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vol. 1, issue 3

Winter 2009 Issue dec • jan • feb Holiday Open House Winter at Red Butte Winter Solstice Winter Date Ideas


Editor

Bryn Ramjoue

Contributing Writers Bryn Ramjoue, Marita Tewes Tyrolt, Jim Bach, Fritz Kollmann, Rita Dodge, Gregory Lee, Miriam Eriksson

Miriam Eriksson, Jason Baker, Amy Thompson, Morgan Trinker

Contributing Photographers

Graphic Designer Amy Printed by

Thompson

IC Group in Salt Lake City

Red Butte Garden, a part of the University of Utah, is a non-profit organization located in Salt Lake City, Utah. With over 100 acres including display gardens, walking paths, and natural areas with hiking trails, Red Butte Garden is the largest botanical garden in the Intermountain West that tests, displays, and interprets regional horticulture. 300 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84108. (801) 585-0556. Copyright © 2009 Red Butte Garden. All rights reserved.

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Red Butte Garden’s mountainside location provides a remarkable setting for experiencing the Garden. Recently, when I was walking on the trails above the formal gardens, I looked back and down at the Garden and the surrounding city below it. From that height, the landscaping of the Garden and surroundings create a perspective on the Garden’s place in our community that we don’t see on a daily basis. 2010 will provide another perspective for Red Butte Garden. Not one based on place or context, but one based on time. It was 25 years ago that Dick Hildreth, Zeke Dumke, and a few others founded the Garden and gave it a mission to connect people to the beauty of living landscapes through horticulture, education, conservation and as setting for cultural events. In a world where companies, causes, entertainers, and politicians are popular one day and gone the next, a 25th anniversary symbolizes the enduring importance of a person, idea, or institution. It speaks to the enduring importance of Red Butte Garden and to the vision of its founders. Red Butte Garden, with its mix of formal gardens and natural areas, with its contemplative nooks and crannies and its wide-open park-like amphitheatre provides a setting for meaningful educational and recreational experiences in nature. It is a place of joy and discovery and a local community sanctuary where a child can have formative, lasting, and highly personal experiences in nature. It is a place of wonder, mystery, and adventure, where families can play, explore, learn, imagine, see, touch, smell and experience nature and the outdoors. For adults it’s a place for education and a place to experience beauty, entertainment, and quietude. For Salt Lake City it is an oasis in the desert, a community gathering place, a source of civic pride, and a place to create memories. Twenty-five years ago, who could of thought that Red Butte Garden would be all that? I suspect our founders did, and that it was that vision that gave them the energy and passion to create this gift to us. - Gregory J. Lee, Executive Director

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table of contents

features 2

Letter from Director

articles

4 Winter in the Garden

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Garden Fresh Recipes

8 Dragonfly Flyby

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Project Update

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12

Memorials

16 Sponsor Spot 16 Garden Information

Bugs in the Winter

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Seed Banking Celebration

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5 Ways Red Butte Staff Makes the Holidays Especially Green

calendar

6 Workshops & Classes

13 Activities - Free with Garden Admission 13 Winter Date Ideas 18 Winter Events Calendar

www.redbuttegarden.org

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The Richard K. Hemingway

Orangerie Did you know the Orangerie is available yearround for special and private events? Book your holiday party, corporate retreat, wedding, or other special occasion between November and April to take advantage of our off-season pricing! Enjoy breathtaking views from the Orangerie's grand windows as the seasons create an ever-changing backdrop of the Salt Lake Valley and the surrounding mountain ranges. Call 801.585.9563 for more information.

