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SEPTEMBER 2012 | A PUBLICATION OF THE RED & BLACK

[AMPERSAND]

BACK TO SCHOOL,

SCHMITT & WILLIAMS: BEYOND THE UNIFORM

BETTER BROWN BAGS BODY IMAGE ISSUES


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&

September 2012

C O N T E N T S

AMPERSAND MAGAZINE

ON THE COVER

16

Body Image & Female Athletes

17

Food: Brown Bags, Reconsidered

28

Balance: Allison Schmitt & Shawn Williams in & Beyond Athletics

6

Georgia Football: Get in the Know Before You Go

8 8

Saturdays Behind the Scenes

10 12

Gameday Done the Right Way The Fan Phenomenon

14

New Year, New Sites

24

19

MEET THE FOUR PERSONALITIES BEHIND

Fashion: Black, White, & Red All Over

24

The Men Behind the Mascot

Sports Soundtracks that Rock

HAIRY DAWG. ON THE COVER WHO: Olympic swimmer Allison Schmitt and defensive captain Shawn Williams PAGE 28: How they balance their sport lives and everything else. STARS COLLIDE: Our shoot was the first time our cover athletes had met. Williams immediately asked to hold Schmitt’s gold medal. Cover photo by Lindsey Boyle

PHOTOS | LINDSAY BOYLE AMPERSAND SEPTEMBER 2012

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&

EXECUTIVE EDITOR MAURA FRIEDMAN MANAGING EDITOR DARCY LENZ DESIGN EDITOR LOGAN PORTER

AMPERSAND MAGAZINE

PHOTO EDITOR LINDSAY BOYLE ONLINE EDITOR ANSLEY VASCONCELLOS

PUBLISHER HARRY MONTEVIDEO EDITORIAL ADVISER ED MORALES BUSINESS MANAGER ERIN BEASLEY OPERATIONS ASSISTANT ASHLEY OLDHAM EDITORIAL ASSISTANT LAURA HALLETT

RECRUITMENT EDITOR JESSIE MOONEY

ADVERTISING

FASHION EDITOR MARGARET HARNEY

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

FOOD EDITORS DARCY LENZ GINA YU DESIGNERS AJ ARCHER SARAH LAWRENCE BRITTANY ROBERTSON NOEMIE TSHINANGA CONTRIBUTING WRITERS ALEX LAUGHLIN MAURA FRIEDMAN GRAFTON TANNER TUKIO MACHINI BRITTINI RAY HANNA YU LYRIC LEWIN GINA YU DARCY LENZ CAITLYN BOHANNON ANDY BARTON LORI KEONG PHOTOGRAPHERS KENDALL THACKER SAMUEL SUTLIVE KAVI VU LYRIC LEWIN KAITLYN FRIZZELL MAURA FRIEDMAN LINDSAY BOYLE

NATALIE MCCLURE STUDENT AD MANAGER DANA COX ACCOUNT MANAGER WILL WHITE AD ASSISTANT LAUREL HOLLAND MARKETING COORDINATORS CLAIRE BARRON JOSEPHINE BRUCKER PATRICK KLIBANOFF HANNAH COUCH MELISSA VOLPE

DISTRIBUTION BEN BOWDOIN

PRODUCTION CREATIVE DIRECTOR DAN ROTH CREATIVE ASSISTANTS SCOTT SOLOMON BENNETT TRAVERS

ILLUSTRATOR SARAH LAWRENCE COPY EDITOR MOLLY BERG

COPYRIGHT 2012: NO PORTION OF THIS MAGAZINE MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT THE WRITTEN CONSENT OF THE PUBLISHER. THE RED & BLACK RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REFUSE ADVERTISING FOR ANY REASON. THE OPINIONS EXPRESSED BY WRITERS DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE OPINION OF THE RED & BLACK OR THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA.

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR I don’t know anything about football. So far I’ve skirted through my undergraduate career by cheering when everyone else in red and black does and telling strangers in airports who, upon hearing I got to UGA, want to discuss football that we’re in a transitional year. Every year. But Saturdays in Athens are still special to me. I love sitting with friends and food on my Pulaski St. porch and watching the streams of students and community members in red and black pass by and cheer to us or just say hello. For a town as diverse as Athens, in some ways these are the only days I feel we’re all truly on the same team. In this issue we tried to preserve that feeling of unity- articles like our gameday flowchart (pg. 6) help you cheer on the team and “The Men Behind the Mascot” (pg. 24) shows a more personal side of school spirit- as well as include content for different preferences- our gameday guide (pg. 10) helps you make the most of football season whether you’d rather embrace or skirt the crowds and “New Year, New Sites” (pg. 13) suggests a slew of new activities for every day between games. Whether you spend the next few home games on the field, in the stands or tucked away in a hidden corner of Athens, know that Ampersand is dedicated to covering the niche stories that intersect your interests and our community. September marks our one-year anniversary as a publication and we hope to only give you more in our second go-around.

75%

over

ads of UGA undergr ol do not feel alcoh xier. makes people se

–Core, 2011

Most UGA students make low risk decisions about alcohol.

