t be discouraged to reapply later down the track. Stay in touch with the organisation. Continue to build on your knowledge, practice your presentation skills and bring it all to the next interview.

Hays, the world's leading recruiting experts in qualified, professional and skilled people.

Innovate Legal provides legal services and patent and trade marks attorney services. We are dedicated to providing superior and practical advice and service. We can assist with all aspects of: / "' '( %#$%'+$'"'&'%!%&#$+%'&"&%(' +#('&$ "'%%-&%'&'% &%'&#"."' "#%!'#"'%$%'&$&&"# /&%") #$!"'$%#''"# #+'%"&%#*"%&$&&"!"' "&" #!!% &'#"%!"'& /&%#"&#%'#"')"'(%"#!$"+%%"!"'& ##$%')&% "'%%!"'& /%'"!%"&"&$#"&#%&$)%'&"%!"'& / "#%!'#""# #+#!$('%&#'*%"%*% / %"&""&'%('#"%!"'& /(&"&&&'%('(%""#%$#%'#)%"") / #!""!%&'%'#""&$('%&# ('#" / #!!%#!""!&#" """'%"'#"'%'& 66 Hope Street, / !$ #+!"' *

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Geelong West VIC 3218 P.O. Box 94, Geelong VIC 3220 p 03 5221 2699  | f 03 5222 5939 m 0411 219 768 e ju@innovatelegal.com.au www.innovatelegal.com.au


RECRUITMENT Social media’s impact Nick warns that social media is also having a huge impact on employment branding. “Social networking gives candidates the opportunity to share their interview and job search experiences with a global audience. So if you fail to make a good impression, such as not getting back to candidates with interview feedback or have a lengthy recruitment process, expect candidates to share their experience of the recruiting process at your company on social networking sites, which will have a crushing impact on your employment brand.” Stand out from the crowd to work for top employers To stand out from the crowd when applying for a job with a top employer, candidates need to think outside the square at the skills they can bring to increase their value. There are a number of benefits to be gained by working for a top employer. According to Hays, candidates are often exposed to opportunities that may otherwise not be available to them. This includes industry-leading training and development programs, overseas secondments and internal promotion paths. So how do you win that coveted role with a top employer? “If you are seeking a job with a top employer you must still do all you can to stand apart,” says Nick. “Most importantly – it’s vital that you are knowledgeable in your field. For example, External Auditors need to be qualified and possess proven experience helping businesses move forward; Estimators need strong trade links and good relationships with

subcontractors; and Occupational Health and Safety professionals need to be aware of changes in legislation. A lot of candidates have matching technical skills and experience, so when applying for your next job, you need to think outside the square regarding the skills you bring which increase your value to a top employer. “Candidates should highlight one or two key unique selling points to differentiate themselves. For example, have they increased profitability for their current employer through increased sales or business development or are they one of the highest achievers in their university degree? Employers need to be made aware of this so mention these unique selling points in your CV and in an interview. "However, candidates don't necessarily need a university qualification to get a foot in the door with a top employer. While it depends on the individual role, many employers are willing to consider unqualified candidates who can bring different skills and abilities to a role, particularly at the entry level. They want new hires who will fit in with co-workers and into the workplace, and are essentially able to get the job done. “If you do get an interview, don’t forget to prepare; research the company and make sure you are up to date with industry trends and changes. Also, candidates need to realistically compare their experience to their expected salary. Great opportunities are available with top employers, so avoid pricing yourself out of contention with over-inflated salary expectations. Instead, focus on finding a role with a top employer to add to your suite of skills.

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“For graduates, work experience will add considerable value to resumes. Most employers prefer to hire new graduates who have some work experience, whether it may be voluntary or through an internship. Graduates who take this path will already have an edge over their peers by having the opportunity to develop their skills in a real workplace environment. It also demonstrates a good work ethic to potential employers.” Some tips on how to land a job with a top employer: •F  ind out what opportunities are currently available or upcoming by speaking with your recruiter to help you stand the best chance of getting the job you want when it arises. • L ook good on paper. Make sure your resume is relevant for the position you are applying for and provide appropriate examples that match the specific job requirements. Highlight the value that you will bring to the organisation. They have a reputation as a top employer for a reason. •D  on’t give up. If you don’t succeed in winning a role with a top employer when you first apply don’t be discouraged to reapply later down the track. Stay in touch with the organisation. Continue to build on your knowledge, practice your presentation skills and bring it all to the next interview.

Hays, the world's leading recruiting experts in qualified, professional and skilled people.