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Winter By Fritz Kollmann

Winter is a garden’s rest period. It is also time for gardeners to rest their weary knees and stiff backs. It’s a time to sit back and reflect on the seasons’ successes and failures. Much of winter can be idled away in the dreamy world of nursery and seed catalogs. And, during this period, if your eyes should wander to the window and see only a bleak, uninteresting snowy landscape, then it’s time you considered adding some plants with winter interest. There are many different qualities dormant plants can provide in the yard, garden or commercial landscape. Trees and shrubs with brightly colored fruit that persist into winter act as a lovely accent on snow covered branches. Spiky seed heads are architectural and attractive to birds when sticking above the snow-covered ground. Large clumps of ornamental grasses stand strong against the cold winds of January while providing cover for birds. Evergreen trees and shrubs are essential to the winter landscape with their striking foliage and strong presence. Trees and shrubs with colorful or peeling bark can add brightness and texture to an otherwise uninteresting winter scene. Trees that add colorful fruit to the winter garden include crabapples such as ‘zumi calocarpa’ (Malus x zumi ‘Calocarpa’) and ‘golden raindrops’ (Malus transitora ‘Schmidtcutfeaf ’). The shrubby staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina) retains it’s spike-like cones of red fruit for most of the winter and provide an

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in the garden important food source for birds. The ‘brown sugar’ colored peeling bark of paper bark maple (Acer griseum) is an incredible accent when the tree is properly placed where it can be easily seen from a window or pathway. Shrubby viburnum species such as the american and european cranberry bushes (Viburnum opulus and V. trilobum) add a touch of red to the early winter landscape with showy red shriveled fruits. The chokecherry bushes are not to be over looked either. There are both red and black fruited species (Aronia arbutifolia and A. melanocarpa) which look great planted ‘en masse’ or singly. The bright red or yellow bark of dogwoods (Cornus sericea and C. sericea ‘Flaviramea’) warm up chilly scenes as well. The ornamental seed heads of purple coneflowers (Echinacea sp.), black eyed-susans (Rudbeckia sp.), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and prairie dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepsis) are a welcome sight in the winter landscape. Smaller grasses also provide interest, the bluish blades of blue moor grass (Sesleria caerulea) and blue fescue (Festuca glauca) look charming when poking out from beneath a fresh blanket of snow. The surprisingly hardy tropical shrub aucuba japonica adds an exotic touch to shady habits with its yellow spotted evergreen leaves. Conifers provide invaluable characteristics which remind us of summer. A few of the many incredible conifers to consider include the deciduous bald

cypress (Taxodium distichum) which sports cinnamon orange bark. The incense cedar (Calocedrus deccurens) has dark green gorgeous fan like branched needles. Highly recommended for their Dr. Suess-like qualities, are the weeping giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum pendula), bristlecone pines (Pinus aristata and P. longaeva) and Tolleson’s weeping juniper (Juniperus scopulorum ‘Tolleson’s weeping’). Some plants even bloom in the winter months. The flowers of vernal witchhazel (Hamamelis vernalis) have long yellow strap-like petals and are fragrant. The bright yellow flowers of winter jasmine (Jasminum nudiflorum) are very fragrant and add a pleasant surprise on a winter day. The flower colors of hellebore (Helleborus sp.) include plum, white, and green tones and bloom in late winter/early spring, hence the common names Christmas Rose and Lenten Rose. For those with xeriscapes, the native great basin wild rye (Elymus cinereus) sports towering stalks while mormon tea (Ephedra viridis) provides a bright accent with its green twiggy leaves. These are just a few of the many plants that one could add to their garden to provide year-round interest. Visit Red Butte Garden and look at plants that interest you this winter and consider adding them to your landscape this spring. www.redbuttegarden.org

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SIGN UP for Winter Workshops & Classes

WREATH WORKSHOPS DEC 5, 9 AM – noon DEC 5, 1 PM – 4 PM DEC 6, 9 AM – noon or Dec 6, 1 PM – 4 PM

BOTANY FOR GARDENERS (LLHG 488)

JAN 26 – FEB 9, TUESDAYS, 6:30 -8:30 PM

Don’t go dormant this winter! Join us as we learn basic plant morphology and terminology knowledge Start the holiday season by creating a fresh wreath that will help you better understand plant for your front door at our annual wreath-making growth and take some of the guesswork out workshop. A variety of fresh greens will be used of gardening. In this hands-on class, you’ll to fill a 16 – 18” wreath frame. Workshop materials include fresh greens, cones, fruits, assorted learn why some shrubs are pruned immedecorations, and ribbon for bows. Attendees are diately after flowering while others are encouraged to bring unusual greens or your favorite pruned in late winter/early spring; how ornaments to include. Bring gloves, scissors, hand to tell a pine from a spruce and why pruners, and a basket. it matters; the reasons behind the difLimited to 25 participants per class. fering watering practices for turf and MEMBERS $50/NONMEMBERS $60 REGISTRATION REQUIRED 801.581.8454 OR ONLINE trees, and other common gardening AT WWW.REDBUTTEGARDEN.ORG questions. Co-sponsored by Lifelong Learning. Limited to 25 participants. Taught by: Michelle Cook, RBG Greenhouse Coordinator. members $62 + $5 special fee (sect. 002) nonmembers $69 + $5 special fee (sect. 001) registration required 801.587.5433 or www. lifelong.utah.edu

