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MARCH 7, 2013 • VOLUME 120, Number 27 Eve Carson was a former Athens resident and UNC student who was shot to death on March 5, 2008 in North Carolina.

redandblack.com

NEWS

Pain at the Pump The fuel cost of spring break

Eve Carson: Five years and not forgotten

Safety tips for this year’s spring fling From avoiding dehydration and sexually-transmitted diseases to not becoming a lobster, The Red & Black has you covered.

page 3 By Emily Schoone @emscho33 A life cut short isn’t necessarily a life not well spent. A treasured Athens daughter and studentbody president at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Eve Carson touched the community. Her accomplishments and influence do not go unnoticed, despite the shock surrounding her shooting five years ago from Tuesday. From Athens to Chapel Hill, Carson had a way with people that few can soon forget. The valedictorian and student body president of Clarke Central High School class of 2004, Carson went on to be a Morehead-Cain Scholar at UNC-Chapel Hill. She was elected student body president in February 2007, and her ambitious platform and heavy involvement was reflective of her enthusiasm for the college and the aesthetic that its students embodied. “I think that Eve was involved in every single part of campus, in some way or another, and that was the way of Carolina student culture, just to do as much as you can in as many different disciplines with as many different types of experiences,” said Katie Sue Zellner, a friend of Carson’s who was involved in her campaign. “Eve definitely embraced that spirit at Carolina and really made the most of that culture ... She had a hand in everything.” Zellner was a freshman when she met Carson, who was a sophomore at the time. They met through a mutual friend, but their paths crossed through the See CARSON, Page 6

Medical residency Residency programs at Athens Regional and St. Mary's will be here in five years for students.

page 9

SPORTS

Record-high national gas prices ensure that students will have less spending money. Above are the round-trip costs to spring break spots. ILLUSTRAtion by jan-michael Cart By NICHOLAS FOURIEZOS @nick4iezos As the prospect of sunny beaches and rolling waves draws nearer, college students wait in anticipation for classes to end and spring break to start. But before they go, students should check their wallets. Record-high gas prices are promising to make a dent on hard-earned vacation funds. The average price per gallon of gas in Georgia closed at $3.71 last week, showing a momentary lapse from the week before’s average of $3.77. February’s average national price was $3.65, its highest ever. “Motorists should see gas prices ease back a little more this week,” said Jessica Brady, a AAA public relations specialist. “We’re starting to see the inflated price of oil and gas drop to more appropriate levels given the economic circumstances.” However, Brady said gas prices could rise again soon. “March is the peak time for refinery maintenance to occur which could keep upward pressure on gas prices,” she said. Some of the most popular spring break destinations for University of

Georgia students include Daytona Beach, Fort Lauderdale and Panama City. But when students cross the border into the sunshine state, they will see gas prices rise to an average of $3.82. Patrick DeHaan, a senior petroleum analyst for GasBuddy.com, said the price difference was mostly due to Florida’s higher tax rate on gas. “The state tax applies to about 6.5 to 7 cents a gallon,” DeHaan said. “The other 3 cents may be the difference in shipping the gas to Florida and the cost of trucking. A lot of Florida’s gasoline is supplied by barge. Georgia has the advantage of a major pipeline running right through it.” Considering that the average car gets 21 miles per gallon, according to mpgfacts.com, the approximately 654 miles from Athens to Fort Lauderdale will cost students about $235 roundtrip. Traveling to Daytona will cost about $145, and to Panama City, about $125. “We really haven’t seen any effect in terms of gas prices having an effect on spring break travel,” Brady said. “If anything, people may just stay closer to home.

The Multicultural Services and Programs office at the University of Georgia has undergone renovations since last summer, displacing its 13 student organizations. New offices for each of the organizations, which range from the Black Theatrical Ensemble to the Hispanic Student Association, had a projected completion date of October 2012, meaning that students would only have to wait two months of the academic year before settling in. However, deadlines were continually pushed back to November, then January, until finally the new offices on the fourth floor of Memorial Hall were made available at the end of February. Meanwhile, the student leaders were forced to share cramped offices and limited space on the second floor, for a

much longer period of time than they anticipated. “We transitioned a few days ago, literally. We’re still unboxing things. We were informed [of delays] six different times. We were told that we were getting new office space...in May, before the summer,” said Regy Perlera, the president of the Hispanic Student Association. “We get here in August, and they’re like, ‘Oh, we’re still doing some finishing touches.’ We get a message from our old director, Miguel Hernandez. He gets us an email that says it’s getting pushed back to January. Then before we leave for winter break, they tell us February or March, and we were ready to move in January before they pushed it back again.” Hernandez left somewhat unexpectedly before the new year, with the stated desire to pursue postgraduate studies at Florida State University. See OFFICE, Page 7

The Diamond Dogs have trusted Nelson Ward to be the spark at the top of their lineup. So far, he has responded well.

page 21

New defensive leaders in the locker room Amarlo Herrera and Damian Swann look to fill the leadership gap on defense this spring.

page 20

VARIETY

See FUEL, Page 3

After 5 months, Multicultural office finally opens By Brad Mannion @madbrannion

Top of the order

Malcolm Mitchell teams up wth Usher The Georgia wide receiver sided with Usher's New Look Foundation to encourage kids.

PLAY

Solo flutist finds solace in creative classics James Galway, the living legend of the flute, will perform at Hodgson Concert Hall Thursday.

PLAY Delays with the new MSP offices in Memorial Hall forced organizations to share a cramped temporary space.

INSIDE THIS WEEK Special pullout inside will provoke ‘Mildcats’ Excited for Thursday's game against Kentucky? We are too! Pull out our "Brick" section to intimidate the Wildcats tonight.

SEAN TAYLOR AND BRAD MANNION/Staff

NEWS, 2 • VIEWS, 4 • SPORTS, 13 • PLAY The Red & Black is an independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community

Established 1893, Independent 1980


Thursday, March 7, 2013

2 NEWS

The Red & Black

AT A GLANCE ‘Perhaps hundreds’ receive false EITS email in scam Phishing emails which appeared to be “legitimate University emails” were brought to the attention of the Enterprise Information Technology Services. An ArchNews email was sent in warning – this scam could be used to gain private information. EITS was alerted to the two emails by an abuse notice sent

to the Security Operations Center, and because it showed up on a few mailing lists, said Laura Heilman, the EITS security awareness training and education manager. “Since the SOC people were able to get a hold of it, they were able to block people who were on campus from going to

that link [included in the email],” Heilman said. “Unfortunately that means that any one not on campus may have responded to it.” There is no way to be sure how many people received the email. Heilman said that one of emails was from an address that looked like it was part of the UGA system

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and included aspects, such as a return address for a “UGA IT Help Desk,” that looked legitimate. With a closer look, they were seen as fake — UGA has an EITS Help Desk instead of an IT Help Desk. — Jana French

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Literacy unites Delta Phi Omega From selling baked goods to competing in a burrito eating contest, Delta Phi Omega hosted a variety of events this week in hopes of raising money for children’s education and literacy. All fundraising proceeds will go to the charity Asha for Education, an organization dedicated to bringing education into the lives of underprivileged children in India. The week kicked off with a bake sale Monday. On Tuesday, the sorority headed to the H.T. Edwards Teaching and Learning Center to help children with their homework. Paddle Palooza took place Wednesday. There will also be a burrito eating contest. In closing their week, Delta Phi Omega will hold an anti-bullying seminar. — Emily Erdelyan

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Ratio Christi, which translates from Latin to “the reason of Christ,” is a Christian apologetics club that has recently appeared on campus. The main focus of the group is the use of apologetics, or defending a religous position through facts and rationale, in order to defend and attempt to provide evidence to prove Christianity. Since its start, the organization has grown to encompass 94 clubs across the nation and eight international groups including one in South Africa at NorthWest University, according to the organization’s website. There are seven clubs in Georgia, including clubs at Georgia State University and Georgia Institute of Technology. The club is comprised of students and run by students. UGA’s club has 15 members, but it has not yet been recognized as an official club by UGA.

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Hitting Athens one more time of Montreal, an Athens-based alternative pop-rock band, performed at 40 Watt Club Friday night. The band said this would be its only performance in Athens this year, but it would be releasing a documentary DVD sometime in 2013. jonah allen/Staff

CRIME NOTEBOOK UGA student charged after driving over yellow lines A University of Georgia student was arrested and charged with DUI and failure to maintain lane Saturday at 2:16 a.m. after the arresting officer saw the student driving halfway out of his lane on Vine Street, according to a UGA Police report. The officer pulled the car over and spoke with the driver, Dexter Jamal Strother, 25. Strother reportedly told officer that he “did not realize he had been driving the way he had.” After getting out of the car, Strother reportedly turned around and put his hands behind his back. The officer asked him to turn around, and asked if he had anything to drink. Strother reportedly told the offi-

cer he had been drinking. He reportedly couldn’t remember what bars he had been to, but said he had two Long Island iced teas and a Guinness beer. The officer said that while speaking to Strother he saw that “his eyes were blood shot, his speech was slurred and slow and that the odor commonly associated with an alcoholic beverage was strong on his breath and person.” Strother was arrested and taken to Clarke County Jail. He was unavailable for comment by The Red & Black — Kelly Whitmire

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Two UGA students report fraud A University of Georgia student reported financial transaction card fraud Sunday between 6 p.m. and 6:57 p.m. after noticing purchases she hadn’t made on her account, according to an Athens-Clarke County Police report. The student told officers her card was declined Sunday. She then saw three transactions which cleared Sunday, worth $177.97, that she hadn’t made. The victim was not aware of anyone having her card. Another UGA student reported a theft of lost or mislaid property and identity fraud Sunday between 1:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. after a man used his debit card in a jewelry store in Jackson County, according to an Athens-Clarke County Police report. The student reportedly went downtown, couldn’t find his debit card and “was unable to cancel his debit card,” and after looking online saw the card was used at Top Jewelry in Jackson County. The victim drove to the jewelry store and got receipts for three purchases totaling $404. The owner of the store was able to find video of the transaction that showed one man from a group of four used the card. — Kelly Whitmire

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UGA student charged after driving wrong way downtown A University of Georgia student was arrested and charged with a DUI after she went the wrong way down East Washington Street, a one-way road, Saturday at 12:44 a.m., according to an AthensClarke County Police report. The officer pulled the car over and spoke with the driver, Egle Gabrielle Trilikauskyte, 22. The officer could reportedly smell “a very strong odor of an intoxicating beverage(s)” on her. Trilikauskyte also had “bloodshot red glassy” eyes and a mild slur. Trilikauskyte reportedly told the officer she “had not con-

sumed any alcoholic beverage(s) what so ever,” and agreed to a breath test. The officer gave her the breath test, and she blew a 0.179. She then said she had a “few beers” about two hours before. The officer then asked Trilikauskyte to perform a field sobriety test, which she failed. The officer then arrested Trilikauskyte and she was taken to Clarke County Jail. Trilikauskyte did not have a comment for The Red & Black. — Kelly Whitmire

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Thursday, March 7, 2013

The Red & Black

NEWS 3

FUEL: Smarter driving could cut traveling costs ➤ From Page 1 If you’re going to the beaches, you might cut back on dining out to compensate for the increase in gas.” Blair Roemer, a sophomore pre-journalism student, said last spring break she and her friends traveled together to Gulf Shores, Ala. She said gas prices limited the scope of her travel plans. “I just feel like the farthest I would go is Florida and it would be expensive,” Roemer said. “But compared to getting a plane ticket, it is pretty equivalent.” While students might feel the pain at the pump, driving still costs less than corresponding plane ticket prices. Flights to the southern regions of Florida, including Fort Lauderdale, range from $400 to $500, costing roughly twice as much. Students looking to lessen the financial strain can take advantage of smartphone apps which let drivers know where the lowest gras prices are. GasBuddy. com’s and AAA’s mobile apps both track gas prices and are free downloads. “We all rode together and split it up, so it wasn’t that much,” Roemer said. “I’ve never used [an app], but it sounds like it would be useful — I never knew they existed.” Brady said travelers could get better gas mileage by making two adjustments. “Not drive aggressively. Not rapidly accelerating, hitting on the brakes - that actually decreases fuel efficiency by 30 percent,” Brady said. “Secondly, remove any unnecessary weight from the vehicle. Only take what you need. The heavier the vehicle, the harder it has to work, the more gas it is going to burn.” More refueling stops, when done strategically, actually increase fuel efficiency. “I know when I was in college, I always drove on an empty tank of gas,” Brady said. “Keep your tank at least half full. That ensures that every time you hit the gas pedal, your vehicle is getting a decent and constant stream of fuel.” Meanwhile, the public’s interest in traveling has increased in the past year, which is possibly a sign of economic optimism. The Traveler Sentiment Index, conducted by the U.S. Travel Association, reported an 86.6 score for October 2012, as opposed to an 81.4 score a year before. The index measures five categories, including overall interest in travel and its affordability, and defines a 100 or higher score as an overall “positive” attitude toward travel.

When traveling for spring break, students should take precautions against exhaustion, dehydration, STDs and sunburn in order to remain healthy throughout the week-long break. COURTESY WILLYSPIERBAR

Don’t let spring break hurt your health Parched at Panama City Beach? How to avoid dehydration:

Travelling to Transylvania? Tips for international destinations:

Symptoms: dry and sticky mouth, tiredness, no tears, sunken eyes, vomiting and diarrhea. Causes: Sweating, fever, vomiting and diarrhea if you’ve been sick. Treatment: Take small drinks of water often — don’t drink a lot all at once. No sports drinks, they have too much sugar. If your dehydration is very severe, go to a hospital. Your doctor may recommend intravenous fluids. “I would just say, basically, to be proactive,” Liz Rachun of the University Health Center said. She said it was important to drink water throughout the day and to remember that alcohol can worsen dehydration. “It’s always good to bring lots of water bottles, disposable water bottles. That’s what I tend to do when I go to the beach and trail mixes and stuff if you’re going to stay at the beach all day so you can make sure you don’t have any weird blood sugar things.” said Paul Dobson, a sophomore risk management major from Watkinsville.

Be aware of any health concerns in your destination spot. Check out the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Traveler’s Health site. Is the water potable — or drinkable — at your vacation destination? “If someone comes back and they’re not well and they don’t feel well, and it lasts for more than a day or so and they have a high fever — any of the normal things, definitely come in to the Health Center and get checked out,” Rachun said.

— Jeanette Kazmierczak

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Weekly

Corner

Red as a lobster at Rosarito Beach? How to avoid sunburn: While sunburn in its less severe forms is self-explanatory, the complications can be severe. Blisters may form in some cases, and long exposure can cause second degree burns. Sun poisoning can result in severe cases. Symptoms include rash, chills, nausea and fever. Long term exposure to the UV rays in sun accumulates over time and may cause skin cancer. Some medications, like the antibiotic doxycycline, can make you susceptible to burning. Treatment: Prevention is the best method, so wear sun block. “Avoid the sun in the middle of the day if at all possible,” Rachun said, or take breaks. In less severe cases, taking a cold shower, applying a cool wet rag, moisturizing cream if there are no blisters and ibuprofen.

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Sensuous in South Padre Island? Advice on sexual health: Nearly 75 percent of all students said they never or rarely used condoms on spring break in a study done in 2002 by Arizona State University. Around 48 percent of the men and women in the study said they regretted the decision to have sex under the influence. About 88 percent of females and 74 percent of males said they weren’t worried about STDs or HIV despite the risk. “Even if [your friend] meets the love of their life, don’t let them leave with the love of their life,” said Liz Prince, associate director of health promotion at the Health Center.

Subdued in South Beach? General safety tips: Know what to do if something goes wrong — “Once you’re intoxicated, you’re not able to do it. Plan ahead, have your safety measures in place,” Prince said. “Getting to know your surroundings, forming a buddy system, trusting your instincts,” Rachun said. “Avoid being alone and isolated with someone you don’t know.” Rachun also suggested students email important phone numbers to themselves — in the event they lose their cell phones, the numbers can be accessed from any computer.

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Alcohol affects everyone differently according to age, gender, race/ethnicity, physical condition, family history and more. “What I typically say to people is make sure you eat a good, solid meal before you go out and drink. Carbs do not absorb alcohol. It needs to be a combination of proteins, fats and carbs.” Prince said. “Don’t conserve calories to drink.” All things in moderation — which the Dietary Guidelines for Americans defines as one drink for women and two drinks for men for a single day. “If you’re going to drink, have a drink and then have either or water or a non-alcoholic drink so you’re spreading it out,” Rachun said. Never leave drinks unattended, if you have to turn your back on it get a new one — “It’s worth the two or three bucks to replace it,” Prince said.

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Thursday, March 7, 2013

The Red & Black

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Red & Black wants to know what you think — so let’s start a conversation. Email: opinions@randb.com or letters@randb.com Facebook: Like The Red & Black Twitter: @redandblack

Kathleen LaPorte Guest Columnist

College kids brace for beach parties

OUR TAKE

UGA Makeouts accommodates viral voyeurism We’ve used our editor’s perch to squawk about voyeurism before. Fads like TapthatUGAguy come and go, but the sometimes innocent, sometimes dark motivation that drives their popularity is a constant. The most recent iteration of this fad is UGA Makeouts, the Twitter dive that compiles photographs of, er, passionate rendezvous downtown. Now, we’re well aware of the boozy urges that lead people to sacrifice their dignity and, later, clothing before the altar of Venus. What stumps us, rather, are the motivations of the picture takers. According to the anonymous Oz behind UGA Makeout’s digital curtain, these snoops submit over 100 photos every weekend night — a veritable army of plainclothes police officers begging you, yes you, to take that final shot of brown liquor and try to get lucky. Do you feel lucky, punk? Some are even willing to sacrifice their anonymity to heighten the joke. Several pictures on the UGA Makeouts feed include the snoops themselves, posing beside their lingually-preoccupied subjects. Finally, we came to the conclusion that these prurient paparazzi are motivated by a confluence of emotions: part schadenfreude, part drunken giddiness and part desire to document just how crazy That Night had been. In other words, they do it for entertainment value, and we hope it can be agreed that entertainment value does not justify snapping compromising photographs of other human beings. It is undignified, even as the act captured is undignified. Regardless of its propriety, it is safe to say that the motivation behind the site is age-old. Whatever possessed an ancient Pompeian to deface a pub wall with the message “I screwed the barmaid” over two millennia ago is surely the same that leads Dawgfan to tweet a photo about the “New boy getting some love,” today. Given these realities, we urge all students to consider their actions downtown. As you reach for your smartphone camera, or alternately for another round of alcohol, ask yourself: is what I’m doing wise? Is it right? —Blake Seitz for the editorial board

Tell us what you think search: makeout ››

M

Julie Bailey /Staff

Meat of the matter: vegetarian lifestyle better for body, soul

F

eeling clearer, lighter and more aware than ever, I can say that leaving meat far behind me was one of the best decisions I’ve made as a young adult. There are notable instances of vegetarianism dating back to ancient Greece. The mathematician Pythagoras, for example, abstained from the consumption of animals due to his fundamental opposition to animal cruelty. Of course today there are many mainstream faces associated with the vegetarian/vegan movement, from Natalie Portman to Anthony Kiedis and even to Mike Tyson (all vegans). One of the main arguments for vegetarianism is overtly spiritual, and can be found in both ancient religions and individual spirituality. Mahatma Gandhi laid out his support for vegetarianism by stating “Spiritual progress does demand at some stage that we should cease to kill our fellow creatures for the satisfaction of our bodily wants.” My switch to the veggie diet was influenced by nutritional evidence, documentaries, spiritual expansion and a pushy mom who happens to be a professional yoga instructor. My mother always told me to “think about where our food comes from,” and for once I listened and started examining how food made me feel. Soon I started to appreciate real food, nutritionally balanced food. As a busy college student who claims to have a social life, I know it can be hard to find

Charles Drury

Guest Columnist

time for documentaries about nutrition, so I’m going to challenge you to do something a little easier, and much less boring: eat vegetarian for a week, maybe two. Take it at your own pace; get creative — whether it’s in a dining hall, your home kitchen or a restaurant. In the end, if you simply reduce your consumption of meat — say, by eating smaller portions, or only once every couple of days — you will still experience great results. When my stepdad and I first tried vegetarianism, we would binge on meat once a week. So take my challenge, and even if you don’t become a vegetarian, you may at least appreciate meat a little more. From all of us happy vegetarians and vegans: give plants a chance. If you don’t love them after a week, you can have your meat back, guaranteed. —Charles Drury is a freshman from Madison majoring in English education

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Students not prepared for puppy ownership

T

here is a puppy problem at the University of Georgia. A Youtube video goes viral with a puppy’s sneeze. Between classes, the service dogs frolic on the quad. Every half hour a mutt-load appears of a friend’s new puppy asleep in a pizza box or wearing a silly hat. I get it, puppies are cute and puppies are better than most college friends. A puppy would never steal your favorite top and then spill a beer on it, and would not dare ask for notes when it slept through class. Puppies provide the innocent joy that chocolate can only provide temporarily. And for the first time, mom and dad can’t stop you from owning one. However, I feel that once the Humane Society becomes a bookmarked website on your computer and you find yourself wandering Petland alone at odd hours, please step back and say no to the puppy.