Welcome back and happy reading,

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Send us feedback! We want your input on our publication. Send an email to magazine@randb.com with thoughts, questions, comments or criticism.

make smart choices. be a

uhs.uga.edu/aod/NCAAchoices.html For Alcohol Awareness and Education

University Health Center • University of Georgia A unit of the Division of Student Affairs


LEAD-INS

6 AMPERSAND SEPTEMBER 2012


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Please apply in person at our offices. 540 Baxter Street.

Downtown Clayton St. Athens’ coolest, best-made, and largest boot selection.


LEAD-INS

SATURDAYS

BEHIND THE SCENES

When it comes to gameday, most people think of the players on the field and the fans in the stands, but there’s a whole slew of other people who help make football games what they are, many of whom are University students. From serving up food to showing around potential recruits, these students have a unique perspective on Classic City Saturdays and the gameday community as a whole.

By Alex Laughlin and Maura Friedman Photos by Kendall Thacker

Emily Dennis Senior middle grades education major from Lawrenceville

Kristen Fairchild

Redcoat Band, clarinet

Senior international affairs and romance languages major from Lawrenceville Game Day Host

&: Why did you join the band? I did it because I had always been in band and I just wanted to continue that. I’ve been a Georgia fan my whole entire life — both of my parents and my granddad all came here, so I grew up coming to campus and seeing what it was like and going to games occasionally, so I remember when I was in high school, coming to some of the football games and seeing the marching band and I was like, ‘Wow, they’re so good!’ I just got really excited.

&: What do you do? We’re kind of like tour guides for all of the high school recruits that come that are interested in playing football here. They can talk with the coaches and then we bus over to the stadium. Usually they bring their families or their coaches, so we answer all of their questions about what life will be like here and why I love UGA.

&: Do you feel like you’re a part of the community on gamedays? Oh, definitely. I feel like I’m a huge part of it. Whenever I tell someone that I’m in the Redcoat Band, a lot of people are like, ‘That is so cool, we love the band, we stay in our seats and watch during halftime!’ And I just think that’s really awesome because people respond to that. We’re always cheering on the team, even if we’re losing.

&: Do you feel like you’re part of the UGA community? I really do think so. I enjoy it more than tailgating. Tailgating’s fun, but to actually be able to be a part of the football recruitment process, contributing what I can to the football team — it’s a good experience.

SIDELINE SOUNDTRACKS SPORTS SOUNDTRACKS THAT ROCK By Grafton Tanner Sports movies are usually known for their content, namely athletics, but if you focus on the sounds rather than the sights, sometimes you may find a pleasant surprise. These three movies are on our list as unlikely, but still superb, sports movie soundtracks that not only enhance the films they’re featured in but are also great as stand-alone playlists.

REMEMBER THE TITANS (2009) MONEYBALL (2011) Mychael Danna is no stranger to film composing. His filmography ranges from “Girl, Interrupted” to “The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus” and his scores fit the mood while guiding the film itself to new emotional heights. “Moneyball” is his latest project and its score mixes complex soundscapes with Reich-ian phasing. Lush beds of strings underlay plinky piano to create slow, bending movements of sound. It’s an atypical score for a sports movie, but then again, “Moneyball” isn’t your typical sports movie. It’s about the business of baseball and the infrastructure that exists within the game.

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FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS (2004) “Friday Night Lights” would have been remembered as just another inspirational football flick if not for Texas post-rock band Explosions in the Sky manning the controls of the musical score. Explosions in the Sky succeeds at making gorgeous, swooping guitar music that is floating and downright tear-jerking. Taking cues and cuts from their 2003 masterwork The Earth is Not a Cold Dead Place, Explosions crafts yet another layer of emotional yearning to a film that is as endearing as it is nostalgic. Not to mention the soundtrack single-handedly vaulted their name into the general spotlight with their weightless, lovesick anthem “Your Hand in Mine.”

The Jerry Bruckheimer-produced “Remember The Titans” is the definition of inspirational sports film. Set in the early 70s, it tells the story of a racially divided football team under the guidance of a new coach, played by Denzel Washington. The story and characters make the film, but the soundtrack defines the setting and era in which it takes place. Throwbacks like “Up Around the Bend” by Creaedence Clearwater Revival and Norman Greenbaum’s “Spirit in the Sky” will no doubt make anyone nostalgic. Though it only clocks in at twelve tracks, the soundtrack reads like a small snapshot of the early 70s popular music scene.