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TECH GUY

Changing laptops as we know them Whilst the acronym CULV may not strike fear into the hearts of notebook toters, it is changing the look, feel and weight of the laptops we carry as our Tech Guy, Jon Mamonski explains. You may have noticed that notebooks are getting thinner, faster and lighter lately and with good reason – it’s all about CULV. Consumer ultra low voltage chips are some of the lowest power processors available, using only a few watts more than the netbook Intel Atom, which is rated at no more than 2.5 W. Because of their low power and heat output, CULV makes for very thin computer systems and long battery life and that is what every mobile user craves. Dell’s Latitude notebooks have long been a favourite in Geelong’s business houses because of their strong build, performance and good pricing. The new 14-inch Latitude E6420, uses a new tri-Metal design with a durable magnesium frame that’s built to stand up to abuse. The grey-brushed metal aluminium lid, matte chrome sides, a backlit keyboard combined with the soft touch, rubberised touchpad area is user friendly, but don’t be fooled. The E6420’s Tri-Metal chassis has a magnesium alloy internal frame and reinforced steel hinges, combined with a matte chrome bumper and protective LCD seal to provide a businessrugged system that’s MIL-STD 810G-tested and

designed to protect against extreme temperatures, dust and vibrations. The spill-resistant keyboard guards against clumsiness. Inside, the E6420 hits the accelerator with a second-generation Core i5 processor which stays remarkably cool under duress - a badge of honour in quality CULV notebooks. The 14-inch, 1366 x 768 glossy LED screen is sharp and bright and the speakers are surprisingly clear for

such a thin laptop. There are three USB ports (one of which has eSATA support), and an ExpressCard /54 slot, an HDMI port, Kensington lock slot and Ethernet. On the left side are one more USB port (for a total of 4), VGA out and a SD card reader on the front. Weighing in at a bare 2.07 kilos, this ‘made for business’ Dell is worth every cent of $1995 and garners 4 Stars from me.

Night Watch

HP 12C 30th Birthday

You know I can’t resist a great wristwatch. Tokyoflash is at it again and this time it's introducing a new concept, called The Kisai Night Vision. Now the LED wristwatch is up for grabs, constructed with black stainless steel, sub-surface LEDs, a hexagonal form factor and support for USB recharging. Despite your initial assumptions, it's actually capable of displaying both time and date, and there's even a built-in alarm with a light-up animation. It's available in black with blue, green or red LEDs and you can snag one for about $130 at Tokyoflash.com. Well fancy that.

At university in the nineties, we all owned one and mine still works. After thirty years, HP’s staple diet of reverse Polish notation 12c calculators is having its big birthday party with a special limited edition number cruncher, featuring an etched faceplate declaring its pedigree. If 1981's coolest calculator isn't your style, don't fret, HP is also releasing a limited edition run of 1982's HP 15c, boasting a hundred-fold improvement in performance over its sibling. Retro calculation can be yours for around $80 for the 12c and $100 for the 15c. Happy Birthday HP!






TECH GUY

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3D Glasses Free If you thought watching 3D TV with glasses was a bit passé, you’d be right. Toshiba has finally put a launch date on its glasses-free 3D TV. The world's first to be available to the public at the 55 inch size, the ZL2 will take its place at the top of the company's range of sets when it launches this December in Germany, complete with an LED-backlit QuadHD resolution, 3,840 x 2,160 LCD panel, (that’s the new ‘post BluRay’ standard). Their German press site currently mentions the set will cost 7,999 Euros (that’s ten grand here) when the 55-inch version launches… Start saving. 

Wireless over anything In the recent years that WiFi has blanketed business and home networks across Geelong, several technologies aimed at using existing wiring in buildings have met with limited success. These have included power line adaptors, MoCA (Multimedia over Coax) and HomePNA (originally for phone lines but later expanded to coax cables). But now, one protocol seeks to rule them all, operating over phone lines, power lines or coax cables for everything in any room - Internet, home theatre movies, radio, TV, phones, cups of tea, (well, might draw the line at a cuppa), but pretty much everything. Dubbed G.hn, the standard promises up to 1Gbps throughput, with ‘real world’ usage over electrical lines expected to reach between 250Mbps and 400Mbps. If that appeals to you, you're not Robinson Crusoe. U.S. service providers like it so much that, despite G.hn's capacity, they are insisting on quality of service standards that could limit or prevent customers from installing it themselves after buying adapters from retailers. Let’s make sure that doesn’t happen here. 

Slate fetish Road warriors that need their tablet - rejoice. Whilst this isn't the rumoured quad-core, ASUS is revving up the enterprise with its quietly introduced Eee Slate. Unlike its Android brethren, this business-minded slate runs Windows 7 Professional with an Intel Core i5 processor and comes loaded with the security tweaks necessary for the corporate roadster, like Computrace LoJack for remote location, data wipe and a Trusted Platform Module microchip that stores encrypted data. Added to the $1,500 12.1-inch package is a Bluetooth keyboard and Wacom Digitizer stylus. There's a 1280 x 800 LED Gorilla Glass display, 4GB RAM, 64GB of storage, dual USB 2.0 ports, mini-HDMI out, SD card slot and 2 megapixel front-facing camera. Everything a ‘show and tell’ tablet user could ask for. It’s available now at your favourite Geelong ASUS dealer. 


