Page 1

Red&Black The

NOVEMBER 8, 2012 • VOLUME 120, Number 14

YOUR TAKE ON THE ELECTION Jasmine Pruett

“ “ “ “ “ “

Freshman German education major from Newnan

Election Relived Check out our Politics page online for news from the local, state and national races. look online

redandblack.com • @redandblack

BARACK (ON)

“I wasn’t particularly invested in either outcome, but it was really funny to watch everybody in my dorm react. I left my door open, and you’d hear shouting and expletives from one end of the hall and ‘Yay’ from the other.”

Rebel Lord Freshman anthropology and linguistics major from Dublin

“I just really think what this country needs right now is to return to its family values. I think that would solve a lot of problems. I hope the winning candidate places an emphasis on getting back to what America once was when it was founded.”

Isaac Hopkins Freshman English and theater major from Gainesville “I also had the opportunity to take my grandmother to vote for her 20th election...I voted because I believe it really is essential for our democracy for youth to take full reign of the direction of the country.”

Jonathan Rawls Economics major from Gwinnett County “I voted for a couple of reasons. It is a historic election in terms of policy and the direction of America. I believe it it important for our democracy to express our opinion, regardless of political affiliation.”

Local Democrats gathered downtown at the Georgia Theatre to watch results on Election Night. When networks predicted a win for President Barack Obama, the viewing room erupted into cheers. MAURA FRIEDMAN/Staff

More decisions to come in December, student employment at stake BY NICK WATSON The Red & Black

Alex Edquist Freshman economics major from Alpharetta “I am just glad Todd Akin lost tonight. That is good for women everywhere.”

Ellen Catlin Senior painting major from Jacksonville, Fla. “I voted because I am from a swing state and know the importance of each vote.”

To Paul Conway, president of Generation Opportunity, the youth voters were left behind in 2008. “They essentially delivered the presidency to [Obama] four years ago,” he said. “It’s easy to forget who delivered you. And in large part, the president forgot.” The unemployment rate remained at 7.9 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, leaving many going into this election concerned about jobs. “The only way that young people will be able to get out of the status quo is if the creation of jobs

becomes the No. 1 economic priority of the next president,” Conway said. “That is the only way that people will be able to get full-time jobs that are meaningful. It’s a huge burden to the next generation.” Students soon leaving the University should concern themselves with the economic decisions to come in terms of their own livelihood, said Charles Bullock III, professor of political science at the University. “Students will later finish up their schooling and will start looking for jobs, and if you’ve got a booming economy, you are more likely to find a job,” he said. “A lot of businesses are reluctant right now to expand,

georgia vs. auburn

Tigers go from first to worst, Bulldogs still ‘ready’ for tussle

Georgia couldn’t stop Cam Newton. The last time the Bulldogs played in Auburn, Ala., two years ago, the eventual Heisman winner combined for 299 total yards and four touchdowns as the No. 2 Tigers won 49-31. Then again, no team was able to slow down Newton and Co. that season, as the Tigers went 14-0 and captured their first national championship since 1957. But the Tigers’ fall from the top has been swift. Two years removed from their magical national championshipwinning campaign, the Tigers enter Saturday’s tilt more paupers than princes, 2-7 overall, and winless in Southeastern Conference play. Mark Richt hasn’t been surprised by the turn of events. Georgia’s head coach said the Tigers’ tumble is an example of how difficult it is to navigate through the SEC year-to-

year. Richt pointed to his own 2010 season for comparison. That year, the Bulldogs went 6-7, their first losing season since 1996. “How much of a different team did we have than some of the teams that might have gone 10-2?” Richt said. “Probably not a whole lot different. Not making a play here or making a bad decision there as a coach or the other team just making a play that day. [Auburn’s season] is not all that mind-boggling to me because it’s just a really tough RICHT league.” Aaron Murray echoed Richt’s views. Asking a team to stay near the top of the pecking order in the SEC is an endeavor. “I don’t believe Auburn’s record reflects the talent they have on that team,” he said. “There were only one or two games they didn’t play up to their potential, but every

search: election ››

WHAT NOT TO MISS

Tale of two years By RYAN BLACK The Red & Black

take on new responsibilities and invest because of this uncertainty about what is going to be happening in terms of their health care costs ... and in terms of their taxes.” Control of one’s party will be the key aspect, Bullock said, in tackling massive debt. Raising revenue will be an issue for Republicans, who must navigate budget negotiations. The question in economic growth will be when, said Jeff Humphreys, director of the Selig Center for Economic Growth. “When do you take the bitter medicine?” Humphreys said.

When: Saturday, 7 p.m. Where: Auburn, Ala. Contact: www.georgiadogs.com

other game they’ve played really well. We have to be ready.” Combine the Tigers’ talent with their season being all but over — no chance for a bowl invite once the regular season concludes — and they become a dangerous foe. With postseason dreams long since squelched, Auburn slides into a “spoiler” role for its final three contests, two coming against teams with conference and national title aspirations in Georgia and Alabama. Ruining another team’s ambitions can be a strong motivator. “When you have nothing to lose, you can throw everything you’ve got at the team you’re going against to try and upset them,” linebacker Amarlo Herrera said. “That’s your main goal in that situation — to upset their season just like your season has been upset. You always have to play hard against a team like that because they’re going to lay it all out there.”

open bluegrass jam

When: Thursday, 7 p.m. Where: Barbeque Shack Price: Free Contact: (706) 613-6752

be a santa to a senior

When: Friday, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Terrapin Beer Co. Cost: $10 Contact: www.terrapinbeer.com

Cornhole tournament When: Saturday, 5 p.m. Where: Fine Arts Building Cost: $10 (per team) Contact: (706) 369-3144

search: calendar ››

search: football ››

Two Torn ACLs As of last week, the Bulldogs have lost wide receivers Michael Bennett and Marlon Broun. Two pieces report on the players' futures — and that of the Georgia Bulldogs. page 14

C.B.Schmelter/Staff

C.B.Schmelter/Staff

ELECTION 2012, 2 • NEWS, 3 • OPINIONS, 4 • VARIETY, 11 • SPORTS, 14 The Red & Black is an independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community

Established 1893, Independent 1980


2

Election Night University students gathered across Athens to participate in and watch the election.

Young Democrats celebrate after campaigning Democrat Spencer Frye won the election for State House with 70.43 percent of the votes. “We’re excited,” he said, and was interrupted for a congratulatory hug from a supporter before continuing. “We’re excited for the people of Athens. It’s a great way to end.” Frye beat Republican candidate Carter Kessler, who was running in his first election. “Mr. Kessler is a hard working man,” Frye said. “And I wish him the best of luck in the future.” Frye told The Red & Black that he’s ready to get back to work after a well-deserved break. “I think we’re going to enjoy the moment for a little while and then tomorrow morning, we’ll start studying what we need to do to make Athens an even better place than it is right now.” Keith Roberson has been working with Spencer Frye since his failed Athens mayoral run in 2010. He graduated from the University in May with a degree in political science. For Frye’s State House campaign, Roberson was the campaign coordinator, recruiting volunteers and helping with day-to-day operations. “Spencer just has a way — I don’t want to sound cheesy — of inspiring people,” he said. Roberson said Frye has a vision of increasing the Democratic voice in Athens and the state. “It’s not just what we can do for Athens-Clarke County. It’s what we can do for the state,” he said. Young Democrat Audrey Rogers said she is an advocate for the middle class, and that’s why she supports President Barack Obama. Stephanie Brownson said she wanted Obama to win because she disagrees with Mitt Romney’s policies. “Mitt Romney is planning on cutting back health coverage, and if he does that, it will devastate the economy,” said the senior health promotion major from Marietta. “So many college students are still on their parent’s health coverage.” The Young Democrats support Obama because the group agrees with what he stands for. “I want him to win because of his social policies and economic policies,” said Anthony Farajallah, a freshman political science major from Marietta. “Such as his gay rights policies, environmental protection and his view on how we should strengthen the middle class.” The Young Democrats started prepping for this election in summer by recruiting freshmen at orientation sessions, said Raven Covington, the communications director for the Young Democrats. Covington started working on her own by helping with Frye’s primary election over a 20-year incumbent. Brett Weber, the Young Democrat’s president, said the chapter as a whole doesn’t help with primaries but helped during the campaign season through phone calls and canvassing. “Gerrymandering meant that our delegation was four Republicans and one Democrat. Spencer Frye is that Democrat, so there’s a lot riding on his shoulders,” Weber said. He said he thought Frye was he best man for the job. Maggie Touchton, secretary for the Young Democrats, said the student group did some work campaigning for Frye. —Jamie Gottlieb, Helena Joseph and Jeanette Kazmierczal

search: democrats ››

Charter, leasing amendments pass BY NICK WATSON The Red & Black With 144 of 159 counties reported, both ballot amendments are passing with more than 15-percent margins. The first amendment, concerning charter schools, is supported with 58.1 percent of the vote. The second amendment, concerning multi-year leasing, has received 63.42 percent of the vote in favor. The charter amendment would ”allow state or local approval of public charter schools upon the request of local communities.” The multi-year leasing amendment would allow “the General Assembly to authorize certain state agencies to enter into multiyear rental agreements.” —Nick Watson

search: charter school ››

Deb Witkoski (left) draws on a chalkboard to say what matters to her. University students (below) line up outside of the Tate Grand Ballroom to watch election results come in and celebrate with food. Taylor carpenter (left)/Staff C.B. Schmelter (below)/ Staff

College Republicans cap day with party The clubhouse at the River Mill Apartments played host to the College Republicans’ election viewing party. Many members of the group were optimistic as they look at the local elections. “I feel very good about our chances in the local contests here. We have worked hard at getting out the vote today and firing up people on campus,” said Samantha Wilson, a sophomore biology major from Duluth. The day for College Republicans began the day in Tate Plaza where the group tried to build up excitement by placing Mitt Romney/Paul Ryan signs in planters and across the walkway. They handed out campaign stickers and signs to passersby. The crowd on Tuesday night was made up of mostly members of the College Republicans. However, several students ventured to the clubhouse despite having no connection to the group. With copious amounts of pizza and beverages, groups gathered around televisions watching the results. The crowd was not too surprised when Doug Collins won the contest in Georgia’s 9th Congressional District. “The district leans pretty strongly to the Republicans, so we were not too surprised. His biggest test came in the primaries. But it was good to get that win,” said Jamie Jordan, a political science major from Griffin is also the state chair of the College Republicans. —Shiv Patel

search: republicans ››

Students reflect on election after polls close

Buttons are laid out for Democratic supporters at the Georgia Theatre (right). The UGA Young Democrats held their election rally there. College Republicans (below) celebrate at the group's party at the clubhouse at the River Mill Apartments. sean taylor (right)/Staff damien salas (below)/Staff

University students speaking about the results of the election said they weren’t surprised by the outcome. “I kind of felt like it was predictable,” Alexis Cordero, a freshman animal health and pre-vet major, said. “I felt like [President Barack] Obama had a good chance of winning just because he already has a strong basis.” Senior English major Richard Scott said the election turned out as he expected. “Overall, I’m happy with the result. I’m not sure it matters much either way since the office of the president and the economy are not necessarily the exact same thing given that in America, we have 350 million people and not just one guy,” Scott said. Jasmine Pruett, a freshman German education major, talked about watching the election results at her dorm. “I wasn’t particularly invested in either outcome, but it was really funny to watch everybody in my dorm react,” she said. “I left my door open, and you’d hear shouting and expletives from one end of the hall and ‘Yay’ from the other.” After the polls in Georgia closed Tuesday at 7 p.m., students walking near the University Arch reflected on the election Tuesday Sadia Hasan, a sophomore health promotions pre-med major from Buford, said she is not happy with either President Barack Obama or Republican nominee Mitt Romney. “I’ve seen the debates, and obviously Obama nailed the last one and the one before that,” Hasan said. “But as a citizen, I’m not happy with my options. If either one wins, I’ll just be like, ‘OK.’” Tyler Kimbrough talked about the importance of integrity. “I feel like when everything else falls apart, integrity and character are the only things you can depend on. We need to be able to trust whoever’s [in] office,” the junior marketing major from Stone Mountain said. Rebel Lord, a first-year anthropology and linguistics major from Dublin, said this is his first presidential election. “I just really think what this country needs right now is to return to its family values,” Lord said. “I think that would solve a lot of problems. I hope the winning candidate places an emphasis on getting back to what America once was when it was founded.” At Myers Hall, students surroundws televisions, eagerly watching the election results flooding in. “I voted because I am from a swing state and know the importance of each vote,” said Ellen Catlin, a senior painting major from Jacksonville, Fla. This is the first election that Isaac Hopkins, a freshman English and theater major from Gainesville, has been eligible to vote. “I voted because I believe it really is essential for our democracy for youth to take full reign of the direction of the country,” Hopkins said. —C.Bailey Davis, Marena Galluccio, Cailin O'Brien, Aepril Smith and Maria Torres

search: campus ››


search keywords on our website and twitter ››

Thursday, November 8, 2012

NEWS

Partner benefits lift psychological burden By JAMIE GOTTLIEB The Red & Black Asen Kirin pays more for his family’s health insurance than other University benefitseligible employees because his family is untraditional — he has a domestic partner. The associate director at Lamar Dodd School of Art said he and his partner suffer financially due to the University’s lack of a domestic partners benefits package. The package would cover employees’ partners' health insurance — a benefit University employees’ spouses receive. “Basically, we have one choice,” he said. “Every time [my partner] needs to pay his premium, there’s an unbelievable increase [in price] and consistently, he gets less and less coverage.” Kirin said the issue is more than a financial burden — it’s a psychological one as well. “Everybody who has a family, who has a spouse, who has children is acknowledged by the University and community as someone whose life and well-being is of value and of importance,” he said. Kirin said this is not so for him. “But people like me and their partners are on a daily basis of no worth in value and have to fend for themselves,” he said. Kirin said the individual health insurance policy his partner buys is substandard compared to the policy that employees’ spouses receive. “They demand more money, and they don’t explain any of the reasons for increasing premiums,” he said. “While increasing the premium, they reduce the services.” Ricky Roberts, chair of

Asen Kirin, associate director of the Lamar Dodd School of Art, pays more for his domestic partner's health insurance than other University benefits-eligible employees do. Courtesy Asen Kirin GLOBES, a gay rights advocacy group, said the lack of the benefits package forces families to find insurance on their own — a difficulty all in itself. “When you go out on your own, it’s significantly more expensive, so these families have been burdened,” she said. “It’s not fair. It’s not just.” Kirin said because costs are so high, his partner is afraid of going to a routine doctor visit for his allergy problems. “Even a routine wellness visit is barely covered or simply not covered,” he said. This puts a financial burden on Kirin’s partner. “Now he’s hesitant to see a doctor because they will slam

‘Nothing in produce surprises’ students as recalled foods list grows BY JEANETTE KAZMIERCZAK The Red & Black Sunland Inc.’s peanut butter has disappeared from grocery store shelves, but not because of its popularity. Sunland has recalled all products made in its New Mexico facility between March 1, 2010 and Sept. 24, 2012 for potential contamination with salmonella. It is only one in a long line of recalls during the past few years, ranging from peanut butter to cantaloupe. The variety of sources for foodborne diseases is hard to grasp. Shane Barnard, a sophomore communications major from Peachtree City, told The Red & Black he had heard about the peanut butter recall, but didn’t know that cantaloupes had been associated with disease as well after the Jensen Farms outbreak last year. “Nothing in produce surprises me, as far as being recalled goes,” said Sarah Stone, a senior biology major from Hartwell. One potential reason for the increase in recalls and apparent increase in outbreaks is health officials have better equipment to track disease and identify sources. PulseNet is a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention system that uses pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to make fingerprints, or molecular subtypes, of bacteria to identify specific strains of a disease organism such as salmonella. Federal, state and local health organizations contribute to the system, but it is led by the CDC. In the last five to eight years, the system has discovered several new vehicles of foodborne disease. Many of them are produce like bagged salads, sprouts and nuts, said Michael Doyle, director of the University’s Center for

him with the entire bill for it,” he said. Janet Frick is the chair of the University Council Human Resources Committee. She said the lack of a domestic partners benefits package is evident in differences in how much she pays for health insurance versus some of her colleagues. “There’s thousands of dollars of difference in compensation,” she said. Frick talked about the amount she is paid versus what employees with domestic partners are paid. “I’m paid more because my partner happens to be the opposite sex,” she said.

On Sept. 27, University Council approved the Proposal for Implementation of Full Domestic Partner Benefits for University employees, according to a previous article by The Red & Black. Frick said if the University were to implement the proposal, more than the lives of employees with domestic partners would benefit. The University’s reputation would also improve. “This is a matter of basic equity, and when you hear that message coming from the administration to correct [the] societal notion we have, that sends a powerful message,” she said. “You are valued in a very real way.” Kirin said the proposal’s approval felt both reassuring and uplifting. He noted the approval was especially reassuring because undergraduate students and his colleagues had such strong support. “Seeing the substantial number of undergraduate students are supportive and sympathetic to the struggles that people like me have has meant the world to me in a way that reassured me that obviously [remaining at the University] wasn’t the worst decision of my life,” he said. Frick said the effect of this proposal lies in several levels. It affects how people feel about themselves and how people feel about their employees. “The University doesn’t have to provide health insurance for my family — it’s a basic business practice,” she said. “But that they do it for me and not for others — that’s a discretionary practice.”

search: benefits ››

3

crime notebook Suspect breaks into students’ home An unknown suspect broke into the home of two University students on Trail Creek Street One student had been home sleeping on the couch Monday at 11:35 a.m., according to an AthensClarke County Police report. — Cailin O’Brien

search: break-in ››

Attempted rape occurs in Best Western An attempted rape suspect fled from the Best Western on Milledge Avenue Tuesday around 3 p.m., according to an Athens-Clarke County email advisory. The suspect is described as a 6-foot2-inch white man. — Cailin O’Brien

search: Best Western ››

Weekly

Corner

Food Safety in Griffin. Before that, meats and poultry were more common sources of disNew donors can receive $30 today ease. and $70 this week! “Five years earlier, Must be 18 years or older, have valid it’s likely that these I.D. along with proof of SS# and local outbreaks would have Biotest Plasma Center never been detected residency. 233 West Hancock Ave. because a robust sysAthens, GA 30601 New DoNors will receive a $10 tem wasn’t in place,” 706-354-3898 boNus oN their secoND DoNatioN Doyle said. www.biotestplasma.com with this aD. Another potential reason there have been more recalls may be that the average 3.2208x 1.5-coupon-athen.indd 1 10/2/12 American diet has expanded to include more types of food and a greater amount. “Considering how much poultry, chicken I should say, is consumed in this country,” Doyle said. “I think the poultry industry has done a remarkable job in reducing the prevalence of salmonella.” Vibrio, a diseasecausing bacteria common in seafood, has become more common in the past few years. Doyle said some theories consider global warming a key factor pakistani•indian•arabic grocery store because Vibrio growth in the environment and oysters — ­­the most common vehicle for the disease — flourishes in warmer temperatures. “We’re eating a $1 OFF Mirch Masala whole lot more produce Tikha Ganthia -Hotthan we ever have spicy chick pea before so that means noodle sticks 12oz there’s more exposure to fresh produce,” Doyle said. “Some of this produce comes from countries that don’t have the best of sanitary practices.” More food in grocery stores comes from outside the country where the Food and Drug Administration has no jurisdiction. “More than 50 percent of the food we eat comes from outside the country,” Doyle said. “Most of the dried fruits are coming from China. Apple juice — more than 60 percent of that comes from China.” Visit Dawgwear.net for great Georgia gear! The Center for Food Safety helps the CDC isolate bacterial strains after epidemiologists have identified the food vehicle carrying the disease.