DO YOU EAT SNACKS ON A REGULAR BASIS?  We are recruiting participants (ages 18-45) for a research study “Snack food liking: The effects of cues and mood”  Participation involves one session lasting 4.5 hours  You will be compensated $45 for your participation  Additionally, you may earn up to $115 based on your answers to study questionnaires  For more information, call (706) 542-6881 or email SnackFoodLiking@gmail.com. This study is being conducted by Dr. James MacKillop of the Department of Psychology at the University of Georgia

REGULAR DRINKERS NEEDED FOR A RESEARCH STUDY  We are recruiting participants (ages 21-45) for an alcohol research study.  Participation will include one in-person assessment.  No treatment will be provided in this study.  You will be compensated $40 for five hours of participation.  For more information, call (706) 542-6881 or email alcoholstudy.mackillop@gmail.com. This study is being conducted by Dr. James MacKillop of the Department of Psychology at the University of Georgia


LEAD-INS

GAMEDAY

THE RIGHT WAY

By Brittini Ray

EAT

SIP

PHOTO | MAURA FRIEDMAN

Most gamedays include beverages, often of the alcoholic variety. For those looking to partake in this particularly spirited tradition, Walker’s Pub and Coffee on College Avenue is the place. Coffee shop by day and pub by night, the venue embraces its Irish motif and offers caffeinated drinks mixed with liquor to keep your Bulldog enthusiasm raging deep into the night. During the day, Walker’s caters to its cafe lovers, with a variety of coffees, teas and baked goods, then transforms its evening menu to cater to a 21 and older clientele. As post-game tradition dictates, patrons head to the heart of the Classic City, flooding downtown bars and eateries. However, many who thrive on the caffeinated zing found in a Starbucks Venti Caramel Macchiato cringe at the thought of game day-induced, mile-long bathroom lines, and must look elsewhere to find their fix. Two Story in Five Points, located just off the intersection of South Milledge and South Lumpkin, offers highquality coffee and tea blends, as well as a peaceful environment for customers to sip soberly and relax.

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A Guide to Surviving Football in Athens

PHOTO | SAMUEL SUTLIVE

Grubbing is a staple to any sporting event, but food generally runs pricey at the games. Instead of racing to concession stands during halftime for a hot dog and Coke, fans can chow down while watching the game at Transmetropolitan. Affectionately dubbed by students as Transmet, the restaurant offers affordable meals in a convenient location on Clayton Street, a short stroll from the gameday action on campus. Transmet offers Italian food, including pizza, pasta and panini, as well as a comfortable and casual atmosphere. Athenians seeking to dine outside of the football fervor alltogether might visit Farm 255 for a delicious oasis. Located at 255 Washington St., Farm 255 dishes out fresh, locally grown fare prepared to reflect culinary creativity and pay homage to regional, farm-to-table tradition. The restaurant prides itself on its “Mediterranean influence with a Southern culinary drawl” and offers a wide selection of wine, beer and spirits for those seeking a refreshingly well-crafted drink. This hidden gem provides customers with a relaxed setting as it resides just outside of the intense gameday foot traffic.


Bulldog printed slacks, stickers professing Greek love for the Dawgs and countless variations of the little red dress; the enthusiasm-filled football season has officially returned to Athens and “it’s time to tee up between the hedges.” But a Saturday in Athens means different things to different people and our guide aims to help you do gameday the right way, whether that’s spending the day fully entrenched in Bulldog Nation or avoiding the chaos altogether.

Ciné can serve as the ideal visual retreat from the gameday rush for those seeking to treat their artistic eye. PHOTO | SAMUEL SUTLIVE

WATCH

Of course, the most important tradition of partaking in a typical “Saturday in Athens” is watching the game. For many, nothing beats experiencing Georgia football quite like sitting in the stands; unfortunately, not everyone can obtain tickets. Fans not squeezing into Sanford Stadium can opt for viewing alternatives at locations around town such as the Georgia Theatre. With generously sized screens, fans watching from afar can feel as though they are cheering from right along the sidelines. Despite its popularity in college towns such as Athens, football does not top everyone’s list of favorite recreational activities. For those who prefer fine arts over athletics, Ciné offers a variety of films from different cultures and independent filmmakers. Instead of the usual popcorn and soda movie combo, Ciné offers a full bar and café for customers. Athens residents who are not fans of the intensity of a Georgia football game can find a calm haven on West Hancock Ave and experience a Saturday filled with cinematic creativity. AMPERSAND SEPTEMBER 2012

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LEAD-INS

BULLDAWG

NATION

A MELTING POT OF FANDOM By Hanna Yu Photo by Kavi Vu

B

etween the hedges, fans range from students and alumni to those who are strictly die-hard fans. When it comes to college football, there seems to be a widespread phenomenon of extreme fandom based in a vicarious linkage to the University itself. Some fans may not have the academic tie to UGA, but they do have a tie that is rooted in family, hope and tradition.

A Bulldog for Tradition Philip Spence was born in June, around the preparatory time for football season, and claims to have been a UGA fan since birth. “I’ve been going to games since I’ve been months old,” he said. “I started to appreciate being a fan since childhood.” The first game he vividly remembers was the 1996 Texas Tech game. “It was pouring down rain the entire evening,” he said. “We left at halftime and we pulled back into our driveway when Larry Munson announced that Georgia had won 15-12.”

A Bulldog Family Jeff Whitmore and his wife Dena have lived in Georgia for roughly 50 years, sharing a long-standing fanship for UGA football.

Spence says his relationship to his family on game day depends on the number of football tickets to go around.