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FABULOUS FRUIT TREES (LLHG 554)

FEBRUARY 25 & 27, THURSDAY 6:30 – 8:30 PM, SATURDAY 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM Apples, cherries, apricots, pears, plums—how do you get the best from your fruit tree each year? Learn to care for your existing trees and give new ones a healthy start as we cover planting, pruning, thinning, pollination needs, and recommended varieties. Class two will meet outside; please bring loppers and pruners to this class. Co-sponsored with Lifelong Learning. Limited to 20 participants. Taught by: Michelle Cook, RBG Greenhouse Coordinator MEMBERS $53 PLUS $2 SPECIAL FEE (SECTION 002) NONMEMBERS $59 +$2 SPECIAL FEE (SECT. 001)

REGISTRATION REQUIRED 801.587.5433 OR WWW.LIFEFLONG.UTAH.EDU


Dragonfly What hap Flyby pens to

By Miriam Eriksson

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This beautiful male Blue-eyed Darner Dragonfly is such a valuable predator insect, reducing the mosquito and fly population at Red Butte Garden. Creeks and ponds are the perfect nursery for dragonflies to lay eggs that will then hatch into nymphs. The larval stage of large dragonflies may last as long as five years. In smaller species, this stage may last between two months and three years. When the larva is ready to metamorphose into an adult, it climbs out of the water and up a reed. Exposure to air causes the larva to begin breathing. The skin splits at a weak spot behind the head and the adult dragonfly crawls out of its old larval skin, pumps up its wings, and flies off to feed on midges and flies. In flight the adult dragonfly can propel itself in six directions; upward, downward, forward, back, and side to side. The adult stage of larger species of dragonfly can last as long as five or six months. 8

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bugs in the winter?

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Insects have a variety of methods for surviving the cold temperatures of winter: migration to warmer climates, hibernation in soil or in the wood of logs and trees, and plant galls. Some insect larvae reduce the water content inside the body and build up glycerol, which acts as a natural antifreeze! Insects also sleep through winter in different life stages; larvae, nymphs, eggs, pupae, or as adults. Many adult insects complete their life cycle and die off before or during the harsh winter season. In general, insects are able to survive cold temperatures easiest when the temperatures are stable. They have a difficult time surviving alternate freeze/thaw cycles. Rest-assured that bugs, and the wonderful role they play in ecology, will be back and will be as happy as we are to welcome spring.


www.redbuttegarden.org

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Garden Fresh

Recipes

Pumpkin Log

submitted by Jamie Trinker, (Marketing Staff)

Cake:

2 large eggs 2/3 cup pumpkin 1 cup sugar 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 3/4 cup flour

Filling:

1 8oz cream cheese 1 cup powdered sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla 2 tablespoons melted butter

Directions

Grease and flour cookie sheet, set oven to 350. Beat together cake ingredients. Pour onto cookie sheet, bake 15 minutes. While cake is baking, make filling. Turn out cake on dish towel that has been sprinkled heavily with powdered sugar. Cool 15 minutes and roll up with towel for several minutes. Unroll cake and spread filling onto layer, roll back up without towel and chill (can be frozen). Cut into slices and serve.