Allison Skinner Guest Columnist

Before branding me as a soulless person who seeks out her potted plants for advice, hear me out. Puppies are expensive creatures that poop when the feeling’s right and chew whatever is handy. They expect you to finance the vet bill when they decide to devour your hidden candy stash. Plus, that dog is going to be around for the next 15 years, which means that the freedom to pick up stakes and go on a road trip, spend a weekend in the big city or disappear in Southeast Asia for a few months ain’t gonna happen until you find and finance doggie daycare. Ultimately, dogs require

the love and care we do not have the time or wallet for when we are expected to hold part-time jobs, do well in classes and find careers in our spare time. Do not despair, however — there are still ways to get your puppy fix. Some campuses are beginning to offer puppy playtime rooms during finals as a way to destress students. Also, the University offers a training service dog program that provides the best of both worlds: a loving dog to accompany you everywhere, without the 15-year commitment. It’s true, nothing beats rubbing a puppy’s belly, but scrubbing poop out of your carpet in fear of your landlord is not much fun either. —Allison Skinner is a sophomore from Athens majoring in public and international affairs

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idterms have slowly sucked all the joy out of life, and the only hope left for a depressed student body suffering from football season withdrawal is spring break. Spring break is the paramount of all college vacations. This is not Thanksgiving with the neighbors or Christmas with grandma — this is a vacation all about you and embracing life as a careless and reckless college student. Planning for spring break has been going on for months now, and if you are just starting to get a move on things, good luck. You will most likely be spending spring break at home watching Shark Week on Netflix, inwardly seething as you imagine a Jaws-like fate for your fortunate peers who planned ahead. Location is key. A beach is nice, but if it is not filled with hundreds of crazy, like-minded college students forget it — you might as well be vacationing at a retirement home. Once your place is booked and set, the yoga mats and tanning beds come out, because being tan before laying out in the sun and obtaining perfectly-crafted abs before inflating your beer gut are both key parts of spring break preparation. As much as spring break is an escape from reality, however, federal, state and scientific laws still apply. Cops are put on high alert during spring break season, so leave illegal items at home. or you may end up checking into the big house rather than the beach house. Once you have made it to the beach, fill up those painted coolers and let the party begin. Spring break is no regular party — this is one of the only times in our mundane lives where we can party on the beach in swim trunks and bikinis, listening to DJs mix beats with ocean waves while playing beer pong on a table dug out of the sand. So enjoy spring break: meet new people, make new friends, meet the love of your life — twice. Just remember that the bigger the party, the harder the hangover hits. —Kathleen LaPorte is a junior from Decatur majoring in journalism and public affairs

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Opinion Meter: The week that was

APOCALYPSE NOW?: In the run-up to Friday’s $85 billion federal budget cuts, some issued dire warnings of laid off teachers, detainees running wild in the streets, five-hour TSA delays and, we can only assume, the end of life as we know it altogether. One week in, we’re still here, waiting for the reaper. What a letdown.

BULL MARKET: The Dow Jones rose to its highest level, a $10 trillion rally since the market’s nadir in 2009. This is a good indicator, but other important indicators (unemployment, GDP growth) remain anemic, and some are skeptical that the sugar rush can continue. We’ll cross our fingers and prepare to sell.

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

NEWS: 706-433-3002

Editor In Chief: Nick Fouriezos Managing Editor: Nick Watson News Editor: Erica Techo Associate News Editor: Cailin O’Brien Sports Editor: Ben Wolk Associate Sports Editor: Yousef Baig Variety Editor: Hilary Butschek Associate Variety Editor: Sarah Anne Perry Opinions Editor: Blake Seitz Multimedia Editor: Gabriel Ram Social Media Editor: Jamie Gottlieb Photo Editor: Taylor Sutton Design Editor: Jan-Michael Cart, Ana Kabakova Senior Reporter: Randell Schafer Editorial Adviser: Ed Morales

SPRING BREAK Or BUST: After a

grueling nine-week stretch of classes and so-called “responsibilities,” the beach calls. Or the ski slopes. Or home. Or the mission field. Wherever you’re going this spring break, take a week off, kiddos — you earned it.

Our Staff

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The Red & Black

Thursday, March 7, 2013

views 5

Age of dorky headgear upon us as Google Glass comes to market

O

K glass…” Get ready to hear that a lot. Google Glass is Google’s new smartphone-esque gadget. If you haven’t heard of it, it’s essentially a tiny computer device attached to a lens and mounted on a pair of wire glasses. It’s a nextgeneration technology — largely voice controlled, hands-free, super-innovative and a little like something out of science fiction: utter “OK glass…” followed by a command and you activate the device. Google says they

Luben Raytchev Guest Columnist

hope to get their product to consumers in the very near future. Steve Lee, Glass’s product director, told a reporter he expects Google to deliver by the end of this year. Ambitious deadline aside, one important question remains: will this product actually take off? Obviously, one of

the big issues Google Glass has to deal with is its unsettling potential to eradicate privacy. After all, if people buy into this, everyone will be walking around with a camera strapped to their heads. People already feel vulnerable to recording because of smartphones, so how will they feel about Google Glass?

Eventually, they’ll get over it. This thing could change social norms; if you remember, we ultimately got over the early 2000s phenomenon where we wondered whether passersby muttering into their Bluetooth devices were crazy. “OK glass, look cool.” This, by far, seems to be the command Google Glass will find hardest to obey. At the end of the day, Glass looks like a thick-rimmed pair of glasses with most of the parts missing. Such a look is

bound to earn you some weird looks. Nevertheless, I think this is another hurdle that Google is going to overcome by the sheer force of the project’s other cool features. It could be the

next big thing, and if not, at least it’s daring. —Luben Raytchev is a junior from Marietta majoring in biology and English

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ollowing the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center, first responders found in the rubble two steel girders jointed in the shape of a cross. The steel girders became a religious icon — Catholic friar Brian Jordan consecrated and held religious services around them. After Christian groups lobbied the World Trade Center Memorial Foundation, the steel girders were placed in the 9/11 museum — but not without resistance. In July 2011, American Atheists filed a lawsuit against the WTCMF. They claimed that the steel girders’ inclusion was exclusionary by design, unconstitutional and represented 9/11 as an attack on Christianity. No accommodations for the atheist group were made, and in August 2012 the case was dis-

11238

Jeremy Markel

Guest Columnist missed. The steel girders stand, but the case is not closed. As a member of the secular community, this court case is important to me. I have a problem with the fact that Christian groups lobbied the WTCMF in order to have the girders placed in the museum; that the girders were modified so they would further resemble a Latin Christian cross; that they were made the museum’s centerpiece; and that the WTCMF made no attempt to compromise with or accommodate the American Atheists.

The prominent placement of the WTC Cross at the museum symbolizes how the causes of the Sept. 11 attacks and the attackers’ motives have been misinterpreted and distorted. Media, religious leaders and politicians have simplified the issue by claiming that the attacks were religiously motivated while ignoring the role of the U.S.’s foreign policy in the attacks. A viable compromise would be to include in the display all relevant information to visitors so that they can make an informed decision about the significance of the steel girders. Moreover, it should be removed from the center of the museum.

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6 NEWS

The Red & Black

Thursday, March 7, 2013

Supreme Court case brings about re-sentencing for Eve Carson killer By Emily Schoone @emscho33 After a change in North Carolina General Assembly policy, Laurence Alvin Lovette, Jr., one of the two convicted murderers of Eve Carson, will have a re-

sentencing hearing. Eve Carson was a 22-year-old University of North Carolina Chapel Hill student and former Clarke Central High School valedictorian who was shot and killed March 5, 2008. Lovette was sen-

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tenced to life in prison at the time of his conviction — when he was 17 years old. In July 2012, the Supreme Court of the United States passed a bill stating that the court will consider “mitigating factors” in determining the sentence of a person who committed a crime as a minor. Since the time of Lovette’s conviction, the debate has been sparked as to whether or not sentencing a minor to life imprisonment is cruel or unusual punishment. The totality of the circumstances surrounding Lovette’s criminal actions will be taken into account at the re-sentencing hearing. Lovette was also convicted of murdering Duke graduate student Abhijit Mahato in 2008. Dan Coenen, the associate for faculty development in the School of Law at UGA, broke down the two issues which will be addressed in Lovette’s resentencing. “One is, affirm the determination of guilt at the trial,” he said. “That is, there wasn’t any error committed in the trial of Lovette that requires a new trial, in other words, is his conviction for first degree murder and for other things, is upheld ... The court also said, which was not a surprise to anybody. .. the Supreme Court of the United States issued this new decision and because of that, it was not appropriate to give him life without parole because that is exactly what the Supreme Court said in this later decision that you can't do.” The “later decision” that Coenen referred to is Miller v. Alabama in 2011, a case where a 14-year-old was sentenced to life without the possibility of parole.

Laurence Alvin Lovette, Jr. , the convicted killer of Eve Carson, was caught on security camera footage attempting to use Carson’s ATM card. Courtesy FOX News While juveniles can still receive a sentence without the option of parole after their re-sentencing hearing, it is also “entirely possible that the judge will give exactly the same sentence, that is life without parole,” Coenen said. There will not be a jury assigned to Lovette’s re-sentencing — the court will make the decision. If the judge sentences Lovette to life with parole, he will be in prison a projected 25 years before parole. As far as his parole eligibility, that would be determined by “summing the minimum terms of the individual sentences,” according to the UNC Chapel Hill School of Government website. This means that his convictions of first-degree murder, armed robbery and murder will also be taken into consideration in determining how long he is imprisoned, which is how the 25 years came about. If Lovette is paroled, he would serve a five-year term. “He is not being retried. That is very important. Being retried means there would be a new trial that would have to do with the determination of his guilt and innocence, in

respect to the charges brought against him that he murdered Eve Carson,” Coenen said in order to clarify the hearing, which will take place on a date which has not yet been announced. The main issue that Miller v. Alabama addresses is the mental maturity of the defendant at the time of the crime. “The legal concept is the brain is not fully formed until you’re an adult,” said Frank Baumgartner, a distinguished professor of political science at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. “And of course, when people see a 17-year-old do some horrific thing, you know, they’re really likely to be angry at a severe punishment if they do some terrible crime. But, you know, at what age are you old enough to really take responsibility?” The Court states three reasons why the possibility of life with parole is on the table for juveniles who committed a crime. First, they have a lack of maturity and an underdeveloped sense of responsibility, leading to recklessness, impulsivity, and heedless risktaking. Second, children are more vulnerable to negative influences and

outside pressures, including those from their family and peers; they have limited control over their own environment and lack the ability to extricate themselves from crimeproducing settings. Third, a child’s character is not as well formed as an adult’s, making his or her actions less likely to be evidence of irretrievable depravity. All of these factors will be taken into consideration for Lovette’s case and convicted minors’ cases in the future, and the judge will have to assess the circumstances and make a decision. “Violent crime is essentially a young m a n’ s game,” Baumgartner said. “You may come out of prison when you’re 45 years old and you may not have learned any life skills in prison, and that’s another issue. You’re not likely to be the same violent predator, and of course, some people are and that’s what people are worried about, but it’s not likely that a 45-year-old person is going to do the same level of violence that a 16, 18, 20, 22 year old is going to do, thank goodness.”

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UNC honors program and Carson’s student-government cabinet — Zellner was Chief of Staff. “I remember her for [her] ability to bring people together. She did a really tremendous job of energizing her campaign staff and bringing a lot of people that I didn’t know, outside of my social contacts at UNC, in to work on the campaign,” Zellner said. “She facilitated in a way that everyone could contribute ideas and she turned the ideas into a really great platform.” Dan Coenen is the associate dean for faculty development at the UGA School of Law, and has been a friend of the Carson family for 25 years. “It was very clear that the sorts of relationships that they had built were not superficial — they were very significant, personally significant,” Coenen said. “That was, I think, driven by her irresistible ability to connect with people and her enthusiasm about people about, in her case, the [University of North Carolina] and triumphs that make things happen.” Coenen reflected on Carson’s freshman year, when she organized a co-ed flag football team purely to engage with people and build community. She was approached, as the organizer, to name the team. It was then that Team Friendship was born. “She was sort of embarrassed of giving it such a trite name, but I do think the name captured something about her, and she would chuckle about that,”

Coenen said. Coenen said Carson's energy and light-heartedness was contagious. “She was just fun — she was just a fun person. So what does that mean? She was the type of person that every time she sent you an email, it had all sorts of exclamation points in it, so she was excited,” Coenen said. “She was enthused by what was going on in life and she was enthused about life.” These aspects, as well as her academic excellence and heart for service, did not go unnoticed by the administration at both Clarke Central High School and UNCChapel Hill. In Athens-Clarke County, the Eve Carson Award endorses her humanitarian spirit. Sam Hicks, a counselor at Clarke Central High School, said the award places emphasis on “students being committed to service and students being committed to taking care of their community.” Students that qualify for the Eve Marie Carson scholarship at UNC must also bear Carson’s qualities — leadership, involvement in community service and academic excellence. “Eve was one of those individuals who had a very special spark. She impacted a lot of people’s lives. Everybody who met her was very impressed by her. It doesn’t happen very often or else it wouldn’t be that special,” said Dan Thornton, associate director of scholarships at UNC-Chapel Hill. Carson’s memorial service on March 6, 2008 reflected the friendships she fostered and the groups

Lovette court case March 5, 2008: Eve Carson is killed by gunfire. March 14, 2008: Laurence Alvin Lovette Jr. is arrested. Dec. 20, 2011: Lovette is convicted of killing Carson. Aug. 29, 2012: Lovette files for appropriate relief. Feb. 5, 2013: Court grants a re-sentencing hearing. she was involved in — an estimated 10,000 people attended the service. The abrupt end to her life left many of her family and friends wondering who she would be and what she would be doing these five years later. “You know we were all waiting to see how our lives turned out together, and now we can’t see how Eve’s life turned out,” Zellner said. “I think that’s something all her friends were excited for, to watch Eve as we grew up, as we led professional lives, as we started families, all of those things were something that I looked forward to in my relationship with Eve and I know that many, many other people did because she touched them.”

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The Red & Black

NEWS 7

Thursday, March 7, 2013

UGA Law provides ‘welcoming community’ Leading law school for

minorities BY BRAD MANNION @madbrannion

The University of Georgia’s School of Law opened its doors to the first African-American student 50 years ago. Since the times of Chester C. Davenport, the minority population of the law school has drastically risen, providing a welcoming, unbiased community. While the limits of defining a group as a minority are not limited to race, ethnicity or religion, it is certain that a minority group is a collection of people who comprise less than the majority of a specified area. This includes — in some aspects of UGA — Hispanics, Asian and African Americans, Indians, Native Americans, Jews and Muslims. Cory Raines, a second-year law student from Fayetteville, said he would estimate the number of minority students ­— in a class of 60 — to be from “five to 15”.

With minority enrollment for the 2012 entering class at 25 percent, the law school at UGA is regarded as a forerunner for minority membership across the South and the whole nation. According to a ranking of law schools from the magazine National Jurist, UGA ranks third in the South — and 14th nationwide — in minority enrollment. Students said the reason behind this renown is how well the community receives people of all backgrounds and how connected everyone is. “I think that’s one good thing about as far as being a minority here is that you’re not separated because you always feel like you’re part of everything that comes around,” Raines said. From Dawn BennettAlexander’s graduation year at Howard University Law School in 1975 to the 2011 to 2012 school year, the rate of total minority enrollment on a national scale increased from 7.9 percent in 157 law schools to 24.5 percent in 201 law schools across the nation. But BennettAlexander, an associate professor of employ-

ment law and legal studies, said the data does not matter,. Rather, it is whether or not students act on opportunities presented that makes a true difference. “I’m not looking so much at numbers as I am at people feeling like they are taking advantage of opportunities that could be there and available for them,” BennettAlexander said. The rise in minority enrollment, however, has not reached the rate which it could be. As opposed to many undergraduate programs, law schools have a tendency to hold minority scholarships in short supply. “[UGA Law offers] a limited number of scholarships in general to anybody,” Raines said. “So, all the people that are on scholarships, they either have the small number that the school offers or they get resources from companies and endowment funds. So, if you get a minority scholarship, it’s likely not through the school but some private or public interest firm.” With groups such as the Law School Admission Council being aware of the

underrepresentation of minorities in the legal profession, many attempts to raise awareness and promote minority involvement in law have been made. In fact, LSAC — working with Georgia universities such as Emory University, Mercer University, Georgia State University, and UGA — held a seminar with the intent to prepare minority students with the best courses of action from beginning their undergraduate career to applying for law school. Entitled Discover Law, the seminar was held on Feb. 28 at Atlanta’s John Marshall Law School and included both college and high school students in the audience. Although minorities in law faced difficulties in the past, students said they face a pleasant environment without discrimination. “There’s always something for you to do, there are always people for you to speak to and everybody pretty much is very friendly and open to you,” Raines said.

Minority enrollment is 25 percent at UGA Law. The class of 2015 is pictured. Courtesy Duane Strok Photography

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OFFICE: MSP organizations move in after five-month wait ➤ From Page 1 Before Hernandez left, MSP suffered staff cuts upon the departure of three employees last summer, two after being fired for falsifying documents, as reported previously by The Red & Black. Megan Segoshi, MSP’s senior coordinator who was hired last October, said the organizations are excited about the new installments. “They’ve expressed that they’re pretty excited about it and no complaints yet,” Segoshisaid. “Every one of the 13 organizations will have their own office, which is something we are very excited about. We’re excited that everyone won’t be sharing and will have their own office space.” While waiting for renovations, the organizations were forced to share offices and alternate time spent within the department. “We shared a space with about four to five other organizations,” Perlera said. “We’re all housed within MSP...so we were sharing some space and it got a little cramped.” Perlera said that he believed the new office space would be useful for management of his organization. “We’d plan meetings, [and] we’d have meetings with general members if they ever had any questions,” Perlera said. “We use it for elections and just general functions that organizations of our size need. We actually hold office hours, so of the 13 [executive members], we’d have somebody in the office in case somebody wanted to stop by.” While waiting, students were given updates about the progress made and some of the reasons for delays. “They were like ‘it’s fire marshal regulation.’ They had to get it up to code,” Perlera said. But even as they’ve begun to move in, Perlera said the offices are not what he expected after such a long delay. “A lot of concerns were raised in the sense that this place isn’t even finished,” Perlera said. “We’re actually in the process of moving, and we’ve noticed the fourth floor in its entirety is still under renovation — there’s still construction going on. Things haven’t been finished, basically. We have a meeting scheduled

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After a delayed move-in date, some organizations in Multicultural Services and Programs felt they were ‘pushed aside upstairs’ with the new offices on the fourth floor of Memorial Hall. BRAD MANNION/Staff with [Dean of Students Bill McDonald} on March 5.” Still awaiting full completion of the offices, Segoshi said much of the delay was unpredictable and a consequence of achieving safety regulations. “I know that construction always takes a long time and things don’t go as smoothly as one would hope,” Segoshi said. “With the number of systems you have going on up there, I know that with construction you have to make everything safer than expected.” As the organizations begin their transition into the new

offices, Perlera said opinions vary as members feel as if they are being neglected and were only given a short grace period to make the transition to the new offices. “There have definitely been some mixed feelings about this place,” Perlera said. “We like it — it’s new, we’re grateful — but we feel like they’ve kind of just pushed us aside upstairs. What I think bothers us about that is, [during the transition], they’re pushing us out of our old office space.”