42

ART

The beauty of bush ballads reborn


42

ART

The beauty of bush ballads reborn There was movement in the theatre When Barry Crocker came to town With a tribute to an Aussie bush balladeer He brought to life the well-loved lines Once wrought by Banjo’s pen That to the eye brought many a quiet tear And when the show was over And the lights they rose upon a smiling crowd The words he sang remained there Echoing round the timber stalls As if the very walls themselves could hear." One of the greats of the Australian entertainment industry, Geelong-born Barry Crocker has captivated audiences for decades with his immense talents as a singer, comic impressionist and dramatic actor. Now, Barry returns to GPAC with a very special show as part of Musical Mornings. Two-and-a-half years in the making, Banjo is Barry Crocker’s stunning tribute to Australia’s most famous poet; a ‘musical play’ recreating the life and times of Andrew Barton “Banjo”

Paterson. Audiences will delight in many of the bush balladeer’s most significant poems and songs from his famous collection, Old Bush Songs, including 'The Man from Snowy River', 'Clancy of the Overflow', the original 'Waltzing Matilda' and many others.

us into the festive season with its annual Christmas show in December.

A fascinating story that reflects the complexities of the passion, the loves and losses of this great Australian icon, Barry Crocker’s Banjo appears in The Playhouse for two performances only, at 10.30am on Wednesday 12 and Thursday 13 October.

Musical Mornings concerts are proudly sponsored by Tuckers Funeral & Bereavement Services and are held in The Playhouse at GPAC on Wednesdays and Thursdays at 10.30am. There is free morning tea available to patrons before the show, along with delightful pre-show performers and exhibits in the GPAC foyer, presented by the region’s various cultural communities with thanks to Diversitat.

Musical Mornings Season Two will then continue in November with the brilliant tribute, Little Help From My Friends – The Complete Beatles, while The Gaslight Company will lead

Tickets for all remaining Season Two shows are now on sale. Phone the GPAC Box Office on 5225 1200 or visit www.gpac.org.au for bookings.


ART NEWS

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Geelong Library CEO joins Gates project Geelong Regional Library Corporation CEO, Patti Manolis, has been selected as the only Australian participant to join the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s inaugural International Network of Emerging Library Innovators (INELI).

and is the only Australian recipient of this remarkable opportunity.

The Global Libraries Initiative of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is establishing this Network in recognition of the turbulent economic times Public Library Leaders around the world are facing, along with the crucial role public libraries play in educating communities and helping them respond to change. A rapidly changing external environment is affecting all libraries regardless of their level of development. This offers a unique opportunity for public library leaders to redefine what it means to be a public library, and for Patti, is ideally timed in the early planning stages of the new Geelong Library and Heritage Centre.

Ms Manolis’ appointment to INELI is a threeyear commitment to learning and engagement with other library leaders globally. She has agreed to travel to other countries, complete academic assignments and volunteer her time to work with other library professionals as part of this commitment.

The Global Libraries initiative of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation believes that the most effective way to ensure that emerging library leaders can respond to change is to provide them with opportunities to connect with each other to explore new ideas, to experiment

Other countries represented in the program will include UK, Kenya, Netherlands, Chile, Botswana, Germany, Philippines, Kyrgyzstan, Egypt, China, South Africa and New Zealand.

with new services, and to learn from one another. One strategy to address this is the creation of the International Network of Emerging Library Innovators (INELI). Following a competitive global application process Ms Manolis will now join 19 others from around the world in INELI

Ms Manolis said, “INELI will provide great personal and professional development opportunities as well as functioning as a public library issues think tank. The issues explored and the learning achieved will be of direct benefit to Geelong Regional Library Corporation’s future planning and service delivery and I will also be looking for opportunities to share this knowledge with my Australian peers. “I am proud to have been selected and I also understand that this is recognition of the very positive work I have undertaken with the GRLC Board and Staff in recent years”, she said.

8 - 22 October

28 October

Metropolis Gallery Collectors Show: Significant smaller works by important Australian artists - The Metropolis Collectors Show is a great opportunity for both established and new collectors to add some major names in Australian art to their walls. Where: Metropolis Gallery. Details: www. metropolisgallery.com.au

Buddy: The Concert - Donning his trademark horn-rimmed glasses, Scott Cameron returns as one of the greatest pioneers of Rock and Roll - Buddy Holly. Where: GPAC. Details: www.gpac.org.au

02-03 November Little Help From My Friends: The Complete Beatles Celebrate the wonderful music of the greatest band that ever lived: The Beatles. Highly talented musician and Beatles aficionado David Cameron will lead the band on piano, guitar and even the sitar. Where: GPAC. Details: www.gpac.org.au

Robert Ingpen Fasting And Feasting Watercolour

To 20 November DAVIDNEWBURY (1925 - 2003)  Breaking Waves Aireys Coast c.1985 Oil On Canvas On Board

27 October John Waters: Looking Through A Glass Onion - John Waters returns in his critically acclaimed production Looking Through A Glass Onion - a homage to the music, mystery and memory of John Lennon. Where: GPAC. Details: www.gpac.org.au

Geelong Acquisitive Print Awards – The 9th year of the nationallyacclaimed acquisitive awards exhibition features entries from around the country. Where: Geelong Gallery. Details: www.geelonggallery.org.au

Bruce Latimer Hold up 2009 etching. Courtesy of the artist. Winner 2011 Geelong acquisitive print awards