Mr. Whitmore first became a UGA fan by listening to famous Georgia sports announcer, Larry Munson. “[It’s all] fun and good times watching games,” Mr. Whitmore said. Their son, 21-year-old Daniel Whitmore, was born a UGA fan. “I have pictures in a UGA onesie,” he said. With a Georgia-filled upbringing, the loyalty to UGA has persisted throughout his childhood and into young adulthood. For the Whitmore family, a mutual passion for Athens, football and the state of Georgia converge to create a special familial bond. “It’s given my family something to always root for together,” Daniel said.

12 AMPERSAND SEPTEMBER 2012

“It’s love-hate depending on who gets to go to what game,” he jokes.

A Hopeful Transfer In Macon, Ga., Perry Lee is rooting for UGA. Lee currently attends Georgia Southern, but hopes to transfer into UGA. The first Georgia game for Perry Lee was the Georgia-Clemson game when he was 11 years old.

It’s brotherly love when Spence and his brother happen to go to the same game. “My brother and I don’t really do much and it’s one of the things we do together,” he said. Of course, Athens offers more beyond Sanford Stadium. Spence reminisces about wandering the North Campus and values traditions that surround gameday, such as ringing the Chapel Bell on victory days.

His brother, David Lee Jr., attended UGA and together they created memories of pre-game tailgating, throwing parties and taking advantage of These are memories shared by UGA fans the vibrant social scene of downtown Athens. everywhere, whether they’ve taken a class on campus or not. “The whole city is amazing,” Lee said.


• 40 Draught Beers • Pizzas, Salads, Hoagies, Wings, & More • Delivery thru Bulldawg Delivery • Free WiFi

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LEAD-INS

NEW YEAR NEW SITES Story and photos by Lyric Lewin

W

hile almost every Athenian has attended an energyinfused concert at the 40 Watt, or eaten a buttery biscuit at Mama’s Boy, there are many restaurants and places of entertainment that seem to stay under the radar. Even though Athens has more bars and music venues per capita than most cities- there are also rivers to float down, state parks to explore, and diverse cuisine to enjoy. As the new semester begins, here are some local gems to explore as you shake up your routine.

Desi Bazaar

For exotic foods, visit Desi Bazaar (pictured far left) for groceries or Quickly (pictured far right) for a meal with bubble tea on the side.

One could easily drive past this grocery store on South Milledge and never even see it. Right before the Islamic Center of Athens and attached to Laser Car Wash is the Desi Bazaar, a small market with food from Pakistan, India and other Middle Eastern countries. A proud sign marks the entrance: First Class Groceries. The store is essentially a small room lined with shelves (one could walk across the breadth of the store in two full steps), but what it lacks in size it makes up for in niche foods such as lamb, goat, naan and other ethnic favorites. For anyone who is from or has been to these parts of the world, this small but personality-driven grocery store will bring back fond memories, from the tubs of olives to Albeni chocolate treats.

Ballroom Dancing The UGA Ballroom Performance Group holds Friday Night Dance Parties on campus throughout the semester. A free lesson is given at 7 p.m., and then after learning the fancy footwork to the tango, salsa or waltz, the social dancing begins at 8pm. The dance is only $3 for students and $5 for non-students. On September 7 the group is hosting a live band and teaching swing dancing lessons. Check out the website for dates and schedules: www.ugaballroom.com.

Quickly This restaurant has an understated storefront with big windows and a simple slogan adorning the doorway: Quickly: Babo Tea and Amazing Burger. Whether you like taro tea with tapioca or you’re craving an appetizer of octopus, Quickly has a wide selection of Asian foods and drinks for incredibly cheap prices. The convenient location on 650 W Broad Street will allow you to pick up food on your way downtown or as you drive home from classes.

Keppner Boxing This boxing gym offers a variety of classes, including competitive boxing, fitness boxing and even youth boxing. The instructor, Keith Keppner, is a licensed USA boxing coach. Check out the website at www.keppnerboxing.com if you’re interested in signing up for a membership, or attending a free adult class on Saturdays at 6 p.m. The gym is located at 143 Ben Burton Circle.

Poetry at the Globe On the first Wednesday of every month, the Globe holds a poetry night. After climbing those creaky wooden stairs to the top floor of the iconic brick building and gathering around a conglomeration of leather sofas and high-back chairs, local writers can recite their poetry to an enthusiastic and empathetic audience. Contact The Globe at (706) 3534721 if you are interested in signing up.