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8 NEWS

The Red & Black

Thursday, March 7, 2013

SGA surveys on ‘unsafe’ campus locations By Kendall Trammell @KendallTrammell

The trail behind the “Lower Five” dorms was called an unsafe location at night by students. Taylor craig sutton/Staff

While you were studying in the Zell B. Miller Learning Center, you forgot how dark the University of Georgia’s campus could be at night. Now it’s time to make the trek back to your dorm. And the question that runs through your mind is, “Is this safe?” Richie Steinberg, director of the Student G o v e r n m e n t Association campus

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life committee, said he and his committee want to make campus a more comfortable place for students. “It was brought to our attention that there were areas on campus where students felt unsafe walking at night due to insufficient lighting,” said Steinberg, a junior economics major from Marietta. The committee administered a survey to locate these problem areas. He said the survey

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Po l i c e Jimmy Williamson said he is glad to see that SGA is working on this initiative, but the police department has also been conducting research on the safety issue. “It’s an ongoing process,” Williamson said. “I applaud their effort in doing it, but it’s not something we haven’t already been doing.” Williamson said that the UGA Police Department along with the Operations and Maintenance Department have been working on replacing old light fixtures with updated ones. Williamson said that the reason this process is taking so long is due to the financial burden. “As money is available, the white light will be put it in, but we can only put so many in as money becomes available, so it’ll just take a while,” he said. Mark Duclos, the director of the Operations and M a i n t e n a n c e Department, said an estimated cost to relamp the remainder high-pressure sodium fixtures to metalhalide would cost more than a million dollars. In the meantime, Williamson said students should walk in groups to feel safe at night. Williamson also said that UGA wants its students to feel safe, but he said campus safety is a team effort. “Campus safety is a partnership,” Williamson said. “We need people to be very aware of their surroundings. If they see things as being suspicious, call the police.”

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Thursday, March 7, 2013

The Red & Black

NEWS 9

New Athens medical residency programs aim for stability, deadlines Jeanette Kazmierczak @sciencekaz The medical residency programs at Athens Regional Medical Center and St. Mary’s Hospital and Health Care System are on track to begin teaching students in July 2016 and summer of 2015, respectively. After four years of undergraduate school and four years of medical school, graduates receive a Medical Doctorate and a training license from the state of Georgia but still need three to seven years of residency in a particular field to be practicing doctors. “Our goal is over 100 residents,” said Jeneva Hakman, executive director of academic affairs at Athens Regional Medical Center. Bruce Middendorf, chief medical officer and director of the graduate medical education program at St. Mary’s, said he expected to take 10 residents a year for three years starting in 2015, beginning with a program in internal medicine. Partnerships and sponsorships Because St. Mary’s is being sponsored by the Georgia Regent’s University/University of Georgia Medical Partnership, it gets help from Shelley Nuss — the partnership’s campus associate dean for graduate medical edu-

cation. student at the partner“The responsibility ship in the middle of for the internal medidoing rotations at the cine residency program, hospitals said she’s to be a viable program excited for residency, to meet all the requirebut is disappointed that ments and be an there will not be accredited resian opportunity dency program,” in Athens. Middendorf said. “ Wo r k i n g “That ultimate our way in with responsibly lies [the doctors] with the sponsorand getting ing institution, everyone comwhich is the medfortable with us ical partnership.” just being Residencies around and are accredited by DEAL stuff — and the Accreditation invading as well Council for — and now all of G r a d u a t e a sudden we’re M e d i c a l like ‘Oh, see ya!’ Education. you know. It’s “You’re kind kind of sad that of responsible for we can’t follow the educational through with program of the that, with this residency procity and the gram — develophospitals here,” ing the curricu- MIDDENDORF she said. lum, developing Austin said the rules and polthere were two icies — all of the parts things medical students — the core faculty, didn’t talk about — how recruitment of faculty long they’re going to be and program directors in school and what speand getting it accreditcialty they’re going to ed,” Nuss said. go into. “Medicine changes Matching with every day. We’re always residents going to be students, we’re always going to be While residencies at learning,” she said. St. Mary’s and ARMC “That’s why it’s called are due to start in the practicing medicine.” summers of 2015 and 2016, they will start Reasons for residency matching with residents funding the year before, which means that the thirdThe new residency year medical students programs were promptat the partnership probed by several factors, ably will not have the including a physician option of taking resishortage and new funddencies there. ing. Ashley Austin, who Nuss said in 2006 is a third-year medical the Association of

American Medical Colleges saw that there was a looming lack of physicians and told every medical school around the country, which is only 141, to increase their enrollment by 30 percent in the next seven to eight years. She said the Augusta campus of what was then the Medical College of Georgia was maxed out, resulting in the creation of the partnership in Athens. The problem was, once the schools had more medical students, there was no place for them to go. In 2012, Governor Nathan Deal approved $1.2 million for establishing residencies in the state of Georgia,

Nuss said, to offset initial costs of hiring faculty and building the infrastructure needed. “St. Mary’s is in $250,000 that they got in this first round of money and Athens Regional got $650,000,” Nuss said. “That goes through June and then those dollars you’re referencing ... would get continuation funding the next year.” Middendorf and Hakman said the ultimate goal of their programs was to establish a long-term structure. Middendorf said St. Mary’s wanted to look back on this decision in 20 years and say it was the “starting point that would catapult us into the future in a very healthy, very solid, sub-

stantial way.” While Hakman and her husband moved to Athens from Fort Lauderdale specifically to be part of the GME program at ARMC, she said the residency program will not immediately be the economic engine that it may seem to be. “We really have really tried to back off of trying to sell it that way because it’s going to take so long,” Hakman said. “Even just the 2016 sounds so far away that we really try to go through and explain why it takes that long.”

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Thursday, March 7, 2013

12 SPORTS

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When talking about elite SEC guards, Georgia’s Kentavious Caldwell-Pope is at the top of the class. He’s top-five in scoring, free throw pct, steals, 3-point percentage, 3-pointers made and defensive rebounds in the conference. He’ll be matched up against Kentucky’s Archie Goodwin who averages 13.8 points per game, but isn’t a threat behind the arc or at the free throw line if he gets fouled. What separates the Wildcats from the Bulldogs is that they have more established depth with their guards. Ryan Harrow has been coming on for Big Blue in its latest stretch. Julius Mays is the third-best 3-pointer shooter in the SEC, and was a differencemaker in February. Caldwell-Pope is going to need strong contributions from his fellow guards if they want to pull off the upset.

Even with the loss of Nerlens Noel, the Wildcats’ frontcourt has remained efficient on both ends of the floor, despite having to slide some guys out of their natural positions. Alex Poythress is averaging 11.9 ppg and Willie Caluley-Stein has really come alive for them lately. He has hit double figures in six of their last eight, and is coming off his third double-double of the season. Kyle Wiltjer has settled into his role off the bench, and is one of the best free throw shooters in the SEC. The Bulldogs frontcourt is known more for its defensive prowess than its offensive production. The loss of Marcus Thornton hasn’t helped either. While Nemanja Djurisic has proven to be valuable off the bench, starters Donte’ Williams and John Florveus don't provide much on offense.

SLIGHT EDGE: Kentucky

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SPORTS 13

Thursday, March 7, 2013

The Red & Black

Freshmen headline key matchups BY CONNOR SMOLENSKY @ConnorSmo The Georgia and Kentucky men’s basketball teams head into Thursday’s matchup with two different mindsets. With two league games left to play, the Bulldogs (14-15, 8-8 SEC) sit in a tie for eighth in the S o u t h e a s t e r n Conference. The only way for Georgia to earn an NCAA tournament bid is to win the SEC tournament, and the Bulldogs hope to make their job a little easier by finishing as one of the top-10 teams in the conference, which would earn them a first-round bye. Kentucky (20-9, 11-5) is in a tie for second in the SEC, and hopes to solidify its case as a MANN legitimate NCAA tournament team. As it stands right now, the Wildcats are on ESPN analyst Joe Lunardi’s last four teams out of the big dance. Mark Fox Calipari

vs.

John

Georgia will not only play host to one of the most storied Division I basketball programs Thursday night, but also one of the most iconic coaches in the sport. Kentucky head coach John Calipari has been on the job for 21 seasons coaching at three different institutions, as well as a threeyear stint with the New Jersey Nets. In his time as a head coach, Calipari boasts a 525-161 record, and has led the Wildcats to a 122-23 record in his four years at Kentucky. Calipari’s teams have made 14 NCAA

tournament appearances, and four final four showings (UMASS: 1996, Memphis: 2008, Kentucky: 2011, 12). The veteran coach sports a 38-13 tournament record, and earned his first NCAA championship last season with a win over Kansas. Georgia head coach Mark Fox doesn’t have nearly as much experience in the head-coaching realm as Calipari, and is in his 9th season in the position. Fox coached at Nevada for five seasons where he saw three NCAA tournament appearances and led the Wolfpack to a 123-43 mark during his time. Since coming to Georgia in 2010, Fox has led the Bulldogs to one NCAA tournament appearance in 2010, where Georgia fell to Washington. Fox holds a 64-61 record at Georgia and has a lifetime record of 187-104. Georgia freshmen vs. Kentucky freshmen Both Georgia and Kentucky rely heavily on production from their freshmen players. Georgia freshmen Charles Mann and Brandon Morris have been in and out of the starting lineup for the Bulldogs, while Kenny Gaines has produced solid minutes coming off the bench. Mann leads all Georgia freshmen in minutes played (21.1), as well as points per game (6.6) and assists per game (2.8). Morris has proven to be a quality defender while playing 16.2 minutes per game, and averaging 4 ppg. and 2.8 rpg. Gaines has been a nice backup for Georgia

leading scorer Kentavious CaldwellPope, and has been a reliable scoring threat while averaging 9.6 mpg. However, Kentucky receives much more production from their three starting freshmen than the Bulldogs. With the absence of Nerlens Noel, who is out with a torn ACL, Willie Cauley-Stein has been forced to be the presence in the middle for the Wildcats, averaging 22.4 mpg., 8.4 ppg., and 5.9 rpg. Archie Goodwin and Alex Poythress lead the front-court of the Wildcats and are two of the top three scorers for Kentucky. Goodwin plays 38.1 mpg., leading Kentucky with 13.8 ppg, while Poythress is the team’s third leading scorer with 10.8 ppg. Charles Mann Turnovers

vs.

One of Mann’s biggest flaws at the point guard position has been his decision making. Mann leads the team with 80 turnovers on the season, and has an assist to turnover ratio of +1.0. That ratio had been in the negative range all year before the Bulldogs' last game against South Carolina when the Atlanta native put up 18 points, 8 assists and zero turnovers. In fact, Mann has not turned the ball over in the Bulldogs' last two games, both in 20-plus minutes of play. Mann’s ability to control the ball could be pivotal in Thursday’s matchup as the Wildcats have made the most of turnovers, outscoring their opponents by a scoring margin of 10.1 points.

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Thursday, March 7, 2013

Tournament time The Lady Dogs begin SEC tournament play on Friday in Duluth.

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Gymnasts Christa Tanella, Shayla Worley, Kati Breazeal and Noel Couch have been teammates for four seasons. They compete in their last home meet together on Saturday against Utah. PHOTOS: TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON AND EVAN STICHLER, ILLUSTRATION: Jan-Michael Cart/Staff

Seniors shape underclassmen BY ELIZABETH GRIMSLEY @AllFlippedOut This year’s Gym Dog seniors — Shayla Worley, Christa Tanella, Kati Breazeal and Noel Couch — have been through ups and downs but as they prepared for their final year as Georgia gymnasts, they had a clear vision of how they wanted it to go. “At the end of last year,” Worley said, “our class got together and we decided we wanted to

be a senior class that is remembered for going the extra mile, for always doing more and being the last ones out of the gym, and always having a good attitude and being the ones that everybody wants to look up to.” However, that wasn’t easy at times like late last year when the team was left without a coach. “We have such a diverse [senior] class, but all of them are leaders and have really helped us with this transition so much,” Davis said. “With the transition, I’ve learned to trust new people. They’ve really brought us together and rallied us after we split off for the summer and went home. We were questioning some things, so when we all got back together in the fall, they really helped.” Part of that leadership came from the example this year’s senior class saw from the senior class of 2010 with Lauren Johnson, Courtney McCool, Marcia Newby, Lauren Sessler and Grace Taylor.

See SENIORS, Page 17

Athletic Board removes 2,054 student seats

Mark Fox unhappy with NCAA deregulation

BY JAMIE GOTTLIEB @jamiegott

recruiting test to contact recruits,” Fox said. “That doesn’t make a lot of sense to me. I can hire [journalists] and say we’re going to pay you money to contact recruits and pay material for us, and you don’t have to even own an NCAA rule book.” Not only will this deregulation increase the workload put forth toward contacting recruits, but will also create a growth in the amount of money spent to do so.

The Georgia Bulldogs controlled their own destiny at the end of the 2012 football season — defeat Georgia Tech, and the players would move one step closer to the National Championship. The Georgia-Georgia Tech game became one of the most monumental games in Sanford Stadium history, but only 9,451 students showed up out of the approximately 18,000 who bought tickets to come. “When students don’t show up, it’s an embarrassment,” Ryan Scates, student representative to the Athletic Board, said. “The SEC prides itself on how many people show up.” Scates said, on average, more than 6,000 student seats go unused at football games. Out of the 17,910 student tickets available, only 11,802 attended games on average since 2009, according to a previous article by The Red & Black. In response to lack of attendance, the Athletic Board developed the Young Alumni Program to increase the number of people who come to Georgia football games. The program includes cutting 2,054 student seats and reallocating them to young alumni — people who graduated from the University within five years. Patrick Gray, associate director of development and annual fund for the Georgia Bulldog Club, said seats will be reallocated in sections 314 to 317, the northeast corner of the stadium near the train tracks. “Just about every game, that’s the top of the stadium that’s generally empty,” he said. “It’s mainly the lower level and west end zone where most students sit.”

See NCAA, Page 16

See TICKETS, Page 19

BY CONNOR SMOLENSKY @ConnorSmo According to the NCAA, bending the rules isn’t always a bad thing. Back in mid January the NCAA Division-I Board of Directors took a step to try and deregulate the organization’s often complex and sometimes unenforceable rules. While this may seem like a nice change of pace, coaches around the nation have voiced their concern over the implementation of these new guidelines — Georgia men’s basketball head coach Mark Fox is one of them. Some of the rules eliminated included the removal of the amount of phone calls and other private communication, such as texts and use of social media that coaches can have with their recruits. Fox said this can work in a school’s favor, but creates more work than necessary. “When they deregulate the amount of contact you can have with these non-collegiate athletes, your work load just increased by thousands because we’re all going to do that,” he said. “If there is a lot more work that is possible to

“My senior class when I was a freshman was the first seniors to give us that image that’s forever going to be burnt in your head,” Tanella said. “There was just such a dynamic, and even though there were so many different personalities, they came together as a senior class. We really just loved the picture of our senior class coming together with our differences just like they came together.” Couch also said one of their goals as a class wasn’t just unity within the team, but helping prepare the underclassmen for what was ahead — a lasting legacy. “When I came in as a freshman, I was a little sister to a senior on the team who was my big sister,” Couch said. “Now as a senior, the role is reversed, so I’ve learned how to take on that role

The NCAA took away some recruting regulation, but Georgia head coach Mark Fox disagrees with some changes. evan stichler/Staff be done, you’re probably going to want to have more man power to do it.” The NCAA committee understands this increased amount of contact with recruits can be bothersome, and has also allowed schools to bolster a greater workforce to communicate to the prospects. However, these employees can merely be picked off the streets, Fox said. “Those people as it’s written now don’t even have to have passed the NCAA


16 SPORTS

Thursday, March 7, 2013

The Red & Black

Lady Dogs ready to end SEC tourney struggles BY ETHAN BURCH @EthanBurch The Georgia women’s basketball team travels to the SEC Tournament in Duluth on Friday where it plans to break its trend of early exits. Georgia (24-5, 11-4 SEC) enters the tournament as the No. 3 seed, and will play the winner of Thursday night’s matchup between LSU and Auburn. The Lady Dogs have been eliminated early in recent SEC Tournament appearances — a stat Landers hasn’t given much thought. “I’m not proud of

the fact we’ve been an early out, but I’m not going to dwell on it,” Landers said. “That was then, and this is now. I think we’ve got a better basketball team, but I think the competition’s even greater. We’ve just got to tee it up and play.” Georgia heads into the tournament ranked high enough for an automatic berth in the upcoming NCAA Tournament. Though the Lady Dogs’ season is not on the line this weekend, Landers said the team has its sights set on something big. “We’re selling this as winning a conference

championship, which is something else we need to do,” Landers said. “We have a chance to win a conference championship. If we play very well then we’re capable of doing that. That’s what we’ve got to buy into. There’s nothing else for us to do this weekend.” The seniors who make up Georgia’s roster have never made it to the semifinals of the SEC Tournament. Senior guard Jasmine James said this year has to be different. “You have to go in with the mind-set that it’s one game at a time,” James said. “I don’t know that we’ve ever really done that, though. We’ve mostly gone in with the mind-set of trying to win the tourna-

ment as a whole. Getting past that first game is never easy because everyone has that same goal in mind.” Because both topranked teams have lost in upsets this season, Landers said the league’s talent goes much deeper than firstranked Tennessee and s e c o n d - r a n k e d Kentucky. “The top four seeds have lost other times, so it goes deeper than five or six,” Landers said. “I think it runs on down to eight or nine teams that can beat anyone on any given night.” Hassell said she hasn’t put any thought into top -ranked Tennessee yet.

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Senior guard Jasmine Hassell was recently named to the All-SEC first team. evan stichler/Staff

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➤ From Page 15 Along the same lines as contacting recruits through texts and social media, the NCAA eliminated the restrictions on sending printed materials to prospects, such as the size and color of the materials. Fox is against this idea as well. “No limit on mail, just imagine producing a life-size poster of the kid you’re recruiting and sending that out,” he said. “The cost of doing some of those things is enormous, and just a couple years ago we got away from printed materials and save money, in order to let people save money electronically.” While the NCAA did not do away with all the regulations,

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about 25 pages of the 500-page rulebook have been thrown away. According to Fox, coaches around the nation will never cause a ruckus over deregulation, but he said there must be a method to its madness. “Everyone favors de-regulation because a 500 page rule book, you’re always looking at the rule book,” he said. “We’re all in favor of yeah we can give him a bagel, and everyone was in favor of ok let him have peanut butter, but if we don’t have some parameters than you open up the flood gates.”

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The Red & Black

SPORTS 17

Thursday, March 7, 2013

Q&A

Gym Dog seniors relive memories

Gymnastics beat writer Elizabeth Grimsley sat down with the four Gym Dog seniors to revisit their fondest memories.

COUCH

WORLEY

TANELLA

BREAZEAL

What is one of the most memorable experiences you’ve had as a Gym Dog? Christa Tanella: I’m just going to be cliché … My most memorable moment throughout my time here has just been this year. I think I’ve made more memories this year than I can remember from the past three years. We have a great team this year. We have great chemistry. We have a great group of girls. And we’ve always had that, but this year, I guess, just being a senior and being at the top looking down, everything just seems so much more sentimental and so much more precious to you. Kati Breazeal: I would have to say this whole year in general. As a senior I’ve just experienced so many new things. I’ve gotten to do more events in competition than I have in previous years. I would just consider this year successful for me because I’ve learned so much, I’ve grown so much and I’ve gotten to do so much more. I’m just really proud of this year and what we’re done as a team too. Shayla Worley: I think one of the most memorable things was definitely the first time I ran out of that tunnel as a freshman. There’s so much hype about it, and everybody tells you about it all fall. So when you get there, you’re just waiting for it in so much anticipation, and it really is everything and more that people talk about. Also again, the first time I ran out this senior year because I think you have a different outlook and appreciation for it going into your senior year. Noel Couch: Just the experience of going out there and being able to represent the University of Georgia as a Gym Dog each and every weekend is such a thrill. Each meet is different and each meet is unique and each year is different because you’re around different people and going to different places, so I really embrace that and really take it all in each and every weekend.