44

COMMUNITY NEWS Foodies of Geelong help break the poverty cycle

The Geelong Ambassador Group of Opportunity International Australia has organised a Food For Thought fundraising dinner at the Empire Grill on Friday 7 October. Opportunity International Australia Ambassador, Cameron Price, explained that all proceeds will help Opportunity International Australia provide support for people living in poverty in developing countries, enabling them establish their own small businesses. A non-profit organisation, Opportunity International Australia provides people living in poverty with small loans (microfinance) to help them start or grow a small business so they can earn a regular income and provide for their families. The main focus is across India, Indonesia and the Philippines, where the organisation is helping close to 2.8 million people make their way out of poverty. “Instead of a hand out, microfinance provides a hand up for people living in poverty. Microfinance uses a business approach to solving poverty.  Providing a micro loan helps to build the individual’s capacity to continue to afford food, water, shelter and education for themselves and their families long after the loan has been repaid,” said Mr Price.

“Empire Grill is sponsoring the event and Scotchman’s Hill has generously donated wine from the Bellarine Peninsula. We invite locals to join us for a delicious three course meal with wine to match, to help break the global poverty cycle,” said Mr Price. " Some interesting facts for International Day for the Eradication of Poverty (October 17): Almost half of the world’s population lives on less than US$2 a day – less money than Australians would spend on a bottle of water or a chocolate bar. Around 2.6 billion people have no access to clean drinking water and 1.1 billion have no access to toilets or proper sanitation – many cannot afford it. An estimated 25,000 people die from the effects of hunger every day. That’s about one person every four seconds. The world produces enough food to feed everyone yet there were 925 million hungry people in 2010. 120 million women are living in poverty in India alone – this is more than 10 times the total female population of Australia. Go to fromgeelong.com to find out how to book online or phone Kristy on 0408 418 468. For more information on Food for Thought, go to http://foodforthought. gofundraise.com.au

Local business gets frocked up to raise funds for Ovarian Cancer This October, local design agency Ultraviolet Design will be frocking up to raise important funds for the Ovarian Cancer Research Foundation. The nationwide movement, ‘Frocktober’, began in Geelong in 2007 when an industrious group of 20-somethings each donned a dress and passed a hat around the pub to raise money for cancer research. Frocktober was born, and last year the group raised $112,000 - making a total of nearly $200,000 since its inception. For many women diagnosed with ovarian cancer, the disease is already well advanced – there is no early detection test and symptoms can be very subtle. In Australia alone, 1 woman dies every 10 hours from ovarian cancer. Emma Pitman, from Ultraviolet Design, says the business is supporting Frocktober to assist in raising funds and have fun at the same time. “We encourage other Geelong businesses to participate in raising funds for the Ovarian Cancer Research Foundation. We are proud to support such a worthy initiative and, of course, we are more than happy to get into our party dresses!” Ms Pitman said. For more information about Frocktober visit the website www.frocktober.org or email info@frocktober.org.

Nature the best medicine The Geelong region will be the site for an innovative new health program that encourages people to head to the park for their health and wellbeing. Launched in September, Geelong’s Active in Parks program will see health professionals, including doctors, maternal health nurses, and youth workers prescribing park visits to improve the health and wellbeing of their patients and clients. The program will also offer a range of free or low cost activities for the general community, which will be detailed on the program’s website www.activeinparks.org The program’s architect, Dr Rob Grenfell, says the program is founded on the growing body of evidence that shows spending time in nature is vital for people’s health and wellbeing. “We’ve spent the last hundred years disconnecting from the natural environment, and the result is a steady increase in lifestyle diseases and increasing social disconnection. As both a general practitioner and a public health physician, I believe there is enormous potential for the natural environment to improve people’s health. There’s a tremendous opportunity for the health sector to use nature as part of a patient’s medical treatment – it’s much cheaper to prescribe a walk in the park than to build a new hospital,” Dr Grenfell said.

“This is an innovative program to help people from the Geelong region break down the barriers to getting out into our magnificent parklands.”

stop and take a break from the many demands of our increasingly busy lifestyles,” he said.

Dr Grenfell says the launch of the new program is timely; with new data showing around six out of ten Australian adults do not meet the recommended guidelines for physical activity.

“We’re challenging Geelong to get active this Spring – and hit Nature’s gym. There will be a wide range of activities suitable for people of all ages and abilities. We all know the saying an apple a day keeps the doctor away – we hope to change that to ‘a park a day keeps the doctor away’.”

“Regular physical activity is essential for good health. Being physically inactive increases the risk of a number of chronic health conditions such as heart disease, stroke and vascular disease, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes and arthritis. For many of us, the best prescription we can have is to take a step into a natural space like a park or the beach. This will not only benefit individual health, but potentially reduce the enormous cost of treating preventable diseases.” Dr Grenfell said the Active in Parks program also aimed to improve mental health and develop stronger communities. “There’s very strong evidence that shows being in a natural space like a park has significant benefits for mental health and wellbeing. A park or the beach is a perfect place for reflection, and really gives us the opportunity to

Dr Grenfell said the program is not a ‘bootcamp’, but suitable for people of all ages and abilities.