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Where It’s Always Saturday in Athens For all your game day needs, gifts and clothing

Celebrating 35 years in Athens!

thetacostand.com | facebook.com/TheTStand

378 e. broad st. • 706.548.2700

Milledge Ave. (est. 1977) 670 N. Milledge Ave. Athens, GA 30601 706-549-2894

3 ATHENS LOCATIONS Eastside (est. 1987) 2270 Barnett Shoals Rd. Athens, GA 30605 706-549-5481

Downtown (est. 1992) 247 E. Broad St. Athens, GA 30601 706-549-1446


LEAD-INS

FEMALE AT H L E T E S and

BODY IMAGE By Gina Yu, Photo by Kaitlyn Frizzell

You wake up in the morning, roll out of bed and stroll out onto manicured, perfectly green grass. You look up to a sea of red and black blurs cheering and chanting. In an instant of panic, you stare down at yourself to see that you are in a shimmering two-piece, or even worse, a leotard... Contrary to belief, athletes are not machines that can simply go to classes and then hours of work-outs, finding an easy balance and healthy self-body image. “Throughout your career at UGA you are expected to look like you did when you entered college,”Emily Brewer, a junior and thrower on the University’s Track and Field team said. “But not only that, you want to better yourself, which at many times means improving your physical shape.” Brewer is actually coached to gain weight in order to be successful in a sport that requires heavy weight lifting and being as strong as physically possible. Often, female athletes are expected to to maintain dual and dueling expectations: be abnormally strong without showing too much bulk or curvature. Look naturally thin. Caroline Keyes, a junior and former Georgette, remarks on her and her peers’ struggle to present an ideal dancer’s body. “Dancers have some of the highest physical expectations because of the aesthetic beauty aspect that goes along with the sport, so many girls struggle with eating disorders and then go workout or dance for hours upon hours a week. After, they then get complimented on how good their body looks, and the cycle continues.” The Georgettes are an auxiliary of the Red Coat Band that have been known for their controversial required weekly weigh-ins. Shayla Worley, a senior and current Gym Dog, also commented on the pressure athletic performance in front of thousands can create and how it can so easily spiral into negative body image. She says she was able to avoid that burden with help from coaches and nutritionists. For Worley, the nature of the perception-based sport of gymnastics taught her what it really means to “look good,” particularly for judges, according to Worley. “A huge part of that is confidence which comes from training and being consistent with your gymnastics,” she said, “and another portion from how comfortable you are with your appearance and the body image you have of yourself. There is no hiding in a leotard.” Facing the scrutiny of crowds and the unforgiving nature of scales and photographs, female athletes at UGA try to embrace their bodies, even amid the expectations of the media-created ideal body shape. “Our bodies are the most important tool to our success and it can’t be forgotten about even with all the stresses that come with being a student-athlete,” Worley said.

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Senior Gym Dog Shayla Worley finds that developing a positive body image stems from first having confidence in her body’s physical capabilities.


FOOD

BROWN BAG DONE BETTER

For the collegiate crowd, limited time and limited funds combined with hectic schedules can lead to carelessly constructed monotony sandwiched between white bread. So often written off as a pseudo-meal eaten out of necessity, it’s no wonder the “brown-bag” lunch has acquired a nasty reputation among the vast majority of anyone 12 years and older. But a lunch worth looking forward to can create the brief midday mental oasis necessary for tackling the latter half of the workday. Packing an enjoyable meal need not be a daunting task and, with these rejuvenated renditions of sack sandwich staples (prep time and costs still kept low), it’s high time we take lunch for all it’s worth. By Darcy Lenz, Food styling by Gina Yu, Photos by Lyric Lewin

PB/B/B

Inexpensive and filling, peanut butter serves as an unfaltering staple in student pantries across the nation. That said, tired peanut butter and jelly sammies enveloped in soggy Wonderbread are better left back in your 1993 Ninja Turtles lunch box. In this vegan take on Elvis’s supposed standby snack, crunchy peanut butter texturally complements tender banana slices. “Frying” the sandwich causes sugar from the banana, nut butter and bread to caramelize into a gooey stack of oh-so-sweet indulgence. Balanced by the vegan bacon’s saltiness, this slightly more sophisticated outlet for your peanut butter yields a most satisfying solution to any sweet+salty craving.

2 slices cinnamon swirl bread 2 Tbsp crunchy peanut butter ½ a large banana, thinly sliced 2 slices veggie bacon

NOTE: pork or turkey bacon may be substituted in a non-vegan/vegetarian option Yield: One sandwich $1.65 per sandwich

VEGAN

Prepare the bacon according to 1/ package directions, set aside. Spray a

skillet with non-stick cooking spray and place skillet on stove burner over medium heat.

The Big Deli-cious 1 pretzel bun, halved 1/2 Tbsp whole grain mustard 1 Tbsp fig butter 3 ounces sliced deli pastrami 3 ounces sliced deli roast beef 1 slice muenster cheese Small handful of arugula thinly sliced red onion Yield: 1 sandwich $3.87 per sandwich Spread the mustard 1/ across the inside of one half

of the bun, then spread the fig butter across the other. Layer remaining ingredients in between the top and bottom half of the pretzel bun.

2/Spread each slice of bread with

one tablespoon peanut butter. Layer the banana slices on one slice of bread. Arrange the bacon slices on top and close the sandwich.

3/Place sandwich in heated pan and

cook until first side is golden brown (3-5 minutes), flip the sandwich and repeat with the remaining side.