Lindsey Cheek and the Gym Dogs fell to LSU and in the rankings. this year and we’ll be happy at the end of the day with whatever comes. KB: Definitely no regrets. My life has gotten me to this point where I am today and I’m happy with myself and what I’ve done, so there’s nothing to do but move forward. SW: Regrets … no. I think regrets are something that nobody ever wants to have, but I think one way to make sure that you don’t have them is to know that you did everything possible. You put in the time, and you put in the effort and the energy. As long as you leave no stone unturned, there are no regrets. I truly believe that that’s what I’ve done since I’ve been here. I can leave knowing that I did all I could. NC: It’s a process, so every practice that you have and every meet that you compete in they’re all different opportunities, so I just want to continue to be better each and every day. That’s something that I’m definitely looking forward to. It’s not defined by one moment or one goal, and just being better each and every day and each and every week is what I’m looking forward to. What’s next for you? CT: The world! The world is open after I graduate! I’m going to hopefully just finish up school and possibly move on to grad school or do more schooling and just pursue my other talents. KB: Grad school! I’m applying to grad school. I’m going to get some internships, hopefully go work in athletics ... so we’ll see what happens! SW: Most of my goals involve gymnastics and all of this, so it’s almost like you don’t make plans or make goals after that. But after this, I plan to stick around and get my MBA here at Georgia. From there … get into the real world and start working as a businesswoman. NC: I’m really taking it one day at a time right now and excited about all the opportunities that I have after gymnastics. I’m excited about that and being able to look forward to another year in undergrad and then graduate school and taking on new challenges.

Do you have any regrets or things you still wish to accomplish before you graduate? CT: Looking back, you’re always going to want to fall into regret, but I don’t think life should ever be lived that way. I don’t think you should ever take regrets from the past but just lessons. That’s something that every athlete needs to learn or else you are just going to eat yourself from the inside out. This year what we want to do and what we set out to do was to perform to our potential. That was what we came together at the beginning of the year and said as seniors; that’s what we’re going to end the year saying. We want to perform to our potential

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Gym Dogs fall back to No. 8 BY ELIZABETH GRIMSLEY @AllFlippedOut The Georgia gymnastics team dropped back down to No. 8 with an RQS of 196.725 after tying their highest road score of the season of 196.825 against LSU. To calculate RQS — regional qualifying score — first take the top three away scores. Then take the next three highest scores — home or away. Finally, drop the highest score of the six and average the remaining five. Florida regained the top spot in the Gym Info rankings with an RQS of 197.440 after scoring 198.425. They are followed by Oklahoma (197.410), Michigan (197.080), LSU (196.965) and Alabama (196.910). UCLA , Utah, Stanford, and Oregon State round out the top 10. The Gym Dogs dropped to No. 6 on vault with an RQS of 49.335 and No. 3 on bars (49.385) where they previously held the No. 4 and No. 2, respectively. The team moved up one spot to No. 9 on beam (49.090) but dropped two spots to No. 12 on floor (49.145). Individually, freshman Brandie Jay dropped from No. 4 to No. 6 on vault with an RQS of 9.910 and freshman Brittany Rogers fell one position into a tie at No. 19 (9.890). Sophomore Chelsea Davis remained the No. 1 bar worker in the country with her RQS of 9.935. Rogers, previously ranked No. 4 on bars,

not sits at No. 5 (9.905). Senior Shayla Worley moved up one spot to No. 7 on beam (9.890) and junior Kaylan Earls jumped from No. 20 to No. 17 on the event

with an RQS of 9.865). Senior Christa Tanella fell out of the top 25 on floor to No. 27.

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➤ From Page 15 and what I need to do to make sure that my little sister knows everything that she needs to and is embracing the process.” However, according to Couch it’s not just about the things that you say that define leadership qualities. “It’s the actions that you show and the example that you set,” she said. It hasn’t been only about helping with underclassmen but the juniors as well as they transition into the leaders of next year’s team. “I don’t know if you can ever fully prepare someone to take on that role,” senior Kati Breazeal said. “But this team, this year especially, has done a great job in taking on your own leadership roles.” Breazeal said the juniors will make a successful jump. “So I think it’ll be an easy transition for them because they’ve already done such a great job,” And prepared or not, it is a role that the juniors will have to embrace. “It’s such a great position to be in, but it comes with great responsibility,” Tanella said. “Anything that I can do as a senior to equip them or prepare

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The Red & Black

SPORTS 19

Thursday, March 7, 2013

DOGS OFF THE LEASH

Jarvis throws first pitch, Golf Boys make news with rap BY TAYLOR DENMAN The Red & Black Former Georgia linebacker Jarvis Jones visited Orlando to throw out the first pitch to a former Diamond Dog Alex Wood before the Braves took on the Detroit Tigers on Sunday. Wood, who made his spring training debut for Atlanta this spring, appeared in two games so far, throwing two scoreless innings, giving up one hit, two walks and striking out one. Former Bulldog and Chicago White Sox second baseman Gordon Beckham has four hits in 15 atbats with a run scored and three RBIs. Former Bulldog and Texas Rangers pitcher Justin Grimm is 0-2 in his two appearances this spring. Grimm has allowed nine runs in four and 0.1 inning. The Rangers’ pitcher has managed to tally up four strikeouts. Team United States is set to compete in the World Baseball Classic this weekend, with former Bulldog Mitchell Boggs as a member of the pitching staff. Team USA’s first game will be against team Italy on Saturday.

also sunk a 19-foot birdie put on hole 16 in his second round of the tournament, but finished the round with a one-over score of 71. Henley shot an even 70 on Saturday and Sunday to conclude his weekend. Former Georgia golfer Bubba Watson did not compete in the Honda Classic, but still managed to make news on Monday. The former Georgia golfer is featured in a follow up rap video to last year’s “Golf Boys” rap along with PGA pros Ricky Fowler, Ben Crane, and Hunter Mahan. The quartet’s new rap is available on iTunes, and according to Watson’s Twitter, at least a portion of the proceeds will be donated to charity.

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Jarvis Jones (left) threw the first pitch of a Braves spring game against the Tigers. C.B. SCHMELTER/Staff

Former Georgia golfer Russell Henley continues to keep up with the Tour’s veterans as he finished one-under and tied for 13th in last weekend’s Honda Classic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. Henley’s best round was on Friday when he shot a 68 with an eagle on the par-five third hole. Henley

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TICKETS: Athletic Board will make additional $394,368 ➤ From Page 15 A risky cut The Athletic Board isn’t cutting available student tickets, but rather available student seats. Instead of 17,910 seats available for students, only 15,856 seats will be open. However, because the Athletic Board isn’t cutting tickets, student seats will be oversold by approximately 2,800. In the 2012 season, fullseason tickets were awarded to 18,645 students, according to a previous article by The Red & Black. Tyler Andrews, a sophomore journalism major from Marietta, said he thinks more students will go to games because the football team had a successful 2012 season, and there is a lot of hype going into the 2013 season. “For certain games, [overcrowding] could be an issue,” he said. “We have a really good home schedule this year with South Carolina and LSU. I think more people will be more inclined to come because Georgia will be in the top five or top 10.” Still, Scates said the board isn’t worried about overcrowding because according to data since 2009, it’s never come close to being an issue, despite successful seasons. “In 2011, we had one of the best home campaigns in history,” he said. “We went to the SEC Championship game, clinched the SEC East, but we actually saw attendance drop in 2012.” In the last four years, the highest scanned total, not including the marching band, was about 14,650 student tickets at the 2011 Auburn game, Gray said. Andrews said he doesn’t agree with cutting back on student seats, but the board’s head is in the right place in respect to getting seats filled.

“It’ll almost make it seem that the whole stadium is filled,” he said. “But it could be a problem if they double book and multiple people don’t have seats.” Despite approximately 6,000 open student seats in the 300level each game, more than half of freshmen claimed they were unable to get a seat within the student section, according to a survey of 100 freshmen conducted by The Red & Black. Scates said those respondents probably couldn’t find seats because they weren’t going to the sections where seats were available and tried to find the best seats in the 100-level instead. “I understand how certain sections can get overcrowded,” he said. “Maybe you have friends that got there an hour before the game, and the section is filled up when you get there, so they can’t find a seat where they originally wanted to sit.” Opportunity for young alums The young alumni are the most underrepresented group in the stadium, Scates said. Gray said young alumni recently heard about the program, and the response has been successful. “Just with online request forms, we’ve had a fairly good response,” he said. “Young alums are realizing this a great opportunity, and an opportunity that helps a lot of them as they try to establish themselves in the professional world.” Scates said the young alumni are the group that have the most to gain by returning to Georgia. “It’s an avenue to reconnect with friends and for those who have nostalgia of being back on campus,” he said. Scates said that as attendance has gone down, the Athletic Board noticed that the

Instead of 17,910 available student seats, there will only be 15,856 in 2013. FILE/Staff group that wasn’t coming back were those who had graduated in the past five years. To make coming back easier on the young alumni, Scates said the Athletic Board waived the first year donation fee to the Hartman Fund as well as giving the young alumni more points than what they’re paying. Young alumni will only need to pay the $40 ticket price, costing a total of $240 for the 2013 season. Craig Russo, who graduated in May 2012, said the program is a smart idea, as long as it doesn’t hurt students. “It’s nice for the young alumni to come back and go to games,” he said. “In the past, it’s been hard for them to get a secure ticket. I know friends who have graduated had a hard time finding tickets. They’re always searching.” Gray said the process of requesting tickets for young alumni will be outside of the Hartman Fund process. May will be spent requesting tickets, while allocation of assignments will be made in June. If young alumni already have Hartman Fund credit, they’re still eligible for the program, Gray said. “We didn’t exclude anybody,” he said. “If you already make a donation and already have season tickets, but fall in the young alumni window — May 2008 to May 31, 2013 —

we’ll still give you that donation credit on top of what you’re already getting.” Payday for Athletic Board Because the Athletic Board isn’t cutting the number of tickets sold, it’ll still be making the same revenue in student ticket sales in addition to the amount generated from young alumni ticket sales. By selling the 2,054 tickets at $40 face value, rather than selling them to students at $8 per ticket, the Athletic Board will make an additional $394,368 for the 2013 season. In total, the sum collected for these young alumni tickets over the six home games would be $492,960. Scates said after the first year, the young alumni will pay $125 per seat to the Hartman Fund. Hayes Patrick, a sophomore biology and psychology major from Baton Rouge, La., said making more money is simply logical. “If the tickets aren’t being used, they might as well make some money off of people that are actually gonna go to the game,” he said. “It makes sense.” The Young Alumni Program will take effect beginning in 2013.

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20 SPORTS

Thursday, March 7, 2013

The Red & Black

Herrera, Swann ready to take on crucial defensive leadership roles BY YOUSEF BAIG @YousefBaig Whether they like it or not, Amarlo Herrera and Damian Swann are going to be the leaders of next season’s defense. Herrera — who plays inside linebacker — is the leading returning tackler from the unit with 70 total tackles, a pick-six, and both a forced fumble and recovery. He played in all 14 games, and started nine of those as a true sophomore. Swann — who plays cornerback — was not far behind with his 53 tackles and a team-high four interceptions. He started every single game and proved to be a valuable asset in the secondary with Bacarri Rambo and Sanders Commings missing multiple games at the beginning of the season due to suspensions. Georgia head coach Mark Richt said last week that this is the time of year when the leaders emerge, and both of the rising juniors realize that it’s going to fall on their shoulders to help lead the young group. Herrera’s spot as the ‘Moe’ linebacker in the heart of the defense requires him to be one of the loudest voices on the field. Being the signal-caller brings responsibility, and he’s accepted that. “It’s not me liking the position, it’s the position I’m in,” he said. “I don’t have no choice, but to like it and

lead around here and show people how to do things.” Swann shares similar sentiments, and is ready to show the newcomers what it takes to play in the toughest conference in college football. “It just shows how much I’ve matured and how much I’ve learned since I’ve been here the first two years,” he said. “Now I’m in the position to teach a lot because I have no other choice. I have to get the other guys ready to play in the SEC. It’s not an easy league.” Their journey to this point has been on parallel paths, with both stemming from the metro Atlanta area. Herrera grew up in College Park which borders Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport. While he was in high school, the city repeated as No. 1 for violent, property and total crimes in the metro Atlanta area according to the FBI’s Uniformed Crime Report in 2009. “It’s a pretty rough area,” Herrera said. “You had the good, the bad and the ugly. You’ve just got to do what you have to do to stay out of trouble, and make a way for your family.” Herrera has used those tough beginnings to his advantage, and said that growing up in that environment has shaped his on-field personality. “It really helped me,” Herrera

Linebacker Amarlo Herrera (right) wears No. 52 in honor of his late friend Davin "Big Kuntry" Redmond, who died of a heart attack at age 18. C.B. SCHMELTER/Staff said. “It did help me get a little edge because … I can be a little angry, and that helps me play better.” His true inspiration is derived from pain and loss, though. In January of 2010, North Clayton High School was struck with an unexpected tragedy. Senior offensive tackle Davin Redmond — better known as “Big Kuntry” — died from a heart attack in the middle of the night. He had played

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football for eight years without a single injury or incident prior to that night. Herrera dedicates his play to Redmond every Saturday, and is the reason he wears No. 52. “I go out there and play for him,” he said. “It was unexpected. He was my teammate; my best friend.”

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The Red & Black

SPORTS 21

Thursday, March 7, 2013

Diamond Dogs deliver mixed messages

T

Georgia diver Laura Ryan qualified for the United States Olympic team. She begins her quest for gold with prelims in April. shanda crowe/Staff

UGA diver starts Olympic journey BY CODY PACE @CodyPace While most of the attention for the Georgia swimming and diving team has leaned towards the swimmers this season, diver Laura Ryan has quietly made a big splash of her own. Ryan was named to the Olympic Performance Squad, which includes 26 divers who have been identified by the United States diving team as having the potential to compete in the 2016 Olympic Games in Brazil. “[The team is] very happy for her,” sophomore Darcie O’Brien said. “We don’t treat her any differently, we joke at practice and everything like that, but yeah, we’re really happy for her.” For Ryan, these accolades have been a long time in the making. “It means a lot,” Ryan said. “I’ve worked hard my entire career up to this point and to be recognized for stuff like that is really exciting and it means that everything is starting to pay off and it just motivates me to keep working harder to achieve more things like that.” This will be the beginning of a three-year journey. Being on the Performance Squad does not guarantee that the diver a ticket to Brazil. It will be evaluated on a yearly basis and those divers who do not perform on par with the expected level can be removed. The road to Brazil will begin

on Monday for Ryan when she tries to qualify for the NCAA Championship meet at the Zone Diving Championship in Knoxville, Tenn. Once that wraps up, she will join Team USA for the FINA Grand Prix Canada Cup in Quebec and the FINA USA Diving Grand Prix in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. in early May. “I’m excited to travel to Canada with Team USA and compete up there as well as the Grand Prix,” Ryan said. “That’s going to be a busy couple weeks but I’m definitely excited about it.” Ryan will compete in the 10-meter platform in Canada and the 3-meter springboard in Fort Lauderdale. She will compete in the synchronized 3-meter with Meghan Houston, a freshman at the University of Texas, at both events. “I was partnered with Meghan just because we were friends and we have the same dives and we sort of dive at the same level,” Ryan said. “It worked out well there.” The synchronized events, which require divers to synchronize their every move, will bring some welcomed challenges. “It’s hard to dive synchro because you have to worry about the timing of the other person as well,” Ryan said. “It’s also kind of more fun because there’s somebody up there with you.”

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here was a different feeling at Foley Field on Sunday afternoon. The air was chilly, but the sun was bright and the sky fantastically azure. The attitude of everyone in attendance seemed to reflect that beauty. The Diamond Dogs had just completed their three-game sweep of the UAB, dominating the series finale 13-2. The Blazers had no shot, and the Georgia dugout was brimming with confidence. Not even one week before, however, the team had assumed a far less cheerful aura. Georgia was sporting a 2-6 record, having just fallen to yet another instate rival (Georgia State) in a disappointing 10-7 defeat. The team was frustrated, that much was painfully obvious, and there was a general feeling of restlessness. It was dark, windy and everyone was eager to head home. Even head coach David Perno might have had some doubts. But then the Diamond Dogs did exactly what they said they needed to do — they started playing better. Georgia won three times over the weekend and in convincing fashion no less, outscoring UAB 33-6 over the course of the series. After suffering through a month’s worth of painful one-run losses, Georgia baseball fully flexed its muscles and played up to its potential. Moreover, the team was relying on a smaller number of pitchers to get the work done. And the offense — which had seniors Curt Powell and Kyle Farmer batting near the Mendoza line for almost a month — had runners

Georgia second baseman embraces leadoff hitter mentality BY CY BROWN @CEPBrown Somewhere behind his impish grin, Georgia second baseman and leadoff hitter Nelson Ward only has one thought bouncing around his head when he steps into the batter’s box: get on base. “I don’t have to get a hit,” Ward said. “I’ve just got to find a way on, whether that’s reaching by an error or getting hit by a pitch. That’s the only focus. ” Thus is the life of a leadoff man, a role Ward has flourished in this season for the Diamond Dogs. The sophomore from Marietta, Ga. leads the team in both batting average, a stellar .438, and on-base percentage, an equally strong .472. He also leads the team in hits (21), multi-hit games (seven) and is tied for the lead in runs scored (nine). In short, as head coach David Perno put it, “He’s that prototypical leadoff guy.” With each passing game, Perno’s words are proven to be more true as Ward continues to get on base. “I love the leadoff spot,” Ward said. “When you’re going good, hitting good, it’s fun to get the team going and spark a little fire under the team.” Despite the importance of the leadoff spot, Ward said the pressure never overwhelms him. “Pressure wise, there’s not really any pressure,” he said. “I’ve just got to find a way on and let the other guys knock me in.” His teammates have also noticed him excel in the leadoff spot. “He’s a real catalyst for us,” sophomore outfielder Hunter Cole said. “A leadoff guy, high energy type guy. He always gets after it, always strives to do his best.” Ward is also one of only three Georgia players who have started all 11 games this season. Last year, as a freshman, Ward played

in 44 games, while only starting in 21 games. “Our intention last year was he was going to be our starter,” Perno said. “We tried him everywhere to get him in the lineup, just becasue you wanted that energy and you wanted that type of player on the field.” Ward is now starting at second base, in the hole left by Levi Hyams, who was drafted by the Atlanta Braves in the 19th round of last year’s MLB Draft. “I got to learn a lot behind Levi Hyams and Kyle Farmer, just watching them play with each other, how they communicate with each other,” Ward said. “That’s one of the big-

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Alec Shirkey Staff Writer

on base seemingly every inning. Farmer alone had 10 hits. While this high-ceiling team has been stacked with talent from the very start, it is also a young team.

We knew there would be growing pains. It is not uncommon. Now, perhaps building off of recent success, the Diamond Dogs will finally escape the trials of February and flourish in the coming months. —Alec Shirkey is a finance and English double-major from Dunwoody

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Sophomore Nelson Ward is at the top of the Bulldogs' order and is hitting .438. evan stichler/Staff gest things. I got to learn from them.” Ward knows what his job is, and, in all likelihood, he’ll keep doing it as well as anyone in college baseball.

“Being on base as much as possible is the biggest thing,” Ward said. “It’s the way I can help the team.”

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Thursday, March 7, 2013

22 SPORTS

KNOW THE SCORE

The Red & Black

Men's Basketball

WOMen's Basketball

Player of the Week

Player of the Week

Kentavious Caldwell-Pope

Jasmine Hassell

GYMNASTICS

Player of the Week

Schedule Opponent Date Young Harris EX 11/02 Jacksonville 11/09 Youngstown State 11/12 Southern Miss 11/15 Indiana 11/19 UCLA 11/20 East Tenn. St. 11/23 @South Florida 11/30 @Georgia Tech 12/04 Iona 12/15 Mercer 12/18 Southern Cal 12/22 Florida A&M 12/29 George Washington 1/04 @ Florida 1/09 Miss. St. 1/12 @Missouri 1/16 LSU 1/19 Florida 1/23 @Texas A&M 1/26 Auburn 1/30 @South Carolina 2/02 @ Tennessee 2/06 Texas A&M 2/09 Alabama 2/12 @ Ole Miss 2/16 @ Arkansas 2/21 South Carolina 2/23 @ Vanderbilt 2/27 Tennessee 3/02 Kentucky 3/07 @ Alabama 3/09

Lindsey Cheek Schedule Opponent Date Results Oklahoma 1/5 L @Arkansas 1/11 W Auburn 1/18 W Stanford 1/21 W Metroplex Challenge1/26 (featuring LSU, Oklahoma, Oregon State, Washington in Ft. Worth, Texas) 4th Alabama 2/2 W @Kentucky 2/8 T Florida 2/16 L @ Missouri 2/22 W @LSU 3/1 L Utah 3/9 6 p.m. @N.C. State 3/17 1 p.m.