Pumpkin Pizza

adopted & modified by Amanda Peterson (VC Staff)

Ingredients

1 pumpkin (about 2 pounds), peeled and seeded 1 small yellow onion, sliced into 1/4-inch thick rings 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 1 1-pound package refrigerated pizza dough 1 tablespoon cornmeal 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves 1/2 cup fresh ricotta

Directions

Heat oven to 400 F. Cut the pumpkin into ½-inchthick slices, then cut each slice into 1-inch chunks. Place the squash and onion on a baking sheet. Drizzle with the olive oil, season with the salt and pepper, and toss. Roast until tender, about 20 min. Transfer to a plate. Increase oven temperature to 450 F. Roll the dough out Ÿ inch thick. Clean the baking sheet and sprinkle it with the cornmeal. Place the dough on top. Scatter the pumpkin and onion mixture over the dough, sprinkle with the thyme, and add dollops of the ricotta. Bake until golden, about 25 min. Slice into wedges.

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To submit your Garden Fresh Recipe: e-mail bryn.ramjoue@redbutte.utah.edu or send it by mail to: Communications 285 S. Connor St. Salt Lake City, UT 84113


pLanning & Construction

update

By Jim Bach, Landscape Architect

Rose Garden & Amphitheatre Renovation: Following its first year of operation, the Rose Garden is receiving the final elements to complete its original design. The Rose House, with a 650 s.f. central hall, 250 s.f. of dressing rooms, two restrooms, clerestory windows and a trellis ringing the exterior, should begin construction in early December and is scheduled to be complete in April 2010. Already under construction is the bridge connecting the Rose Garden and rear of the Amphitheatre stage. Helical piers, driven into the creek sediments to a depth of 30 feet to support the structure, assured the foundation would have minimal impact on the riparian vegetation and soil. Beams, joists and metal skirting are now in place and decking should be installed soon. Rails and lighting will complete the installation, which should be done by mid-December 2009.

Visitor Center Expansion:

The structure for our Visitor Center expansion is erected, the interior walls are framed, the gift shop has been removed in anticipation of reconstruction. The Administration, Education, Development, and Marketing staff are very excited about the upcoming move from Fort Douglas to the Garden. We are scheduled to occupy the space in late February. Development of the connector between Visitor Center and Orangerie has maintained momentum and concrete walls now define the mechanical area, elevator shaft and stairway. The contractor will be replacing paving on the Courtyard side of the Visitor Center before Thanksgiving and will work on the site repair and landscaping in the spring.

Conservation Garden: The Garden is about to begin design work on a Water and Resources Conservation Garden and improved roadway for tram service up to a turn-around above a future Rock Garden. The scope of work also includes design of an integrated interpretive and signage program, which we hope will provide a wayfinding sign template that could be extended to the remainder of the Garden.

Where do my donations go?

Please Consider a Donation to Red Butte Garden.

When you make a donation to Red Butte Garden, you are giving a gift to the community. Your contribution helps one of the State’s most valued resources maintain beautiful display gardens and offer quality educational programs for school children, adults, and families. Here is a sample of what your gift can do to help the Garden: $25 – New books for the Children's Garden library

$750 – Weather station in the Sprout House

$50 – 50 bulbs, two shrubs, or annuals for one flower bed

$1,000 – Haul away mixed use recycling for one year

$75 – Bus fare for one Title One school to visit the Garden

$2,500 – One year’s supply of shovels, rakes, and hand tools

$100 – Four rose bushes or twelve perennials

$5,000 – Haul green waste to the Salt Lake City composting facility for one year or purchase Garden's mulch

$250 – One month’s seasonal color display in the Orangerie $500 – Keep Red Butte Garden’s lawn green for one year

$10,000 – One utility cart or passenger shuttle

To make year-end tax-deductible contributions Call Chris Agnello, Red Butte Garden Development Director, at 801-581-5658. www.redbuttegarden.org

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Planned Giving

July – October 2009

In Memory of: £•

Jere Jones Millicent Wells John Donahue Robin Nelson Helen Kessler Ray Canning Rodney and Paulyne Preator

∫¢ For Memorial Gift Information call Wendy Loyning at (801) 585-3813

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Consider a charitable or estate planning gift. We invite you to explore with us the many ways planned gifts can be used to help the Garden achieve our important mission of education, conservation, botanical display, and community enrichment, while meeting your financial and planning needs. Red Butte Garden is grateful for all gifts and welcomes the opportunity to work with you and your personal advisors to determine what may be appropriate for you. All inquiries and communications are held in strictest confidence and without obligation. Please contact the Garden's Development Director, Chris Agnello at (801) 585-5658 or Executive Director, Gregory J. Lee at (801) 5813878 for further information.