Cold cuts have potential far beyond limp sandwich bread and a Kraft American single, and reaching it is no difficult feat. Building a better sandwich boils down to a simple balancing act- flavors, textures and of course time and budget. Inspired by elements from the best of NYC deli fare, this sandwich requires little time to pull together but yields a big return in taste. Bold components such as mustard, red onion and arugula are juxtaposed against a mild nutty cheese and sweet fig butter for a palatable equilibrium. Spring for cold cuts freshly sliced in the grocery store’s deli department if your budget allows. In a mighty meat stack such as this, beef quality counts. AMPERSAND SEPTEMBER 2012

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FOOD

THE SPREAD A good bit of what separates the “gourmet” sandwiches you purchase in restaurants from those you make at home pare down to the details. Here are a few extremely simple condiments that can take your sandwich above and beyond any quick-hit sub shop.

maple bacon bbq sauce 1 Tbsp bbq sauce ½ Tbsp grade A maple syrup ½ Tbsp crisp bacon bits

Curried Avocado Egg Salad Pita ½ a large pita bread 1 large egg 2 Tbsp Greek yogurt ¼ tsp curry powder (or more to taste) 1 pinch white sugar 3-4 red grapes, quartered ¼ rib celery, diced 1 Tbsp cashew pieces ¼ large Hass avocado (peeled and diced) salt and pepper to taste Yield: 1 sandwich $1.08 per sandwich The beauty of egg salad in general: there’s a solid chance that, at this very moment, your kitchen is stocked with the basics to whip up a quick batch. Switching mayo for Greek yogurt significantly cuts saturated fat and boosts health benefits. Tossing curry powder and avocado into the salad packs in flavor you won’t find in the typical tea sandwich standard and bears a healthy dose vitamins and heart-healthy fat. Simple to prep ahead in bulk, tripling the egg salad on Sunday means this week’s lunch is one less thing to worry about. Adapt with different mix-ins to keep things interesting. This isn’t your grandmama’s egg salad.

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Place the egg in a small saucepan and fill with 1/ cool water, covering the egg by about one inch.

Bring to a boil. Once the water reaches a boil, turn off the heat, cover the pan, and allow to sit on the warm stove for 15 minutes. In the meantime, whisk together the yogurt, 2/ curry powder and sugar in a medium-sized bowl.

feta spread 1 oz crumbled feta cheese 1 Tbsp Miracle Whip

Add the grapes, celery, nuts and avocado. After the egg has completed cooking, run under cool water and allow to stand at room temperature for 1-2 minutes. Peel the egg shell, and carefully dice the hard-boiled egg and add to the other ingredients. Gently stir with a rubber spatula until all components are evenly distributed. Add salt and pepper, then adjust other spices to taste.

3/

Spoon egg salad into the halved pita pocket.

blackberry ketchup 1 tbsp prepared ketchup 1 Tbsp blackberry preserves

PRO-TIP: To prevent your pita from

becoming soggy, package the egg salad in a small tupperware, bring along a spoon and assemble the sandwich whenever you’re ready to chow.

VEGETARIAN rosemary mayo 1 Tbsp prepared mayonnaise ½ tsp chopped fresh rosemary leaves 1 dash garlic powder


FASHION

WHITE, BLACK &

RED

ALL

OVER

This September, slip between the aisles in collegiate style with UGA-perfect hues and a nod to the Swinging Sixties that translates school spirit off the tailgate and into the stacks. Fashion Editor | Margaret Harney Assistant Fashion Editor | Kimmy Keslin Stylist Assistants | Maria Finocchiaro & Caitrin Wolford Photographer | Maura Friedman

AMPERSAND SEPTEMBER 2012

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FASHION

CLOSE

ENCOUNTERS Her long silhouette and his sporty initiative fit right in with gameday status quo but make for breezy postgame break-aways.

On Her: Maxi stripe dress, $46.50, Private Gallery. Fabric cuff, $10, Community Boutique. Slap bracelet watch, $18.50, Native American Gallery. On Him: Members Only maroon windbreaker, $24, L.L.Bean black briefcase, $60, Minx.

Sport mixed prints, not mixed signals in checkers, sparrows, and striped.

On Her: Mystic tie-neck blouse, $56, Fab’rik. Freeway black and white bandage skirt, $25, Community Boutique. Studded leather bracelets, $16.50 each, White leather bracelets, $24 each, Native American Gallery. On Him: Lord & Taylor Kensington Collection checkered vest, $25, Minx.

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On Her: Katie May Los Angeles Megan tank, $19, Show Pony. Black equestrian style leggings, $29, Pitaya. Chain necklaces, $18 each., Pearl necklaces, $16 each, Cillies. Xhilaration Silverleaf wedge in animal print, $29.99, Target.

WINDOW

SEAT

Sunning and studying requires the nook of an arm, familiar plaid, and gray-scale garb.

AMPERSAND SEPTEMBER 2012

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FASHION

Reserved Section Stand out in the archives with studies in monochrome.

FACE

BOOK

Turn pages with flirty florals and comfy cardigans to break into fall semester.