Gym Dogs vs. LSU Team Results 1. LSU – 197.050 (Vault – 49.5, Bars – 49.3, Beam – 48.875, Floor – 49.375) 2. Georgia – 196.825 (Vault – 49.2, Bars – 49.25, Beam – 49.225, Floor – 49.15) Top Individual Performers Vault: Chelsea Davis (9.9) Bars: Chelsea Davis, Brittany Rogers (9.9) Beam: Shayla Worley (9.9) Floor: Christa Tanella (9.875)

AP Top 25

Aaron Murray and the Georgia football started spring practice last Saturday with the G-Day game fast approaching on April 6. EVAN STICHLER/Staff

NCAA Rankings 1. Florida 2. Oklahoma 3. Michigan 4. LSU 5. Alabama 6. UCLA 7. Utah 8. Georgia 9. Stanford 10. Oregon State 11. Auburn 12. Nebraska 13. Denver 14. Minnesota 15. Penn State

TRACK & FIELD Player of the Week

Lucie Ondraschkova Schedule INDOOR SEASON 01/19 Auburn Invitational 10 a.m. Birmingham, Ala. 01/25 Razorback Invitational Fayetteville, Ark. 2 p.m. 01/26 Razorback Invitational Fayetteville, Ark. M-4th (63), W-5th (78)   02/01 Akron Invitational Akron, Ohio 5 p.m. 02/02 Akron Invitational Akron, Ohio 5 p.m. 02/08 Husky Classic Seattle, Wash. 2 p.m. Virginia Tech Elite Blacksburgh, Va. 5 p.m. 02/09 Husky Classic Seattle, Wash. 2 p.m. Virginia Tech Elite Blacksburgh, Va. 5 p.m. 02/22-24 SEC Championship Fayetteville, Ark. 1 p.m. 03/02 NCAA Qualifier TBA TBD 03/08 NCAA Championships Fayetteville, Ark. Noon 03/09 NCAA Championships Fayetteville, Ark. Noon

SOFTBALL

MEN'S TENNIS

WOMEN'S TENNIS

Player of the Week

Player of the Week

Player of the Week

1. Gonzaga (51) 2. Indiana (7) 3. Duke (5) 4. Kansas 5. Georgetown (2) 6. Miami (Fla.) 7. Michigan 8. Louisville 9. Kansas State 10. Michigan State 11. Florida 12. New Mexico 13. Oklahoma State 14. Ohio State 15. Marquette 16. Saint Louis 17. Syracuse 18. Arizona 19. Oregon 20. Pittsburgh 21. Virginia Commonwealth 22. Wisconsin 23. UCLA 24. Notre Dame 25. Memphis

SEC Stat Leaders Geri Ann Glasco

Nathan Pasha

Silvia Garcia

Schedule

Schedule

Schedule

01/18 - 21 National Collegiate Tennis Classic in Palm Springs, Calif. All Day 1/25 vs. Vanderbilt 4-3 W 01/26 vs. VCU 5-1 W 01/31 vs. Clemson 6-0 W 02/03 @ Ohio State 5-2 L 02/08/13 @ Georgia Tech 4 p.m. 02/15-18 ITA National Team Indoor Championships in Seattle, Wash. TBA 02/24 vs. Furman 6-1 W 02/25 vs. ETSU 5-2 W 03/01 vs. Tennessee 4-1 W 03/04 vs. William & Mary 7-0 W 03/08 @ Ole Miss TBA 03/10 @ Miss. State 2 p.m. 03/15 vs. Florida 2:30 p.m. 03/17 vs. South Carolina 1 p.m. 03/22 @ Vanderbilt 3 p.m. 03/24 @ Kentucky 1 p.m.

01/18 - 20 Georgia Invitational . All Day 01/27 vs. Columbia 4-1 W 01/28 vs. Georgia State 7-0 W 02/02 @ Clemson 5-2 W 02/08-11 ITA National Team Indoor Championships in Charlottesville, Va. TBA 02/23 vs. Georgia Tech 4-3 W 03/02 @ Tennessee 6-1 W 03/08 vs. Ole Miss 4 p.m. 03/10 vs. Mississippi State 1 p.m. 03/12 vs. Notre Dame 1 p.m. 03/15 @ Florida 5 p.m. 03/17 @ South Carolina 1:30 p.m. 03/22 vs. Vanderbilt 4 p.m. 03/24 vs. Kentucky 1 p.m. 03/29 @ Missouri 6 p.m. 03/31 @ Texas A&M Noon 04/05 vs. LSU 4 p.m.

NCAA Rankings

NCAA Rankings

Opponent Elon Ohio St. Elon Ohio St. Winthrop Campbell Northwestern MTSU Colorado St. Oklahoma Cal Poly Stanford Washington NDSU Radford Indiana St. NDSU Radford Radford Delaware St. @Winthrop Kent St. W. Illinois N.C. A&T @Ga. Tech @Auburn @Auburn @Auburn Gardner-Webb Ole Miss Ole Miss Ole Miss Ga. Southern

Date 02/08 02/08 02/09 02/09 02/10 02/15 02/15 02/16 02/21 02/21 02/22 02/22 02/23 03/01 03/01 03/02 03/02 03/03 03/03 03/08 03/08 03/09 03/09 03/10 03/13 03/15 03/16 03/17 03/20 03/22 03/23 03/24 03/27

NCAA Rankings 1. Alabama (27) 2. Oklahoma (4) 3. Arizona State 4. Florida 5. Missouri 6. California 7. Texas A&M 8. Tennessee 9. Oregon 10. Texas

Result L, 5-2 W, 6-1 W, 8-0 L, 5-4 W, 5-3 W, 11-0 W, 6-5 W, 13-1 W, 5-4 L, 5-0 L, 1-0 L, 6-0 L, 14-2 W, 4-1 W, 11-0 W, 9-1 L, 3-0 W, 10-2 W, 12-0 2 p.m. 4 p.m. 1 p.m. 3 p.m. 1 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 1 p.m. 1 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 4 p.m. 2 p.m. 6 p.m.

1. Virginia 2. UCLA 3. Southern California 4. Duke 5. Kentucky 6. Oklahoma  7. Georgia 8. Ohio State 9. Ole Miss 10. Tennessee 11. Mississippi State 12. Pepperdine 13. Illinois 14. Texas A&M 15. Tulsa 16. Drake 17. Harvard 18. Northwestern 19. Vanderbilt 20. Clemson 21. Texas 22. Wake Forest 23. Cornell 24. California 25. Washington

1. North Carolina 2. Duke 3. UCLA 4. Texas A&M 5. Florida 6. Alabama 7. Northwestern 8. Michigan 9. Georgia 10. Nebraska 11. Vanderbilt 12. Southern California 13. Miami (Fla.) 14. Auburn 15. Notre Dame 16. Florida State 17. Clemson 18. California 19. TCU 20. Stanford 21. Purdue 22. Tulsa 23. Texas Tech 24. UC Irvine 25. Memphis

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Schedule Time 86-52 W 68-62 W 68-56 L 62-60 L 66-53 L 60-56 L 54-38 W 64-53 L 60-50 L 81-78 L 58-49 W 64-56 W 82-73 W 52-41 W 77-44 L 72-61 L 79-62 L 67-58 W 64-47 L 59-52 W 57-49 W 67-56 W 68-62 W 52-46 W 52-45 L 84-74 L 62-60 L 62-54 W 63-62 L 78-68 W 7 p.m. 4 p.m.

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11133

Points Per Game 1. M. Henderson (MISS) 19.5 2. K. Caldwell-Pope (UGA) 18.0 3. Elston Turner (A&M) 18.0 4. Jordan McRae (UT) 16.0 5. Trevor Releford (AL) 15.4 6. B.J. Young (ARK) 15.2

Opponent Date Rutgers 11/11 Presbyterian 11/14 S. Carolina State 11/16 11/18 Belmont Savannah State 11/20 St. Bonaventure 11/23 11/24 New Mexico 11/28 Furman @ Georgia Tech 12/02 Mercer 12/04 Lipscomb 12/16 @ TCU 12/19 12/28 @ Illinois Missouri 1/03 1/06 @ Tennessee 1/10 @ Alabama 1/13 South Carolina 1/17 @ Arkansas Texas A&M 1/20 Florida 1/27 Alabama 1/31 @ Kentucky 2/03 2/07 Auburn 2/10 @ LSU 2/17 @ Florida 2/21 Arkansas 2/24 @ Ole Miss @ Miss. St. 2/28 Vanderbilt 3/03 SEC Tournament 03/06 NCAA Tournament 03/23

Time 57-51 W 66-38 W 62-46 W 70-38 W 94-57 W 84-48 W 72-42 W 83-47 W 60-50 W 80-38 W 93-42 W 72-59 W 70-59 L 77-46 W 79-66 L 95-83 W 42-40 W 57-53 W 64-46 L 69-52 W 65-59 W 75-71 W 61-58 W 62-54 L 62-57 W 66-34 W 73-54 W 50-38 L 55-50 W TBA TBA

AP Top 25 1. Baylor (40) 2. Notre Dame 3. Connecticut 4. Stanford 5. California 6. Duke 7. Kentucky 8. Penn State 9. Tennessee 10. Maryland 11. Dayton 12. Georgia 13. Louisville 14. UCLA 15. North Carolina 16. Delaware 17. South Carolina 18. Colorado 19. Texas A&M 20. Green Bay 21. Nebraska 22. LSU 23. Florida State 24. Syracuse 25. Toledo

BASEBALL Player of the Week

Defensive Rebounds Per Game 1. Nerlens Noel (UK) 6.8 2. Murphy Holloway (MISS) 6.2 3. K. Caldwell-Pope (UGA) 5.9 4. Jarnell Stokes (UT) 5.6 5. Johnny O'Bryant (LSU) 5.5 6. Alex Oriakhi (MIZ) 5.3 3-Point FG Percentage 1. Erik Murphy (UF) .464 2. Andre Stringer (LSU) .397 3. Julius Mays (UK) .386 4. Elston Turner (A&M) .378 5. K. Caldwell-Pope (UGA) .378 6. M. Henderson (MISS) .356 Steals Per Game 1. Anthony Hickey (LSU) 3.2 2. K. Caldwell-Pope (UGA) 2.1 3. Trevor Releford (AL) 2.1 4. Nerlens Noel (UK) 2.1 5. Alex Caruso (A&M) 2.0 6. Charles Carmouche (LSU) 1.9

SEC Rankings 1. No. 11 Florida (23-5, 13-3) 2. Kentucky (20-9, 11-5) 3. Missouri (22-8, 11-6) 4. Ole Miss (22-8, 11-6) 5. Alabama (19-11, 11-6) 6. Tennessee (17-11, 9-7) 7. Arkansas (18-12, 9-8) 8. Georgia (14-15, 8-8) 9. LSU (17-10, 8-8) 10. Vanderbilt (13-15, 7-9) 11. Texas A&M (17-12, 7-9) 12. Auburn (9-20, 3-13) 13. Miss. State (8-20, 3-13) 14. South Carolina (13-16, 3-13)

Nelson Ward Upcoming Schedule Opponent Date Time @Georgia State 02/26 L, 10-7 UAB 03/01 W, 14-2 UAB 03/02 W, 6-2 UAB 03/03 W, 13-2 W.estern Carolina 03/05 L, 12-7 Liberty 03/08 7 p.m. Liberty 03/09 3 p.m. Liberty 03/10 2 p.m. App. State 03/12 7 p.m. App. State 03/13 5 p.m. @Texas A&M 03/15 7:35 p.m. @Texas A&M 03/16 3:05 p.m.

Team Stats Ward (.407, 0 HR, 8 RBI, 4 BB) Farmer (.381, 0 HR, 10 RBI, 5 BB) Powell (.365, 0 HR, 8 RBI, 2 BB) Walsh (.361, 1 HR, 6 RBI, 2 BB) DeLoach (.316, 1 HR, 9 RBI, 9 BB) Cole (.265, 1 HR, 9 RBI, 5 BB) Nichols (.194, 1 HR, 5 RBI, 4 BB) Phillips (.138, 0 HR, 3 RBI, 4 BB) Bowers (.348, 3 HR, 7 RBI 1 BB) Sheedy (.333, 0 HR, 1 RBI, 1 BB) Posey (.400, 0 HR, 2 RBI, 1 BB) McLaughlin (.267, 0 HR, 2 RBI, 0 BB)


Thursday, March 7, 2013

The Red & Black

23

Enter the Red & Black's Caption Contest Pick up the paper each week to find the winner of the previous edition and see the picture for the upcoming week. Email submissions to me@randb.com to enter.

02/28/2013, LAST WEEK'S PHOTO

03/07/2013, THIS WEEK'S PHOTO

TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON/Staff

TAYLOR CRAIG SUTTON/Staff

WINNER

RUNNER-UPS

Bro, that is a huge cannon you've got, let me help you hold it — that's what she said.

I bet if we keep shooting at that UT fan, he will flip out and shove a cop.

Where's that Auburn fan?

JEREMY LACKMAN

@UGATAILGATING

JANET MCDONALD ROWLAND

Got a caption for this baby? Email submissions to

me@randb.com

Deadline is Wednesday at 4:30 p.m.

Summer Semester at Athens Technical College starts May 20, 2013! ARTS 1101 Art Appreciation ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric ENGL 1102 Literature and Composition ENGL 2130 American Literature HIST 2112 U.S. History HUMN 1101 Introduction to Humanities MATH 1101 Mathematical Modeling MATH 1111 College Algebra

MATH 1127 Introduction to Statistics MUSC 1101 Music Appreciation PHYS 1110 Conceptual Physics PHYS 110L Conceptual Physics Lab PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology PSYC 2013 Human Devolpment SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology SPCH 1101 Public Speaking

Early Application Deadline is April 1

Transient Students Welcome!

Check with your advisor to see which courses will transfer to fulfill your degree requirements.

Find out how ATC can help you. www.AthensTech.edu/Admissions Thinking about Fall? Early Application Deadline is July 1.

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EMPLOYMENT

HOUSING

INTERNSHIP POSITION available in organic gardening. 10-15hrs/week. Great learning opportunity! Unpaid/Course credit eligible. contact maggie@hungrygnome.org. See full description on our website at www.hungrygnome.org

Royal Oaks 2BR 2.5BA $685 & 1BR 1.5BA Deluxe $575. Intimate Townhome community minutes away from campus. Great for GRAD students.Call for preleasing specials.Joiner Management 706-353-6868 www.joinermanagement.com.

The Flats at Carrs Hill is currently hiring for leasing agents. If you love helping others,have a great attitude, are hard working and want to work for the newest student housing in Athens this is the job for you. Call 706-357-1111 or apply in person at 125 S. Milledge Avenue.

3BR/3BA Townhouse for Rent The Woodlands of Athens (Gated Community) $1350+ utilities split three ways WiFi/ Cable Ready. Available May 2013. www.woodlandsofathens.com. Contact: Jennifer 404.375.8327 massey.jm@ gmail.com.

FT/PT NEXT GENERATION MARKETING FASTEST GROWING ENERGY DRINK IN THE WORLD BE SERIOUS MINDED GREAT EARNINGS 1-800-3371520, health.life315@gmail. com. PLAY SPORTS! HAVE FUN! SAVE MONEY! Maine camp needs fun loving counselors to teach All land, adventure & water sports. Great summer! Call 888-844-8080, apply: campcedar.com. Lifeguards Wanted. Work at Legion Pool on the UGA campus. Late May through mid-August. $9.00 per hour. UGA student applicants only. Applications available at the Tate Information Desk. Call Jamie at (706) 542-8512 for additional information. Inoko Japanese Steakhouse is now hiring servers/hosts. Experience preferred but not required. Please apply in person at 161 Alps Road, MonThurs, 4:30-5:30pm.

Equal Opportunity Instition

11359

$1,175 per month 3 bedroom/3 bath cottage The Woodlands Privately owned, great amenities, in-home security, W/D, no pets. Anita@ TAU-USA.com. Need a room with a view? We have you covered. Lease a 1,2,or 3 bedroom at The Flats at Carrs Hill apartments. Sign up now and get covered parking. Call 888-500-1721 for leasing information. Follow us on facebook for construction updates

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HELP! The Red & Black has been helping students find off-campus housing for over 25 years.

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PRE-LEASE FREE CABLE AND WIFI INTERNET, 4bed 4bath Tall ceilings, hardwood floors, Granite tops, IPOD docking station, 5 minutes to UGA, close to shopping $450/BDRM, PRELEASE Pet Friendly Town Home 3bed 3bath Hardwoods and granite $375/ BDRM, PRE-LEASE Pet Friendly 2bed 2bath Condo Flat with Screen Room $425/BDRM includes water, trash & pool. Call/Text Bob @ 706-215-6848 Bob@ CallBobAllen.com or Brad @ 706-7143580, Brad@CallBobAllen.com View pictures and Virtual tours at www.CallBobAllen.com. 3 Bed/3 Bath in Woodlands. $465/person with easy landlords. Pets welcome with deposit. Lease from 8/3/13 to 8/1/14. Contact Carly at 770843-4242 for more information. 3 bdrm/2 bath condo for rent in Creek Pointe Condominiums. $875/month. Newly renovated. <3 miles from UGA. No pets. (404) 304-7600 – serious inquires only.

EVENTS Athens Skate Inn Oldskool Night! EVERY WED 6:30to9:30pm. $4 Adm. FREE Reg Skates Also, join us for adult night, every 2nd Sunday/ month. 7-10 pm $5 Adm. 295 Commerce Boulevard, Athens.

SERVICES

Standardized Tests Experienced, caring and canny coach available for GRE, GMAT, MAT, English and writing. Reviews available. David Oates (706) 546-7797, dvdoates@aol. com. SUBLEASES Looking to sublease my Lakeside apartment for $295! Just pay for June & July and you can stay in May half price! Please contact me for details! (678)557-3258 skipper@uga. edu. Sublease 1 bedroom/1 bath fully furnished luxury pkg apartment in Abbey West. Available immediately. $405 or best offer. Email uga_sublease@bellsouth.net if interested.

Sublease a luxury unit at The University Apartments. Rent is $400 (includes all utilities). Athens Transit & UGA Bus stops at the U. Contact Melissa at 678-630-0070 for more information. 1 bdr in 3-bdr/1-bath house. S. Milledge & Parkway Dr. Hardwood floors. Backyard. 2 male roommates. Prefer mature individual. $295/month + utilities. 706-380-2806. 1 bedroom available for sublet June-August in a 4 br/ba house. 3 friendly female roommates. Close to campus/downtown Athens. Rent is $350/ mo+utilities. Call 706.994.3332. Furnished room + private bath available now at The Reserve! $389/month. Email vanessac@uga.edu. Looking to sublease 2 rooms in a 3bd/3ba apt at The Summit May 10th-July. Rent $410/ month per room (only $205 for May's rent) + utilities. Contact whitneyshirley1@gmail.com if interested. Graduating in May and REALLY need someone to take over my lease from May to July at Lakeside Apartments. Fully furnished, ALL utilities are included. On bus #14. email mhudd92@uga.edu. Looking for that PERFECT ROOMMATE?? What better way to find them than in the RED & BLACK roommates Section. Bringing roommates together for 107 years.

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R&B PLAY Thursday, March 7, 2013

Art finds greater audience among Athenians Art has found more room about town in growing gallery spaces which allow creative venues to show off their talents.