10% off any purchase of $30 or more with valid UGA ID Coupon must be present at time of purchase dixiepeachescouture.com 706.549.4531 890 Old Hull Rd. Athens, GA 30601

$2 OFF ! w ne

Free Regular

Skate Rental

9:28 PM

BBQ NACHOS

295 Commerce Blvd. Bogart Ga Near the Mall | 706.353.3113

with purchase of a drink. Dine in only. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Valid through 9/15/12 at any Athens location. Tax not included. Not valid with other coupons, discounts or specials. One coupon per table per visit. See store for details.

AWARD-WINNING WINGS • BURGERS • SANDWICHES • SALADS

$1.00 OFF* any medium smoothie *Exludes Acai and Planet Pro One per person. Expires 11/30/12

Taj Mahal 706.549.9477

Homemade Food “Heat N’ Eat”

Pmac_CouponCorner_Workshops_Layout 1 10/1/12 6:12 PM Page

FREE Workshops! Register online at peachmac.com

706.208.9990 • peachmac.com

$5 OFF any Wash valued at $12 or more. FREE VACUUMS! AFTER 5 WASHES GET THE 6TH FOR FREE!

Save up to 75% on select items Free Cheese Bread, Garlic Bread, or Humus with purchase of full-priced entree.

search: outbreaks ››

Text ‘2Story5Points’ to 90210 to win a FREE coffee for a week.

• limit one per customer • must present coupon 320 E. Clayton St. • Downtown

Coffee Differently.

Check us out on FaceBook or visit us online at www.t wostorycoffeehouse.com


4

OPINIONS

Thursday, November 8, 2012

The Red & Black

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Red & Black wants to know what you think — so let’s start a conversation. Email: opinions@randb.com or letters@randb.com Facebook: Like The Red & Black page Twitter: @redandblack

Blake Seitz

Opinions Editor

Hoping against hope for a better four years

P

resident Barack Obama is president, and he will be still come Jan. 20, 2013. He won handily, taking to the stage just after midnight to acknowledge his crowds. It was a nice victory speech, soaring and humble at the appropriate times. It was the commendable speech of a leader. But that made it all the more a departure from the Obama we came to know on the trail — sour, scolding, sarcastic. One line from his victory speech seemed particularly dissonant: “[The nation] moves forward because you reaffirmed the spirit that has triumphed over war and depression, the spirit that has lifted this country from the depths of despair to the great heights of hope." After following economic indicators and the president’s myopic campaign for the better part of his term, I can’t help but wonder what kind of “hope” he thinks has so enraptured the American people. Is it hope of the “I hope I don’t have to move into a shantytown” variety? Or hope of the “I hope Mitt Romney isn’t a reptilian warlord disguised as a preppy New Englander like the media tells me” variety? Obama spoke of hope as a positive, aspirational force. But most of what I have seen the past few months is of the opposite variety — the kind that says simply, “I hope to God the Other Guy doesn’t win.” The despairing mood of a foundering country rewarded small ball, pugilistic politicking, and the Obama administration and its surrogates lowered themselves to the task with gusto. Thus was born a narrative: Mitt Romney as the sum of all fears. This, of course, is an absurd argument to level against a milquetoast, moderate, mildly-successful Massachusetts governor. A Mormon, at that. So of course its furtherance led to absurdities. Like Mitt Romney the woman-hater. He locks them away in binders back in the 1950s, don’t you know. He consorts with Todd Akin in the woods at midnight. But it worked. Prior to their debate successes, the Republicans played a dirty game, too. Nothing I said above should be construed to pardon the GOP’s nastiness and lies. They’re very real. So consider this an indictment of an increasingly repellent facet of our politics — the replacement of debate with demonization; where demonization is impossible, derision. This is a facet President Obama has contributed to, dealt with and will undoubtedly deal with in his second term. Even if you disagree with the man, you should hope he’s up to the challenge this time around. That’s hope of the American variety. — Blake Seitz is the opinions editor of The Red & Black

search: hope ››

Julie bailey /Staff

Liberalism’s proud history culminates in second term

T

here is a mirror of the famously conservative Orange County, Calif., on America’s eastern seaboard: it’s called Oconee County, and it’s less than 10 miles south of Athens. The reason I know this is because I have lived there for 15 of the 19 years I’ve been alive. And it’s relevant to me because, as a Democrat, it’s so hard to feel at home, well, at home. In school, it wasn’t that politics wasn’t talked about — there was certainly discussion. But the only place you’d find openly liberal conversation was in the safe haven of the Young Democrats meeting room. Everywhere else, there was a constant stream of “socialist” this or “Muslim” that — unhindered and unashamed (but typically ignorant) criticism of the person, not the president, that is Barack Obama. Needless to say, I embraced college with open arms. So now, I’m not ashamed to say that I am a liberal Democrat. If anything, I’m grateful to identify with a political ideology that was born out of some of the most memorable revolutions in history and that supports the right of individuals to make their own choices against any and all institutions, from God to the state. I’m proud to identify with a party that advocates civil rights for all people while at the same time demanding justice from those who jeopardize our democracy. The facts are these: the presidential election was a triumph for progress. The reforms of the last four years — on which this election was a referendum — have been validated. The economy, while still lacking momentum, has begun to show signs of life. The question of whom the burden of funding our nation should fall on has been decided — it should fall on those who are most capable of giving economic assistance.

William Belcher Guest Columnist

Obama victory earns mandate to something

Timothy Moore Guest Columnist

The number of people with access to health care has been undeniably expanded. Across multiple states, gays and lesbians have received more civil opportunity in one day than perhaps in any other point in American history. With recent gains made against terrorists abroad, the nation is safer than ever, and our international image is more tolerable. And, perhaps most importantly of all, this election has vindicated the principle that constant and blatant lying will not reward candidates with the highest office in this great nation. If there is one more group of people I have to voice my support for, it has to be everybody who voted, either on Election Day or via early voting. As I’m sure you know, we now have a Democratic president and Senate and a Republican House of Representatives, just like before. But there is a different mandate this time: bipartisanship. We can choose to struggle through the next (at least) two years just the same as the last two, or we can choose to compromise and take what we can get for the betterment of the country. This is how democracy works, whether we agree with it or not. If I’ve made you sick from reading this, feel free to jump off here. If not: four more years!

P

resident Barack Obama won his reelection campaign, and it wasn’t really close. Obama won big in the urban voting districts of south Florida, giving him a small victory in the Sunshine State, along with a win in Ohio and an ever more Democratic Virginia. The only swing state Romney was able to win was North Carolina, and the fact that North Carolina is even considered a swing state is a testament to the Democrat’s electoral juggernaut. Last night’s results are a thorough rebuke of what the Republicans are offering, and they have a good bit of reorganizing to do before the midterm elections of 2014. An AP exit poll found that more voters believe that George Bush is responsible for our nation’s economic problems than the current U.S. president, which will allow David Axelrod to continue finishing his every sentence with “After inheriting the worst economy since the Great Depression...” until the day he dies. After running a reelection campaign utterly devoid of any substantive second term policy platform, it is unclear where Democrats will go from here. Elizabeth Warren will be a big star for the Democrats, and a comfortable margin in the Senate will allow for a few policy initiatives. What the Democrats will pursue is anyone’s guess. What is almost guaranteed to result is a country $20, perhaps even $25, trillion dollars deeper in debt, a tax code based on “fairness” and not efficiency and an anemic foreign policy. The results of this election are certainly a rejection of the Republican’s conservative message, but exactly what voters have affirmed is anyone’s guess.

— Timothy Moore is a sophomore from Watkinsville majoring in history

search: Oconee ››

— Will Belcher is a senior from Atlanta majoring in political science

search: Democrats ››

Opinion Meter: The week that was

SHAME, SMokers: Most smokers ignore the campus-wide smoking ban that was implemented last year, so now the professional scolds at the SGA are looking for ways to add teeth to the ban. They should leave it alone and let students make their own decisions. To SGA: you’re our representatives, not our nannies.

OLIVE BRANCH: Yesterday, House Speaker John Boehner expressed willingness to deal with Democrats to avoid the “fiscal cliff." Boehner mentioned Republicans would be willing to tolerate a tax increase if it was accompanied by entitlement reform. Here’s hoping for progress during the lame duck session.

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

NEWS: 706-433-3002

Editor In Chief: Polina Marinova Managing Editor: Julia Carpenter News Editor: Adina Solomon Associate News Editor: Megan Ernst Sports Editor: Nick Fouriezos Variety Editor: Tiffany Stevens Opinions Editor: Blake Seitz Recruitment Editor: Alex Laughlin Multimedia Editor: Lindsey Cook Photo Editor: C.B. Schmelter Design Editors: Jan-Michael Cart, Amanda Jones Senior Reporters: Adam Carlson, Mariana Heredia Editorial Adviser: Ed Morales Assistant Editorial Adviser: Erin France

DAWGS after dark: When we were

freshmen we loved the inflatable slides, Chick-fil-A and oodles of swag at Dawgs After Dark. All of it free for students who have paid the $52 student activity fee. But if each Dawgs After Dark event costs upward of $37,000, maybe we don't need so many inflatable slides after all.

Our Staff

Editorial Assistant: Laura Hallett Staff Writers: Ashton Adams, Haley Allen, Karen Ashley, Yousef Baig, Ryan Black, Carolyn Brown, Cy Brown, Jesse Bruno, Ethan Burch, Hilary Butschek, Ashlee Davis, Megan Deese, Sara Delgado, Jacob Demmitt, Taylor Denman, Luke Dixon, Kat Drerup, Tyler Evans, Hayden Field, Nat Fort, Jason Flynn, Jamie Gottlieb, Elizabeth Grimsley, Elizabeth Howard, Megan Ingalls, Zach Jarrett, Morgan Johnson, Helena Joseph, Jeanette Kazmierczak, Lauren Loudermilk, Wes Mayer, Kristin Miller, Ashton Moss, Cailin O’Brien, Robbie Ottley, Cody Pace, Shiv Patel, Sarah Perry, Wil Petty, Gabriel Ram, Heather Reese, Alec Shirkey, Aepril Smith, Preston Smith, Connor Smolensky, Erica Techo, Maria Torres, Nicholas Watson, Taylor West, Kelly Whitmire Chief Photographer: Evan Stichler Staff Photographers: Megan Arnold, Wes Blankenship,

Lindsay Boyle, Taylor Carpenter, Shanda Crowe, Michelle Norris, Erin Smith, Taylor Sutton, Sean F. Taylor, Zackary Tedders, Jennifer Wilson, Annie Wise Videographer: Jenna Reed, Michelle Samuel Page Designers: AJ Archer, Ana Kabakova, Ilya Polyakov Copy Editors: Leigh Borkowski, Margaret Chwat, Molly Golderman, Jill Hueter, Nicole Melius, Cariann Saunders

ADVERTISING: 706-433-3001

Advertising Director: Natalie McClure Student Ad Manager: Dana Cox Inside Sales Manager: Laurel Holland Distribution Assistants: Ben Bowdoin, John Mayfield Account Manager: Will White Classified Manager: Natalie Lett Marketing Coordinators: Claire Barron, Josephine Brucker,

brown joins bennett: Wide receiver

Marlon Brown tore his ACL last week, joining fellow wide receiver Michael Bennett on the sideline for the season. Georgia will play the rest of the season minus two strong players, but it also means something more: potentially career-ending injuries for two fine Bulldogs.

Patrick Klibanoff, Derek Reimherr, Andre Sutton

PRODUCTION: 706-433-3021 Creative Director: Dan Roth Production Staff: Caleb Hayes, Scott Solomon, Bennett Travers

BUSINESS: 706-433-3000 Publisher: Harry Montevideo Business Manager: Erin Beasley Operations Assistant: Ashley Oldham Sr. Recruitment Editor: Carolyn Crist

The Red & Black is published each Thursday throughout the year, except holidays and exam periods, by The Red & Black Publishing Company Inc., a non-profit campus newspaper not affiliated with the University of Georgia. Subscription rate: $195 per year.


Thursday, November 8, 2012

search keywords on our website and twitter ››

OPINIONS

5

UGA Young Democrat wins election prediction map contest The winning map (a perfect map, moreover) was submitted by Alex Rowell, a sophomore from Valdosta majoring in economics and international affairs. Rowell is the political director for the UGA Young Democrats. He frequents Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight Blog, The Huffington Post and Pollster for political news. “Florida was the one thing I was shaky on,” Rowell said. “When I went to the GeorgiaFlorida game, I saw the ground game and how many doors had been knocked on, and I thought it would put us over the edge. It was a gut call and kind of a pride call because [Young Democrats] had put in so much work on Florida. We made about 4,000 calls to Florida.” Congratulations, Alex — you’re $20 richer. —Lindsey Cook

search: winning ››

Editorial prediction by Alex rowell, Map from votenight.org

Over

rads g r e d n u A G U of cohol l a l e e f t o n o d xier. e s e l p o e p s e mak –Core, 2011

Most UGA students make low risk decisions about alcohol.

make smart choices. be a

uhs.uga.edu/aod/NCAAchoices.html For Alcohol Awareness and Education University Health Center • University of Georgia A unit of the Division of Student Affairs

• The tone of the presidential debates, and if the candidates are properly answering the questions • Issues concerning safety on UGA’s campus • The push to add more gambling in Georgia • The attacks against U.S. officials in Libya • The Bulldogs chances to reach the SEC title game

ON REDANDBLACK.COM

WEIGH IN AT REDANDBLACK.COM

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

SUGGEST STORIES

email@randb.com

tellus@randb.com

ON FACEBOOK

ON TWITTER

comment on stories

theredandblack

online polls

@redandblack

• Where are the best places to tailgate? • What are the top fall events coming up? • What places in Athens offer discounts with a UGA ID? LET US KNOW

lifehack@randb.com

SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS TO OUR CALENDAR

online@randb.com


6

OPINIONS

Thursday, November 8, 2012

The Red & Black

U.S. misses big exit opportunity on statist ‘Highway to Hell’

Congratulations to Obama from the loyal opposition

W

F

ell, my prediction was correct — Ohio was the final state to determine the outcome of this election. But I could’ve told you that in middle school. Per my other prediction, I was too kind to Libertarian Gary Johnson. He didn’t even break 1 percent of the vote. But now let's turn to things that mattered about the election. For one, given the tight popular vote, President Barack Obama no longer has the “mandate of the

UGA Students... Want to have fun while getting a good workout? Come join us!

Brian Underwood Guest Columnist

people.” Vox populi, vox Dei is never a moral principle, and it is no longer something to which he can appeal to justify his policies. More importantly, I truly hope this serves as an awakening for the Republican Party. Twice the GOP has tried to run a

WED 6:30-9:30p ➠Old School Night! THU 6:30-9:30p ➠Family Night! FRI 7-11p ➠Teen Night! SAT 10a-12p ➠Kids Skate! SAT 1-5p/7-11p ➠All Ages Skate! SUN 2-5p ➠All Ages Skate!

online ordering avainolawble

10% OFF with mondays a valid student ID on

St

University of Georgia

e

Peabody

St

706.548.7803

ege Av

sunday - thursday

581 S. Harris St.

NORTH

Baxter St S Harris

tuesday

$1.75

domestics

S Milld

trivia on

locosgrill.com

AWARD-WINNING WINGS • BURGERS • SANDWICHES • SALADS

“compromise” candidate — a moderate who will supposedly draw in more votes by being the “least unattractive” of the two candidates. Twice they have lost. And they will continue to lose. A man with principles — no matter how abhorrent — will always beat a man with none. Americans do not want a moderate. They want a man who stands for something. Anything. President Obama stands for something. It isn’t individual rights. It is time for the Republicans to abandon their appeals to folksy, religious-driven ruralism, which only produce candidates like Missouri Senate candidate Todd Akin. True, their choice of a Massachusetts equity firm partner moved away from that, but it exchanged one problem for another. Although Republicans should embrace their label of being the pro-business party, this does not mean nominating businessmen who do not defend the things which make businessmen successful: free markets, respect for individual rights, a rejection of altruism, etc. In any case, the country remains on AC/ DC’s “Highway to Hell,” and we just passed the last exit for another four years. In the meantime, I’ll just look forward to the Red Dawn remake. — Brian Underwood is a junior from Evans majoring in political science and history

search: highway ››

Best on the PLANET!

New Location! Next to Loco’s

1993 Barnett Shoals Rd.

irst, let me open with an extension of extraordinary respect to President Barack Obama. I freely admit that I underestimated the Obama campaign’s turnout operation. I never thought 2012 Democratic turnout would match — and often exceed — the historic turnout of 2008. Although I was rooting for former Governor Mitt Romney, I congratulate the President on his reelection and hope the next four years are more productive than the last. Let me first address my thoughts on the Republican side, before looking forward to the future. The Republican Party is unsustainable — and it should be. Given the conditions surrounding the President’s reelection, it should have been a prime opportunity to oust an incumbent president. But the Republican primary was a circus, and Republicans need to recognize that. Conservatives in my Twitter feed were down on Romney immediately following the call for Obama. Moderate Mitt couldn’t win. Too liberal. Perhaps. But who else would have been better? Rick Santorum? Newt Gingrich? Rick Perry? I shudder at the thought. Election night would have been less stressful, at least. Ron Paul piques my curiosity. I like some of his ideas and I admire his ability to stand up to the RNC establishment. The bench for 2016 looks more promising than this year’s crop. Florida Sen. Marco Rubio will have more experience in his chamber, as will Texas Senator-elect Ted Cruz. New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez will be a two-term governor. Notice what they all have in common? They’re Hispanic Republicans. I don’t particularly like identity politics. I think ideas should stand or fall on their intrinsic merit, not on the appearance of the person espousing the ideas. But old white men have been the face of the GOP, nationally speaking, for too long. And GOP ideas are not particularly popular, as we found out last night. Most voters can’t identify with someone like Mitt Romney. He’s extraordinarily wealthy and successful — I applaud that — but he doesn’t look like a guy who understands you. Barack Obama is also a successful multimillionaire — I applaud that too — but he seems to get you. If Republicans want to move forward (oh the irony), they need fresh

Sam Hempel

Guest Columnist

faces and fresh ideas. They need to be open and honest about their shortcomings. This, in a way, is a rare and exciting chapter of politics because we get the uncommon opportunity to pull back the curtain on all the electoral rah-rah and look at the RNC. Party officials will have to go on the record and explain what went wrong and what needs to change. I relish the thought of such honesty and look forward to it. As for the governing coalition ahead of us, I look forward to less vitriol. That might be wishful thinking, but Obama never faces the ballot box again — relax, conservatives — and I hope he takes a more positive leadership role going forward. I look forward to productive solutions on tax reform, immigration reform and other important issues. Our federal tax code is 3.8 million words long. Tax preparation collectively costs six billion hours and $160 billion each year. Obscure loopholes are far too prevalent. Immigration policy is in need of reform as well. We allow talented students from other countries to come here and get a graduate education in important STEM fields. I like this. But then their student visas run out and we send them back home, where they’ll start companies and create jobs. How dumb is that? Countless other issues abound. Our nation is strong enough to improve on our problems if we can muster the courage to confront them honestly in the first place. President Obama has proven his resilience in the face of adversity. Perhaps we should follow his example: work hard, stick it out and look forward to better days. In sum, I thank Gov. Romney for stepping up to challenge the President. Respectful dissent has been, and always will be, an act of patriotism. And I congratulate President Obama on his reelection, and, with renewed respect for his vision, look forward to four years better than the last four. Here’s to you, Mr. President. — Sam Hempel is a junior from Atlanta majoring in economics

search: dissent ››

Celebrating Douglas County's leftward 'nudge'

| 706.353.8181

Checkout coupon corner for our weekly special

Auburn’s Premier Sports Bar! UGA ALUM OWNED & OPERATED

154 N College Street Auburn, AL 36830 Downtown Auburn 1 block from Toomer’s Corner 334.887.7800

L

ast night the pundits on CNN and Fox may have been keeping an eye out for results in key counties like Cuyahoga County in Ohio and Hillsborough County in Florida, but my eye was on Douglas County right here in Georgia. This has been my home in America for over a decade. My parents and three dogs still live comfortably in a calm, suburban Douglas neighborhood. So why is Douglas County important? It went blue. I was a senior in high school when Obama was running for election the first time. Not old enough to vote, I donated to the Obama campaign and got a button. I displayed it on my purse proudly. I got into a lot of debates that year. Yet somehow, despite McCain’s best attempt, the Obama campaign sold its message of hope and change and easily won the presidency. As any person not living under a rock in America knows, Obama’s victory last Tuesday was not so easy. As it did in 2008, Georgia went to Mitt Romney early and by a wide margin, and I was upset.