Medibank Community Fund is the major sponsor of Geelong’s active in Parks program. George Savvides, Managing Director of Medibank, said the sponsorship was a perfect fit for the Medibank Community Fund which aims to get people living longer in better health through exercise and healthy eating initiatives. “By involving general practitioners, who play an important role in their local communities, and reaching-out through established community networks and leaders, this program has all the ingredients that are needed for generating significant changes in community health outcomes for the Geelong region,” he said. For more information and details of activities visit www.activeinparks.org


COMMUNITY NEWS

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Bean Squeeze Takes On the Ultimate Coffee Run

promotional cups in the lead up to Run Geelong.

Geelong drive-through coffee business, Bean Squeeze, is taking the idea of a coffee run to new heights in support of the Run Geelong charity fun run event in November. Bean Squeeze printed 180,000 limited edition paper cups bearing the Run Geelong logo for its five local stores to promote the run from now until the event takes place on November 20, 2011.

“Run Geelong is an important event in the Geelong community calendar and we have taken our love of helping people to the next level by throwing our support behind the fun run,” Andrew said.

Run Geelong is an annual event that raises funds for the redevelopment of the Geelong Hospital Children's Ward, with the goal is to raise $500,000 this year. It is now Australia’s biggest regional fun run and organiser, the Cotton On Foundation, will use the funds raised through entry fees to underpin a $7.2 million upgrade for the ward. All Bean Squeeze staff taking part in the run will have their entry fee paid by Bean Squeeze and its newest store at 322-328 High St, Belmont, will donate all profits on the day of Run Geelong to the Cotton On Foundation. This means Geelong locals can still contribute to the fundraising efforts even if they are not running on the day. Co-founder, Andrew Pec, said the Bean Squeeze team would be spreading the word by serving all coffee in the specially printed

Improving efficiency of care for elderly Retirement villages should be used more widely to support the elderly in surrounding communities who still live in their family home, says Mr Derek McMillan, head of Australian Unity Retirement Living. Mr McMillan said that selected retirement villages owned by Australian Unity had already started to do this, providing health and associated services for older Australians living in nearby suburban homes. “We believe our villages can make a significant contribution to the provision of health and care services to the elderly living in and around our communities. Day respite and in-home care delivered from a retirement village is a very practical and cost effective solution to a growing health care problem. This approach reduces travel time of specialist health workers who now visit clients at their homes. It allows them to spend more time helping clients rather than spending most of their time travelling. “We would like to provide these services more widely, however current government funding and allocation processes are too fragmented to support such efficiencies.” He said the Productivity Commission’s Caring for Older Australians report recommendation for a government-backed Aged Pensioners Savings Account scheme could also make it easier for those wanting to make the move into more age appropriate housing. “Current Centrelink arrangements are a big disincentive for pensioners wanting to sell up and move into smaller, age-appropriate accommodation,” Mr McMillan said. “Today, when age pensioners decide to sell their

home, they are penalised by a reduction in their pension payments by as much as 70 per cent, eroding the capital they have just released – just to maintain a comfortable standard of living. This creates a barrier for those wanting to move into purposefully designed units that adapt to their changing physical needs and would effectively allow older Australians to ‘age in place’,” he said. He explains: “For decades Australia has been creating a society of older people living isolated lives in large suburban homes; with scarce health care workers such as nurses spending unnecessary hours travelling across suburbs to care for them. Retirement villages, with their specialist care services for the aged, can both support the healthcare system as well as relieving it of many of the timeconsuming services required by the elderly that can be delivered better by others. “The savings account would help eliminate these financial barriers and enable older people to fund part of their care costs, alleviating the pressure on the government. As part-payers of their services, care receivers would also be able to direct their funding to service providers of their choice, giving them greater freedom and consumer power.” He said the costs involved to implement such a scheme are negligible—since the default behaviour (not selling and moving) means they keep the pension anyway—with immediate benefits to the community. These benefits include relieving the pressure on Australia’s housing supply—a key issue facing our cities—and reducing the pressure on health and ageing budgets. “The simple fact is, if pensioners have more money, they will either spend it on living (the economy wins) or on staying healthy (society wins),” Mr McMillan said.

Wills cut stress  Red Cross is encouraging us all to prepare a Will with special community Wills events to be held in East Geelong and Grovedale during October. Ian Williamson from Red Cross says, “The death of a loved one is a difficult time for everyone. You can help ease the stress on your loved ones by having a current Will. “A legal Will can save those closest to you from an enormous amount of unnecessary anxiety, complication and expense after you pass. A Will is also the most practical way of ensuring your final wishes are clear and the people you wish to look after are, in fact provided for. “After providing for loved ones, you can also help others by leaving a gift in your Will to Red Cross, so they can assist the most vulnerable people in our local communities for generations to come. Every gift in every Will, however large or small, makes a difference.” Red Cross and local solicitors have teamed up to help people prepare simple Wills for only $75 per person, at special community Wills events at Grovedale and East Geelong on the 27th and 28th of October. “This is a great opportunity to update or make a new Will,” says Mr Williamson. For appointments and more information phone Nicole on 8327 7917 or email nbaker@ redcross.org.au GROVEDALE Community Wills Event: 11am 3pm, Thursday 27th October, 2011. Anglican Church, Vicarages, 85 Heyers Rd, Grovedale. EAST GEELONG Community Wills Event: 10am - 2pm, Friday 28th October, 2011. St Matthews Anglican Church, Vicarages, 230 McKillop St, East Geelong. 