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search: Art ››

STAFF/The Red & Black

EVENT LISTINGS, 2 • DRINK & DINING GRID, 8-9 • SUDOKU, 12 • CROSSWORD, 13


Thursday, March 7, 2013

2 PLAY

THURSDAY, MARCH 7

ALL IN PERSPECTIVE

Locally-made art easily found out and about town BY CHELSEY ABERCROMBIE @comma_freak Creative minds in Athens finally have a place to go. Last semester, The Red & Black reported on the limited number of gallery spaces in Athens compared with the large amount of artistic talent. “Generally, because of the lack of an art market here in Athens, it’s very hard for a commercial gallery to survive. That’s due to a lot of factors,” said Carl Martin, a local architect, photographer, Ciné exhibition curator and Guggenheim Memorial Fellow. The harsh economic climate of recent years hasn’t helped improve on the limited number of gallery spaces. “One thing that surprised me when I moved here was actually how high the rent was,” said Hope Hilton, the gallery manager of Athens Institute for Contemporary Art. However, just as the financial markets seem to have weathered the worst of it, many local artists are now seeing a slight upturn in the state of the art scene. A few more spaces have opened or are planning to open, while some say public interest in locally made art is also showing signs of life. “I feel like there were a lot more, like a ton of artist markets going on during Christmas, more so than ever,” Devin Clower, a University of Georgia art graduate and owner of Frontier, said, “so I think just in general people are extremely interested in supporting local products and crafts, and so I think there’s definitely an eagerness to want to find it and appreciate it.” While students’ dreams of a student-run gallery may be intangible for now, the number of venues where they might showcase or create their work is expanding.

“There are some new studios opening up,” Clower said. Hilton echoed Clower’s statement. “A lot of businesses are opening up that lend themselves to contemporary art, like Double Dutch Press. I think that’s encouraging,” Hilton said. “In terms of new spaces, I feel like the new circle gallery at UGA is really important, as well as the AthensHasArt! space on West Broad Street.” Frontier and ATHICA have also recently launched a series of collaborations aimed at elevating the profile of local artists. “A few times a year, we’re going to do a joint feature on artists we’ve found in our window space, so hopefully that’ll help new artists get exposure,” Clower said. “When you work together, you can always accomplish more.” The various spaces provided by local businesses have started to expand past the usual coffee houses and restaurants. “A lot of businesses have also stepped it up in terms of having curated art,” Hilton said. “Instead of just throwing it up, it’s scheduled and promoted. I really like that. I like seeing art coming in and out of the regular places that I go.” ATHICA collaborated with a somewhat unlikely partner, Athens Ford, to set up an exhibition. “They have a huge showcase gallery for cars there, but there aren’t always cars there, so we’ve been putting art there,” Hilton said. ATHICA’s first exhibit at Athens Ford will have its grand opening on March 7. The Classic Center expansion is another recent addition to the face of Athens that’s sure to change the art scene for the better. “With the expansion, they tripled, quadrupled their wall space, these very

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big, luxurious walls that were otherwise unplanned for any type of art,” curator Didi Dunphy said. Dunphy, who is also the curator for the GlassCube and Gallery space at Hotel Indigo, will curate the new Classic Center galleries. She plans on curating two shows annually in the new space. “There’s tons of traffic at that place. To incorporate art in the everyday in a venue like the Classic Center is very enriching,” Dunphy said. In lieu of galleries, nontraditional spaces are becoming more common. “One of my interns is putting on a show at the Georgia Theatre, which has a mezzanine gallery,” Dunphy said. “That’s a new space, so yes, there’s been some growth.” Martin, Dunphy and Hilton are all involved in the Third Thursday initiative, an organization whose aim is to provide “visual art in Athens, Georgia every third Thursday” according to its website. “The really concerted effort of all of us is to bring awareness to art in terms of the public concept of how art can participate in culture and viable economic development,” Martin said. UGA is playing a tremendous part in the ongoing life of the community as well. “The art department at UGA has really stepped it up with their new hires,” Hilton said. “Several new faculty members have pushed the students along and they’re sending their students [to ATHICA], which is really very supportive and positive.” Like the creative process, expansion may be something that can’t be rushed. “I think it’s on everybody’s minds right now,” Clower said.

search: Art ››

Old Skool Trio When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Price: Free Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com Sam Sniper When: 11 p.m. Where: Farm 255 Price: Free Contact: www.farm255.com Live in the Lobby: Brothers When: 8 p.m. Where: WUOG 90.5 FM Price: Free Contact: www.wuog.org Goldblues When: 12 a.m. Where: Green Room Price: Free Contact: www.greenroomathens.com Paul Thorn, Bonnie Bishop When: 8 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $15 (adv.), $18 (door) Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com Scott Low and the Southern Bouillon, Caleb Caudle, Haley Dreis When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Contact: www.flickertheatreandbar.com Thunderchief, Barb Wire Dolls When: 10 p.m. Where: Max Price: Free Contact: (706) 254-3392 Quiabo de Chapeu When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Price: Free Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com Burns Like Fire, Swaggerin’ Growlers, Grim Pickins & The Bastard Congregation,

Stone Mountain Freeway, Three’s Away When: 9:30 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+), $7 (18-20) Contact: www.caledonialounge.com Kendrick Lamar When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Tate Student Center Price: Sold Out Contact: tate.uga.edu Oconee Rivers Audubon Society Lecture: Birds are Dinosaurs When: 7 p.m. Where: Sandy Creek Nature Center Price: Free Contact: www.oconeeriversaudubon.org Visiting Author: Jessica Maria Tuccelli When: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Avid Bookshop Price: Free Contact: www.avidbookshop. com Little Free Library Launch When: 6 to 9 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: Donations Accepted Contact: readathens@gmail. com Trivia with a Twist When: 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Where: Johnny’s New York Style Pizza Price: Free Contact: (706) 354-1515 Reiki Circle When: 7 to 8 p.m. Where: Healing Arts Centre Price: Donations Accepted Contact: (706) 338-6843 Make It an Evening: James Galway When: 6 to 8 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Price: $5 Contact: www.pac.uga.edu


Thursday, March 7, 2013

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Karaoke When: 9 p.m. Where: Walker’s Coffee & Pub Price: Free Contact: (706) 5431433 Scottish Country Dance Classes When: 7 to 9 p.m. Where: Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Athens Price: $3 Contact: dabmillier@ gmail.com James Galway When: 8 p.m. Where: Hodgson Concert Hall Price: $5 students, $20-59 non-students Contact: www.pac.uga. edu Athens Kinnection: Desert Dwellers, The Human Experience, Aligning Minds When: 10 p.m. Where: New Earth Music Hall Price: $8 (adv.), $12 (door) Contact: www.newearthmusichall.com Opening Reception: Shamiria Mahaffey, Demek Kemp When: 7 p.m. Where: Athens Ford Price: Free Contact: www.athica. org And I Feel Fine When: 1 to 9 p.m. Where: Athens Institute for Contemporary Art Cost: Donations Accepted Contact: (706) 2081613

FRIDAY, MARCH 8 To Kill a Mockingbird When: 7 p.m. Where: Seney-Stovall

Chapel Price: $8-16 Contact: www.roseofathens.org Winnie the Pooh When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Athens Little Playhouse Price: $5-10 Contact: www.athenslittleplayhouse.net Master’s Recital: Kuei-Fan Chen, cello When: 3:35 p.m. Where: Edge Recital Hall Price: Free Contact: www.music. uga.edu Classic City Kings, DJ Mahogany When: 10 p.m. Where: Go Bar Contact: (706) 5465609 The Gentlemen Callers: “Holly Wood” When: 10 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: $5 Contact: www.facebook.com/lkshuffleclub Clay Classes When: 7 to 9 p.m. Where: Good Dirt Price: $20 Contact: (706) 3553161, www.gooddirt.net Zumba(r) with Ingrid When: 6 to 7 p.m. Where: Casa de Amistad Price: $5 Contact: zumbathens@ gmail.com Healing Fridays When: 6 p.m. Where: Body, Mind & Spirit Price: $10 Donation Contact: (706) 3516024

Rand Lines When: 8 to 11 p.m. Where: Highwire Lounge Price: Free Contact: www.highwirelounge.com Lee Coulter When: 7 p.m. Where: Avid Bookshop Price: Free Contact: www.avidbookshop.com Cosmic Charlie When: 8 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $10 Contact: www.georgiatheatre.com The Humms, Timmy Tumble When: 11 p.m. Where: Farm 255 Price: Free Contact: www.farm255. com Leaving Countries, Ken Will Morton and The Contenders When: 10 p.m. Where: The Pub at Gameday Contact: (706) 3532831 Erik Neil Band, The Rays featuring Carla Le Fever When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: (706) 5464742 King of Prussia; Feather Trade; Pipes You See, Pipes You Don’t When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Contact: www.flickertheatreandbar.com Common People Band When: 8 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $6 (adv.), $8

(door) Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com Muuy Biien, The Milkstains, Future Virgins, Ritvals When: 9:30 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+), $7 (18-20) Contact: www.caledonialounge.com Broken Arrow Blues Band When: 8:30 p.m. Where: The Office Lounge Contact: (706) 5460840 The Granfalloons When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com

PLAY

A Novel Music Tour When: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Avid Bookshop Price: Free Contact: www.avidbookshop.com Water Music When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org Object in Focus: The Orpheus Relief Project When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org From Savanna to Savannah: African Art

from the Collection of Don Kole When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org Americans in Italy When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org Defiant Beauty: The Work of Chakaia Booker When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org

MAR 8 ..................................................... Cosmic Charlie MAR 19 ................. Boomfox & Immuzikation (rooftop) MAR 20 ....................... Florida Georgia Line - SOLD OUT MAR 21 & MAR 22 ........... STS9 & Minnesota - SOLD OUT MAR 25 .................... Free Energy & John Swint DJ Set MAR 26 ...........................Banff Mountain Film Festival

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Flute legend keeps classical music pure By SARAH ANNE PERRY @sarahanneperry The living legend of the flute is coming to Hodgson Concert Hall. Flute virtuoso James Galway's performance will embrace several musical genres and time periods, with compositions by W.A. Mozart, Claude Debussy, Henry Mancini and others. “Through the years, I’ve played many concerts, and I’ve seen all the pieces that the people like,” Galway said. “I thought, ‘This is a good opportunity to do pieces that I like to play and that the public like to hear.’” Galway has performed with a myriad of artists, including Ray Charles, Joni Mitchell and Pink Floyd — and worldwide leading orchestras. Still, Galway called the combining of classical and pop music “a waste of time.” “A Haydn symphony is a Haydn symphony,” he said. “It’s written in a very particular time frame, historically speaking, and you can’t rock ‘n’ roll it. If you try to use these popular techniques to a Haydn symphony, you really don’t get anywhere because in the end, it sounds much better played on original instruments and with a forceful performance given by people who really care about the music.” Born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Galway studied flute in London and Paris before playing in the Royal Philharmonic and London Symphony orchestras. In 1975, he decided to pursue a solo career. Now, he has performed for three

FRIDAY, MARCH 8 Remixing History: Manolo Valdés When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org Belleek Porcelain from the Collection of Linda N. Beard When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org

SATURDAY, MARCH 9

James Galway will perform straight classical music at the University of Georgia. Courtesy James Galway American presidents, several monarchs and even a pope. Queen Elizabeth II honored Galway with the Order of the British Empire in 1979 and a knighthood in 2001 for his services to music. Behind Galway’s accomplishments are thousands of hours of dedicated practice. “You can be as talented as you want,” he said. “If you don’t do the work, you won’t get there. Now, you know, the reason that you do all this work is to finetune — here’s a pun — fine-tune the performance that you’re going to give. Now, if you don’t do all the exercises and everything like that, you ain’t gonna get there.” Galway recently filmed 15 high-definition flute lessons, which will be the first installment in the “James Galway Online Flute Tutor Series.”

JAMES GALWAY Also Including: Lady Jeanne Galway and the Galway Chamber Players When: March 7, 8 p.m. Where: Hodgson Concert Hall Price: $5 (students), $20-$59 (public) The interactive series is an attempt to offer flutists anywhere access to comprehensive flute instruction. Galway has simple counsel for performers. “The bottom line is — start practicing," he said. "Because for every minute you’re not practicing, somebody else is.”

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Bubonik Funk When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: (706) 5464742 Erik Neil Band When: 9 p.m. Where: The Office Lounge Contact: (706) 5460840 DJ The King, MC Cord, Toaster When: 10 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: Free Contact: www.facebook.com/lkshuffleclub Holly Hunt, Rapturous Grief, Pale Prophet When: 9:30 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+), $7 (18-20) Contact: www.caledonialounge.com Jacco Gardner, Les Racquet When: 10 p.m. Where: Green Room

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Price: $3 Contact: www.greenroomathens.com Bubbly Mommy Gun, The Dream Scene, Bo White, Human Pippi Armstrong, Stephen Cooper, Rene Le Conte When: 11 p.m. Where: Farm 255 Price: $5 wristband Contact: www.farm255. com Diving Bell, Imperceivable Shifts, Sensual Harassment, Co Co Ri Co When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Price: $5 wristband Contact: www.flickertheatreandbar.com Killick, Brannen Burland and Schultz, Craig Dongoski When: 7 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: $5 wristband Contact: www.facebook.com/lkshuffleclub Miracles of Modern Science, Powerkompany, Blue Blood, Adam Vidiksis, Thom Jordan When: 7 p.m. Where: The World Famous Price: $5 wristband Contact: www.theworldfamousathens.com Grape Soda, The Suzan, Glasscrafts, Baby Baby When: 9 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $5 wristband Contact: www.40watt. com The Dream Scene, Harouki Zombi, Twin Powers, Electrophoria When: 11 p.m. Where: Go Bar Price: $5 wristband Contact: (706) 546-

5609 Kate Morrissey, Chris McKay When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com To Kill a Mockingbird When: 7 p.m. Where: Seney-Stovall Chapel Price: $8-16 Contact: www.roseofathens.org Winnie the Pooh When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Athens Little Playhouse Price: $5-10 Contact: www.athenslittleplayhouse.net DJ Mahogany When: 10 p.m. Where: Cutters Pub Price: Free Contact: (706) 3539800 Spring Forward Dance Party: Immuzikation When: 11:30 p.m. Where: The National Price: Free Contact: www.thenationalrestaurant.com Feral Youth, DJ MK Ultra When: 11 p.m. Where: New Earth Music Hall Price: $5 wristband Contact: www.newearthmusichall.com Without Flowers: Mosses, Liverworts, Ferns and Horsetails When: 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Where: State Botanical Garden of Georgia Price: $50 Contact: www.botgarden.uga.edu


Thursday, March 7, 2013

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New Moon Dreamboards When: 10 a.m. to noon. Where: Over the Moon Creative Possibilities Contact: mamainthemoon.blogspot.com Athens Area Democrats Breakfast When: 9 a.m. Where: Brett’s Casual American Restaurant Price: $11 Contact: (706) 2487455, athensareademocrats@gmail.com CCRG vs. Dixie Derby Girls When: 7 p.m. Where: Athens Arena Price: $10 (adv.), $12 (door) Contact: www.classiccityrollergirls.com March for Meals 5K When: 9 a.m. Where: ACC Council on Aging Price: $15-25 Contact: (706) 5494850, www.active.com Grand Opening When: 8 p.m. Where: Smokey Road Press Price: Free Contact: smokeyroadpress@gmail.com Spring Forward Dance Party When: 11:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Where: The National Price: Free Contact: (706) 5493450 Table Tennis Tournament When: 2 p.m. Where: Oconee Veterans Park Price: Free Contact: kthomas@ oconee.ga.us, www. oconeecounty.com/ ocprd

Beginner Disc Golf Clinic When: 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Where: Sandy Creek Park Price: Free (w/ $2 park admission) Contact: www.facebook. com/athensdiscgolf Tech Shot: “Locative Media & Society” When: 2 p.m. Where: Ciné Barcafé Price: $5 wristband Contact: www.athensslingshot.com Tech Shot: “Translocal Future” When: 3 p.m. Where: Ciné Barcafé Price: $5 wristband Contact: www.athensslingshot.com Lecture: “The Place for Which our Fathers Sighed: Black Men and Women in Athens” When: 1 p.m. Where: Morton Theatre Price: Free Contact: (706) 2476777 Athens Slingshot When: 2 p.m. to 2 a.m. Where: Athens, Ga. Price: $5 wristband Contact: www.athensslingshot.com Athens Slingshot Film Screenings When: 8, 10 p.m. Where: Ciné Barcafé Price: $5 wristband Contact: www.athensslingshot.com Bread and Puppet Circus When: 5 p.m. Where: Canopy Studio Price: Free Contact: www.breadandpuppet.org

PLAY

Instagrammed Athens conveys nuanced character BY CHELSEY ABERCROMBIE @comma_freak The headline at the top of the My Athens Is webpage is constantly shifting. Each new adjective puts a different spin on the Classic City: charming, generous, amazing. Reflecting the many different views of more than 30,000 residents is part of the goal behind the innovative, Instagram-driven art show, My Athens Is. For months, My Athens Is has been inviting photographers of all skill levels to tweet or Instagram their photos of Athens to the hashtag #my_ athens. Many of the photos will be curated for an exhibit to take place at the Bottleworks on Prince Avenue, April 6 to April 20, where the many works will be silently auctioned to raise money for the Athens Area Habitat for Humanity. Through the duration of the show, locals will hold special events, including musical performances, lectures and conversations about “art and creativity, social good and the community,” at the Bottleworks, according to the My Athens Is website. Greg Gilbert, the University of Georgia graduate behind the My Athens Is initiative, was inspired by the social media love recently shown for another great Georgia city. “We were definitely inspired by Atlanta, by the We Love ATL that happened in December,” Gilbert said. “I loved the concept of taking something in a world where people are online, going

My Athens Is compiles user-submitted Instagram photos of Athens and will display a few chosen photos in an April art show. Courtesy My_Athens digital, less depth of relationship, less community, and using social media as a drive to bring people together.” Online, the #my_ athens hashtag has collected more than 2,000 photos so far. The deadline for photos to make it in the show has passed, but photos are still being collected for photo of the day picks and other contests this year. “It was a really cool idea about Habitat for Humanity, easy and simple enough to get involved with, because all you do is post Instagram stuff,” said Nolan McClure, a graduate student from Roswell, studying family financial planning. McClure tweeted a photo of the Student Learning Center to contribute to the cause. “As a graduate student, I’ve been in Athens for five years now,” McClure said. “It really celebrates the town, and it goes directly towards benefitting the Athens community.”

Leslie Bentley, a fourth-year nutrition science major from Winder, found out about the movement the reverse way: it started following her on Instagram. Bentley posted a photo from a concert at the Georgia Theatre, in addition to adding the #my_athens hashtag to several photos she’d already posted to Instagram. “I think it’s neat, because you kind of see different people’s perspective of Athens,” Bentley said. “Athens is such a cool city, and there are so many different landmarks, but when people Instagram them, you see the city in a different way, which I think is really cool about it.” For Gilbert, the charity-oriented display of love for his favorite town is just as much about reaching out as it is giving back. The project expanded his own horizons. “Through this process, what I realized is that I have certain patterns of places I would

go and things I would see, and many times they were the same places and the same things,” Gilbert said. “It has been phenomenal to really go deeper and wider into what the city has to offer.” The fact that the proceeds from the silent auction will benefit the Athens Area Habitat for Humanity only enhances the initiative’s focus on community. Many of the photos that aren’t sold will be placed inside Habitat for Humanity homes to “give them a little something to have on their wall to represent Athens,” said Lawrence Jones, the public outreach director at Athens Area Habitat. “It’s just a really great way to engage your community,” Jones said. Photos may be uploaded to Instagram or Twitter at any time using #my_athens.

search: Instagram ››

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Thursday, March 7, 2013

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SUNDAY, MARCH 10

Classes to find jewelry, art in scraps

Spotlight Tour When: 3 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Price: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org

BY CAROLINE WINGATE @cmargaretw The baby of 10 children, Annette Paskiewicz was born with a confidence to go and do as she pleased. “When you’re the baby of the family, everybody loves [you] and loves what [you] do,” Paskiewicz, artist and owner of Studio Mod Glass, said. The life of a career artist has ups and downs. Sometimes, artists have to deal with making tough choices and also making ends meet. “I live very frugally, but that can change when you make more and invest more in your work. I have gone into this other work — the glass work painting — not jewelry but it’s wall work. It takes a little time to get that going and get the ideas figured out,” Paskiewicz said. Paskiewicz has worked part-time jobs to pay the bills, but her art is most important to her. Her artistic passion was influenced by her mother, also an artist. “My mother was an art teacher. She taught all ages, and she herself made and moved around in different mediums, making clay, weaving on a loom and other things. So, my mother was a big inspiration in my life to make things,” Paskiewicz said. Paskiewicz said she kept aware of trending styles. “I would say the other inspiration is from the other artists. Every time I do a show, I see

Clay Classes When: 2 to 4 p.m. Where: Good Dirt Price: $20 Contact: www.gooddirt. net Studio Mod workshops allow participants to create jewelry and art with glass scraps. Courtesy Studio Mod

SMALL GLASS FUSING WORKSHOPS When: March 9, 23 and April 6, 20 Where: 424 Nacoochee Ave. Price: $100 Contact: (310) 5927048 the most beautiful work, and you see what people are doing with their lives,” Paskiewicz said. She stays true to her passions. Without intense vigor and inspirations, many of her works wouldn't exist. “I can’t imagine being any other type of person. I am inspired by the great artists and just seeing great art. It's exciting. It's an exciting life,” Paskiewicz said. By teaching classes at Studio Mod, she shares her knowledge. “That’s what I’ve been doing for 20 years, and it's really fun. I decided too that I should try these classes to make a little more money. The glass course is unusual. With somebody like me, [customers] are walking into a professional studio with some exciting products.