Ana Kabakova

Guest Columnist

But then I saw it. Douglas County, with 100 percent of precincts reporting, had gone blue. Obama had eked out a victory with 51.5 percent of the vote, a mere 2,000 more ballots than Romney. I was shocked and delighted, but I was also confused. Wasn’t my county in the middle of the South? Wasn’t there a car dealership around every corner and a Romney sticker on the bumper of every SUV? I looked at the demographics: 52.5 percent white, 39.5 percent black or African American, 0.3 percent Native American, 1.4 percent Asian and 2.4 percent from two or more races. I looked at the median income: $50,798. Unemployment rate: 9 percent. Hmm. Maybe the Obama campaign had put in extra effort there? I called my Mom Wednesday morning to ask if there had been extra signs,

canvassing or anything else unusual relating to the campaign. She said she didn’t think so. Finally, I was pleasantly stumped. If my unapologetically right-leaning metro-Atlanta county is taking the time to rethink its politics and move left (even if it’s just a nudge), maybe the rest of America is as well. Tuesday night showed us that America is becoming more progressive: same-sex marriage and marijuana decriminalization passed in several states. There were many firsts: the first openly gay woman, the first AsianAmerican woman and the first disabled woman were elected to the Senate. While there is, by necessity, a place in our country for both right and left-leaning politics, I think that the progress we’re seeing in modern political races shows that America, as a whole, is rethinking what it stands for. — Ana Kabakova is a senior from Douglasville majoring in English and Russian

search: douglas ››

Make sure to make The Bury your home during the holiday season! M

ne M oo nshi

argaritas & Craft

Beer

Come watch the Auburn game on our Projector TV! Follow us on Twitter for drink specials @TheBuryAthens. 321 E. Clayton Street • Downtown Athens


go to:


8

NEWS

Thursday, November 8, 2012

The Red & Black

Dawgs After Dark events cost average of $37,665 each, more than $300K annually BY CAILIN O’BRIEN The Red & Black University Union hosts Dawgs After Dark to offer a “free” alternative to drinking downtown or partying for students. “[The funding for Dawgs After Dark] comes from student activity fees,” said Elizabeth Hansen, assistant director of student activities at University Union. “It’s always free for students, but we do charge for nonstudents. We only charge about $5, but that does help our budget as well.” Dawgs After Dark used $301,316 of student activity fee money to operate during fiscal year 2011, according to information obtained by The Red & Black. With eight events a year, that means the average Dawgs After Dark event costs approximately $37,665. Students pay $52 in activity fees yearly. But junior advertising and sociology major Brian Alsobrook said he did not know any portion of his student activity fee went to Dawgs After Dark. “I assumed the school paid for it,” he said. Alsobrook said he has attended four or five Dawgs After Dark events, mainly in his freshman and sopho-

more years. “It was something to do,” Alsobrook said. “When I first showed up ... It was a good way to meet people.” While Hansen has seen an “awesome” increase in upperclassmen at the monthly event, mostly first-year students attend Dawgs After Dark, she said. “The first semester that you’re here, you’re still trying to meet new people,” she said. “Dawgs After Dark is a great way to do fun activities. You can show up with friends or you can go by yourself and still have a really great time.” Alsobrook and other upperclassmen still spend approximately $8.50 on the program, whether they attend it or not. But Alsobrook said he does not mind the extra cost. “I understand kind of why it’s there,” he said. “It’s only on Friday nights, so it’s trying to keep people — particularly underclassmen ­— from doing things downtown where they might be drinking.” University Police Chief Jimmy Williamson said Dawgs After Dark does not cut down on underage drinking crimes downtown, but the monthly programming does offer an alterna-

Country singer Jason Aldean performed at a Dawgs After Dark event on Oct. 18 as part of the University football pep rally at Legion Field. erin smith/Staff tive to students who would have chosen not to drink downtown anyway. Hansen said students also have the chance to help plan monthly activities to determine where they would like to see their money go. Such a committee within the University Student Union plans each monthly Dawgs After Dark event, but Hansen said the ideas for the events often come from students outside the

organization. “It’s a totally student-run process, and we love to get feedback from people,” she said. “We do surveys at our events, too, so even if people don’t come to the committee meetings they can have their input on the surveys or on Facebook or anything like that.”

search: dawgs after dark ››

CAES

SAA If you love UGA, then you’ll love SAA! Visit the website to learn about exciting events, the class ring, the G Book, and more!

www.alumni.uga.edu/SAA 1-800-606-8786

Sign a 1-year lease and get

$500 off

your first month’s rent! * Some restrictions may apply

Must present this coupon at time of initial signing, not good with any other offer.

Expires 11/30/12

Carriage House Realty Inc. 706-353-1750

Come check out our college and register for prizes like: • A year supply (52 meals) from Chick-fil-A • Two tickets to the UGA-GA Tech game • A Mark Richt-signed football Wednesday, November 14th 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. by Conner Hall & Chemistry Building FREE FOOD | pRizEs | FREE FOOD | pRizEs


NEWS

search keywords on our website and twitter ››

Thursday, November 8, 2012

9

ACC Police, UGA Police each received 14 formal complaints in 2011 By CAILIN O’BRIEN The Red & Black Athens-Clarke County residents filed 14 formal complaints against Athens-Clarke County Police from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 2011, according to a framed public notice found on the wall of the department’s Lexington Road location. In 2011, University Police also received 14 complaints. ACC Police makes all this information available to ensure the public that the police are holding themselves accountable, said Detective Kevin Hooks of the Professional Responsibilities Division. “It’s the general consensus of the public,” Hooks said. “Sometimes, people think the police are not going to police the police, so to say. We’re showing that police officers sometimes go out there and make some boneheaded mistakes.” Hooks and the ACC Police have been investigating formal complaints and posting them as a “public notice” for “as long as [Hooks] can remember,” he said. University Police do not post their formal complaints publicly, but it would if students asked, said University Police Chief Jimmy Williamson. “We track our complaints and compliments both, but we don’t put them on a plaque or anything,” he said. “We just don’t get that many.” In fact, Williamson said over “the past couple years, [their] compliments outnumbered [their] complaints.” Out of University Police’s 14 complaints in 2011, eight concerned how the officer handled

the situation and two dealt with the thoroughness of an officer’s investigation. Four people complained about the University Police towing illegally parked cars. But in 2011, University Police also received 46 compliments for teaching safety, protecting the public and helping people out of dangerous situations. The ACC Police do not post compliments or informal complaints on its public notice,

Hooks said. “Those are the actual formal complaints against officers where a complainant actually signed an affirmation basically stating that if they’re not telling the truth, we can come after them civilly,” he said. Of the 14 formal complaints filed in 2011, there were five excessive force complaints, eight rule violation complaints and one communications personnel complaint. Ten out of ACC

Police’s 14 formal complaints were “not sustained,” meaning the investigation into the incident either turned up nothing or the complainant failed to cooperate with the police. “Sometimes, people are just mad,” Hooks said.

For more news about ACC and UGA Police search: complaints ››

University Police does not publish how many formal complaints it receives during a year. file/Staff

For more xxxx and some more xxxxx

MOVE IN DURING THE MONTH OF OCTOBER OR NOVEMBER AND GET THE MONT

H OF DECEMBER

FREE!

Stop by and Tour an Apartment Today!

www.ReserveAtAthens.com

706.548.4400 | 175 International Drive | Athens, GA 30605

Luxury Student Apartments NEW Coming Summer 2013! Modern, sophisticated and earth-friendly, The NEW Flats at Carrs Hill offers a community designed for student living at its finest. With state-ofthe art amenities, spacious floor plans, and a convenient location close to campus, The Flats at Carrs Hill is more than a place to live, it’s a lifestyle.

community

fitness & recreation

peace of mind

• 1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor plans • Fully furnished • Private bedrooms • Private bathrooms • Hi-speed fiber-optic data and video • 42” widescreen television • Washer & dryer • Full kitchen • Energy-efficient appliances • Plank wood flooring in common areas • Utilities included with cap

• Ultra modern community center • Group conference room with audio/visual equipment • Computer lab • Wi-Fi accessibility • Residents life program • Covered parking • Short walk or bike ride to campus • Located on Oconee River Greenway

• State-of-the-art fitness center • Indoor sports court • Yoga/dance studio • Tanning bed • Billiards room • Internet cafe Downtown Athens • Resort-style pool t overlooking campus78 Stree oad W. Br • Outdoor grill and patio

• Gated community • Individual leases • All inclusive rent • 24-hr on-call emergency service • Elevators with interior hallways • 24/7 Video surveillance e on

eS

et tre

Leasing Office

Oc

apartment

Dudley Park

Located on the Oconee River. Walk to campus or downtown! Sanford Stadium

Call 706.357.1111 today to reserve your spot for next fall! S. Milledge Avenue

Leasing Office: 125 S. Milledge Ave. Ste. E • TheFlatsatCarrsHill.com EQUAL HOUSING

oad

OPPORTUNITY

am pu sR

University of Georgia


10

NEWS

Thursday, November 8, 2012

The Red & Black

Banks ‘taking advantage’ of debit card affiliation BY CAILIN O’BRIEN The Red & Black Kelsey Butterworth owns the University Bank of America debit card — but she said she had no idea the card paid the school in any way. “When I opened up my Bank of America checking account before I came to college, they asked if I wanted a special debit card,” said the junior music business major. “They had a little catalogue. I thought, ‘Well, since I’m going to UGA, I’ll just choose the one with the ‘G.’’” The University may be taking financial advantage of students by allowing Bank of America to offer a debit card decorated with a “G” that pays the University, said Christine Lindstrom, higher education project director of United States Public Interest Research Groups. “Banks and other financial firms are taking advantage of a variety of opportunities to form partnerships with colleges and universities,” according to a report released by U.S. PIRG in May entitled The Campus Debit Card Trap. The Red & Black discovered an addendum added on June 1, 2010 to a contract between the previously active Arch Foundation and Bank of America that created a campus-affiliated debit card. The addendum was added to an already existing “affinity agreement” the University had with Bank of America beginning June 30, 1999, according to documents obtained by The Red & Black. It was signed by Cindy Coyle, executive director of the University Foundation. The addendum described a debit card provided to students through Bank of America that pays the University each time a student opens an account connected to the “G” debit card. Nobody explained to Butterworth that the University receives $2 for each new checking account opened with at least $50 in it and an additional $1 for every account that still has at least $50 in it a year later, according to the addendum. “Basically, what [the contract] is saying is that the University is making money,” Lindstrom said. “And if the contract is really bad, the University is making money every time a student pays one of those penalty fees.”

Bank of America offers a debit card decorated with a “G” that pays the University. c.b. schmelter/Staff But the University does not profit off fees students may acquire on their accounts, according to the addendum. Lindstrom said U.S. PIRG still does not condone the University’s relationship with Bank of America. “We still have a problem with your school dealing with Bank of America that way because Bank of America wants to get onto campus to get as many students as possible to open accounts with them,” she said. “Bank of America has a long-term interest in gaining you as a customer.” The Red & Black was unable to reach Bank of America for comment. Lindstrom said the University should strictly monitor the bank’s interest in students instead of choosing to partner with the bank that can provide the most money to the school. “UGA should say, ‘Fine, if you want to market to our students, take out that penalty fee and take out this and give them overdraft protection and don’t charge them with that,’” she said. “But instead, they’re not doing that at all. They’re just going, ‘Oh, cool. Bank of America gave us 100K. Citizens Bank would only give us 10K, so let’s go with Bank of America.’” The Red & Black could not find anybody at the University willing or able to talk on the record about

IMPORT

liquor store locations 4388 Lexington Rd. 706.583.4066 265 North Ave. 706.543.0005

large selection of domestics & craft beer fine wine & liquor reserve kegs

CA

R DOC

S TO R

Now opeN Accepting New patients

706.353.0057 706.583.4066 706.543.0005 1195 cedar shoals drive

great service. the lowest prices.

1900 W. Broad Street • (706)-353-6006 8am - 5:30pm Monday-Friday • 8am - 12pm Sunday

housing fair In conjunction with UGA Housing

the contract. However, an anonymous University employee in the Division of External Affairs said the contract is not harmful because students are given the choice about whether to use Bank of America. Once students become Bank of America customers, they are then given the option of deciding whether they use the University-affiliated debit card. But both Butterworth and junior public affairs major Katherine Sims told The Red & Black that nobody explained to them that the card benefitted the University or that it was different than a normal debit card. “I had to go to apply for a debit card or whatever, and that’s just the one they gave me. I didn’t even have an option,” Sims said. “I wanted the regular one, but the lady was like, ‘Oh, so you’re a UGA student? We’ve got this new card. Here, I’ll give it to you.’” Butterworth and Sims’ experiences were not out of the usual pattern for banks, Lindstrom said. She said even with the “optional” cards, “the majority of the student body” will have one of the cards “within a very short period of time.” “The reason for that has to be one of two things,” Lindstrom said. “Either students are going, ‘Oh my god, this is such a good deal. Wow.’ The other reason is because in fact, the marketing is set up in a way that the students feel compelled to get the card.” U.S. PIRG’s report said Universities and banks should avoid “push marketing.” “Given that the campus card has already been chosen by the college ... there must be strong rules to avoid push marketing,” according to the study. “Students should be able to opt in or out of the university-sponsored debit card program through the campus itself, rather than making the option through provider-sponsored venues.” But while Butterworth and Sims may have been “pushed” into receiving their University endorsed cards, neither student cared that they had been benefiting the school without their knowledge. The University’s agreement with Bank of America will end and be up for review June 20, 2013, according to the addendum.

search: debit card ››

Freshmen make mark in politics even before voting age by campaigning The voting age may be 18, but anyone can get involved with political campaigns. Two freshmen took a step into the world of politics well before they could sign an official ballot. William Johnson worked as a volunteer for the Roy Barnes campaign in 2010 when Barnes ran for a second term as Georgia’s governor. “It was a really great experience for me. I always knew I wanted to get involved with a political campaign from a pretty young age. And it seemed like the right place to start,” said the freshman political science major from Douglasville. For Justin Smith, the campaign to re-elect U.S Sen. Johnny Isakson was a vehicle to engage the people in his community. “I went around the city and handed out brochures to anybody who was willing to listen,” said the freshman economics major from Albany. “Volunteering with the campaign gave me an inside look at the political process that most don’t get to see. I learned that the biggest part of the campaign was engaging people at a street level. It was about talking to people.” — Shiv Patel

search: campaign ››

Terry Professor in 2nd place for business professor of the year At first, University finance professor Mark Laplante didn’t think his nomination for Economist Intelligence Unit’s Business Professor of the Year Award was real. He thought the email alert, which mentioned a monetary prize, was just spam. But he recognized the name of the student who nominated him and realized the email might not be a scam. He Googled the competition and did some research, and only then did he believe the competition was “legit.” Laplante is in sec-

ond place for the voting portion of the competition falling behind the first place candidate by eight votes as of press time. “We have a lot of good professors at Georgia, but this is for someone who teaches business in large lectures, does it well and inspires,” said Jeff Netter, acting department head for banking and finance. “That criterion fits Dr. Laplante perfectly.” — Erica Techo

search: Terry ››

Tired Of Roommates? Move-In Today Or In January

Talk with us. 706.353.6868

Whistlebury Waterford Place Whistlebury Walk

Quality. Location. Price. MANAGEMENT

1 Bedroom options at White Columns Hall & Cedar Bluffs www.joinermanagement.com


Thursday, November 8, 2012

VARIETY

11

Do you love to write?

Page-turners for chilly weather November is schizophrenic. The weather in Georgia never makes any sense — and it especially makes no sense during the last month of fall, a month of sudden heat spurts and cool nights and storms. What to do? What to wear? The options abound — and overwhelm. But that irregularity finds its ideal partner in literature. For every mood, a book. As you’re buffeted about by volleying temperatures and wind

Thursday

Sunny — 66/35

Mostly Sunny — 66/40 Lay out in a field (don’t be tempted by the small clearing adjacent to the MLC and stick to your nearest park — or the Intramural Fields) and page through J.K. Rowling’s “The Casual Vacancy,” about a small municipality and its madness over a small municipal election.

Saturday

Do you love to design graphics?

Do you want access to concerts, football games, movies and more?

What?

Red & Black Forum’s Information WHO ARE WE? Session:Working The Red & Black is UGA’s award-winning newspaper. Estab- atTheRed&Black

Come work with us.

lished in 1893 and independent of the University since 1980, The Red & Black is the largest college newspaper in Georgia and the 10th largest newspaper in the state.

WHAT DO WE DO? Our two-fold mission is: to provide a training ground for students interested in gaining experience in various aspects of newspaper publishing and to produce a high quality newspaper for the University of Georgia community.

When? Thursday Nov. 8, 6-8 p.m.

Where?

Cloudy with Chance of Rain — 69/50 Avoid the drip-drip-dripping of everything today and read some T.S. Eliot — specifically “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” which has the twin distinction of being both a modernist masterpiece, all jeweled metaphors cut sharp with facet and of helping you prep for ENGL 1102.

Sunday

Do you love to shoot videos?

— Adam Carlson

This is the perfect fall day. Junot Díaz won the Pulitzer Prize for “The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao” four years ago — but that has nothing on Díaz’s short fiction. “This is How You Lose Her" is sharp and clear-eyed. Save the last one, “Miss Lora” for last. Every line thrills.

Friday

Do you love to snap photos?

speeds and cloud patterns this season, consider each new day another opportunity; and consider the following, a mix of one old and some new, a handy guide. These aren’t actual weather predictions, understand. That would be too easy. Consider these, instead, predictions on how the weather might be, on any given November day, and how you should be as well.

Showers — 60/37 It’s the season’s coldest sort of day, and you have two options. One: curl up with Gillian Flynn’s “Gone Girl” — a cutting mystery about a married couple that cannibalizes itself. Or two: stay away from any and all books, start a fire and sleep instead.

BSB_FanUp_R&B_Halfpg_ECB outdoor 10/24/12 4:27 PM Page 1

Miller

WHY JOIN THE R&B? LearningCenter Our community of professional staff, editors, advisors and adRoom 207 vertisers can help get you started on your career path. Alumnus work for The New York Times, The Washington Examiner, Sports Illustrated, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and The Sacramento Bee. While working with us, you can have access to local concerts, movies and football games. And we’re interested in your ideas. What do you think we could do better?

Feel like signing up for an appointment to learn more about The Red and Black? Email the recruitment editor at recruitment@randb.com. Visit us at www.redandblack.com or call (706) 433-3000.