Maximize Your Membership Benefits This Winter! These activities are FREE for members and are included with the price of admission for non-members - No Registration Required. To become a member call 801.585.3813 or visit www.redbuttegarden.org.

HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE & ART SHOW

DEC 5 – 6, SAT – SUN, 10AM – 5PM Visit us for the Holiday Open House, enjoy hot chocolate and cider in a festive atmosphere. This has become a wonderful tradition at Red Butte. For two days we have free admission to the public, our popular Wreath-Making workshops, and fantastic local artists offering their work for sale. FREE ADMISSION FOR EVERYONE!

GREEN HOUSE TOUR

FEBRUARY 11, THURS, NOON - 1:30PM Step out of the cold and into the warmth of Red Butte Garden’s greenhouses. Join us for a behind the scenes tour of our state-of-the-art greenhouses where we grow 100% of the Gardens annuals, basket and container plants, and Orangerie plants. Get a sneak peak at what is to come in spring. Limited to 25 participants. Taught by: Michelle Cook, RBG Greenhouse Coordinator REGULAR GARDEN ADMISSION/MEMBERS FREE NO REGISTRATION REQUIRED

Winter Date Ideas:

Snowshoeing: Check the snow conditions and bring your snowshoes to the Garden to explore the Natural Area. If you don’t have your own, you can rent snowshoes from Outdoor Recreation (2140 E. Red Butte Rd (300 S.) BLDG. 650, for $4-6/person). Hot Chocolate: Pack a backpack with a couple of old towels and thermoses of hot chocolate. The towels will help keep the thermoses hot while you enjoy the beauty of the gardens, and to sit on when you are ready to stop and drink your hot chocolate. Variation: Bring homemade soup in your thermoses and have a picnic. “TRACKING”: Bring binoculars with you to the garden. Ask the front desk staff what creatures have been sighted lately in the garden. Keep track to see who spots the most animals or animal tracks first as you prowl the garden. Photo Scavenger Hunt: Bring a camera and see if you can find and photograph all of these objects: 1) a bat house, 2) the baby moose sculpture, 3) the oak tunnel, 4) a seed pod, and 5) an icicle. bonus points: the quarry stone house Post your photos on our Red Butte Garden facebook, twitter or flickr sites and we will enter your name into a drawing and send the winner a day pass to the Garden.

www.redbuttegarden.org

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Seed Banking Celebration!

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This year Red Butte Garden joins in an international celebration of a milestone achievement in plant conservation! Ahead of schedule, the Millenium Seed Bank Project accomplished the challenge of conserving 10% of the world’s flora before 2010. The collection includes more than 3.5 billion seeds from 25,000 species. Along with 120 institutions in 54 countries, Red Butte Garden has participated in the Seeds of Success Program with the Millenium Seed Bank for seven years. The Millenium Seed Bank is an international plant conservation project headquartered in the UK at Royal Botanic Garden KEW. A seed bank truly is a bank that deals in plant seeds vs. money. At the facility seeds are placed into long-term storage by deep freezing them at -4˚C or cryogenic freezing and stored for hundreds of years. Operating similar to a financial bank, seeds are kept safe from disaster, are exchanged and loaned out, used to support research and restoration, and increased by seed production. Similar seed banks have focused on agricultural crops; however this is the first seed bank focusing attention on wildland plant species. Faced with global environmental changes and loss of biodiversity, even the most common species are in need of insurance for their survival. 14

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By Rita Dodge, Conservation Director Each year Conservation staff at RBG has been scouring the Utah landscape in search of the best seeds, ripe for gathering. A collection may involve a simple trip up Big Cottonwood Canyon; but more often requires our dedicated staff and volunteers to travel to remote areas, camp, hike hours on uneven terrain, and fight off occasional pests and sheep. The knowledge that we are making a positive impact on our environment is supplemented by the joy of time spent outdoors, amazing scenery, and making friendships. We also look forward to the challenges of MSB’s next goal for an additional 15% of wildland flora to be banked by 2020. RBG has contributed a total of 203 species to the Seeds of Success-Millenium Seed Bank Project. Of the 20,000 seeds in each collection half are stored at KEW and half at the National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation in Fort Collins, Colo. A portion of the seeds are made available for research and restoration efforts by Bureau of Land Management and other US partners. The BLM, which is the primary partner for the US, is particularly supportive of the MSB due to its emphasis for “on the ground” conservation and hard science which is immediately applicable for use on public lands. The Millenium Seed Bank is one investment whose value continues to grow with each passing day.