There will be different things that you end up with — a window piece or some jewelry. Basically, it is just a chance to touch the glass and see how it all comes together. It’s more of an educational experience,” Paskiewicz said. In the course, she works with people of all levels of experience, using materials from previous projects. “I have a lot of scrap glass that we will be using. I have bins of scrap glass from other projects. There is a small-scale limit of making five things, making a 5-inch to 6-inch square of something,” Paskiewicz said. A Wisconsin native who lived in California for years, she moved to Athens for its people and artistic environment. “In Athens, you see this indie-South look where people are selling $10 and $20 things, but they are still paying $80 to be in that indie market,” Paskiewicz said. This artist's chosen career path is a gamble, but there are many people here to support her. “That’s what we go through as artists,. There is so much uncertainty,” Paskiewicz said.

search: glass ››

Sunday Night at the Bowling Alley Blues Band When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Ten Pins Tavern Price: Free Contact: (706) 5468090 Gumshoe When: 6 p.m. Where: Ted’s Most Best Price: Free Contact: www.tedsmostbest.com lowercase letters When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com Casual Curious When: 10 p.m. Where: Farm 255 Contact: www. farm255.com Ken Stringfellow, Phillip Brantley When: 7 p.m. Where: The World Famous Price: $15 Contact: www. theworldfamousathens. com Emotions Anonymous When: 4 to 5 p.m. Where: Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Athens

The Red & Black

Contact: (706) 2027463, www.emotionsanonymous.org Book Launch: Shadows and Wings When: 3 to 4 p.m. Where: Avid Bookshop Price: Free Contact: www.avidbookshop.com Winnie the Pooh When: 3 p.m. Where: Athens Little Playhouse Price: $5-10 Contact: www.athenslittleplayhouse.net The Taiwan Oyster When: 5 p.m. Where: Ciné Barcafé Price: $10-12 Contact: www.athenscine.com Water Music When: 1 to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org Minna Citron: The Uncharted Course from Realism to Abstraction When: 1 to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org Object in Focus: The Orpheus Relief Project When: 1 to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org From Savanna to Savannah: African Art from the Collection of Don Kole When: 1 to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free

Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org Americans in Italy When: 1 to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org Defiant Beauty: The Work of Chakaia Booker When: 1 to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org

MONDAY, MARCH 11 Rock and Roll Trivia When: 9 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: Free Contact: www.facebook.com/lkshuffleclub Middle Eastern Mondays When: 7 to 9 p.m. Where: Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Athens Price: Free (first-time visitors), $10-12 Contact: www.athensbellydance.com Roadside Flower + Exotic Blossoms + Watercolor = Magic When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Where: State Botanical Garden of Georgia Price: $75 Contact: www.margaretwalshbest.com The Constellations When: 9 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $5 (adv.), $7 (door) Contact: www.40watt. com


Thursday, March 7, 2013

The Red & Black

Cult of Riggonia, Tom Television, The Parlour Suite When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Contact: www.flickertheatreandbar.com Quiabo De Chapeu When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Price: Free Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com The Hoot: Green Flag, Mary Sigalas, Appalachian Rhythm, Susan Staley When: 6 p.m. Where: Melting Point Price: Free Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com Irata, Freedom Hawk, Guzik When: 9:30 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+), $7(1820) Contact: www.caledonialounge.com

TUESDAY, MARCH 12 Athens Fibercraft Guid When: 12:30 p.m. Where: Lyndon House Arts Center Price: Free Contact: (706) 5434319 Alcoholics Anonymous When: Call for times Where: Call for locations Price: Free Contact: (706) 3894164 Gentle Hatha Integral Yoga When: 5:30 to 7 p.m. Where: St. Gregory’s Episcopal Church Price: $9 Contact: (706) 543-

0162 Ashtanga Yoga When: 5:15 to 6:45 p.m. Where: Healing Arts Centre Price: Free Contact: www.healingartscentre.net Special Collections Tour When: 2 p.m. Where: Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries Price: Free Contact: www.libs.uga. edu/scl Recreational Disc Golf Doubles Night When: 6 to 8 p.m. Where: Sandy Creek Park Price: Free (w/ $2 admission) Contact: www.athensdiscgolf.com Leaving Countries When: 6 p.m. Where: Mirko Pasta Price: Free Contact: (706) 8505641 Tuesday Night Confessional: Fester Hagood, Danny Hutchens, Rick Fowler, Redneck Greece When: 9 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: (706) 5464742 Adam Garza, Josh Perkins When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Contact: www.flickertheatreandbar.com The Aviators, En Limbo When: 10 p.m. Where: Go Bar Contact: (706) 5465609

PLAY

RATED E!

PlayStation divulges details about fourth generation By WES MAYER The Red & Black Well, everybody, it’s the moment we’ve all been waiting for — the PlayStation 4 is officially coming. Last Wednesday, Sony threw a lot of information at us, about its next PlayStation generation. The company held plenty of things back as well (like what the system actually looks like), but we still have enough to drool over until we can get our hands on it later this holiday season. “So what is going to be so great about the PS4?” you might ask. Well, first off, it’s going to support the next generation of games, which look gorgeous. We have already seen what a few of these games will look like, the best-looking of which are Bungie’s sci-fi epic, “Destiny” (which won’t be an Xbox exclusive like “Halo”); Ubisoft’s third-person shooter centered around hacking every electronic device in sight, “Watch Dogs;” a beautiful looking fantasy game by Capcom, “Deep Down," a personal favorite, and a familiar PlayStation exclusive to kick things off, “Killzone: Shadow Fall.” The graphics the PS4 supports are incredible. The PS4 will be able to run Epic Games’ next-gen graphics engine “Unreal Engine 4,”, and will support 4K (with four times more pixels than 1080p) prerecorded video. Sony isn’t at a stage where it can make 4K games playable, but we’re getting there. The controller will be upgraded too. The

PlayStation announced details about changes to the controller as well as other portions of the fourth version of its gaming system. Courtesy Slashgear DualShock 4 is a little more curvaceous and a little more “modern” looking. It has stripped the START and SELECT buttons and replaced the front with a touchscreen, making it clear that games will include new touch features. The analog sticks are modified to be easier to grip, the triggers (L2/R2) will be shaped more like triggers, and there is a small speaker under the touchscreen — perhaps separate sounds (ones that would seem closer to you, like a gun firing, maybe) will come directly from the controller. One of the most interesting features is the controller’s SHARE button. This next generation, Sony has figured out, is all about social media. The PS4 will make it much easier for gamers to share what they are playing with all of their friends. Hitting the SHARE button will allow players to record recent gameplay, upload it to the Internet and share

it with their friends. This is a great feature because creating your own gameplay videos now is a fairly costly and complicated process. Another feature that the controller includes is the new “Move” control. On the top/front of the controller which would normally face your TV is a three-color LED light strip. The strip will change color according to gameplay and connect to the new PlayStation 4 Eye, a camera that will detect where the player is in the room (no, it’s not a Kinect). The DualShock 4 will detect where the player is in three dimensions, and this will probably bring new “Sixaxis” resembling features (which weren’t widely utilized with the PlayStation 3) to PS4 gameplay. Unfortunately, there is also bad news with the PS4. The new system will not be backwards compatible. PS3 and PlayStation Network games and game saves will not

work on the PS4. Nothing from your PS3 will transfer to the PS4 (they didn’t say anything about our PlayStation Network IDs or Trophies), so don’t plan on forgetting about your PS3. Instead, it seems like the PS4 will completely restart the new generation, which is good or bad news depending on your point of view. Also, DualShock 3s will not work on the PS4. They just aren’t advanced enough. The PS4 will ship with a new DualShock 4 and a headset though, meaning much more chatty online play. Of course, there are many things we do not know about the PS4. The detail they are blatantly holding back is what the system actually looks like. With the former codename “Orbis,” we could be looking at a circular device, but that’s just speculation.

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LANDMARKATHENS.COM • 706-395-1400

125 S. MILLEDGE AVE. SUITE A, ATHENS GA 30605

CEDAR SHOALS SQUARE • 3-5 BEDROOMS • 3 STORIES • 3,000 SQUARE FEET • POOL • ON THE BUS LINE

Thursday

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

$2 Terrapin Draft & Bottles Buy A 32oz beer and get a refillable mug FREE! HAPPY HOUR 12 to 8 p.m. $1 off Pitchers, Imports, and Liquor Drinks

1/2 OFF Wine or Sangria $1 Bottle Miller Lite $3 Wells $4 Pitchers Miller High Life BOGO Boneless 9-midnight

Thursday Bomb Night: $2 Cruzan Bombs, $3 Jager Bombs, $3 Barcardi Bombs $5 Moonshine Margarita

FRIDAY

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

HAPPY HOUR 12 to 8 p.m. $1 off Pitchers, Imports, and Liquor Drinks

$1 Bottle Miller Lite $3 Wells $4 Pitchers Miller High Life BOGO Boneless 9-midnight

$3 Domestics, $3 Gameday Shot, $4 Jack Drinks, $5 Moonshine Margarita

Saturday

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

HAPPY HOUR 12 to 8 p.m. $1 off Pitchers, Imports, and Liquor Drinks

$1 Bottle Miller Lite $3 Wells $4 Pitchers Miller High Life BOGO Boneless 9-midnight

Sunday

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

Rooftop Restaurant and Bar open 11:30 am - 2 am

Early Bird Special $2 Regular Sushi Rolls

50% OFF Beer, Wine, & Sake w/ Student ID

Rooftop Restaurant and Bar open 11:30 am - 2 am

Early Bird Special $2 Regular Sushi Rolls $4.50 late night chicken plate

N/A

$3 Domestics, $3 Gameday Shot, $4 Jack Drink, $5 Moonshine Margarita

Rooftop Restaurant and Bar open 11:30 am - 2 am

Early Bird Special $2 Regular Sushi Rolls $4.50 late night chicken plate

N/A

N/A

Rooftop Restaurant and Bar open 11:30 am - 2 am

N/A

50% OFF Beer, Wine, & Sake w/ Student ID

10% Student Discount on Meals (w/valid College ID)

The NFL Package

Live Trivia 7pm $10 Pitchers Blue Moon, Yuengling, & Bud Light $1 Bottle Miller Lite $3 Wells BOGO Boneless 9-midnight $2 Specialty Martini’s $1 Bottle Miller Lite $3 Wells $4 Pitchers Miller High Life BOGO Boneless 9-midnight

Pitcher Monday Night Football:

Monday

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

$0.50 Wings HAPPY HOUR 12 to 8 p.m. $1 off Pitchers, Imports, and Liquor Drinks

Tuesday

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

$1 Coors Light 16oz. HAPPY HOUR 12 to 8 p.m. $1 off Pitchers, Imports, and Liquor Drinks

$2 OFF Terrapin pints $1 Bottle Miller Lite $3 Wells $4 Pitchers Miller High Life BOGO Boneless 9-midnight

Tuesday Dollar Night: $1 Shots/shooters, $1 Wells, $5 Moonshine Margarita

Wednesday

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

Trivia Night Starts at 8PM HAPPY HOUR 12 to 8 p.m. $1 off Pitchers, Imports, and Liquor Drinks

$2.50 Buffalo Canyon-ritas $1 Bottle Miller Lite $3 Wells $4 Pitchers Miller High Life BOGO Boneless 9-midnight

Wednesday Ladies Night: $3 Martinis, $6 Bottles of House Wine, $5 Moonshine Margarita

allgood

Where: 256 E. Clayton Phone: (706) 549-0166 Website: allgoodlounge.com On Facebook: facebook.com/pages/ Allgood-Bar/ 152530911447853

Blind Pig Tavern

Where: 485 Baldwin Phone: (706) 548-3442 On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ BlindPigTavern

buffalo’s

Where: 196 Alps Rd., Suite #49 Phone: (706) 354-6655 Website: buffaloscafe. com/athens.php On Facebook: facebook.com/ BuffalosCafeAthens

$6 Yuengling Pitchers, $6 Solarita Pitchers, $7 Bud Light Pitchers, $8 All other pitchers, $5 Moonshine Margarita

Bottles: PBR, Natural Light, Miller High Life - $1.50 Domestics: Bud, Bud Light, Miller Light, Coors Light, Yuengling, Rolling Rock - $1.75 Bottles: PBR, Natural Light, Miller High Life - $1.75 Domestics: Bud, Bud Light, Miller Light, Coors Light, Yuengling, Rolling Rock - $2.75

Terrapin pints $2

1/2 Off Bottle of Wine, HAPPY HOUR all day $2.75 Well Drinks & Guinness, late night slices

1/2 doz wings + domestic pitcher $10

$1 Off all Draft Beers, late night slices

1/2 doz wings + domestic pitcher $10

Open regular business hours, late night slices

N/A

N/A

Mini mega nachos + PBR $10

$2.50 Terrapin Rye Pale Ale

Bottles: PBR, Natural Light, Miller High Life - $1.50 Domestics: Bud, Bud Light, Miller Light, Coors Light, Yuengling, Rolling Rock - $1.75

Frozen Margarita pints $2.75

$2.75 Well Drinks & $3 Guinness

Bottles: PBR, Natural Light, Miller High Life - $1.50 Domestics: Bud, Bud Light, Miller Light, Coors Light, Yuengling, Rolling Rock - $1.75

Selected craft/import beers $2

1/2 Off Bottle of Wine

Bottles: PBR, Natural Light, Miller High Life - $1.75 Domestics: Bud, Bud Light, Miller Light, Coors Light, Yuengling, Rolling Rock - $2.75 Bottles: PBR, Natural Light, Miller High Life - $1.50 Domestics: Bud, Bud Light, Miller Light, Coors Light, Yuengling, Rolling Rock - $1.75 10% off w/ valid Student ID

Rooftop Restaurant and Bar open 11:30 am - 2 am

Early Bird Special $2 Regular Sushi Rolls

50% OFF Beer, Wine, & Sake w/ Student ID

Bottles: PBR, Natural Light, Miller High Life - $1.50 Domestics: Bud, Bud Light, Miller Light, Coors Light, Yuengling, Rolling Rock - $1.75 Trivia at 8:30pm

the bury

Where: 321 E. Clayton Phone: (706) 612-1650 On Facebook: www.facebook.com/theburyathens

$2 Miller High Life

Rooftop Restaurant and Bar open 11:30 am - 2 am

georgia theatre

Where: 215 N. Lumpkin Phone: (706) 850-7670 Website: georgiatheatre.com On Facebook: facebook.com/ GeorgiaTheatre

Early Bird Special $2 Regular Sushi Rolls

50% OFF Beer, Wine, & Sake w/ Student ID

Early Bird Special $2 Regular Sushi Rolls

50% OFF Beer, Wine, & Sake w/ Student ID

Grilled Teriyaki

Where: 259 E. Broad St. Phone: (706) 850-6880 Website: http:/www. grilledteriyakiathens.com On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ Grilled-Teriyaki-Athens

Inoko

Where: 161 Alps Phone: (706) 546-8589 On Facebook: www.facebook.com/inoko

locos

Where: 581 S. Harris St. Phone: (706) 548-7803 Website: locosgrill.com/ On Facebook: facebook.com/pages/ Locos-Grill-PubCampusHarrisSt/307232036555

TACO STand

Where: 247 E. Broad Phone: (706) 549-1446 Website: thetacostand. com

transmet

Where: 145 E. Clayton St. Phone: (706) 613-8773 On Facebook: facebook. com/pages/ Transmetropolitan/ 100870599957408


Thursday, March 7, 2013

10 PLAY

TUESDAY, MARCH 12

Artistic duo couples acoustic, aesthetic art BY CHELSEY ABERCROMBIE @comma_freak For many University of Georgia students, books and music occupy places equally close to their hearts. For Lee and Sharisse Coulter, the nexus between the two is about exactly that. Along with their 4-year-old son, Kai, the multi-talented husband-and-wife duo has embarked on a six month, 55 city, hybrid music and literary tour around the country. His music recently skyrocketed to popularity on Sirius XM Radio, and her debut novel was just released. On March 8, the Coulters’ A “Novel” Music Tour will make a stop at Athens’ Avid Bookshop. Rachel Watkins, Avid’s director of public relations and events, cites multiple reasons for jumping on the opportunity to have the Coulters visit Athens. “At Avid Bookshop, we do tons of what you might expect — the usual author, book signing, book launch. But on occasion we have music here, which is a really cool fit for a town like Athens,” Watkins said. “I thought [A ‘Novel’ Music Tour] was a perfect fit because he’s doing what probably lots of people in Athens would like to do.” But a community brimming with young musicians and writers doesn’t need inspiration. What it does need are words of advice — something the Coulters

Grassville When: 7:30 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $5 Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com

A “NOVEL” MUSIC TOUR

DJ Lady Lov When: 9 p.m. Where: The Office Lounge Price: $5 Contact: (706) 5460840

When: March 8 Where: Avid Bookshop Price: Free are primed to share. Musician Lee, an Australian based in San Diego, Calif. sings “deeply lyrical songs reminiscent of classic thematic songwriters of the ’40s and ’50s, while in the form of modern acoustic indie-pop,” according to his website. Sirius XM’s The Coffee House recently called Lee “the singersongwriter discovery of 2011.” He had much to say to any UGA students hoping to emulate his success in music. “Basically, it’s more likely than not going to be a long road, if you want to do it for a career,” he said. “Remember what you’re in it for. Every once in a while, you’re going to question what you’re doing.” Lee’s wife has also reached a similar pinnacle of success in her creative life with the publication of her debut novel, “Rock My World,” which is described as “a contemporary women’s fiction novel about friendship, family and damage control in the celebrity spotlight.” Sharisse lists her literary influences as Jane Austen, the “lightheartedness” of Nora Ephron’s screen-writing and J.K. Rowling. She also had sever-

The Red & Black

Object in Focus: The Orpheus Relief Project When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org Singer Lee Coulter and writer Sharisse Coulter are spouses touring with their son, Kai. Courtesy Lee Coulter al words of advice to offer UGA’s aspiring writers. “I would say that the toughest hurdle in writing is making time to do it when you’re not making money,” Sharisse said. “I think that if it’s something you want to do, you just have to sit down and treat it like you would any kind of job and just get it out there.” The decision to combine their creative forces didn’t require any of the creative leaps and bounds they put into their work. “It was initially going to be just a music tour, because I had some momentum going from my radio play,” Lee said. “Basically I read the novel and said we were doing a disservice to [Sharisse’s] creativity and our journey in life not to include it on the tour.” And while a toddler

is a non-traditional element on both book and musical tours, having their son Kai on board has only sweetened the deal for both Lee and Charisse. “It’s awesome. It definitely makes us slow everything down. I don’t think we’d see as much of the city if it weren’t for him,” Lee said. Sharisse agreed with her husband that hitting the road was a great decision. “I think the best part for me is just getting to do this type of tour with my family. We get control over where we go, how long we stay, and you know we get to build in time for doing fun things like going to pubs and taverns and taking our son to different museums and stuff,” Sharisse said.

search: Novel ››

From Savanna to Savannah: African Art from the Collection of Don Kole When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org Americans in Italy When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13 Tour at Two When: 2 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Price: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org

Life Drawing Open Studio When: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Where: Lamar Dodd School of Art Price: $8 Contact: www.art.uga. edu Caleb Darnell When: 8 p.m. Where: Farm 255 Price: Free Contact: www.farm255. com Jazz Night When: 7 p.m. Where: Porterhouse Grill Price: Free Contact: (706) 3690990 Georgia Red Clay When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: (706) 5464742 Baxter and the Basics, Spry Old Men When: 10 p.m. Where: Go Bar Contact: (706) 5465609 Full Contact Trivia When: 8 p.m. Where: Blind Pig Tavern Price: Free Contact: (706) 5483442 Trivia When: 9 p.m. Where: Copper Creek Brewing Company Price: Free Contact: (706) 5461102 Trivia When: 8 to 10 p.m. Where: Willy’s Mexicana Grill Price: Free Contact: (706) 5481920


Thursday, March 7, 2013

The Red & Black

PLAY 11

NOW SHOWING!