22 AMPERSAND SEPTEMBER 2012

On Her: Flower print dress, $88, Fab’rik. Xhilaration Silverleaf Wedge, $29.99, Target. Vinyl record earring, $12, Red leather cuff, $39, Agora. On Him: Lacoste Izod cardigan, $49, Cillies.

On Her: Moody Street by Puritan checkered blouse, $25, Chainmail bracelet, $40, Community Boutique. Old Navy tweed miniskirt, $12, Cillies. On Him: Polo Rallph Lauren polo, $19, Agora. Geneva silver wristwatch, $30, Cillies.

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ATHENS’ OWN

One Dawg, Four Faces—Getting to know the men behind the mascot By Caitlyn Bohannon, Photos by Lindsay Boyle

O

ne of the most iconic mascots in the country, Hairy Dawg has quite the split personality- four to be exact. Head mascot Charles Purcell, Parker Moore, Colton Fowlkes and Billy McWhorter trade off performing the role of this jersey-clad bulldog to collectively make up one of the top 10 mascots in the nation. Tryouts for the part of Hairy Dawg require a formal application, a twominute skit and an improv performance judged by a panel consisting of former mascots, cheerleading and dance coaches and the spirit coordinator. For their brief skits, applicants base their performances around a solid theme, which allows them to show their individual creativity. Veterans Purcell’s and Moore’s skits blew away the audience, as they used their “signature moves” to win over the judges, according to Purcell. Purcell, a senior from Augusta, Ga. majoring in management information systems, is beginning his third year as mascot. He has an affinity for using props and crowd surfing at games, while Moore looks forward to leading the band, as the Red Coats holds a special place in his heart, he said.

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AMPERSAND SEPTEMBER 2012

Growing up with stories detailing the glory of ol’ Georgia from his father, a former UGA football player, University senior Parker Moore has always wanted to be involved with the team. After shooting sideline photography for a couple of years, the New York City native majoring in communication studies decided to try out for the part of Hairy Dawg and is beginning his second year as mascot. “What gives us the most joy is being able to give back to the community,” Moore said. “Whether it’s visiting nursing homes or children with special needs, the amount of enthusiasm on their faces makes this job definitely worth it.” Though this will be his first season as Hairy Dawg, Colton Fowlkes, a sophomore from Cumming, Ga. majoring in genetics, is no novice on the field. Having served as his high school mascot for two years, Fowlkes was determined to pursue the mascot program at UGA. After Fowlkes was told by the spirit coordinators to keep prop usage to a minimum during his skit, he was convinced he had sold the crowd following his performance, but


Though each bears his own signature mascot moves, Purcell, Moore, Fowlkes and McWhorter, collectively form the dedicated and dynamic Hairy Dawg.

AMPERSAND SEPTEMBER 2012

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ATHENS’ OWN heard about the extravagant routines of Purcell and Moore. “I knew there was no way I could make it after that, but then I did.” Fowlkes said. Billy McWhorter, a sophomore from Lincolnton, Ga., may be undecided on a major at UGA, but he is wholeheartedly dedicated to his responsibilities as mascot. Currently serving as an alternate, McWhorter looks forward to his first year as Hairy Dawg and seeks to be full-time next season. “I’m ready to step up and do whatever it takes to make the crowd happy,” McWhorter said. “It makes me feel grateful to be able to put a smile on people’s faces.”

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Though it is a position based on spreading joy, wearing the Dawg head isn’t for the faint of heart. Aside from posing for countless snapshots with fans and maintaining crowd interest, Hairy Dawg battles temperatures that run roughly 35 degrees warmer inside his suit than those outside. Despite the discomfort, these select students push through the blazing football games because of their devotion to the job. “The mascot program is taken very seriously,” Purcell said. “I think a person has to be extremely committed to be Hairy Dawg as well as have the ability to not take yourself too seriously.”

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Temperatures inside the Hairy Dawg suit run roughly 35 degrees warmer than the weather on the field.

Check It Out Hairy Dawg tryout videos can be found on YouTube via the UGAHairyDawg channel, where you can watch Purcell do the Bernie and turn his swag on, while Moore pushes the crowd to get “Outta Your Mind” with the help of a Dance Dawg, then lead the Redcoat band through one of their songs.

26 AMPERSAND SEPTEMBER 2012


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ATHENS’ OWN

BALANCE By Andy Barton and Lori Keong, Photos by Lindsay Boyle

Strength of body and strength of mind are inseparable for an athlete—a balance that can rule the success of a game or event. For those who are striving towards academic excellence and healthy social lives on top of that, maintaining a delicate balance of time and energy during one’s daily routine becomes even more critical. Senior Shawn Williams will begin his senior year rounding out Georgia’s defensive line-up and tackling economics classes. Three-time Olympic gold medalist Allison Schmitt will likewise return to school to complete her degree and swim for the Lady Bulldawgs.

R

eturning senior Shawn Williams has built a strong reputation for himself at UGA. Since his arrival at the University in 2009, Williams has appeared in 40 games, was named a Newcomer of the Year winner for special teams and received both the Aubrey Cecil Rhodes Football Scholarship and the Milton “Red” Leathers Football Scholarship.