Look Forward to 2010 JANUARY Plant highlight: Paperbark Maple, Lacebark Pine FEBRUARY Plant highlight: Daphne, Lenten Rose, Witchhazel MARCH Plant highlight: Mini bulbs: snowdrops, crocus, squill Come visit our new, larger Gift Shop APRIL Plant highlight: 200,000 Spring Bulbs in Bloom Orchid Show April 3 - 4 Spring Bulb Show April 17 - 18 Arbor Day, April 30, is a ZAP Free Day MAY Plant highlight: Iris, Wisteria, Crabapples, Peony, Lilac Concert Tickets go on sale Annual Fundraiser Plant Sale May 7 - 8 Mother’s Day Jewelry Show May 9 Bonsai Show May 7 - 9 JUNE Plant highlight: Roses, Penstemon, Delphinium Check Website for Camp-Outs & Monday Family Night Concerts Annual Gala June 19 JULY Plant highlight: Day Lily, Hibiscus, Hollyhock, Roses Pioneer Day, July 24, is a ZAP Free day AUGUST Plant highlight: Roses, Sedum, Boltonia The Club Cactus blooms just one time a year SEPTEMBER Plant highlight: Aster, Autumn Crocus, Anemone Greek Theatre in the amphitheatre Labor Day, Sept 6, is a ZAP Free Day Bonsai Show Sept 24 - 26 Fall Bulb & Native Plant Fundraiser Sale Sept 24 - 25 OCTOBER Plant highlight: Native Grass, fall foliage and fruits Garden After Dark Oct 21, 22, 23,25,29 & 30 NOVEMBER Plant highlight: Oak collection Glass Art Show Nov. 5 - 30 Orchid Show Nov 6 - 7 DECEMBER Plant highlight: Conifer Collection Holiday Open House and Art Show Dec 4 - 5 ZAP Free Days for the Holiday Open House Wreath-making Workshops Dec 4 - 5 Winter Solstice Celebration Dec 18 Confirm events on our website.

5 Ways Red Butte Staff

makes the Holiday Season Especially Green Red Butte Garden Green Team

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“After the holidays, I take a pair of zig-zag scissors and cut out the front image from all the beautiful cards I have received. Next year, I punch a hole in them and use them as gift tags!” -Denise Charles (Guest Services)

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“I reused wine bottles last year by putting a small set of Christmas lights inside the bottle and decorating the outside with Christmas pine left over from the tree. Another fun idea is to make a wreath out of wine corks.” -Roxanne Kulakowski (Administrative Director)

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“My family spends a little extra on nice gift bags that we use for all occasions. Each time the bag shows up we try to guess the last time we all saw it.” -Wendy Loyning (Membership)

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“I save my brown packaging after a move to use as Christmas wrapping paper. I just add pretty ribbon and stamp it to make it more festive!” -Ann Flynn (Development)

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“It’s tradition to meet at my place downtown for a potluck. Then we walk to Trax and see the lights at Temple Square. We finish the night with hot chocolate and a festive movie.” -Nick Rothacher (Education)

www.redbuttegarden.org

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Sponsor spot So ... What do you think? We want to hear from you! As you have probably noticed - we have decided to turn a new leaf with our quarterly newsletter and calendar and provide you with a Mini-Magazine. We will be refining the magazine to make it a great resource for you and your family. We would love your suggestions for features or articles you would be interested in reading. We invite you to submit to our magazine. You can e-mail submissions and suggestions to bryn.ramjoue@redbutte. utah.edu or mail them to our mailing address below (attn: communications). Submission Ideas: original garden fresh recipes, garden poetry, photos: what’s blooming in your garden, articles on relevant seasonal subjects.