‘Django Unchained’ blends Southern beauty, bloodshed BY COLBY NEWTON @excel522 “Django Unchained,” Best Original Screenplay Oscar winner, is typical Tarantino. In a seeming attempt to utterly destroy the beautified image of the antebellum South presented by “Gone With the Wind,” Tarantino shows us the ugliness that lies beneath every idyllic fantasy of the South ever presented. He creates a film that manages to present the image of Southern aristocracy without ever reveling in the decadence, not allowing the audience to forget for a moment just how these lauded gentlemen treated other human beings in order to maintain the lifestyle. Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio) is the most blatant avatar of these hypocritical aristocrats, but not a single American in the film is free from the prejudice that infected the old South like a cancer. Tarantino also makes the violence against black Americans a visceral experience. While the white characters die in Tarantino’s usual scenes of gleeful carnage, the violence experienced by the film’s slave population is never anything other than horrifyingly, depressingly realistic. It’s a stunningly bold-faced accusation toward an often glossed-over

Crow’s Nest Trivia When: 8 p.m. Where: Crow’s Nest Price: Free Contact: (706) 5467050 Open Mic Night When: 11 p.m. Where: Boar’s Head Lounge Price: Free Contact: (706) 3693040 Zumba at the Garden When: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Where: State Botanical Garden of Georgia Price: $10 Contact: www.botgar-

period in American history. Of course, while Tarantino may be attempting to provoke a deeper discussion than some of his earlier films, he wouldn’t be Quentin Tarantino if he weren’t able to craft an excellent, character-driven action movie out of these controversial subjects. Dr. King Schultz (Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner Christoph Waltz) poses as the breakout character, with many of the best lines and a personality that threatens to overwhelm the screen, but the star of the film, stoic titular character Django (Jamie Foxx) is both more interesting and a stronger character. Foxx’s stern, unflinching performance comes off as wooden on the surface, but a more measured consideration reveals Django as a man grappling with deeply internalized rage, confusion, loyalty and love. Kerry Washington puts on a spirited performance as Django’s captive wife Brunhilda von Shaft, managing to create an interesting, multifaceted character despite severely limited dialogue and screen time. Lastly, Samuel L. Jackson plays the self-loathing Stephen with his usual overblown aplomb, pulling big laughs while embodying a despicable, insidious character. Tarantino’s directorial hallmarks are also on display throughout the film, with the usual digressive mono-

den.uga.edu SALSAthens When: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: $8 Contact: (706) 3386613 Spicy Salsa Dancing When: 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. Where: Jerzee’s Sports Bar Price: $3 (21+), $5 (18-20) Contact: dg2003@ yahoo.com

Buddha Book Study When: 6 p.m. Where: Body, Mind & Spirit Price: Donations Accepted Contact: (706) 3516024 Egyptian-Style Dance When: 7 p.m. Where: Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Athens Price: $10-12 Contact: rajnigamar@ gmail.com Stamp Making When: 6 to 8 p.m. Where: Double Dutch Press

logues, blood-soaked battlegrounds and anachronistic soundtracks coming together for a whole greater than its parts. Only a poorly-edited beginning portion keeps the film from reaching the heights of Tarantino’s best, with several scenes coming off as unnecessary or misjudged. A particularly egregious scene of early Klansmen gathering gets big laughs but manages to completely destroy any tension and momentum. Tarantino also continues mistakenly believing that he can act, appearing after one of the film’s most spectacular setpieces to destroy audiences' immersion with a ludicrously unbelievable accent and utterly pointless character. At this point in his career, Quentin Tarantino has become less an auteur and more of a brand name. His film work comes with certain expectations: stories of bloody revenge, homages to the forgotten detritus of film history, scenes of cartoonish violence. Tarantino has been taking his work further and further away from reality with each successive film, most recently rewriting the end of World War II in order to give Adolf Hitler the bloody ending he deserved in “Inglorious Basterds.” But, while “Django Unchained” in many ways continues the process of historical revisionism, the film’s stron-

Price: $35 Contact: www.doubledutchpress.com Rabbit Box 10 When: 6 p.m. Where: The Melting Point Price: $5 Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com Object in Focus: The Orpheus Relief Project When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org

gest moments come from the honest, unflinching depictions of slavery Tarantino puts on the screen. Overall, however, Tarantino has created another propulsive, delightfully debauched glorification of genre and gore with a beating heart and an active mind — a worthy addition to his canon, and a worthy recipient of praise and awards. “Django Unchained” will play at Ciné through March 7.

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From Savanna to Savannah: African Art from the Collection of Don Kole When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org Americans in Italy When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org

Defiant Beauty: The Work of Chakaia Booker When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org Remixing History: Manolo Valdés When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Georgia Museum of Art Cost: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org


Thursday, March 7, 2013

12 PUZZLES

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The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

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The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

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The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

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The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

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9

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13

Thursday, March 7, 2013

13 PUZZLES

THURSDAY CROSSWORD - Answer online March 7

ACROSS

1 Soft drinks 6 Eve’s husband 10 Floor pads 14 Alter to fit  oy Rogers and 15 R __ Evans 16 Ladd or Thicke 17 Engine 18 Count calories 19 A  fterbath wraparound

61 H  eroic tale

The Red & Black

FRIDAY CROSSWORD - Answer online March 8

ACROSS

1 Soft drinks

63 M  iss __; matriarch on TV’s “Dallas”

6 Eve’s husband 10 Floor pads 14 Alter to fit  oy Rogers and 15 R __ Evans

64 O  n __; nervous

16 Ladd or Thicke 17 Engine

65 I ce cream parlor order

18 Count calories 19 A  fterbath wraparound 20 Church officials

24 Dishonest one

66 L  ate actor Christopher __

25 C  ontainer full of potting soil

 tag or 67 S doe

25 C  ontainer full of potting soil

26 Bricklayers

68 G  ush forth

26 Bricklayers

20 Church officials 22 Just a __; slightly

29 Portion 30 “ Ode on a Grecian __”

22 Just a __; slightly 24 Dishonest one

69 Spirited horse

31 No longer fresh

33 Build

 leep under the 1 S stars

37 Equipment 39 Each 41 F  or __; on the market 42 Wise men 44 Artist’s stand 46 Signal to an actor 47 Keep watch over 49 Prepares taters 51 Spookiest

DOWN

2 Skunk’s defense 3 Tardy 4 S  pace flight program 5 Overexerts 6 Deadly snake  peaker’s plat 7 S form 8 Brewed drink

54 List of dishes

9 S  trength of character

55 Explosions

10 Seattle team

56 Purses

11 In the air

60 Tap a baseball

12 Piece of dining

29 Portion

room furniture 43 Hard fat of beef and mutton

13 Smile derisively

30 “ Ode on a Grecian __”

 ne of the five 21 O senses

45 Columnist Ann

31 No longer fresh

23 Marathon

48 Evaluate

33 Build

25 Morgan of TV

 ent from a 50 R renter

37 Equipment

26 Big coffee cups

51 Receded

39 Each

60 T  ap a baseball 61 H  eroic tale 63 M  iss __; matriarch on TV’s “Dallas” 64 O  n __; nervous 65 I ce cream parlor order  ate 66 L actor Christopher __ 67 Stag or doe 68 Gush forth 69 Spirited horse

DOWN

1 S  leep under the stars

41 F  or __; on the market

53 Stove

42 Wise men

54 Large parrot

44 Artist’s stand

56 Animal pelt

46 Signal to an actor

34 Per person

57 Toward shelter

47 Keep watch over

35 C  lassic board game

58 __ up; quit

49 Prepares taters

59 Grain

36 Golf pegs

51 Spookiest

62 Burst

7 S  peaker’s platform

54 List of dishes

8 Brewed drink

55 Explosions

9 S  trength of character

29 Beg  urn aside, as the 32 T eyes

38 Sign up 40 Neighbor of Saudi Arabia

56 Purses

10 Seattle team 11 In the air  iece of dining 12 P room furniture 13 Smile derisively

52 Slip away from

27 Region 28 Nylons mishap

 ne of the five 21 O senses 23 Marathon

2 Skunk’s defense

25 Morgan of TV

3 Tardy

26 Big coffee cups

4 S  pace flight program

27 Region

5 Overexerts 6 Deadly snake

28 Nylons mishap 29 Beg  urn aside, as the 32 T eyes

38 Sign up 40 N  eighbor of Saudi Arabia 43 H  ard fat of beef and mutton 45 Columnist Ann 48 Evaluate 50 Rent from a renter 51 Receded 52 Slip away from 53 Stove 54 Large parrot 56 Animal pelt 57 Toward shelter

34 Per person

58 __ up; quit

35 Classic board game

62 Burst

59 Grain

36 Golf pegs

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Thursday, March 7, 2013

14 PUZZLES

The Red & Black

Free Cheese Dip with Purchase of an Entreé SATURDAY CROSSWORD - Answer online March 9

ACROSS

MONDAY CROSSWORD - Answer online March 11

1 “ The Twilight __” of old TV

ACROSS

4 M  onte __; Monaco casino

5 Parable lesson 10 Smell

9 Good fortune

14 D  ecorative pitcher

13 Close by 15 Stay away from

15 Quickly 16 Window glass

16 B  it of land in the ocean

17 Singe

17 Disassemble

18 P  eaches with smooth skins

18 P  ass on, as information

20 1  /3 of a tablespoon: abbr.

19 Jump 20 Mariners

21 Cooper or Sinise

 _ interested; 22 _ doesn’t care

22 Uneasiness 23 E  nd of the Greek alphabet

23 Division; split 24 Feminine pronoun

25 Pass away

26 Conflict

26 Burning

29 Game bird

28 Vital signs

perhaps

33 M  ont Blanc or the Matterhorn

34 H  uge lifting machine

35 Examination 37 Majority

35 C  apital of South Korea

38 Spouse

36 Milked animal

61 Uptight

40 B  ursting at the __; overly full

37 Ladder step

62 Poet Lazarus 63 Raced

41 Quick look

38 _  _ off; gets less angry

 _ against; 19 _ denounces

43 Candy bar

39 Part of the ear

44 Like formal attire

40 __ up; misbehave

65 Pompous fool

21 Topaz & ruby

46 Tea variety

41 M  elodramatic; trite

7 Suggestive

31 F  eminine undergarments

51 Peg for Trevino

8 Perform

32 O  utdoor play areas

54 Usurers

9 Actor Nicholas

57 Donkey’s cry

34 Acquired

58 Enthusiastic

10 S  tates one’s views

36 _  _ up with; tolerates

59 “Bye, Juan!”

37 Free-for-all 38 _  _ or less; approximately 39 M  usic from Jamaica 40 Full of lather 41 Treaties 42 Get tangled 44 Hate 45 Cereal grain 46 Primp 47 Scrapbook 50 Computer tech,

1 P.E. class building

60 Get up 61 T  ennis court dividers 62 Slow-witted 63 High cards

DOWN

11 Mild oath 12 Dollar bills 13 Take a nap

24 G  eography book drawings

1 Energy

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2 Has debts

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4 Blunder

28 Hunted animal

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47 Arkin or Hale 48 Be crazy about

42 “Uncle Miltie”

49 Fishhook lure

43 V  oice mail recordings

50 Clutch

57 Once more 58 Small brook 60 Heavy book

64 Lawn tool

DOWN

1 African antelope

by Homer 9 Easter flowers

35 Tender to the touch

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38 Ponder intently

11 E  xtended family group 12 Saved 14 Laughing loudly 21 Small flute 25 Actor Holbrook 26 “Get lost!”

39 Free time 41 Taxi 42 Tap a baseball 44 Saturated 45 Narrow rug 47 Elevate  ainting and 48 P sculpturing

27 Cease-fire

2 Cravings

 _ and raves; car 28 _ ries on

3 Created

29 Lowly laborers

50 C  apitol’s roof, often

49 Closed circle

45 Sabotaged

4 Wine container

30 Sacred

52 Like fine wine

52 At __; relaxed

46 Geisha’s sash

31 Oak nut

53 Chimed

53 Looks at

47 __ away; flees

5 T  urn aside, as the eyes

48 Actor Alan __

32 B  arnes & __ Booksellers

54 Bean variety

55 Owned 56 Commotion

51 Large hairy spider

57 Two-cup item

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Thursday, March 7, 2013

15 PUZZLES

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ACROSS

WEDNESDAY CROSSWORD - Answer online March 13

1 Pass out cards

ACROSS

5 Plank

6 Ladder rung

10 Charitable gift

 ne of the Three 10 O Bears

14 Wheel shaft 15 Refueling ship

14 Extreme

16 Actor Reiser

15 Bangkok native

17 Space agcy.

16 Eras

 o down 18 G smoothly

 ake a smudge 17 M worse

19 Stuffed bread

18 Feed bag morsels

20 _  _ toward; having a crush on

19 Marine bird

 it musical film 22 H for Liza Minnelli

20 F  ace on a 10-dollar bill

24 Religious sister

22 S  hrink back in fear or distaste

25 Ibis or heron

24 __ up; bound

26 Sum finder

25 Go in again

29 Drink like a dog  ate Russian 30 L leader Vladimir

26 Deteriorate 7 Muhammad __

58 Finished

34 _  _ the line; was very obedient

59 Meat shunner

35 Sup

61 Give work to

 ssert charges 36 A before proving 37 Hostel

62 Cash register 63 Sidestep

8 Baggage porter 9 Apprehension 10 Clothing 11 Lion’s den 12 Silent

 _ Benedict; 64 _ breakfast order

13 Bench board

40 Tavern order

65 _  _ May Clampett; old sitcom role

21 “ __ Father, Who art in...”

41 Those defeated

66 Dueling sword

43 Bacardi product

67 Fired a gun

23 “ Beauty and the Beast” role

 bit crunchy, as 38 A vegetables

44 Nudge

46 Understand

1 Actress Delany

48 Pierced 50 Earl Grey drink 51 11/11 honoree 54 M  eat market employee

25 Irrigated 26 Leaning

45 __ on; trample 47 Mazatlán cash

1 K  eep a cooking turkey moist

DOWN

2 C  heckup at the doctor’s office

27 Philanthropist 28 Not very bright 29 Boy

3 To boot

31 Approaches

4 Mastered

32 House of snow

 aval warrant 5 N officer, for short

33 Requires 35 Golfer Ernie __

6 Lubricates

36 $  20 bill spewer, for short

Pasta

31 Lion cries

39 Dingbat

33 Bread ingredient

42 With bells on

37 F  ree __; personal choice

 _-and-cream 44 _ complexion 46 L  arge city in Switzerland 47 Calico or collie 49 W  ild nighttime dance parties 50 Piano adjuster 51 Cast a ballot

39 Passenger 41 Song for one 42 Bar seat 44 Day or Roberts 46 Religious sister 47 Recluse 49 Cruise ships 51 Clap

63 Giggle’s sound 64 Aware of the shenanigans of 65 British peer  f the largest 66 O continent 67 Baby bird’s cry 68 Little child 69 Narrative

DOWN

1 C  linton’s successor

54 Escape

2 _  _ mater; one’s old school

54 Commanded

55 Going astray

3 Flower stalk

55 Lofty

 ccess code to a 56 A website

4 Characteristics

60 Daytime serial

6 _  _ up; rose from a chair

52 Wicked 53 Spill the beans

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34 Top-notch 35 Insulting remark 36 2  ,000-pound weights 38 Sucker 40 Small brooks  ive, but expect 43 G back 45 Afternoon naps 48 Bit of gold 50 Most modern 51 Fable teller 52 Lying flat 53 Babble 54 Fairy tale 56 Leave the car

28 C  hocolate-andcaramel candy

57 Akron’s state

29 Zeal

59 Declare untrue

32 Helped

58 Fanny 62 Sunbeam


Thursday, March 7, 2013

16 PLAY

The Red & Black

Malcolm Mitchell (left, center front) visited Emory University Feb. 16 to talk with high school students participating in the Leadership Academy to give them advice about their futures. Mitchell participates in charity events often and hopes to serve as a role model in the future. Courtesy Maria Hibbler

Malcolm Mitchell dives into leading charity work off football field By AMANDA DIXON @amandaadixon Community service is not just a requirement for Malcolm Mitchell — it’s a genuine passion. Last month Georgia wide receiver Malcolm Mitchell visited Emory University and spoke to high school students involved in Usher’s New Look Foundation, which prepares youth for success as serviceoriented leaders on a global scale. Malia Hibbler, a senior marketing major from Decatur, has been involved with New Look since 2005. She arranged for Mitchell to speak during a weekly meeting for the Leadership Academy, knowing he could be an inspiration to the students in the program as well as oth-

ers around him. “He really takes pride in being someone somebody can look up to,” she said. “He’s changing for good, and I want more people to be like him, so that’s why I got him out there doing all this and speaking to people, because I want this to have an effect on people — his friends and the people who watch him on TV.” Mitchell revealed details about his past he had never shared publicly and candidly discussed the struggles he experienced. His story emphasized that regardless of their circumstances, if the students worked hard in school, they too could enhance their talents and achieve their dreams. “I know growing up, that motivation can mean a lot,” Mitchell

said. “I took the opportunity to just see if I could be one of those people out there in the world who could motivate kids to do much more than what they were doing.” Tramel Terry, an early enrollee football recruit from Charleston, S.C., also shared personal stories. He talked about the trouble he got into when he was younger and how he maintained focus in order to gain acceptance into UGA. The students were energetic after hearing Terry and Mitchell speak and asked plenty of questions. Mitchell’s presence, in particular, was important because he epitomized New Look’s model. “Malcolm essentially represents our program model of using your talent, education,

career and service,” said Vanecia Thompson, a National New Look Mogul in Training and senior journalism major from Lithonia. “I think Malcolm was setting a great example for the younger generation who want to be in his position athletically, but also to know that they need to give back to their community.” Word spread on social media about Mitchell’s visit with the New Look participants. A video of his speech currently has more than 2,000 views. Although this was his first experience speaking up as a role model, Mitchell has participated in community service projects with his teammates and on his own with organizations such as the Boys & Girls Club of Athens.

Mitchell intends to continue giving back and empowering youth. In his hometown of Valdosta, he plans to launch a program called STAND, which stands for Start Taking a New Direction, in collaboration with the YMCA. “In my hometown, the kids have lost, I feel, have lost a lot of motivation, and I think that’s because [of] the lack of role models we have in the community,” Mitchell said. Mitchell, who enjoys reading, will start a book club through STAND for kids of all ages. He will also continue sharing his story with students across Georgia. Hibbler gave Mitchell credit for stepping up and becoming more active in the community, but he insisted that he could not be successful without the

support of his family and friends. “I did take the initiative to try to step out beyond, I guess, the limits that some people give us as athletes or us as people as far as helping out others,” he said. “But I also do have a great support team as far as Malia [Hibbler], my mom, her mom. I have like two or three really close friends who ride with me the whole way with anything that I’m trying to do.” New Look was founded by R&B singer Usher Raymond IV in 1999 in Atlanta. The goal of the organization is to provide role models to the community through leadership programs that focus on talent, education, career and service.

search: Mitchell ››


March 7, 2013 edition of The Red & Black