! P U N FA

! e r e h w y n A r a e w g w a D t s o M The

Dawgwear, Used Textbooks, Student Notes, Supplies & Gear

706-549-3081 • bsbsonline.com • dawgwear.net Located across from the Dorms

GET BIG CASH FOR YOUR BOOKS! Come see us at the end of the semester for the best “book buyback” anywhere.


12

VARIETY Thursday, November 8, 2012 Creating successful Dawgs After Dark events Student-run committee finds swag, manages time BY HANNAH REISS The Red & Black Dawgs After Dark is a production. But for those involved, the work is worth the effort. Each event Dawgs After Dark puts on has been in the works for months. With the exception of the annual November carnival, the Dawgs After Dark committee decides the theme for each event the semester before it happens. Katie AliFarhani, the Dawgs After Dark student coordinator, said after deciding on the theme for the

night, the committee next decides which activities to have. They then contact Interactive Attractions, an Atlanta-based company which supplies many of the inflatables and games so integral to Dawgs After Dark. “We have a good relationship with them,” AliFarhani said. “We’ve been with them for a while and they usually give us a discount.” As student coordinator since this past January, AliFarhani said she spends 10 to 15 hours a week planning for Dawgs After Dark. Despite the method, there is occasionally madness. This October’s Dawgs After Dark event was held following Basketbash. AliFarhani said the volunteers had to run around to set up in time for the crowd. “I try to say that things don’t necessarily go wrong — they just don’t always go as planned,” AliFarhani said.

The Red & Black

Some Dawgs After Dark events, such as the yearly Homecoming Carnival, take up to a year of planning, including coming up with themes and booking activities. Dawgs After Dark coordinators usually work with the same company to provide rides and games. ERIN SMITH/Staff “I’m a planner, but it’s always good to have a creative solution, a back up plan.” AliFarhani’s studies as a communications major help her in her role as student coordinator. “[Any problems] usually stem from miscommunication, and that’s why I try to bring my major in and make sure everyone knows what’s going on,” she said.

Dawgs After Dark is an essential part of AliFarhani’s life. “My world actually revolves around Dawgs After Dark,” she said. “I want to be an event planner, and I love the purpose of Dawgs After Dark — it’s for students to have fun in an environment where they don’t have to go downtown or go to some party. It’s familiar, since it’s

at UGA, so it already has that sense of community.” AliFarhani also brings in her frugal side whenever she can. “I try to save as much money as possible,” she said. “We have saved a lot of money this year through having volunteers.”

search: after dark››

Fall Music Festival/ Blind Pig West

Nov. 9 • Starts @ 6pm Featuring Debris w/Sonny Ortiz (of widespread Panic) $5 Coors light Pitchers (West Only)

Didn’t expect to be expecting? Know your options. Get the facts. Free lab quality pregnancy test and ultrasound. Compassionate and confidential support.

No Appointment Necessary! Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday 9:30am - 4:00pm Thursday 9:30am-7:00pm (678)-753-3180 | 767 Oglethorpe Ave. Athens, GA 30606 info@AthensPregnancyCenter.org www.AthensPregnancyCenter.org

Come check out our weekly specials!

Pre-game for the Ole-Miss vs. UGA game. We will be open at NOON! Like us on Facebook @TheStill. Text 90210.

Your Tailgate Headquarters

50% off with student id sun-thurs.

Student activists often have to choose between homework and activism. Some students have to drop classes when their causes conflict with work in advocacy organizations. Courtesy Maura Friedman

Student activists struggle to balance work, protest BY HILARY BUTSCHEK The Red & Black Heather Hatzenbuhler works a full-time job, but she doesn’t get paid. Hatzenbuhler is a full-time student and a full-time student activist on the executive board of the UGA Student Sierra Coalition, the largest youth environmental organization in the U.S. The senior environmental economics and management major from Lawrenceville also has a part-time job at Alice Depass Studio of Dance. “This organization has been my life for three years,” Hatzenbuhler said. Hatzenbuhler fights for the environment by discussing alternatives to coal as a fuel source on campus with University officials and President Michael Adams. Katie Bridges, executive board member for the University’s chapter of Amnesty International, fights for human rights issues around the world and focuses on raising awareness on campus. Both have been committed to their causes since the beginning of their college careers and contributed to the rise of their organizations. First, Hatzenbuhler signed a petition against coal use on campus, then before long she was the one protesting in Tate Plaza and handing out petitions to be signed. By fall of 2011 the group was given student organization status and a cubicle. Now, it has an office. “We thought that was a really big deal,” Hatzenbuhler said. “It speaks a lot to the importance of the work we do and the dedication we show.” She’s more committed to the cause than to her school work, and it’s led Hatzenbuhler to make some sacrifices. “I feel like I’ve kept an OK balance, but I do always feel like I’m dropping one thing,” Hatzenbuhler said. The past two years Hatzenbuhler has had to drop a class because the professors were unwilling to work with her over an end of the year trip to the United Nations Framework

Convention on Climate Change. “To me, it’s worth it to work with people around the globe to talk about environmental solutions,” Hatzenbuhler said. For Bridges, the shift towards activism has paralleled a more personal journey. Because she was affected by activism, she affects others through her work with Amnesty. “Throughout my freshman year I was still kind of really if-y in Amnesty, but as far as taking a stand on an issue I was still trying to figure out my footing,” Bridges said. “It wasn’t until my sophomore year that I realized it’s OK to take a stand on these things. It’s OK to be pro-gay rights. It’s OK to be anti-death penalty and really take a stand on those things.” After growing up with a conservative, Christian background, Bridges began to think more about issues such as gay rights and the death penalty. She realized she had exactly the opposite view than what she had been brought up with. Her involvement in Amnesty helped her solidify her opinion. “I really felt an obligation in a sense the more I learned and the more I got involved,” Bridges said. Later, Bridges adopted an atheist religious view and came out as a lesbian. “Looking back I see how [coming out as a lesbian] did fuel me and how that was really important in my activism and in my learning about activism,” Bridges said. Both Hatzenbuhler and Bridges have let their work with their activism change their lives and their schedules. Hatzenbuhler spends up to 40 hours or more each week working on various things for the student group from meeting planning to manning a table in Tate to holding awareness events. “It’s a full-time job,” Hatzenbuhler said. “It’s really hard for me to quantify the time I spend with it because I’m always thinking about it, but I wouldn’t do it if I didn’t love it.” Bridges said she thinks awareness is the most important issue for an activist organization, but it’s also the hardest.

“The problem with activism on a college campus is it has to be a constant reminder like this is going on you can do this you can do that,” Bridges said. It’s a common theme among student leaders and activists for the organization they are involved in to take over their life, but both student leaders believe it's worth it. “In my opinion, I could have spent the last three years totally concerned with myself and what’s best for me, but I feel like that gets us into that same value system that’s let us down in the environment and in the economy,” Hatzenbuhler said. “It’s so much more satisfying to do something collectively with other people to improve society than working on myself.” Bridges focuses more on individual members. She sees a problem with the way people view human rights in today’s world. “A lot of the original beliefs I held kind of fuel what I do now because people are so mis-educated,” Bridges said. “That’s kind of my motivation because I don’t want anyone else to go through that. I don’t want anyone to look back and be like I really wish I would have known this.” To these student leaders activism isn’t about waving the signs and shouting, it’s about the bigger picture – the fight. “I remember the night of the execution of Troy Davis,” Bridges said. “It was really emotional, but I think I distinctly remember there were about four black women there singing ‘We Will Overcome,’ singing old hymns I didn’t know, and I was just thinking about all the people who had worn the ‘I Am Troy Davis’ shirts, just thinking that this isn’t really over. It happened with Trayvon Martin case, this happened with all the racial discrimination, with all the immigration problems in the United States. It’s just that this isn’t a Troy Davis case. This is a bigger case. It’s not about Troy Davis it’s about everyone else who has the same story.”

search: activists ››

pakistani•indian•arabic grocery store

Taj Mahal 706.549.9477

$1 OFF Mirch Masala Tikha Ganthia -Hotspicy chick pea noodle sticks 12oz

Free beer or wine w/ purchase of student entree (Student ID and coupon required)

open 7days 10am-9pm

we offer: take out. authentic homemade food. chappati and samosas. 100% Zabiah handcut chicken, lamb, goat, and beef. we carry asian spices. CATERING AVAILABLE

not valid w/any other coupon Good through 11/14/2012

1039 Baxter St. Athens, GA 30606


search keywords on our website and twitter ››

Thursday, November 8, 2012

VARIETY

13

Professors, students turn Ecology pond into Appalachian music hot spot BY SARAH ANNE PERRY The Red & Black Twice a week, music comes from the pond outside of the Ecology building. Jim Wilson, a professor in the department of mathematics education, has played by the pond for at least eight years, but he said groups have been informally meeting there for longer. Although masses of students rush hurriedly by the ring, they seldom stop. “Some of them, it looks like they speed up to get by quicker,” Wilson said. “But for the most part, they smile. Some come and listen for just a little while and go on, ‘cause they’re all busy. For the most part, this is a heavy traffic area, and people are busy, and they barely look up.” That’s alright with the musicians, though. “Honestly, I’m not here to enter-

OPEN JAM SESSIONS WHEN: 12:30 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays WHERE: Ecology Building PRICE: Free tain anybody except myself,” said Jeff Buckley, a 4-H specialist at the University. “I don’t need a crowd of folks. I prefer, actually, two or three.” Buckley had just arrived for his first session with the group, a testament to the location’s status as a long-time jam spot. Any musician with an instrument and an affinity for mountain music is welcome. The group is unaffiliated with the School of Music, and no particular department is more represented than others, Wilson said.

Wilson’s musicianship began in childhood. He learned the fiddle and mandolin in Kansas, then picked up the guitar in adolescence. He used music to pay his way through college, though he never played professionally. Music continued to shape his life. In the 1950s, Wilson drove one of his bandmates back and forth to visit his girlfriend. Eventually the bandmate married the girl and her sister became Wilson’s wife. Buckley, too, began playing in childhood. He picked up banjo from his dad, though his primary instrument was guitar..

Trivia

1 Pints 7 Domestic Pitchers 12 Micro or Import Pitchers changes weekly

320 easT clayTon sT.

Classic City buskers serenade downtown for enjoyment, survival BY SARAH ANNE PERRY The Red & Black Clayton Street homes not just stores, but street performers. Nicholas Ridout is an import from Nashville, Tenn. He played banjo in a band called Spit Shine, then hopped freight trains from Missoula, Mont. and hitchhiked to get to Athens. Attesting to this fact is the DIY tattoo of train tracks on his wrist. A few days a week, he sits in front of Mellow Mushroom plucking at his banjo, with his dog Wesson at his feet. Down the street, Athenians often spot a juggler. Clad head-to-toe in pink spandex on Thursday afternoon, this busker preferred not to be identified by name. Instead, he remained in character. “My name is Felix the Cat,” he said while juggling lemons. “I am working under a professional clown as an apprentice. He is the boss clown, and I am his little henchman. We meet in magical places, and he drops me off here downtown in a Model T Ford.” Felix hails down pedestrians, offering free juggling lessons and saying odd but uplifting things. He performs in College Square several times a week. Last week, he was dressed as a skunk, but Thursday, he was the Pink Panther. At night, bar-hoppers might spot another performer in College Square: guitarist and singer Donald Keesing. Keesing, known at open mic nights and on the Internet as Donkee Tonk, has been making music for 30 years.

He was a choir boy at 10-yearsold, but became a part of the D.C. punk scene before pursuing country music. Keesing came to Athens after spending time in other music towns like Nashville, Tenn.; Charlottesville, Va.; and Asheville, N.C. Keesing and Ridout, who have performed on the street and in venues throughout the U.S., have both experienced a warm reception from passersby. “It’s my second time in Athens, and I love this town,” Ridout said. “It’s a very nice, quiet town. A lot of people just keep walking, but I’ve been very well accepted here and whatnot. Met a lot of great people, and people have been very generous.” Keesing said that he too feels welcomed by Athens locals. “They’re comfortable in their skin in Athens, and they’re not trying to impress people too much,” he said. “I like that. They just are themselves. Even the hipster kids aren’t obnoxious here; they’re laid back, you know.” And, said Keesing, motivation is key. “It’s joy,” he said. “I never play a song I’m not feeling. I really love playing those rolling sets and decompressing at the Waffle House afterwards. It is joy, and yeah, I think if you don’t feel it, you shouldn’t do it. You can’t sell a song you’re not feeling. I mean, people can tell what you’re feeling. If I’m not feeling it, I shut the case and leave.”

search: buskers››

search: Ecology jamming ››

Trivia begins wednesdays 8pm $ $ $

Donald Keesing, a guitarist and singer who goes by Donkee Tonk, often performs at College Station. He's traveled for years with his music playing street corners in locations such as D.C., Tennessee and Virginia. DAMIEN SALAS/Staff

“I’ve played guitar throughout my career of losing money playing music,” he said. “I don’t ever make money.” Money is not the object – these people are not your downtown buskers. The appeal lies in the community the music creates. “I think it’s a primal thing to make music,” Buckley said. “Most folks don’t get to do that because it’s always around them, and it might not occur to them that they could just play it themselves.”

1sT, 2nD & 3rD place prizes

40 Beers on Draft and a FUll Bar 706.613.0892


14

SPORTS

Thursday, November 8, 2012

The Red & Black

Sudden, sad ending to Marlon Brown’s resurgent senior season BY RYAN BLACK and JACOB DEMMITT The Red & Black With a heavy heart, Georgia head coach Mark Richt announced Sunday that wide receiver Marlon Brown’s career had come to a close. Richt confirmed Brown tore the anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee, and though he is expected to make a full recovery, the senior has played his last snap as a Bulldog. Georgia Sports Communications said in a release that Brown’s surgery will take place at a “yet-tobe determined date,” with team orthopedic surgeons performing the procedure. Richt noted “it’s an injury people recover from well,” and Brown’s future pro career likely won’t be negatively affected. That didn’t make it any easier for Richt to handle. “We’re just very sad and sorry that it hap-

pened for Marlon and for Georgia,” Richt said. “It’s just a hard thing to swallow right now.” The injury occurred during the third quarter of Saturday’s victory over Ole Miss, at the end of a 30-yard reception by Brown. Richt said in his postgame press conference he didn’t believe the tackle leading to the tear was dirty, and hadn’t had time to pore over the play Sunday. “We didn’t sit there and just labor over that,” he said. At the time of the injury, Brown had a team-high three catches for 113 yards against the Rebels, including a 66-yard touchdown reception in the second quarter. Richt said Brown handled news well considering the circumstances. “Obviously no one enjoys to hear that kind of news. It’s not good news, but Marlon’s a man now,” Richt said. “He’s not a boy any-

CAREER STATS 2012: 27 catches for 469 yards, four touchdowns. 2011: 15 catches for 234 yards, three touchdowns. 2010: 11 catches for 133 yards, and one touchdown. 2009: Two catches for 15 yards

more, he’s a man.” Brown’s ACL tear is the second season-ending knee injury to hit Georgia’s receiving corps. Redshirt sophomore Michael Bennett tore his ACL during practice in the first week of October. Like Brown, Bennett was also leading the team in receptions at the time. Richt admitted yet

UGA apartments & townhomes

Live better. 706.543.4400 | Live-RiverClub.com

another blow to the unit will be a challenge for the remaining receivers to overcome. “Marlon and Michael were just two outstanding football players,” he said. “At the time of the injuries, they’re both leading the team in receptions and have a nice physicality to them as well at that position. We’ll miss that.” News of Brown’s season ending injury sent a shockwave through the Georgia locker room. But for some, the troubling news was also an opportunity. As coaches shuffle players around to fill in the holes, a few unfamiliar faces will be spending more time on the field. One name popping up is Justin ScottWesley, a lightning-fast redshirt sophomore with just one catch in his young Georgia career. “He’s a guy that really doesn’t have any experience but he doesn’t let that effect him,” said junior wide receiver Rantavious Wooten. “He’s been waiting. Right now, this is his time." To Scott-Wesley, the chance to show what he can do can’t come fast enough. “You’re [always] one play away from being on the field,” he said. “Even some games when I knew I wasn’t

Wide receiver Marlon Brown saw his career finish sadly after sustaining an ACL injury against Ole Miss last Saturday. He is expected to recover fully, but has lost playing eligibility. WES BLANKENSHIP/Staff getting some playing time, I was still in there watching film just in case a guy went down or two guys went down." After declaring his commitment to Georgia on the winners podium at a state track meet in 2010, Scott-Wesley has done everything he can to shed the stigmas attached to being the fast guy — almost. “People really didn’t

acknowledge my skills as a receiver so I just have to show people I’m a football player,” he said, wearing his Georgia track sweatshirt. “Day in and day out I show people I’m more than just a fast guy. I catch the ball, I can take a hit, I can give a hit, I can block.”

search: Marlon ››

From denial to rehabilitation Michael Bennett reflects on ACL injury, season BY JACOB DEMMITT The Red & Black Athletes use a variety of words to describe the sound an ACL makes when it tears. Some say it’s a burst, others call it an explosion. But according to Georgia wide receiver Michael Bennett, it’s just two simple “pops.” “I could hear them clear as day. I asked everybody else if they heard them, they said no. But I heard them. I heard them pop and I knew that couldn’t be good,” Bennett told The Red & Black in his first media interview since an ACL injury signaled an early end to his 2012 season on Oct. 2. There’s no need to look far for reminders of the unpredictable nature of football. South Carolina running back Marcus Lattimore texted Bennett earlier in October, offering support after Bennett suffered the season-ending knee injury. Lattimore could relate because he had suffered a similar fate when he tore his left ACL in 2011. Three weeks later, Lattimore was back on the sidelines — this time, with a right knee injury. Meanwhile, Bennett had led the Bulldogs in receptions (24), receiving yards (345) and touchdowns (four) through the first five weeks of the season. But now his stats sit frozen. “I went through a phase of [asking what if]. But now it’s just kind of like, ‘Dude, it’s over,’” Bennett said. “And I just know God has a plan for me. It’s going to work out the way He wants it to. For some reason He didn’t want me to finish the season.” Bennett has already fixed his eyes on what he has to do to get back on the field in 2013. As soon as doctors diagnosed a torn ACL, his first response was to schedule the surgery that would make it possible for him to play again. Doctors took pieces of bone and tendon from other places on his knee to build a new ACL on Oct. 9. Four weeks later, they say Bennett is doing better than most. The incisions have turned to scabs and he walks without crutches. He wears a knee brace most days, but Bennett said he has no doubt he’ll be ready to go next season. “I know my work ethic and how hard I’m going to try to come back,” he said. “So I’m not really worried about the comeback part. It’s just the time of everyday sitting in the training room. It’s kind of boring.” And he has good reason to be optimistic. Many high-profile NFL athletes such as New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady and Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson have managed to return as strong as ever after ACL tears. “I think he knows he has a great future ahead of him,” Georgia head coach Mark Richt said. “He still has two years of eligibility and people recover quite well from that type of surgery.”