Dependability, convenience, security, trust and courtesy are the founding values of Wells Fargo. We’re conifident as we have been for 158 years through virtually every economic cycle that serving our customers responsibly and keeping customers at the center of everything we do is the best way to serve our communities. Together, we want to help create more economic growth and prosperity in Utah. Wells Fargo is one of the state’s largest financial contributors to communities. Even during this economic downturn, we continued our giving to nonprofits. Wells Fargo is proud of its long-standing partnership with Red Butte Garden and to support the Garden’s remarkable venues and programs.

Garden Information

2009 Advisory Board:

Admission:

Laurie Eastwood, Chair Carter Livingston, Vice Chair Olivia Agraz Dorothy M. Anderson Peter Ashdown Jane Barker Angelina Beitia Fred Esplin Kelly Fisher David E. Gee David L. Gilchrist Ron Henriksen Kathie Horman Peter Lassig Gregory Lee Vickie Long Rob McFarland Manny C. Martinez Michele Mattsson Rob McFarland Judy Moreton Michael Perez Bob Rose Ann Scott Sandra Steinvoort Sonnie Swindle Jim Wall

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Red Butte Garden

Hours: November 1 - December 23 Daily 9 am - 5 pm January 2 - February 28 Daily 9 am - 5 pm Closed Sundays from Jan. 1- Feb. 28* Closed Thanksgiving Day & Dec. 24 - Jan.1*

Adults (18-64) $6 Children (3-17) $4 Children under 3 Free Seniors (65+) $4 University of Utah Faculty & Staff with ID $4 University of Utah Students with ID Free Groups of 12 or more receive $1 off regular admission price for each person. Full group payment is due at time of Garden entrance.

* Private events may still be booked on closed days.

Location: Visitor Center, Gift Shop, & Mailing Address: 300 Wakara Way Salt Lake City, UT 84108 Phone: (801) 585-0556 Fax: (801) 585-6491 Website: www.redbuttegarden.org Comments: (801) 581-4938 or email bryn.ramjoue@redbutte.utah.edu

Product group from well-managed forests and other controlled sources

www.fsc.org Cert no. SCS-COC-001216 1996 Forest Stewardship Council


Saturday & Sunday December 5th & 6th 2009 Local Artists Open House – Unique Gifts

Don’t Cry ... Garden Adventures continue throughout the winter! Garden Adventures are our Kid’s events held on certain Saturdays throughout the year. Garden Adventures start promptly at 10 AM in Em’s Sprout House. Space is limited to 25 participants ages 4 - 12 are welcome with a caregiver. Please no infants. Members: $4 / Nonmembers: Regular Garden Admission +$6. REGISTRATION REQUIRED. See calendar on pages 18-19 for Garden Adventure dates. Call 801.581.8454.

Walk the Gardens – Free Admission Wreath Making Workshops* *Register at www.redbuttegarden.org OR CALL 801.585.0556

www.redbuttegarden.org

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WINTER 2009 Events at Red Butte Garden

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FABULOUS FRUIT TREES DAY 1 OF 2 (LLHG 554) 6:30 – 8:30 PM

20 Garden Adventures: 27 Beeswax Candle Making 10 - 11:30 am FABULOUS FRUIT TREES DAY 2 OF 2 (LLHG 554) 10 AM – 1 PM

28 Full moon

www.redbuttegarden.org

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NOW is the Perfect Time

to Purchase a Gift Membership

By giving your friends and family a Red Butte Garden membership you are giving them 4 seasons of: Discounts

Free Admission

• Garden admission for 12 months • Members Only Plant Sale • Floral Shows & Art Exhibits • Select Classes, Hikes & Lectures • Member Night at Garden After Dark • Over 200 Reciprocal Gardens Nationwide

• Outdoor Concert Tickets • Education & Children’s Programs • Guided Hikes & Workshops • Birthday Parties • 10% off at Red Butte Garden’s Gift Shop • Local Retail Partners

Purchase a Red Butte Garden gift membership at the Visitor Center or call 801-585-3813. Non Profit org. US Postage PAID Salt Lake City Permit #1529 300 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108


Red Butte Garden Newsletter - Winter 2009