To extend that list of accomplishments even further, the statistics for his breakout 2011 season suggest that Williams reaches towards his potential with full force. In 2011, he recorded a team-best 72 tackles in 14 games, with 48 being solo.

So how does a prominent student-athlete like Williams keep this win-driven whirlwind from getting to his head? He makes a daily conscious decision to focus only on the tasks directly in front of him. “You’ve got to go out every day and do what’s for now. You can’t think about tomorrow. Tomorrow’s not promised to you,” said a placid Williams. It’s evident that Williams knows a thing or two about balance, focus and stability. He knows that success in football, as well as life outside of Sanford Stadium, is largely about being mentally prepared. The consumer economics major attends class until about 2 p.m, at which time he gets into the football mindset and practices until roughly 6 p.m. “Everything’s a mind thing. Even when things get hard and tough, you’ve got to keep

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AMPERSAND SEPTEMBER 2012


going,” said the 6’1 strong safety. Aside from being mentally prepared, it doesn’t hurt that Williams is physically equipped as well. The senior from Damascus was named the defensive recipient of the True Grit Award following spring practice, and he’ll need that momentum heading into the 2012 season. “He’s what you really want from a safety-style player,” said secondary coach Scott Lakatos. “He can make tackles, he’s versatile in coverage, he can play some man on some guys, he can play some zone, and he’s smart so he’ll be around the ball, and when he gets there, I’m sure if he gets his way, he’ll be very physical.” The Bulldogs have a lot to live up to this season. They’re currently ranked sixth in both the USA Today Sports poll and ESPN.com’s Power Rankings. When asked how he deals with that kind of pressure and media attention, Williams knows that both simply come with the territory. “The same people that’ll lift you up will be the ones to bring you down,” Williams said. “If you’re gonna listen to all the good stuff that they say about you, you’ve got to be ready for the bad things.” Williams is the full package equal parts mental fortitude and physical prowess. He’s a balanced player with the experience necessary to get the job done on defense and lead the Bulldogs to another appearance in the SEC Championship game. Accommodating athletics, academics and a social life is no easy task; it takes hard work, dedication and the right amount of mental preparation. For Williams, it’s worth it, because everyday is a fresh start with no promises for tomorrow.

A

lthough decorated Olympic swimmer Allison Schmitt is far from her childhood days, the start of the 22-year-old University senior’s impressive athletic career hails backto her youth in Canton, Mich In an article written by the Plymouth-Canton area Patch, Schmitt’s junior swim coach, Josh Morgan, said she and her family “kept the mood light” when Schmitt was growing up and tackling sports in addition to normal-kid activities. She credits her ability to handle many projects at once to her parents, who instilled discipline in her from a young age. “My parents taught me growing up that academics come first,” Schmitt said, going on to explain that learning time management when she was a child helped her to handle all of her responsibilities. Her tight-knit family is also closely linked with her bubbly demeanor; with them she grew up learning to laugh, and laugh a lot. Even in a press conference, with several cameras trained on her, bright-eyed Schmitt barely seems to notice and continues to crack jokes in between questions. “She has a pretty positive look on everything,” said UGA head swimming coach, Jack Bauerle. “Even through disappointments, she’s smiling.” Known for her consistently upbeat persona, during the Olympics, she emerged from races with an effervescent grin beneath her swim goggles. Likely for practical reasons as well. After all, Schmitt left the pool at each race she swam in London with a medal—three gold, one silver and one bronze.

AMPERSAND SEPTEMBER 2012

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ATHENS’ OWN

Although she brilliantly anchored two relays and brought back gold both times for her team, Schmitt’s most telling demonstration of flair and mastery in her craft were in the 200m freestyle event, where she broke new Olympic ground. There was a lot of pressure on her to do well, said Baurle, “but ‘Schmitty,’” as he affectionately calls her, “has a good sense of how to focus when on that level. She has a very unique approach to the sport. It’s inherent and very special.” While some athletes are marred by their competitive side, Schmitt is markedly close with her teammates. Calling her a “consummate team-player,” Bauerle said Schmitt was “great for everyone, not just for herself.” Perhaps the biggest factor in her success, though, is her approach to challenges. In the intense pressure surrounding athletics at an Olympic level, it takes not only a great degree of physical stamina, but also a large mental capacity for calm under duress. Describing Schmitt’s attitude during races, Bauerle simply said that she “has more fun, the more important it is.”

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AMPERSAND SEPTEMBER 2012

Schmitt takes this approach to high pressure situations and applies it to her studies as well. Now that she is at UGA, Schmitt will work towards completing her bachelors in psychology, but when she graduates, she said she hopes to somehow work with kids, giving back some of the opportunities she had. When asked what it means to go from an international sporting event back to school, Schmitt said nonchalantly, “There’s not much that’s different. There are more obligations as media requests come in, but I still have focus. It’s just another chapter of life.”


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Ampersand Magazine, September, 2012 Edition  

Ampersand Magazine, September, 2012 Edition

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