Georgia wideout Michael Bennett was leading the team in receptions, receiving yards and touchdowns before suffering an ACL injury versus South Carolina. C.B.SCHMELTER/Staff The injury happened on the last drill of Tuesday’s practice as the Bulldogs prepared to face Southeastern Conference rival South Carolina — a game they would eventually lose 35-7. Bennett was tied up in a block when a defensive teammate twisted his body in a strange direction. “When he did that, my next step I knew was going to be kind of weird,” Bennett said. “When I tried to catch my balance with my right foot, I put my heel down and my leg was just straight — no bend in it. I just heard two pops. And instant pain.” But the pain subsided and Bennett ended up walking off the field under his own power. “I thought I was fine,” he said. “It was at the end of practice, so I was like, well at least practice is over.” But the training staff performed a quick stability test that suggested something more serious. “I didn’t really believe him,” Bennett said. “Because I walked off the field. Honestly, I was getting a little emotional when he told me that, but in my mind I was going, ‘It’s not torn. Let’s just get this MRI over with and show it’s fine.’” The MRI confirmed the trainer’s suspicions later that evening. As his teammates suffered their first loss of the season to South Carolina a few days later, Bennett was stuck on the couch yelling at the TV with his dad. “It’s very frustrating; very, very frustrating to watch my team out there,” Bennett said. “That South Carolina game was bad. They needed a lot more than me out there.” Things didn’t get much easier when the Bulldogs won their next two games, including one against rival Florida. Now, Bennett was missing out on all the fun. “I think when we stop playing games and the season is over it’ll be a lot easier for me because right now I’m just chomping at the bit to get out there,” he said. “But it’s just not going to happen.”. Bennett expects to be back on the field by the time spring practices start. He won’t participate in contact drills, but he’ll be able to ease back into things by running routes and working more closely with teammates.

search: Bennett ››


search keywords on our website and twitter ››

Thursday, November 8, 2012

SPORTS

15

‘Cinco’ knows language of football Sophomore corner Swann strong at forcing turnovers BY RYAN BLACK The Red & Black “Cinco” doesn’t speak Spanish. Damian Swann, known as “Cinco” to his Georgia coaches and teammates due to the lone numeral on his jersey, has never taken a Spanish class. Instead, French was the foreign tongue he decided to tackle. “I’ve done decent,” he said. “Not great, but decent.” His satisfactory level of French and his lack of Spanish aside, the Bulldogs only care about Swann mastering one language: football. Specifically, defensive coordinator Todd Grantham’s 3-4 scheme. And to hear Swann’s teammates and coaches tell it, it’s a book the sophomore defensive back can recite by rote. “He’s smart, just a smart football player,” said Malcolm Mitchell, Swann’s stated “best friend” and fellow sophomore. “Sometimes he knows the play before it happens. He can call it exactly the way it is.” Swann’s near-memorization of the playbook was to Mitchell’s benefit when he was forced to make the switch from wide receiver to cornerback this spring. Swann knew everything, and did his best to pass his expertise to Mitchell. Many times, Mitchell didn’t even ask for it. “He had the answers. He knew,” Mitchell said. “He probably knows every position in the secondary, even the safeties.” Swann’s position coach, Scott Lakatos, has seen many of the same things Mitchell attested to, praising Swann’s “football I.Q.” Lakatos said Swann was always aware of what was going on around him, and did a good job communicating things to his teammates. “He’s put a lot into improving himself physically in the offseason to be able to do those types of things,” Lakatos said. “He just works at the game.” The Atlanta native’s hard work and attention to detail has paid off. After appearing in 11 games last year and being named the defense’s most improved player in the spring, Swann has played at a high level this fall. He has started every game at the nickel corner for the Bulldogs and made his presence felt the last two weeks in victories over Florida and Ole Miss, respectively. In the 17-9 win over the Gators, Swann nabbed his second interception of 2012 and returned it 15 yards. He felt he could have gone a lot farther, though. “The stumble, I think the stumble got me,” he said. “If I could have just kept my feet and kept running, I think I would taken it to the house.” Along with the interception, he also had a sack and a forced fumble against Florida. He followed that performance up against Ole Miss, recovering two fumbles and notching another sack. Swann played well enough that he even caught the eye of Georgia head coach Mark Richt. “We’ve always believed Damian was going to be an outstanding player for us,” Richt said in his postgame press conference. “He plays a lot in the nickel but he’s very capable of playing a wide corner as well ... He really helped himself physically to play the nickel, because you’ve got to do some run support there.” Lauding Swann in run support doesn’t do his season justice, however, as he is tied for the team lead in interceptions (two) and is tops in return yardage (15) on those pair of pilfers.

Tracking the trajectory of the ball is second nature to Swann, after all. It’s a skill Swann perfected during his baseball career, mostly in center field. Though he played four sports at Grady High School — baseball, basketball, football and track — his love for the diamond means it’s still his “favorite.” Swann even had the opportunity to play for the Diamond Dogs when he arrived in Athens, recruited by Georgia assistant coach Jason Eller. If he wanted to play, there was a roster spot waiting for him. But when Swann assessed his options, he felt he couldn’t do it. The decision was made — he gave up the sport he had so much passion for. “It would be nonstop,” Swann said of the two - sport grind. “Baseball is going on right now, leading up to their season, so as soon as I finish with football, I’d have to jump right into baseball. I felt like I

would need some type of break. At this point in your life, you can’t just keep going and going. You have to take a break at some point.” Being able to take a football-only approach has helped Swann ascend to where he is now, the lone underclassman who has locked down a starting spot on defense in every game. But as big a factor as he has been this year, Swann knows his importance will only continue to grow in future campaigns. “Coming up, I’ve always taken on that leadership role and I’ve always been one of the guys that was considered a leader on my team, whether it was basketball, baseball, football,” he said. “I think that being a leader is going to come natural for me.” Lakatos agreed. Give Swann the rest of the year and another offseason of seasoning, and he could be great. “The cupboard is still bare,” Lakatos said.

“He’s got a lot of football still to learn, and he’s going to turn out to be really special if he continues to work.” Lakatos is the person who spearheaded the “Cinco” nickname. Swann wore No. 1 in high school, taking after Morgan Burnette, who Swann’s older brother played with at North Clayton High School. Burnette, who went to Georgia Tech and is now a safety for the Green Bay Packers, referred to himself as “Uno” in high school and college. Swann did the same, donning No. 1 at Grady, but ran into an obstacle with the Bulldogs. Jersey No. 1 was already accounted for. So No. 5 it was. “’Coach Lak’ [Lakatos] was like, ‘Man, you’re not No. 1 anymore. Guess we’re going to have to call you ‘Cinco’ now,’” Swann said. “And ever since then, the majority of the team calls me that.” Even though Swann said he started going by “Uno” well before the

★ ★ Receive push notifications to your mobile device when new deals are made available by our great local merchants. Make sure to turn Push Notification - Offers ON under the MORE menu of our app.

Georgia cornerback Damian Swann has forced two sacks and two interceptions in the last two games, fortifying Georgia's defense. EVAN STICHLER/Staff NFL’s Chad Johnson changed his last name to “Ochocinco,” he admitted the former Pro Bowl wide receiver had an advantage he couldn’t match. “He changed [his name] legally,” Swann said, “so he’d probably

get the credit for the idea.” Not that it bothers Swann. "I'm not going to be No. 5 forever," he said. "So I won't be changing my name."

search: swann ››


Athens Area Businesses, Clubs & Organizations, and UGA Departments • Art Shows • Concerts • Fund Raisers • Volunteer Opportunities • Activities

We want your events! Make an account Create an event Hit submit—DONE! The community wants to know. Make your audience aware.

NEW Online Event Calendar! redandblack.com/calendar/


Thursday, November 8, 2012

search keywords on our website and twitter ››

SPORTS

17

Club sports chug along without fields BY ELIZABETH HOWARD The Red & Black

Keith Keppner took the advice of his father, Doc, in becoming a boxing coach and using psychology to help his pupils. Courtesy Keith Keppner

Local boxing coach emulates famous father BY ALEX URBAN The Red & Black If you talk with Athens-native and professional boxing coach Keith Keppner for five minutes, you’ll quickly realize that boxing runs in his blood. Keppner is the owner and coach at Keppner Boxing on the west side of Athens, a new gym that he hopes will attract not only professionals but also average people looking to get in better shape. For Keppner, boxing is a way of life, and is a sport he always had close ties to because his father, Doc Keppner, was a professional boxing coach himself, as well as a cut man. “A lot of people around Athens know my father,” Keppner said. “Basically, for anyone who has boxed in Athens he has worked with them or has worked the corner for them.” Doc’s pedigree in the sport of boxing is top-notch. He was mentored by legendary coach Chuck Bodak, who coached Muhammad Ali for over three years and worked as a cut man for Oscar De La Hoya. Growing up with a boxing coach for a father, it is easy to assume that Keppner always aspired to be a boxer, but he didn’t pursue the sport seriously until he was 17 years old because he was more interested in art and music. “I was very artistic, and everyone would say that I was a great artist, but my dad would always say ‘Keith is going to be welterweight champion of the world,’” Keith said. “I was always very neutral to that, but boxing did have this allure.” Boxing remained in the back of Keith’s mind, and when he reached his late teens, his passion for it grew tremendously. Part of the reason he took up the sport seriously was to help with his health — Keith contracted lyme disease at a young age and went undiagnosed for several

years, leading to a long trial of antibiotic treatment. Once Keith decided he was serious about gaining his strength back and improving his health, boxing was the natural choice since it was right in his backyard. Keith’s own experience is one of the reasons he believes boxing is one of the best ways to achieve better fitness and overall health. “Boxing is physically difficult, so to be physically successful, you have to live a healthy life,” Keith said. As Keith got older, he decided boxing was something he wanted to make into a career, and he spent two years in Mexico training with his father, before injury forced him to retire in 2010. A neck injury sustained during weight lifting caused neurological problems and Keith decided it wasn’t worth the possibility of being paralyzed to continue his dream of becoming a professional boxer. He decided to channel his experience and hardship into coaching others in the sport he loves so much. “Because of my struggles with boxing, especially in the beginning, I am more equipped to help people through their problems,” Keith said. “I have compassion for both my professionals when they lose fights and my recreational boxers when they are struggling.” Keith considers himself uniquely skilled as a coach, having grown up with a father who was not just a boxing coach, but also a renowned clinical psychologist. He said Doc's influence helps him understand the mental aspect of the sport more than most coaches and makes him more empathetic. “I push people, but everybody is at a certain level," Keith said, "and just because someone can’t do something isn’t necessarily because of a lack of will."

search: boxing ››

University club sports give students the competitive collegiate experience, but some teams are faced with the challenge of finding a place to practice. Many club sports, including rowing, sailing, hockey, aquatics and baseball, are considered offcampus club sports because the University does not provide a practice facility for the teams. These teams must overcome financial obstacles to pay for facilities. “I hate to say it but it is a common theme in many of our off-campus clubs, but I am very honored to work with students that work so hard to keep their clubs going despite those challenges,” said Emmie Gooch, the University’s club sports coordinator. The sailing team practices at Sandy Creek Park, and keeps a boat stored there. However, it costs players every time they want to enter the park to sail. Ben Hicks, the racing captain, said the team members have to pay $2 a day. The club rowing team practices at Fort Yargo and is a nonprofit organization. The rowers own their own boathouse, a fleet of boats and handle security on their own, Gooch said. But rowing captain Will Hedgpeth, a senior sociology major from Fort Valley, said the one-hour drive was inconvenient. The club baseball team is being forced to field-hop after being displaced from its usual practice fields. The team has previously played on Holland Field for free, but the complex is now demanding a contract and payment. Head coach Tyler Jones, a senior, said the team has also played at Smith Field, but now it’s closing down. Scott “Fish” Haddock said the team was limited in its practice options due to the changes. “Last year we could practice every day and we could get a full team practice and this year is hard to do that because the fields are not ideal,” Haddock said. “We can’t work on double plays and things you need to do."

search: club ››

Coaches, players sound off on ‘true sport’ cheerleading BY KRISTIN MILLER The Red & Black The American Academy of Pediatrics released a statement outlining the concern about increased injuries in cheerleading and ways to prevent them from becoming more serious. But Georgia coaches and cheerleaders are not worried about the heightened concerns because cheerleading is already taken seriously. “We are treated like a sport here at UGA with our own sports medicine staff and team doctors,” Georgia Spirit Coordinator Ben O’Brien said. “UGA does a good job making sure we are taken care of in terms of safety.” The AAP stressed that in the past 30 years, cheerleading has increased both in popularity and complexity. Cheerleading has mobilized from sideline cheering to center court stunts. “People hear cheerleader and automatically think pom-poms, which is the basis of what we do,” O’Brien said. “Our first role is to be a support squad for the teams we cheer for, but we are also ath-

letes. We practice several days a week, compete in April for a National Championship and work just as hard as other sports.” As cheerleading has shifted to more complex stunts and routines, injuries have been on the rise. “The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission reported 4954 hospital emergency department visits for cheerleading injuries in 1980,” according to the policy statement released by the AAP. “By 2007, the Consumer Product Safety Commission reported this number had climbed more than 400 percent to 26,786.” When asked about serious injuries the Georgia squad has suffered in the past senior cheerleading captain Stephanie Ross said she was not allowed to comment on injuries. O’Brien was able to comment on Georgia’s injury report. “We have not had any extremely serious injuries,” O’Brien said. “We have a training staff and our own trainer. Kids go in and get rehab just like any other sport.”

search: cheerleading ››

The baseball team has trouble practicing with trash cans and bleachers on the field. ELIZABETH HOWARD/Staff

www.fcs.uga.edu 112 Dawson Hall, 706-542-4847

...Your Career Starts Here... OPEN LATE NIGHT!

FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS UNTIL 3 AM! $4.50 LATE NIGHT CHICKEN PLATE FULL SUSHI MENU AVAILABLE 259 E Broad St. Downtown grilledteriyakiathens.com

Enjoy 80 years of Tradition, again.

BBQ • CATFISH • SOUL FOOD Store Hours: Monday to Friday: 11am to 7pm Sunday: 11am to 4pm

Christmas Design Showcase On Stage Live Arrangements by Dean Pannell November 10th 10am - 12pm

North Oconee H.S. Auditorium $20 per ticket Sponsored by the Oconee County Chamber of Commerce

$2 o c Ta sday e Tu

NFL SUNDAY TICKET (1:00)

Watch all the games and follow your fantasy football league with free Wi-Fi and laptop hook-ups at every table in the BBR

Brewers Inquisition Live Trivia Sunday 7:00

off 10% alid v with e I.D. g e l Col unday on S

Where It’s Always Saturday in Athens

For all your game day needs, gifts and clothing

Mention this ad and get 10% OFF Any One Item

Georgia coaches and cheerleaders said cheerleading is already taken seriously. TAYLOR SUTTON/Staff

HOW ABOUT THEM DAWGS!!! $10 $5 OFF ANY

SERVICE $20 OR MORE w/student ID

OFF ANY CAR WASH $10 OR MORE

✪ Clean Towels and Glass Cleaner available for our Express Exterior customers!

✪ Locally owned and operated. 20 years experience in the carwash industry. ✪ $3 Express Wash on Game Day! ✪ Free Self-Serve Vacuums! 2375 W. Broad St. (across from Arby’s) • Hours of operation: Monday-Saturday 8-6, Sunday 10-5 www.3minutecarwashdetail.com

WESTSIDE: 1550 OGLETHORPE AVE. 706-549-5112 DOWNTOWN: VOTED ATHENS’ DOWNTOWN: 145 E. CLAYTON STREET THURSDAY-SATURDAYFAVORITE TILL 2AMLOCAL PIZZA! 706-613-8773


18

SPORTS

Thursday, November 8, 2012

The Red & Black

KNOW THE SCORE

VOLLEYBALL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

FOOTBALL

BCS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

Alabama (9-0) .9957 Kansas State (9-0) .9318 Oregon (9-0) .9166 Notre Dame (9-0) .9050 Georgia (8-1) .8171 Florida (8-1) .7863 LSU )7-2) .7054 South Carolina (7-2) .6206 Louisville (9-0) .6040 Florida State (8-1) .5969 Oregon State (7-1) .5965 Oklahoma (6-2) .5812 Clemson (8-1) .5772 Stanford (7-2) .5086 Texas A&M (7-2) .5060 Nebraska (7-2) .3976 Texas (7-2) .3593 UCLA (7-2) .2533 USC (6-3) .1706 Louisiana Tech (8-1) .1584 Miss. State (7-2) .1453 Texas Tech (6-3) .1422 Rutgers (7-1) .1214 Northwestern (7-2) .0962 Toledo (8-1) .0796

9-0 9-0 9-0 9-0 10-0 8-1 8-1 8-1 7-2 8-1 9-0 7-2 7-1 6-2 7-2 7-2 7-2 7-2 8-1 7-2 6-3 7-2 8-1 7-1 6-3

Others receiving votes: N. Illinois 64, Kent State 61, Michigan 53, TCU 38, Northwestern 32, Oklahoma St. 27, Ohio 22, UCF 15, Boise St. 11, Washington 9, Penn State 8, San Diego State 7, Tulsa 6, Arizona 5, Utah State 4, Fresno State 2.

Georgia Schedule vs. Buffalo @ Missouri vs. FAU vs. Vanderbilt vs. Tennessee @ So. Caro. @ Kentucky vs. Florida vs. Ole Miss @ Auburn vs. Ga. South. vs. Ga. Tech

Sept. 1 Sept. 8 Sept. 15 Sept. 22 Sept. 29 Oct. 6 Oct. 20 Oct. 27 Nov. 3 Nov. 10 Nov. 17 Nov. 24

45-23 W 41-20 W 56-20 W 48-3 W 51-44 W 35-7 L 29-24 W 17-9 W 37-10W 7 p.m. 1:30 p.m. TBD

SEC Schedule, Oct. 20 Arkansas at No. 7 South Carolina Lousiana-Lafayette at No. 6 Florida Missouri at Tennessee No. 15 Texas A&M at No. 1 Alabama No. 21 Mississippi State at No. 7 LSU Vanderbilt at Ole Miss Matchups of the Week No. 11 Oregon State at No. 14 Stanford No. 24 Northwestern at Michigan Penn State at No. 16 Nebraska SEC Standings Conference Overall East W L W L Georgia 6 1 8 1 Florida 6 1 7 1 South Carolina 5 2 7 2 Vanderbilt 3 3 5 4 Missouri 1 5 4 5 Tennessee 0 5 4 5 Kentucky 0 7 1 9 West Alabama Texas A&M LSU Miss. State Mississippi Arkansas A uburn

W 6 4 3 3 2 2 0

L 0 2 2 2 3 3 6

W 9 7 7 7 5 4 2

L 0 2 2 2 4 5 7

For weekly practice reports and updates search: football ››

NSCAA Coaches Poll 22-2 23-2 20-3 20-3 19-4 18-5 21-2 22-4 18-5 20-5 23-3 22-4 22-3 23-2 18-8 19-4 20-4 28-3 18-5 15-7 18-7 21-4 20-5 18-8 22-3

verall O East W L W L Florida 13 1 19 4 Kentucky 11 4 17 8 Tennessee 10 4 17 6 Missouri 8 6 16 8 Georgia 7 7 13 11 South Carolina 3 12 15 12 West W Texas A&M 11 Arkansas 9 Auburn 8 LSU 7 Ole Miss 4 Alabama 4 Mississippi St. 0

AP Top 25 Poll Alabama (60) Oregon Kansas State Notre Dame Ohio State Georgia Florida Florida State LSU Clemson Louisville South Carolina Oregon State Oklahoma Texas A&M Stanford UCLA Nebraska Louisiana Tech Texas USC Mississippi State Toledo Rutgers Texas Tech

Stanford (60) Penn State Texas Oregon Washington UCLA Hawaii USC Nebraska Minnesota Louisville Dayton Florida State BYU Ohio State Florida Kansas State Western Kentucky San Diego Iowa State Purdue North Carolina Kansas Pepperdine Creighton SEC Standings

Team percentages are derived by dividing a team's actual voting points by a maximum 2850 possible points in the Harris Interactive Poll and 1575 possible points in the USA Today Coaches Poll. Week 8 is the first week of the BCS Poll. The top two spots will determine which teams will play in the BCS Championship Game.