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COMMUNITY

Moving on from tragedy Helping people to pick up the pieces after life altering events has underpinned a number of recent projects facilitated by BacLinks, a division of Karingal, in partnership with local businesses. One example was ‘Project Pamper’, an evening of special treatment for people affected by cancer. Initiated by GMHBA, in partnership with BacLinks and supported by Myer Geelong and BayFM, the evening saw up to 200 women generously treated to a relaxing night of beauty and clothing advice, intimate apparel fittings, champagne, fine finger food, exclusive offers and samples. “We were so excited to launch this initiative for local people and their families who have been battling life threatening illnesses” said Mr Mark Valena, GMHBA Chief Executive Officer. The women enjoyed the evening enormously and were very appreciative of the opportunity to be pampered away from the day-to-day shopping crowd and to socialise with other women and their families who have shared their experiences with cancer. “I really enjoyed the night out. It was uplifting after a very tough time in my life,” reported one attendee. “I could just relax and enjoy the wonderful company, advice and treatment and it was a great reward for my daughter who went through everything with me”. Another project was developed in reaction to the devastating news of fire gutting the Jirrahlinga Koala Hospital, one of the region’s best-loved wildlife rescue sanctuaries, which claimed the lives of 6 koalas. BacLinks was pleased to work with the Alcoa Point Henry Smelter who provided a number of

Guests received champagne, fine finger food and other treats at ‘Project Pamper’ enthusiastic employee volunteers to spend a day taking care of general and garden maintenance, as well as constructing a memorial garden at the burial site of the koala fire victims. “After hearing about the fire, Alcoa employees were keen to volunteer their time in support of Tehree and the team at Jirrahlinga. The sanctuary not only provides a necessary service to Geelong, but it is also a wonderful facility where visitors can learn about native animals of the region” said Cynthia Crowe, Alcoa’s Community Relations Officer. Established more than 30 years ago by Tehree Gordon, following the Ash Wednesday bush fires, the Jirrahlinga Koala and Wildlife Sanctuary located at Barwon Heads provides a

much needed haven for injured and distressed wildlife, as well as a unique therapy for people who have a disability, special needs and the aged. The Sanctuary makes it possible for people to engage quietly with animals in a supportive environment that encourages interaction without placing demands on a person’s physical or mental capacities. Funded entirely by entry fees, donations and sponsorships, the Sanctuary welcomed Alcoa’s support as it strives to restore the site to its former glory. “The input from the employees at Alcoa not only assisted in building a memorial for the lives that were lost, but also gave our sanctuary staff a chance to help others understand our work and the loss and devastation caused by the fire,” said Tehree Gordon, Jirrahlinga Director. “Both of these projects are great examples of how local businesses can share their resources to make a positive difference to our community,” said Sheree Holdsworth, BacLinks Manager. “BacLinks support GMHBA and Alcoa with many community projects each year and are proud to call them Premier Partners.” How your business can assist your community right now… Donations of clean, well maintained men’s corporate wear, including shoes, are needed to help prepare disadvantaged young men enter the workforce. If you can assist please contact BacLinks on 5249 8989.

Jirrahlinga is a safe haven for injured animals such as these dingo pups.


WINE

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The Toast is Back Back in the day, you ate and drank what you grew and produced yourself. If times were good and the weather was kind you would grow a little extra to sell at market or even trade with your neighbour. You were limited by the climate and soils that existed on your property in your part of the world. As time went by shops were invented to sell the produce and then shops became supermarkets and, as they say, the rest is history; or is it? There is a growing movement back to the not so ancient art of market shopping. Every week in numerous suburbs and regions around Australia there is a regional farmers market where you can buy farm fresh produce. Luckily for us the farmers are prepared to make the long trek to the city to bring the very best their part of the country has to offer. You can buy fresh fruit and vegetables, meats, cheeses and sometimes, even wines. I’ve visited a few in my local area and they are packed. People turn out in great numbers, parking is at a premium, and if you don’t get in early you’ll miss out on all the good stuff. You get free samples and tastings, there’s usually local entertainment and everyone is friendly. You get to speak to the farmers and they’ll chat all day if you allow them to, not because they’re lonely, but because they are extremely passionate about the produce at their stall.

no competition between farmers’ produce and supermarket offerings. Supermarkets are convenient and suit our lifestyle as, according to statistics, we are time poor, but rather than sending money overseas to multinational organisations, helping out our local farmers is a far more worthy activity. In Europe, when you travel through both cities and the countryside, the locals are proud of their local produce. When you’re in Dijon you buy the best mustard, when you’re in Scotland you buy the best whiskey. We don’t have the history of many of the great food nations, but we have the passion. With such a diverse multinational population, we offer a diversity of produce that can be found nowhere else.