1 2 3 4 5 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 21 22 23 24 25

SOCCER

AVCA Coaches Poll

The Georgia equestrian team, the top-ranked team in the country, fell to No. 2 South Carolina 11-8 at the UGA Equestrian Complex. But the Bulldogs' difficult schedule won't let down, with No. 3 Auburn up next. Jennifer wilson/Staff NCAA Stat Leaders

SEC Stat Leaders

Passing Efficiency Rating

Passing Efficiency Rating

1. Collin Klein (KSST) 174.4 2. E.J. Manuel (FLST) 174.0 3. A.J. McCarron (AL) 173.5 4. Tajh Boyd (CLEM) 170.2 5. Teddy Bridgewater (LOU) 170.0 6. Aaron Murray (UGA) 168.9 7. Marcus Mariota (OR) 168.5 8. David Fales (SJST) 165.7 9. Nick Florence (BAY) 165.5 10. J.W. Walsh (OKST) 163.8 11. Matt Barkley (SCA) 163.3 12. Geno Smith (WV) 162.9 13. Colby Cameron (LATECH) 162.5 14. Kawaun Jakes (WKY) 161.1 15. Tino Sunseri (PITT) 160.3

1. AJ McCarron (ALA) 173.5 2. Aaron Murray (UGA) 168.9 3. Connor Shaw (SC) 155.0 4. Tyler Wilson (ARK) 149.8 5. Johnny Manziel (TA&M) 149.5 6. Tyler Bray (TENN) 149.3 7. Bo Wallace (MISS) 140.2 8. Tyler Russel (MSST) 139.8 9. Dylan Thomson (SC)136.0 10. Jeff Driskel (FLA) 134.8 11. Jordan Rodgers (VAN) 135.0 12. Z. Mettenberger (LSU)128.2 13. James Franklin (VAN) 107.8 14. Kiehl Frazier (AUB) 100.7 15. C. Berkstresser (MIZZ)93.5

Passing Yards

Passing Yards 1. Tyler Bray (TENN) 2812 2. Johnny Manziel (TA&M)2527 3. Tyler Wilson (ARK) 2526 4. Aaron Murray (UGA) 2448 5. Tyler Russell (MSST) 1954 6. AJ McCarron (ALA) 1849 7. Bo Wallace (MISS) 1836 9. Zach Mettenberger (LSU)1717 8. Jordan Rodgers (VAN)1458 10. Connor Shaw (SCAR)1338 11. Jeff Driskel (FLA) 1226 13. James Franklin (MIZZ)1057 12. Maxwell Smith (UK) 975 14. Kiehl Frazier (AUB) 753 15. C. Berkstresser (MIZZ)698

1. Rakeem Cato (MARSH)3290 2. Derek Carr (FREST) 3070 3. Nick Florence (BAY) 3019 4. Dalton Williams (AKR) 3003 5. Colby Cameron (LATECH)2946 6. Seth Doege (TXTECH) 2869 7. David Fales (SJST) 2850 8. Matt Scott (AZ) 2848 9. Tyler Bray (TN) 2812 10. David Piland (HOU) 2779 11. Ryan Nassib (SYR) 2773 12. Matt Barkley (SCA) 2750 13. Tajh Boyd (CLEM) 2680 14. Geno Smith (WV) 2677 15. Chuckie Keeton (UTST) 2671 Rushing Yards-Per-Carry 1. Dri Archer (KENT) 9.2 2. De'Anthony Thomas (OR)8.3 3. Ja'Terian Douglas (TLS)7.7 4. Chris Thompson (FLST)7.5 5. Cole Gautsche (NM) 7.5 6. Giovani Bernard (NC) 7.4 7. Jordan Lynch (NIL) 7.3 8. Kenjon Barner (OR) 7.2 9. Bronson Hill (EMI) 7.2 10. Denard Robinson (MI)7.2 11. Latavius Murray (CFL)7.2 12. Lindsey Lamar (SFL) 7.2 13. Gee Gee Greene (NAVY)7.1 14. Cody Getz (AF) 7.0 15. T.J. Yeldon (AL) 7.0 Rushing Yards 1. Jordan Lynch (NIL) 1342 2. Stefphon Jefferson (NV)1341 3. Kenjon Barner (OR) 1295 4. Le'Veon Bell (MIST) 1249 5. Johnathan Franklin (UCLA)1204 6. David Fluellen (TOL) 1181 7. Braxton Miller (OHST) 1166 8. Kasey Carrier (NM) 1156 9. Robbie Rouse (FREST) 1101 10. Beau Blankenship (OH)1097 11. Venric Mark (NWEST) 1077

Come in for Thirsty Thursdays!!

$1 Sam Adams ALL NIGHT LONG!

Just one of our many amazing specials! 166 East Clayton Street

Rushing Yards-Per-Carry 1. T.J. Yeldon (ALA) 7.0 2. Johnny Manziel (TA&M) 6.7 3. Ben Malena (TA&M) 6.6 4. Todd Gurley (UGA) 6.2 5. Keith Marshall (UGA) 6.1 6. Michael Ford (LSU) 5.9 Kenny Hilliard (LSU) 5.9 8. Dennis Johnson (ARK)5.7 9. Eddie Lacy (ALA) 5.7 10. Tre Mason (AUB) 5.6 Jeremy Hills (LSU) 5.6 12. LaDarius Perkins (MSST)5.3 Zac Stacy (VU) 5.3 14. Raymond Sanders (UK) 5.2 15. Jeff Scott (MISS) 5.0 Rushing Yards 1. Johnny Manziel (TA&M) 922 2. Todd Gurley (UGA) 857 3. LaDarius Perkins (MSST)804 4. Mike Gillislee (FLA) 797 5. Zac Stacy (VAN) 752 6. T.J. Yeldon (ALA) 725 7. Tre Mason (AUB) 706 8. Eddie Lacy (ALA) 679 9. Kendial Lawrence (MIZZ)666 10. Marcus Lattimore (SCAR)662 11. Ben Malena (TA&M)637 12. Jeff Scott (MISS) 633 13. Dennis Johnson (ARK) 598 14. Rajion Neal (TENN) 532 15. Keith Marshall (UGA)520

Men's Basketball Schedule Opponent Date Time Young Harris EX 11/02 7 p.m. Jacksonville 11/09 7 p.m. Youngstown State 11/12 7 p.m. Southern Miss 11/15 8 p.m. Indiana 11/19 5:30 p.m. UCLA/Georgetown 11/20 7:30/10 p.m. East Tenn. St. 11/23 7 p.m. @South Florida 11/30 7 p.m. @Georgia Tech 12/04 7 p.m. Iona 12/15 5 p.m. Mercer 12/18 TBA Southern Call 12/22 1:30 p.m. Florida A&M 12/29 4 p.m. Georgia Washington 1/04 7 p.m. @ Florida 1/09 7 p.m. Miss. St. 1/12 1:45 p.m. @Missouri 1/16 8 p.m. LSU 1/19 8 p.m. Florida 1/23 8 p.m. @Texas A&M 1/26 6 p.m. Auburn 1/30 7 p.m. @South Carolina 2/02 1:45 p.m.

WOMen's Basketball Schedule

Opponent Date Time Rutgers 11/11 2 p.m. Presbyterian 11/14 7 p.m. S. Carolina State 11/16 7 p.m. Belmont 11/18 2 p.m. Savannah State 11/20 7 p.m. St. Bonaventure 11/23 5:30 p.m. New Mexico/N. Texas11/24 7/9 p.m. Furman 11/28 7 p.m. @Georgia Tech 12/02 2 p.m. Mercer 12/04 7 p.m. Lipscomb 12/16 2 p.m. @TCU 12/19 8 p.m. @Illinois 12/28 8 p.m. Missouri 1/03 7 p.m. @ Tennessee 1/06 1 p.m. @Alabama 1/10 9 p.m. South Carolina 1/13 1 p.m. @Arkansas 1/17 8 p.m. Texas A&M 1/20 5 p.m. Florida 1/27 1 p.m. Alabama 1/31 7 p.m. @Kentucky 2/03 2 p.m. Auburn 2/07 7 p.m. @LSU 2/10 1:30 p.m. @Florida 2/17 1 p.m. Arkansas 2/21 7 p.m. @Ole Miss 2/24 2 p.m. @Miss. St. 2/28 8 p.m. Vanderbilt 3/03 1:30 p.m.

For weekly practice reports and updates search: Landers ››

L 4 6 7 8 10 11 15

W 19 18 17 11 10 15 4

L 5 8 8 13 13 12 20

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

Stanford (33) UCLA Penn State BYU Florida State San Diego State Virginia Wake Forest Maryland Florida North Carolina Texas A&M Georgetown Baylor Marquette Duke West Virginia Santa Clara Tennessee UCF Ohio State Pepperdine California Virginia Tech Notre Dame

16-1-1 15-1-2 16-2-1 16-1-1 16-2-0 17-1-1 14-4-1 13-4-3 12-5-1 14-4-1 11-4-2 16-3-1 15-2-2 14-1-4 14-2-2 12-5-1 11-3-4 10-3-5 14-4-2 14-4-1 13-4-1 13-5-0 15-4-0 13-5-1 13-4-2

SEC Standings Overall ast E W L-Tie W L-Tie Florida 11 2-0 17 4-1 Tennessee 9 3-1 4 4-3 Kentucky 8 4-1 13 6-1 Missouri 8 5-0 14 7-0 South Carolina 3 7-3 7 10-4 Georgia 3 8-2 7 11-2 Vanderbilt 2 7-4 5 10-5 West Texas A&M Auburn Arkansas LSU Ole Miss Alabama Mississippi St.

W L-Tie 10 2-1 7 6-0 6 6-1 5 6-2 5 8-0 3 8-2 2 10-1

W 17 12 9 9 13 8 9

Player of the Week

Player of the Week

Jasmine Eatmon

Ashley Baker

Schedule Opponent Date Score Georgia Southern 8/24 3-1 W Troy 8/25 3-0 W Georgia State 8/26 3-0 W Slovenia 8/26 3-0 L Fla. International 8/31 3-0 W Florida A&M 8/31 3-0 W @ Florida State 9/01 3-1 L Albany 9/07 3-1 W IPFW 9/08 3-1 L @ Michigan State 9/08 3-0 L @ South Carolina 9/14 3-0 L @ Miss. State 9/16 3-1 W Alabama 9/21 3-2 W Arkansas 9/23 3-0 L @ Missouri 9/30 3-0 L @ LSU 10/03 3-2 W @ Tennessee 10/07 3-2 L Auburn 10/12 3-0 W Ole Miss 10/14 3-2 W Georgia Tech 10/16 3-1 L @ Alabama 10/21 3-0 W Missouri 10/24 3-0 W Kentucky 10/28 3-2 L @ Florida 11/02 3-0 L @ Auburn 11/04 3-1 L 11/09 7 p.m. LSU Texas A&M 11/11 2 p.m. @ Arkansas 11/16 8 p.m. @ Kentucky 11/18 1:30 p.m. @ Miss. State 11/21 5 p.m. @ Florida 11/23 7 p.m.

L-Tie 4-1 10-0 10-1 8-4 9-0 9-2 10-1

Schedule Opponent Date UNC Greensboro 8/17 Furman 8/19 @ Kansas 8/24 South Dakota St. 8/26 South Florida 8/31 9/02 @ UCF New Mexico 9/07 Vanderbilt 9/14 Arkansas 9/16 @ Alabama 9/21 @ Florida 9/23 Missouri 9/28 LSU 9/30 @ Ole Miss 10/05 @ South Carolina 10/07 10/12 Auburn Kentucky 10/14 @ Mississippi State 10/19 @ Texas A&M 10/21 @ Tennessee 10/25

Score 1-0 W 2-1 W 1-0 L 5-0 W 2-1 W 1-0 L 2-0 L 0-0 Tie 2-0 W 2-1 L 4-1 L 2-1 L 2-2 Tie 2-0 W 1-0 L 1-0 L 1-0 L 3-0 W 1-0 L 3-2 L

For weekly practice reports and updates search: soccer ››

A Look Back

A Look Back

After their loss to the Wildcats, things began to unravel for the Bulldogs. Travelling to both Florida and Auburn, the Bulldogs lost both matches 3-0 and 3-1, respectively. They hope to turn their luck around with back to back home games against SEC opponents.

Playing with a chance to go to the SEC Championships, the Bulldogs came up short in a 3-2 loss at Tennessee. One bright spot for the Bulldogs is that junior defender Torri Allen was named to the All-SEC second team.

MEN'S TENNIS

WOMEN'S TENNIS

Player of the Week

Player of the Week

KU Singh

Maho Kowase

A Look Back

Singh leads a group of three Bulldogs into the USTA/ITA National Indoor Championships in New York. He is the only Bulldog competing in the singles competition.

A Look Back

Kowase represented the Bulldogs this weekend in the finals at the USTA Collegiate Invitational Shoot-out Tournament but lost 10-4 to a USTA junior opponent.


Thursday, November 8, 2012

search keywords on our website and twitter ››

SPORTS

19

Players miss out on election

Football players embrace studies, diverse majors

BY NICHOLAS FOURIEZOS The Red & Black

It’s easy to dismiss the student aspect of the student-athlete equation, but Georgia football players make time for education. “People are going to know names that play football, but they’re not going to hire you if you don’t have a degree,” said offensive lineman Watts Dantzler, a sophomore health and physical education major from Dalton. What most players have focused on is business. Of 121 football players on the roster, more than 30 have business-related majors both in and out of the Terry College of Business. And it makes sense, said Terry’s Director of Assessment Myra Moore, that athletes want to have a background in business. “Those students [who go into professional athletics] essentially become entrepreneurs. What they’re selling is their talent,” Moore said. Fullback Quayvon Hicks, a freshman pre-business major, said business runs in his family. He wants to be successful and “wear the suits.”

The Georgia football team has trouble getting to the polls. Wide receiver Rhett McGowan said the hectic schedule of a student-athlete makes it difficult to keep up. “It prevents us from knowing what’s going on,” McGowan said. “I don’t know as much as I used to.” Linebacker Amarlo Herrera agreed that he didn’t expect a large voting turnout from the football. “I don’t know who voted on the team,” Herrera said. “You can watch the debates. You have time. You can watch TV.” Senior wide receiver Tavarres King said he didn’t vote as well, due to time constraints. The players who were interested in politics varied, though their intelligence in such matters was called into question by King. “A few guys are into politics, but some don’t know what they’re talking about,” he said. He did notice that one position unit in particular joined the political discussion. “Definitely the whole offensive line,” King said. “They come into the locker room [and talk about politics].” Wide receiver Malcolm Mitchell said that he was planning on voting. While none of the players said which candidate they preferred, McGowan did say there were certain attributes he appreciated in the incumbent, President Barack Obama. Obama has expressed his interest in college sports often, which has both Herrera and McGowan paying their due respect to the “athlete”-in-chief. “He’s a North Carolina fan and I think he’s a very good basketball player,”

Wide receiver Rhett McGowan said it was difficult for football players to vote on Election Day because players often don't have time to stay informed. WES BLANKENSHIP/Staff McGowan said. “I heard he was playing yesterday or something.” It is an annual tradition for the NCAA Championship team to visit the president at the White House. McGowan said he hoped Georgia, currently ranked No. 5 in the BCS rankings, would be that team. And if Obama happened to win the election, he might see some stiff competition

from some of the Georgia football players. “If Obama is there, we probably will [ask him to play],” McGowan said. “We would definitely have some people challenging him. It would be a great experience to visit the White House and meet the president.”

— Maria Torres

search: McGowan ››

search: majors ››

Dawgs off the leash: Isner ousted, Bailey gets interception BY LUKE DIXON The Red & Black

Former Bulldog John Isner fell in the BNP Parbias Masters tournament 6-4, 7-6. ERIN O. SMITH/Staff

After a bye in the first round, former Bulldog tennis star John Isner was knocked out of the BNP Paribas Masters tournament by France’s Michael Llodra, in straight sets (6-4, 7-6). Isner was unable to recover after giving up a break in the first game, as Llodra quickly grabbed a two-game lead in the opening set. Llodra held serve, not allowing Isner to break him back to take the first set, 6-4. In the second set, both players held serve, forcing a tie breaker at 6-6. Llodra was

able to grab a break in the decisive game and held serve to end No. 10 Isner’s chance of qualifying for this year’s ATP World Tour Finals. In comeback effort, Bailey’s Broncos win over Green & Atkins’ Bengals In a back-and-forth affair in Cincinnati, the Broncos earned their third straight victory, 31-23, over the Bengals. Former Bulldog defensive back Champ Bailey’s first interception of the season was key, late in the final quarter. Bailey got under a the

errant pass that was intended for another former Bulldog in wideout, A.J. Green. The pick halted the Bengals’ potential response as Denver grabbed the lead back. Despite being under thrown on one occasion, Green led Cincinnati in receptions with seven catches for 99-yards. He also extended his touchdown catch streak to seven. His third quarter touchdown brought the Bengals to within three of the Broncos. The score was also the start of 17 unanswered points for Cincinnati, through the second and third quarters.

Watch the game on one of our big screens!

Watson to play in Thailand next month Bubba Watson, the 2012 Masters Champion and a Georgia golf alum, announced he will be heading east next month to compete in the Thailand Golf Championship. Watson, who has yet to win a tournament internationally, will attempt to break that trend and snap his eight month win-less streak. The first round is slated to begin Dec. 6.

search: Isner ››

Terry believes business is part of the community. Major in

Management Information Systems It’s more than technology...

Beer and Margarita Specials!

www.terry.uga.edu/mis

Downtown Location - Open Late thetacostand.com | facebook.com/TheTStand LOCALLY OWNED SINCE 1977

CLASSIFIEDS DISCLAIMER The Red & Black does not verify, investigate, or endorse any classified ad. Readers are urged to use caution when responding to an ad.

AUTO 1994 Nissan Maxima GXE, V/6 Engine, Automaticic Trans, 4Door, 163K Miles, Replaced Timing Belt, Water Pump, Fuel Injectors, Front Brakes, Power Steering Hose. $2600. (706)3804416 No Calls After 9:00PM EST.

EMPLOYMENT

Watkinsville Watkinsville family looking for a French tutor tutor33days daysa week forfor a 17 a week a 17year yearold. old. Please respond to dillard@aol.com

or call (706) 340-0710.

Inoko Japanese Steakhouse is now hiring servers/hosts. Experience preferred but not required. Must be able to work through breaks. Please apply in person at 161 Alps Road, Mon-Thurs, 4:30-5:30pm.

FOR SALE

Looking for an evening tutor for my 4th and 6th grade students. Must be willing to tutor our kids at our home. Pay negotiable. Contact Rani (706) 461-0525.

Basic Kindle with red cover w/ reading light. Like new. $50. meganab@uga.edu 678-920-1078.

Seeking fun, self-motivated tanning tech to assist female clients. Very flexible: the more you do, the more you make! Great student job! Serious inquiries only. Send letter to borntobebronzed@gmail.com.

The Terraces at Whitehall: New luxury student apartments coming summer 2013. Preleasing now! Call Carriage House Realty at 706-353-1750 for more information.

Students! Get paid for spotting typographical errors online! There are billions of dollars up for grabs. www.TypoBounty.com. Get your free account now! Athens Little Playhouse Children's Theatre is accepting resumes for public relations internship. Position includes stipend. Send resume and introduction letter to athenslittleplayhouse@ gmail.com. Deadline: 11-23-12. Part-time Gymnastics Team Coach at YMCA in Clarkesville. Must have knowledge of USAG/ AAU routines. Compensation based on experience. Send resume to Kaitlin Worthington. Kaitlin.worthington@gmail.com. 706-839-1431.