In our own back yard, Geelong has a multitude of producers who work tirelessly 365 days of the year (weather permitting) to bring you the finest world-class food and wine. All they ask is that for one weekend a year you take the time to visit them and enjoy the celebration that is The Toast Of The Coast. We’re spoilt because we don’t have to travel as far as some, and if you check the program there is bound to be a venue offering something that will suit your taste. Adrian Marchiaro When not immersed in his work as Winemaker's Assistant and jack-of-all-trades at the award-winning Witchmount Winery, Adrian presents wine tasting evenings at Lamby's Restaurant + Bar [check on renaming of Lambys to Black Sheep Café?]

Now, I’m not saying that we’re all going back to shopping this way. You do have to get up early and after a hard week of work, weekends can be a great opportunity to catch up on some sleep. For the more discerning amongst us however, who are all about the quality, there’s

eVeRY FRIDaY FROM 5pm

Free Entry, Free Wine Tasting, Free Gourmet Platters For Patrons, Free Live Entertainment Each Week 7th October – Made in many ways but always known as Merlot Some of the finest Merlot’s from home and abroad Entertainment: Warm Sands

21st October – Too many great wines of Tuscany An array of great Italian wines from the region of Tuscany Entertainment: Warm Sands

14th October – The diversity of today from New Zealand’s greatest Bay A fine array of wines from Hawkes Bay, New Zealand Entertainment: Paul Carrigg

28th October – And there off, and racing, can you pick a winner? A selection of wines to help you celebrate the Spring Racing Carnival Entertainment:Chic


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AFTER HOURS

GCC celebrates a well-supported innings The Geelong Cricket Club celebrated its Hat Trick Event for members last month, as the club celebrated an exciting phase of its 18-year history in one of the nation’s elite sporting competitions. Club President, Peter Jefferies said, “Cricket Victoria’s Premier Cricket competition is embarking on a new era of growth and expansion with significant resources being allocated to the promotion of Premier Clubs within the wider community. The emergence of Twenty20 and Women’s/Girl’s Cricket in recent years are just two of the areas where rapid growth and success are expected to continue and are being heavily resourced.” The event, held at the Fred Flanagan Room at Skilled Stadium brought cricket and sportlovers from around the region. [Photos by Terry Broun Jr]

Cricket Geelong President Peter Jefferies; Theresa Best & Ian Cover

No 1 ticket holders for Cricket Geelong Theresa Best & Ian Cover

Elisa Walleris & Rebecca Shanahan

Russell Peak; Glenn Buterworth; Karen Butterworth; David Barnes

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AFTER HOURS

49

Legalese made easy A crowd of over 100 guests attended the Harwood Andrews Lawyers presentation at a Geelong Chamber of Commerce breakfast event last month. The presentations addressed the key changes to the law in the last 12 months relating to businesses and how they operate.

Rod Payne Principal (Harwood & Andrews)

Jim Rutherford spoke on bullying and social media policies. John Hannagan provided an overview of the carbon tax legislation that has been introduced into Federal Parliament and Joanna Monahan spoke on the current interpretations of taxation laws. 

Greg Ure at Q&A time (Carlson Labs PL)

All businesses operate through having terms and conditions, even if they are as simple as stipulating the time within which payment of an account must be made.  At the start of this year, the Trade Practices Act which was Federal Legislation was replaced by the so-called new Australian Consumer Law which imposed uniform consumer protection throughout Australia, and importantly introduced consumer guarantees and prohibition against unfair contract terms in relation to all business dealings with customers.  By no later than January 2012, further legislation will commence to operate which governs how businesses can record their interest in goods that have not been paid for.  The combination of these pieces of legislation is that all businesses should be reviewing the terms and conditions of trade, which will incorporate their quotations and invoice terms.  Rod Payne provided an overview of these two important pieces of legislation.

Joanna Monahan Principal - (Harwood & Andrews) Sue  De Gilio - CEO GForce) Nicole Rowan (Greenline Engineering PL)

Jim Walshe (GCOC); Prof. Jean du Plessis (Deaking University)

Adams Court, Eastern Park Gardens East Geelong, VIC P: (03) 5226 2121 E: gcc.functions@aus.salvationarmy.org

www.gcc.net.au


50

AFTER HOURS

A fitting farewell for theatre season The cast of the show and two of Albert Namatjira’s grandchildren, artists Lenie Namatjira and Mervyn Rubuntja, chatted with Green Room guests at the GPAC stage production of Namatjira last month. The captivating play that took the audience into the life and extraordinary talent of Albert Namatjira was the final show of GPAC’s 2011 Alcoa Theatre Season. The play is a groundbreaking new work by Australian playwright, Scott Rankin, who teamed up the production’s star, Trevor Jamieson, to create a show that is taking theatre-going audiences around the country by storm. The Green Room event also farewelled the 2011 season, which featured Love Letters, Breast Wishes, Commercial Farce, Rainbow’s End, TURNS, Capture the Flag, The Gift, Krakouer and Namatjira. Photos by Ferne Millen Photography

Michael Betts, Jill Smith, Ros Betts and Tim Orton

Angela Howarth and Clem Laybourne

Trevor Jamieson, Derik Lynch, Lenie Namatjira and Mervyn Rubuntja.