EVENTS Haven't found a major that fits? Check out the College of Ag. and Env. Sciences at Major Madness on Nov. 14, 10:30a.m. 3p.m., outside Conner Hall!

HOUSING

2BR 1BA dplx off Cedar Shoals Dr. Fireplace, Fenced Yard. $575/month. On bus route #22. Available immediately. Pets OK. Call 706-296-8040 for appointment. Owner\ Agent.

$800.00 month, 2 bedroom, 1 bath, new bath and kitchen, 2 miles from UGA, city bus line, no smokers, no pets, 1st month rent, plus $800.00 deposit. 706338-3520.

ROOMMATES Roommate needed! 2 bedroom apartment with private bathroom, walk-in closet and private study area! Close to campus! Please call 229-326-3122. Leave message if no answer and will call back.

SUBLEASES Subleasing room in Whistlebury Spring/Summer 2013! DISCOUNTED PRICE $400/ month! Second story flat. HUGE bedroom and closet and your own bathroom! Contact Courtney lehotanc@uga.edu. Sublease a luxury student apartment for $460 per month includes furniture and utilities, lease by December 1st and receive $50 off 1st months rent. Contact: chmartin@uga.edu. Looking for a place to live next semester? I got you covered! Subleasing 1 bedroom (with private bath) of a 4 bedroom apartment with 3 other awesome roommates. Email casabonn@ uga.edu! Great Sublease available January 2013-July 2013-$8152BR/2.5Ba Off Baxter Call 404421-1989 if interested.

Looking For someone to takeover my Lease in January! Town-home style apartment. Utilities included. Spacious with wonderful student roommates! Please contact Blaine Cox at (678) 982-9033 for more information! $700/1br-640sf. Sublease Available 12-1 The Woodlands-Private entrance, bed/bath, walk-in closet, Living space,Open Kitchen, porch, balcony. Clubhouse,Pool, Tennis & Basketball courts, wooded paths, 27 bus, pets okay. Contact 211mbeach@gmail.com. Sublease in Abbey West. 405 a month rent. Furnished. Private bath. Pool. Gym. Computer lab. Batting cages. Tennis court. Gated. Contact Jessica 7064571981. Subleasing room at The Exchange in Athens;4 bedroom/4 bathroom.3 other female roommates.Hardwood floors in living area,carpet in bedroom.contact missab08@uga.edu. Rent is 440/ monthly excluding electricity. Up to two bedrooms for sublease in 3BR/3BA Cottage overlooking the Summit pool starting January 2013. Rent $450 per bedroom + utilities. Contact Robyn rflegal@uga.edu.

RECRUITMENT Ampersand, the Red & Black’s independent student magazine, is currently accepting applicants for our online editor position. Our online editor directs Ampersand’s online content and presence through our website and social media platforms. Ampersand is a creative, independent environment covering niche stories in the Athens community and we’re looking for a kindred colleague to help us widen our reach and think innovatively about new content. Responsibilities include: - Posting content on the Ampersand website - Managing social media accounts (pushing content, generating buzz and interacting with the community) - Generating and directing online marketing strategy - Assisting in brand execution To apply: email our executive editor, Maura Friedman, at mfriedman@randb.com with your resume (attached as a PDF) and a short cover letter in the body of your email with the subject “Online Editor Application” by November 15th. Second round applicants will be scheduled for interviews shortly thereafter.


the

Red & Black

Join Our Team

Pub Crawl

Plasma Donors Needed Now

Tuesday, November 13th 7pm-12am Downtown Athens Treat yourself to a night on the town for the price of a night in!

NLIN TMENT O IN O P P O UR A A.COM BOOK Y TPL ASM S E T IO B AT:

We’re teaming up with local businesses to bring you stellar specials on food, drinks, & fun for one night of secret deals all over the town... and our new Mobile App is your invitation to the party!

E

Please help us help those coping with rare, chronic, genetic diseases. New donors can receive $30 today and $70 this week!

How does it work?

Ask about our Specialty Programs! Must be 18 years or older, have valid I.D. along with proof of SS# and local residency.

Just download the Red & Black mobile app, pick up a Real Time Wristband from a table on campus, then use our Real Time Deal$ feature to unlock specials on Tuesday night!

Walk-ins Welcome. Wireless Internet Available. Biotest Plasma Center 233 West Hancock Ave. Athens, GA 30601 706-354-3898 www.biotestplasma.com

Check out our Facebook page for table locations, participating bars, and more! 085RedandBlack4.9X10.5.indd 1

8/21/12 9:01 PM

athens’ best student living now leasing for fall 2013 great location to campus + individual leases + full kitchens private bedrooms & bathrooms available pet friendly + fully furnished apartments available

lakeside apaRtMents

the club

RiveR Mill


R&B

PLAY

Thursday, November 8, 2012

Penny Tration After competing in America’s “Next Drag Super Star,” RuPaul’s Drag Race’s Penny Tration will perform in Athens with student drag artists.

PAGE 12 search: Penny Tration ››

Courtesy Charlie Brewer

EVENT LISTINGS, 2 • DRINK & DINING GRID, 6-7 • SUDOKU, 8 • CROSSWORD, 9


2

PLAY THURSDAY, NOV. 8 Charter Lecture When: 2 p.m. Where: Chapel Price: Free Contact: www.arts.uga. edu “Inner and Outer Space Images from the Micro to the Macro” When: 4 p.m. Where: MLC Price: Free Contact: www.willson. uga.edu Black Theatrical Ensemble Performance When: 5:15 to 5:45 p.m. Where: Tate Student Center Price: Free Contact: ef01891@uga. edu Sharpshooter’s Basketball Clinic When: 5:30 p.m. Where: Lay Park Price: $1 to 2 Contact: www.athensclarkecounty.com/lay Art Reception and Lecture When: 5:30 p.m. (reception) 6:30 p.m. (lecture) Where: Georgia Museum of Art Price: Free Contact: www.georgiamuseum.org Candid Coal People When: 5:30 p.m. Where: Terrapin Beer Co. Price: Free Contact: www.terrapinbeer.com Opening Reception When: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Where: ARTini’s Open Art Studio, Gallery, & Lounge

The Red & Black

search keywords on our website and twitter ››

Price: Free Contact: www.artinisartlounge.com Meet the Southern Chef: Rebecca Lang When: 6 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Avid Bookshop Price: Free Contact: www.avidbookshop.com DMA Recital When: 6:30 p.m. Where: Edge Recital Hall Price: Free Contact: www.music. uga.edu Etienne de Rocher When: 6:30 and 9:30 p.m. Where: Ted’s Most Best Price: Free Contact: (706) 5431523 Open Bluegrass Jam When: 7 p.m. Where: Barbeque Shack Price: Free Contact: (706) 6136752 LENNONYC When: 7 p.m. Where: Ciné Price: Free Contact: www.athenscine.com Don We Now Our Gay Apparel Drag Show When: 7 p.m. Where: Tate Student Center Price: $5 (w/ student ID), $10 Contact: www.ugalambda.wordpress.com Psycho Kickoff Party & Poster Exhibit When: 7:30 and 10 p.m. Where: Ciné Price: $7.50 (students/ seniors), $9.75 Contact: www.athenscine.com

Second Thursday Concert Series When: 8 p.m. Where: Hugh Hodgson Hall Price: $5 (w/ student ID), $18 Contact: www.pac.uga. edu Josh Abbott Band, Jeff Vaughn Band, Brent Cobb When: 8 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $10 Contact: www.georgiatheatre.com Young Choreographers Series Senior Concert When: 8 p.m. Where: New Dance Theatre Price: $8 (w/ student ID), $12 Contact: www.arts.uga. edu Jazz Jam When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Price: Free Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com Nuci’s Space Jam When: 8 p.m. Where: Nuci’s Space Price: $5 Contact: www.nuci.org deadCAT When: 8 p.m. Where: WUOG Price: Free Contact: www.wuog.org Billy Martin & Wil Blades Duo When: 8:30 p.m. Where: Melting Point Price: $12 (adv), $15 (door) Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com

Blues Night with The Shadow Executives When: 9 p.m. Where: Office Lounge Price: Free Contact: (706) 5460840 WUOGFest w/ New Madrid, Werewolves, Brothers, Velocirapture When: 9 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+), $7 (18+) Contact: www.caledonialounge.com Scott Spillane, Betsy Franck, Patrick Morales, Ryan Moore When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Contact: www.flickertheatreandbar.com SheHeHe, Shitty Candy, Thunderchief When: 9 p.m. Where: Max Price: Free Contact: (706) 2543392 Life Coach, Eureka California, Free Association When: 10 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Contact: www.facebook. com/lkshuffleclub Free Range Comedy When: 10:30 p.m. Where: Farm 255 Price: Free Contact: www.farm255. com Erik Neil’s Sour Diesel Foundation When: 11 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: (706) 5464742

FRIDAY, NOV. 9 African Diaspora Conference Keynote Lecture When: 9 a.m. Where: Russell Library Price: Free Contact: www.afrstu. uga.edu Performance Sampler When: 12:15 to 12:45 p.m. Where: New Dance Theatre Price: Free Contact: www.arts.uga. edu UGA Trombone Studio Recital When: 3:35 p.m. Where: Edge Recital Hall Price: Free Contact: www.music. uga.edu Athens PRIDE Percentage Night When: 5 to 10 p.m. Where: Capital Room Contact: www.athenspride.com Be a Santa to a Senior When: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Terrapin Beer Co. Price: $10 Contact: www.terrapinbeer.com Zumba with Ingrid When: 6 p.m. Where: Casa de Amistad Price: $5 Contact: zumbaathens@ gmail.com Junior League of Athens Fall Event When: 6 p.m. Where: Melting Point Price: $20 to $25 Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com

Spiritual/Metaphysical Discussion Class When: 6 p.m. Where: Body, Mind, & Spirit Price: $10 Contact: (706) 3806027 Debris, Midnight Sun, Candid Coal People When: 7 p.m. Where: Blind Pig Tavern (W. Broad St. location) Price: Free Contact: (706) 2087979 DMA Recital When: 6:30 p.m. Where: Edge Recital Hall Price: Free Contact: music.uga.edu BFA I Exhibitions & Reception When: 7 to 9 p.m. Where: Lamar Dodd School of Art Price: Free Contact: www.art.uga. edu Rand Lines When: 8 to 11 p.m. Where: Highwire Lounge Price: Free Contact: www.highwirelounge.com The Darker Face of the Earth When: 8 p.m. Where: UGA Fine Arts Building Price: $12 (students), $16 Contact: (706) 5424400 Del the Funky Homosapien, Bukue One, The Difference Machine When: 8 p.m. Where: New Earth Music Hall Price: $10 Contact: www.newearthmusichall.com


search keywords on our website and twitter ››

Thursday, November 8, 2012 WUOG Fest feat. Reptar, Rubblebucket, and Stepdad When: 8 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $15 Contact: www.georgiatheatre.com

When: 10 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $5 (21+), $7 (18+) Contact: www.caledonialounge.com

The Dictatortots, VG Minus, Thunderchief When: 8 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Contact: www.40watt. com

Ken Will Morton and The Contenders When: 10 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: (706) 5464742

Béla Fleck and The Marcus Roberts Trio When: 8 p.m. Where: Hugh Hodgson Hall Price: $20 to $47 Contact: www.pac.uga. edu

Athens Showgirl Cabaret When: 10:30 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: $5 Contact: (706) 3693144

Surface of the Deep When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Price: $3 Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com

Velveteen Pink, American Mannequins When: 11 p.m. Where: Farm 255 Price: Free Contact: www.farm255. com

Rollin’ Home When: 9 p.m. Where: Buffalo’s Southwest Café Price: $5 Contact: www.buffaloscafe.com/athens

Erik Neil’s Sour Diesel Foundation When: 11 p.m. Where: Amici Price: Free Contact: (706) 3530000

The Viking Progress, Daymoths, DJ Mahogany When: 9 p.m. Where: Go Bar Price: Free Contact: (706) 5465609

SATURDAY, NOV. 10

The Georgia Healers When: 9:30 p.m. Where: Office Lounge Price: Free Contact: (706) 5460840 Shonna Tucker, Bo Bedingfield, Matt Hudgins

Free to Breathe 5K Run and One-Mile Walk When: 7:30 a.m. Where: Sandy Creek Park Price: $20 to $25 Contact: www.freetobreathe.org/Athens The 11th Annual Junkyard Jog 7.5K Race When: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Where: ACC Landfill Price: $10 to 20 Contact: www.active.

com Athens Farmers Market w/ Emily Jackson, Scott Baxendale When: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Where: Bishop Park Price: Free Contact: www.athensfarmersmarket.net Athens Rock and Gem Club Show When: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Where: Sandy Creek Nature Center Price: Free Contact: www.athensclarkecounty.com/sandycreeknaturecenter West Broad Market Garden Produce Stand When: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Where: West Broad Market Garden, 1573 W. Broad St. Price: Free India: Land of Enchantment When: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Where: Lyndon House Arts Center Price: Free Contact: (706) 6133623 Community Music School Open House When: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Where: Hugh Hodgson School of Music Price: Free Contact: www.ugacms. uga.edu Stone Walls Workshop When: 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Where: 140 Pulaski Heights Price: $15 to $25 Contact: www.athensclarkeheritagefoundation.bigcartel.com

Acoustic Guitar Summit When: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Where: Musician’s Warehouse Price: Free Contact: (706) 5487233 2nd Annual Athens Martial Arts Tournament When: 11 a.m. Where: East Athens Community Center Price: Free Contact: www.clarkecountyyk.com/tournament Athens Psychic Fair When: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Where: Body, Mind, & Spirit Price: Free

PLAY

3

Contact: www.athenspaganpride.org

Contact: www.athenshumanesociety.org

Really Really Free Market When: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Where: Reese & Pope Park Price: Free

“Bach Transmogrified” When: Noon Where: Russell Library Price: Free Contact: www.willson. uga.edu

Daily Groceries Co-Op Block Party w/ Coconut Moon, Like Totally!, The Ecotones When: Noon to 4 p.m. Where: Daily Groceries Co-Op Price: Free Contact: www.dailygroceries.org Pet Care Clinic When: 1 to 4 p.m. Where: Pet Supplies Plus

The Little Clay Cart When: 2:30 p.m. Where: Fine Arts Building Price: Free Contact: www.arts.uga. edu Cornhole Tournament When: 5 p.m. Where: Fine Arts Building Price: $10 (per team) Contact: (706) 3693144

Nov 8 ......................... Josh Abbott Band, Jeff Vaughn Band & Brent Cobb Nov 9 ...........WUOG Fest Presents: Reptar & Rubblebucket w/Stepdad Nov 10 .......................................GRiZ, Cherub & Machines are People Too Nov 13 ................................. Yellow Dubmarine (Reggae Beatles Tribute) Nov 15 ...................... Perpetual Groove & Eddie and the Public Speakers Nov 16 ............Kinchafoonee Cowboys w/Bobby Compton & Caylee Anna Nov 17 ....................................................................... Rehab w/OH GEEZ


4

PLAY Josh Nix Band When: 5:30 p.m. Where: Terrapin Beer Co. Price: Free Contact: www.terrapinbeer.com Smoke on the Mountain When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Morton Theatre Price: $5 to $15 Contact: www.mortontheatre.com The Darker Face of the Earth When: 8 p.m. Where: UGA Fine Arts Building Price: $12 (students), $16 Contact: (706) 5424400 Athens Symphony Winter Concert When: 8 p.m. Where: Classic Center Price: Free (tickets required) Contact: www.classiccenter.com Young Choreographers Series Senior Concert When: 8 p.m. Where: New Dance Theatre Price: $8 (w/ student ID), $12 Contact: www.arts.uga. edu Deerhoof, Liam Finn, Tunabunny, Formica Man When: 8 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $12 Contact: www.40watt. com Betsy Franck, Dave Desmelick, Abby Owens When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Price: $5 Contact: www.hender-

The Red & Black

search keywords on our website and twitter ››

shotscoffee.com Griz, Cherub, Machines Are People Too When: 9 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $10 Contact: www.georgiatheatre.com Three Down Crew When: 9 p.m. Where: Amici Price: Free Contact: (706) 3530000 Lingo, Marco Benevento When: 10 p.m. Where: New Earth Music Hall Price: $12 (adv.), $15 (door) $10 (UGA student ID) Contact: www.newearthmusichall.com Manray, The Bronzed Chorus, Self-Evident When: 10 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Price: $6 (21+), $8 (18+) Contact: www.caledonialounge.com Kenny Bowman When: 10 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Price: Free Contact: (706) 3693144 Burlesque Beta When: 10 p.m. Where: Go Bar Price: $3 Contact: (706) 5465609 Les Racquet When: 11 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Price: Free Contact: (706) 5464742

Alexis Gideon, Abandon the Earth Mission, The Dream Scene When: 11 p.m. Where: Farm 255 Price: Free Contact: www.farm255. com

SUNDAY, NOV. 11 The Little Clay Cart When: 2:30 p.m. Where: Fine Arts Building Price: Free Contact: www.arts.uga. edu Athens Heritage Walk When: 2 p.m. Where: Henderson Avenue Historic District Price: $12 to $15 Contact: www.athensclarkeheritagefoundation.bigcartel.com Glass Fusing Class When: 2 to 4 p.m. Where: Good Dirt Price: $60 Contact: www.gooddirt. net The Darker Face of the Earth When: 8 p.m. Where: UGA Fine Arts Building Price: $12 (students), $16 Contact: (706) 5424400 Smoke on the Mountain When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Morton Theatre Price: $5 to $15 Contact: www.mortontheatre.com Athens Ceili Band When: 4 p.m. Where: Globe Cost: Free Contact: (706) 3534721

Veteran’s Day Book Signing When: 4 p.m. Where: Avid Bookshop Cost: Free Contact: www.avidbookshop.com Center Potluck When: 5 to 7 p.m. Where: Athens Institute for Contemporary Art (ATHICA) Cost: $10 to $30 Contact: www.athica.org Gospel Extravaganza When: 5 p.m. Where: Classic Center Cost: $25 to $35 Contact: www.classiccenter.com Ballroom Dance Club When: 6 to 7 p.m. (beginner), 7 to 8 p.m. (advanced) Where: UGA Memorial Hall Cost: Free (beginner), $3 (advanced) Contact: www.ugadance. com/imnew UGA African American Choral Ensemble When: 6 p.m. Where: Emmanuel Episcopal Church Cost: Free Contact: www.music. uga.edu All-Faith Candlelight Prayer Service With Taize Songs When: 6 p.m. Where: Holy Cross Lutheran Church Cost: Free Contact: www.holycrossathens.com Sunday Night at the Bowling Alley Blues Band When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Ten Pins Tavern Cost: Free

Camp Amped Finale Show When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Cost: Free Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com

MONDAY, NOV. 12 WorldFest When: 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Where: Tate Student Center Cost: Free Contact: worldambassadorsuga@gmail.com Power Yoga for Athletes When: 6 to 7:15 p.m. Where: Total Training Center Contact: www.totaltrainingcenter.com Zumba with Ingrid When: 6 p.m. Where: Casa de Amistad Price: $5 Contact: zumbaathens@ gmail.com DMA Recital When: 6:30 p.m. Where: UGA Edge Recital Hall Price: Free Contact: www.music. uga.edu Line Dancing When: 7 to 10 p.m. Where: Buffalo’s Southwest Cafe Price: Free Contact: www.buffaloscafe.com/athens The Rolling Stones Presents a Film by Peter Whitehead When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: Free Contact: www.georgiatheatre.com

Open Mic When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Cost: Free Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com The Hoot! Featuring Matuto and KenneyBlackmon String Band When: 8 to 10 p.m. Where: Melting Point Cost: Free Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com Wind Symphony When: 8 p.m. Where: Hugh Hodgson Hall Cost: Free Contact: www.music. uga.edu The Segar Jazz Affair When: 6 p.m. Where: The Grotto Cost: Free The Skipperdees, Drew Kohl, The Universal Thump When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Cost: Free Contact: www.flickertheatreandbar.com Solid Gold Country Revival When: 9 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Cost: Free Contact: (706) 5464742 Grape Soda, Helen Scott, Four Eyes When: 10 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Cost: $3 (21+), $5 (18+) Contact: www.caledonialounge.com


Thursday, November 8, 2012 L of 8, Biodiesel When: 11 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Cost: Free Contact: (706) 3693144

TUESDAY, NOV. 13 Athens Fibercraft Guild When: 12:30 p.m. Where: Lyndon House Center Cost: Free Contact: (706) 5434319 Lecture Demonstration When: 1:45 p.m. Where: Edge Recital Hall Cost: Free Contact: www.music. uga.edu West Broad Market Garden Produce Stand When: 5 to 8 p.m. Where: West Broad Market Garden, 1573 W. Broad St. Price: Free UGA Vocal Quartet Concert When: 5 to 6 p.m. Where: Edge Recital Hall Cost: Free Contact: www.music. uga.edu ACHF Athenaeum Club When: 5:30 to 7 p.m. Where: Volstead Cost: Free Contact: athenaeumclub@gmail.com Louis Phillip Pelot When: 6 to 9 p.m. Where: Mirko Pasta (Gaines School Rd.) Cost: Free Contact: (706) 8505641 Peace Corps GLOBE Talk When: 6 to 7 p.m.