Robert and Rita Costa

Maddie Steel and Kaz Paton


WHATS ON

51

08-09 October 2011 Streets Are Alive

Archie Roach

Streets Are Alive returns for its second big year, featuring a dazzling array of musicians, artists and street artists performing around the city centre and waterfront precincts. A weekend crammed with top line performers, with an emphasis on those from the local region. The city's streets, laneways and waterfront will buzz with all sorts of great entertainment. Streets Are Alive is an event coordinated and run by the The Gordon public relations students with the full support of the City of Greater Geelong. Little Malop Street will be the place to be on Saturday 8 October 2011 as its laneways are transformed into a street party fiesta, featuring powerful acrobatics, quirky roving street performers, a lantern parade and world class musicians! To ensure the event’s safe conduct, Little Malop Street between Moorabool and Gheringhap Streets, including James Street between Little Malop and Ryrie Streets, will be closed from 4:30am to approximately 7:30pm. Join in the fun the following day and head to the Waterfront as the fun continues from 12noon to 5pm, Sunday 9 October 2011. Come and experience the excitement of this all-age family friendly free event, celebrating our arts and culture. Where: Central Geelong. Details: www.streetsarealive.com

01-31 October

2011 Geelong Seniors Festival - The largest celebration for seniors in regional Victoria featuring a huge variety of community-hosted events. Details: www.geelongaustralia.com.au/seniorsfestival

07 October

St Laurence Annual Gala Dinner - Fundraiser dinner for St Laurence Community Services Inc. with performance by James Morrison and trio. Where: The Pier. Details: www.stlaurence.org.au

08 October Alcoa Australia Corporate Head of the River - This fun filled rowing regatta is targeted towards business and designed to raise funds for Give Where You Live. Where: Barwon River Rowing Precinct. Details: www.givewhereyoulive.com.au/events Central Geelong Farmers Market – Where: Little Malop Street, between Yarra and Moorabool Streets. Details: www.geelongaustralia.com.au

10 October

Creek Football Club. Where: Potato Shed, Drysdale. Details: www.geelongaustralia.com.au/potatoshed

15-16 October

El Caballo Blanco: Dance of the White Stallions. Where: The Arena. Details: www.elcaballoblanco.com.au

16 October

Camp Quality EsCarpade - Each year EsCarpade entrants hit the road for seven days in vehicles that are at least 20 years old, raising much-needed funds for Camp Quality. Where: Richie Boulevard. Details: www.campquality.org.au Bupa Around the Bay – Mass participation cycling event fundraising for the Smith Family. Where: Rippleside Park. Details: www.bv.com.au

20 October

An Evening with Friends of Viqueque – The story of VECCI and the businesses of Timor Leste. Where: Davidson Restaurant, The Gordon. Details: www.geelongaustralia.com.au

MasterClass for Growth Program – Information session on business growth in 2012. Cost: Free. Where: Victorian Business Centre, Geelong. Details: www.business.vic.gov.au/masterclass

21-28 October

12 October

Ride to Work – Join in the fun of Ride to Work Day. Where: The Laneway Gore Place Geelong. Details: www.geelongaustralia.com.au

Musical afternoon with Paul Zabrowarny on Cello, and Wang Zheng-Ting on Sheng. Where: Sainsbury Honigsberg, 1A Seaforth Street, North Shore. All welcome. Details: www.sainsburyhonigsberg.com

13-14 October

28-30 October

Jayco Herald Sun Tour – Some of Australia’s best cyclists head to Geelong for this premier event. Where: Geelong, Waterfront Geelong, Great Ocean Road to Drysdale. Details: www.jaycoheraldsuntour.com.au

13-16 October

2011 Royal Geelong Show – The Show returns this October. Where: Geelong Showgrounds. Details: www.royalgeelongshow.org.au

15 October

The Merger: Sportsman’s Night 2 - In this sequel to his multi- award winning show Spotsman's Night, comedian Damian Callinan reintrodues us to the Bodgy

Children’s Week – Various activities across Geelong. Details: www.geelongaustralia.com.au

23 October

Riches of Stitches – Embroidery exhibition. Where: St Stephens Church Hall, Belmont. Details: www.embroidersguildvic.org/branches/geelong

29 October

St Leonards Community Festival – Where: St Leonards. Details: www.stleonardscommunityfestival.com.au Portarlington Pelargonium Festival – Flower show. Parks Hall, Portarlington. Details: www.geelongaustralia.com.au

29-30 October

Toast to the Coast – Wine and food festival. Details: www.toasttothecoast.com.au

To publicise your event in GBN’s What’s On in November email: editor@geelongbusiness.com.au


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Geelong Business News - 201