Where: Caldwell Hall Cost: Free Contact: www. peacecorps.gov Middlewood Journal Book Signing When: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Avid Bookshop Cost: Free Contact: www.avidbookshop.com Terrapin Tuesday feat. Matrimony and Mark Cunningham When: 7 p.m. Where: Melting Point Cost: $5 Contact: www.meltingpointathens.com Ike Stubblefield & Friends When: 8:30 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Price: $5 Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com Yellow Dubmarine When: 8:30 p.m. Where: Georgia Theatre Price: $10 Contact: www.georgiatheatre.com miXt When: 8 p.m. Where: Ramsey Concert Hall Price: $27 Contact: www.music. uga.edu The Barlettas When: 8 p.m. Where: WUOG Price: Free Contact: www.wuog.org American Aquarium, Cotter Pen When: 9 p.m. Where: 40 Watt Club Price: $5 Contact: www.40watt. com

search keywords on our website and twitter ›› Asher Armstrong When: 9 p.m. Where: Flicker Theatre & Bar Cost: Free Contact: www.flickertheatreandbar.com Tuesday Night Confessional w/ Fester Hagood and Friends When: 9 p.m. Where: Nowhere Bar Cost: Free Contact: (706) 5464742 Michael Paumgardhen When: 9 p.m. Where: Go Bar Cost: Free Contact: (706) 5465609 Drafts and Laughs When: 9:30 p.m. Where: Pub at Gameday Cost: Free Contact: (706) 3532831 Simon Joyner, Twin Tigers When: 11 p.m. Where: Farm 255 Cost: Free Contact: www.farm255. com

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 14 Peace Corps on the Plaza When: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Where: Tate Plaza Cost: Free Contact: www. peacecorps.gov AARP Meeting When: 10 a.m. Where: Athens First Bank and Trust Cost: Free Contact: (706) 3409418

Community Snapshot: What to Do with Your Dog in Athens When: 12:30 p.m. Where: Lyndon House Arts Center Cost: Free Contact: www.boomersinathens.org Driven to Recycle When: 4 to 7 p.m. Where: Body Shop of Athens Cost: Free Contact: www.athensclarkecounty.com/recycling Tree Identification Workshop When: 5 to 7 p.m. Where: Intermural Fields, Oconee Forest Park Price: Free Contact: williams@warnell.uga.edu Zumba at the Garden When: 5:30 p.m. Where: State Botanical Garden of Georgia Cost: $10/ class, $80/ session Contact: www.uga.edu/ botgarden Yusif! When: 5:30 p.m. Where: Terrapin Beer Co. Cost: Free Contact: www.terrapinbeer.com UGA Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble When: 6 p.m. Where: Ramsey Concert Hall Cost: Free Contact: www.music. uga.edu SALSAthens When: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. (intermediate), 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. (beginners)

PLAY

Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Cost: $8 (incl. $3.50 drink) Contact: (706) 3386613 Beer Dinner When: 6:30 to 9 p.m. Where: Farm 255 Cost: $45 Contact: www.farm255. com Porterhouse Jazz Night When: 7 p.m. Where: Porterhouse Grill Cost: Free Contact: (706) 3690990 Rabbit Box 7 When: 7 to 9 p.m. Where: Melting Point Cost: $5 Contact: mreppers@ gmail.com Coal and Immigration Lecture When: 7 p.m. Where: College of Environment and Design, Room 125 Cost: Free Contact: freedomuniversitygeorgia@gmail.com Fine Arts Night Out When: 7 to 9 p.m. Where: East West Bistro Cost: Free Contact: (706) 5469378 Trivia When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Choo Choo Japanese Korean Grill Express Cost: Free Contact: www.choochoorestaurants.com Beertickers: Beyond the Ale When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Ciné Cost: $5 Contact: www.athen-

5

scine.com Death & Transfiguration When: 8 p.m. Where: Hugh Hodgson Hall Cost: $5 (w/ student ID), $10 Contact: www.pac.uga. edu Modern Skirts When: 8 p.m. Where: Hendershot’s Coffee Bar Cost: $10 Contact: www.hendershotscoffee.com Stephanie Wrembel When: 8 p.m. Where: New Earth Music Hall Cost: $10 Contact: www.newearthmusichall.com Ritvals, Jeremy Dubs, Home Body, Cars Can Be Blue When: 9:30 p.m. Where: Caledonia Lounge Cost: $5 (21+), $7 (18+) Contact: www.caledonialounge.com Guzik, Rat Babies, Irata When: 10 p.m. Where: Little Kings Shuffle Club Cost: Free Contact: (706) 3693144 Open Mic Night When: 11 p.m. Where: Boar’s Head Lounge Cost: Free Contact: (706) 3693040 DJ FOG JUICE When: 10 p.m. Where: Go Bar Cost: Free Contact: (706) 5465609


Drink/DINING specials:

Your weekly guide to Athens’ daily deals

ARE YOU A LOCAL BAR OR RESTAURANT WITH WEEKLY SPECIALS?

$2 Terrapin Draft & Bottles

1/2 OFF Wine or Sangria

Thursday Bomb Night: $2 Cruzan Bombs, $3 Jager Bombs, $3 Barcardi Bombs $5 Moonshine Margarita

FRIDAY

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $2 Killer coolaid shooters $1 off of everything, $2 Miller Lite bottles Build your own Bloody Mary $3.50 Barcardi bombs Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

HAPPY HOUR 12 to 8 p.m. $1 off Pitchers, Imports, and Liquor Drinks

$1 Draft Miller High Life, $1 Bottle Miller Lite, $3 Wells, $4 Pitcher Miller High Life

$3 Domestics, $3 Gameday Shot, $4 Jack Drinks, $5 Moonshine Margarita

Rooftop Restaurant and Bar open 11:30 am - 2 am

N/A

$3 Well drinks & shots

Cubano Con Leche with cinnamon & sugar 12 oz. - $4.45

SATURDAY

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $2 Killer coolaid shooters $1 off of everything, $2 Miller Lite bottles Build your own Bloody Mary $3.50 Barcardi bombs Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

HAPPY HOUR 12 to 8 p.m. $1 off Pitchers, Imports, and Liquor Drinks

$1 Draft Miller High Life, $1 Bottle Miller Lite, $3 Wells, $4 Pitcher Miller High Life

$3 Domestics, $3 Gameday Shot, $4 Jack Drink, $5 Moonshine Margarita

Rooftop Restaurant and Bar open 11:30 am - 2 am

N/A

$5 Pitchers Coors/High Life $3 Wells

Real-Fruit Smoothies - $4.25

SUNDAY

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $2 Killer coolaid shooters $1 off of everything, $2 Miller Lite bottles Build your own Bloody Mary $3.50 Barcardi bombs Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

The NFL Package

$1 Draft Miller High Life, $1 Bottle Miller Lite, $3 Wells, $4 Pitcher Miller High Life, 10% Student Discount with College ID

N/A

Rooftop Restaurant and Bar open 11:30 am - 2 am

50% OFF Beer, Wine, & Sake w/ Student ID

$5 Pitchers Coors/High Life $3 Wells

Italian Soda with cream - $2.65

MONDAY

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

$1 off value menu items. $2 Blast, $1.75 PBR 16oz.

$6 Yuengling Pitchers, $6 Solarita Pitchers, $7 Bud Light Pitchers, $8 All other pitchers, $5 Moonshine Margarita

Rooftop Restaurant and Bar open 11:30 am - 2 am

50% OFF Beer, Wine, & Sake w/ Student ID

$5 Pitchers Coors/High Life

Personal French Press 16oz - $2.95

TUESDAY

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

$2 Capt. Morgan drinks/shots, $2.50 Amaretto Sour, $1.75 PBR 16oz.

Tuesday Dollar Night: $1 Shots/shooters, $1 Wells, $5 Moonshine Margarita

$2 Miller High Life

50% OFF Beer, Wine, & Sake w/ Student ID

HAPPY HOUR $1 Pints of High Life all day

Cappuccino 6 oz. - $3.15

WEDNESDAY

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

$2.75 Jack Daniels, $2 Dirty Shirleys, $1.75 PBr 16oz.

50% OFF Beer, Wine, & Sake w/ Student ID

8pm - Trivia $7 Domestic pitchers, $1 High Life pints

Frozen Latte Ghiaccio - $4.45

THURSDAY

HAPPY HOUR 5 to 10 p.m. $1 off of everything, Build your own Bloody Mary Bar Buffet 12 to 9 p.m.

$1 Sam Adams $4 Absolut drinks

Rooftop Restaurant and Bar open 11:30 am - 2 am

50% OFF Beer, Wine, & Sake w/ Student ID

$6 Frozen drinks, $13 House wine bottles

Loose-leaf tea 16 oz. - $2.85

WANT TO BE A PART OF THE DRINK AND DINING GRID?

Pitcher Monday Night Football:

ALLGOOD

Where: 256 E. Clayton Phone: (706) 549-0166 Website: allgoodlounge.com On Facebook: facebook.com/pages/ Allgood-Bar/ 152530911447853

BARCODE

Where: 166 E. Clayton On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ BarcodeAthens

$0.50 Wings

$2 Specialty Martini’s All you can eat Wings

$1 Coors Light 16oz.

$2 OFF Terrapin pints $2 Tacos

Trivia Night Starts at 8PM

BLIND PIG TAVERN

Where: 485 Baldwin Phone: (706) 548-3442 On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ BlindPigTavern

Wednesday Ladies Night: $2.50 Buffalo Canyon-ritas $3 Martinis, Rooftop Restaurant and All you can eat Wings $6 Bottles of House Wine, Bar open 11:30 am - 2 am $5 Moonshine Margarita

BUFFALO’S

Where: 96 Alps, Suite #49 Phone: (706) 354-6655 Website: buffaloscafe. com/athens.php On Facebook: facebook.com/ BuffalosCafeAthens

THE BURY

Where: 321 E. Clayton Phone: (706) 612-1650 On Facebook: www.facebook.com/theburyathens

GEORGIA THEATRE

Where: 215 N. Lumpkin Phone: (706) 850-7670 Website: georgiatheatre.com On Facebook: facebook.com/ GeorgiaTheatre

INOKO

Where: 161 Alps Phone: (706) 546-8589 On Facebook: www.facebook.com/inoko

MELLOW MUSHROOM

Where: 320 E. Clayton Suite 201 Phone: (706) 613-0892 Website: mellowmushroom.com

ADVERTISE WITH US AND BE SEEN BY THOUSANDS EVERY WEEK!

TWO STORY COFFEE

Where: 1680 S. Lumpkin St. Phone: (706) 850-5422 Website: twostorycoffeehouse.com/ On Facebook: facebook. com/pages/Two-StoryCoffee-House/ 118625911559586

706.433.3000 REDANDBLACK.COM

You wont miss a thing


8 8

PUZZLES SAA

The Red & Black

search keywords on our website and twitter ››

1072 Baxter St. 706.549.9940

Bring in this ad and recieve 25% off your next flower purchase

www.alumni.uga.edu/SAA 1-800-606-8786

expires 11/30/12

2

1

8

6

4

7

3

5

9

3

4

6

9

5

2

7

8

1

5

The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

6

4

9

7

8

1

9

7

8

2

5

3

6

7

1

3

5

4

2

9

8

2

7

3

1

5

4

3

9

1

6

8

7

2

1

4

5

8

6

9

3

4

8

9

1

2

6

5

6

3

2

4

9

1

7

like us!

2

5

6

7

3

The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

4

8

9

6

3

6

5

9

7

1

3

2

4

8

1

3

9

2

6

4

8

7

8

5

4

1

3

2

6

9

8

6

3

2

1

4

Difficulty level: 18

6

4

9

5

7

3

8

4

2

1

7

5

6

9

IMPORT CAR DOCTORS Now Accepting New Patients 1900 W. Broad Street

5

8

9

3

6

4

5

8

1

2

7

2

8

4

6

8

5

6

7

9

1

2

2

3

9

1

4

8

5

7

6

3

5

8

9

1

1

9

7

8

2

6

4

6

1

4

2

5

7

3

4

8

2

3

7

5

9

9

7

1

6

3

4

8

3

4

5

9

1

2

6

Pasta

Paninis

thursday, friday & saturday nights

2

5

6

7

Pizza

5

9

9

now serving slices uPstairs until 2 am

7

8

3

TRANSMETROPOLITAN 1

7

2

Difficulty level: 10

4

3

7

3

8

Late Night BOGO Boneless from 9pm to Midnight

The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

4

5

Difficulty level: 10

2

1

(706) 353-6006

5

6

8

4

1

7

3

7

1

3

2

8

9

5

5

9

6

4

2

5

2

7

4

3

8

1

9

3

9

1

6

2

8

4

7

5

8

1

7

6

The Japanese Sudoku puzzle relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing needs to add up to anything else.

4

9

2

1

5

7

7

6

3

1

2

4

8

4

7

8

5

3

6

9

1

5

4

8

9

3

2

Difficulty level: 18

5

3

1

9

8

7

6

9

2

6

7

5

1

4

2

1

5

6

7

9

3

6

9

2

3

4

8

5

3

8

7

4

6

2

1


Thursday, November 8, 2012

search keywords on our website and twitter ››

You’ll find answers here... www.fcs.uga.edu 112 Dawson Hall 706-542-4847

THURSDAY CROSSWORD - Answer online Nov. 8 ACROSS 1 Takes more than one’s share of 5 Pupil’s written assignment 10 Underground plant part 14 New thought 15 Word after soy or Hollandaise 16 Therefore 17 __ for; summon 18 In a weary way 20 180˚ from NNW 21 Gender 22 Hits the ceiling 23 Overwhelming defeats 25 Street paver’s substance 26 Go by, as time 28 Lively dances 31 Noisy brawl 32 Forest 34 Taxi 36 Downtown street name 37 Monte __; casino spot 38 One of the 12 Tribes of Israel 39 Bladed tool 40 Trio number 41 Can wrapper 42 Confidential bit of information 44 Ten-year period 45 Chop down 46 Primp 47 Entreaties 50 Palmer’s pegs 51 Last page of a calendar: abbr. 54 Usurers 57 Commanded

58 59 60 61 62 63 1 2 3

4 5

6 7 8 9

Monster “Bye, Juan!” Like fine wine Healthy Stupid Autry or Kelly DOWN Snake’s noise Lofty poems Make sweeping assumptions Unhappy Manor and its grounds Jib & spinnaker Confident Highest card Affirmative

10 Comment 11 C  alif.’s northern neighbor 12 Make eyes at 13 Playthings 19 Grad school finals, at times 21 Ponder 24 Unlock 25 Hullabaloo 26 Actress Samms 27 Goes first 28 Flag holder 29 Sprain wraparound 30 Kept for later 32 Unsightly growth 33 Miner’s find 35 Liver secretion 37 Use the molars

2545 Atlanta Highway • Athens • (706) 354-8707

38 Frilly trimming 40 Lock of hair 41 Marvin and Meriwether 43 __ No. 5; classic perfume 44 Like formal clothes 46 Tea type 47 Farm machine 48 Theater box 49 British peer 50 Journey 52 Barbara __ 53 Give up land 55 __ it out; fought 56 “Much __ About Nothing” 57 Paper sack

Your Tailgate Headquarters

PUZZLES

9

Save BIG Money on New & Used Textbooks

Top of Baxter Hill across from Cane’s • ocbs.com FRIDAY CROSSWORD - Answer online Nov. 9 ACROSS 1 “For __ a Jolly Good Fellow” 4 Passion 9 Uncle __ Rice 13 Cereal grains 15 Strainer 16 Declare 17 Maple or palm 18 Nat King and Natalie 19 __ Strauss 20 Flab around the middle 22 Boast 23 Without 24 A short time __; recently 26 Part of a minute 29 Shake one’s fist at 34 Sound of cymbals 35 Gravy 36 Tiny 37 Poor box donation 38 Toward the Arctic Ocean 39 Evergreens 40 Buzzing insect 41 Ongoing quarrels 42 Finger or toe 43 Haughtiness 45 Handbags 46 Assistance 47 Actor’s part 48 Look-alike 51 Make laws 56 Like pink cheeks 57 Happening 58 Circular edges 60 Tulsa’s state: abbr. 61 Good judgment

62 63 64 65

1 2 3 4 5 6

Short note Adolescent Derisive look “Brylcreem, a little __’ll do ya...”

DOWN Scorching All __; listening Ladder rung Go upward Hilarious folks Place to buy salami and rye 7 Above 8 Investigate the background of 9 Rocky __; Stallone role

10 H  ardly __; seldom 11 __ Scotia 12 Quick drink from a flask 14 Fall and winter 21 Sounded a bell 25 “__ whiz!” 26 Strikebreakers 27 Actress Burstyn 28 Small role for a big star 29 Late for school 30 Shacks 31 Small branches 32 Mysterious 33 Robins’ homes 35 Bitter 38 __ to say; obvi-

378 E. Broad St. Athens, GA 706.548.2700

ously 39 Weapon 41 J . Edgar Hoover’s agcy. 42 Boring 44 Spreading tree 45 Colorful movie advertisement 47 Hose down 48 Horse’s gait 49 __ up; became alert 50 __ of Capri 52 Fair; balanced 53 Wilder or Barry 54 __ up; bound 55 Actress Samms 59 Bawl


10

PUZZLES

The Red & Black

search keywords on our website and twitter ››

An Escape from the Ordinary

Your Favorite New Bar In Athens

Follow us on Twitter for drink specials @TheBuryAthens.

1 5 10 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 24 25 26 29 30 34 35 36

37 38 40 41 43

44 45 46 47 48 50 51

54 58 59 61 62 63

SATURDAY CROSSWORD - Answer online Nov. 10

ACROSS Dairy product Blazing Think ahead “__ go bragh!” Evil spirit Take a fancy to Bird of peace Bus station Leave out Smiled scornfully Buster & Diane Scoundrel At __; initially Of the city Anger Instruct Toot the horn Feathery scarf Water parted by Moses Cereal grain Walk leisurely Calico or puma Playing a role Actress Courteney __ Nylons Motif Pass away Silenced Walks the floor Flower’s start Store window dummy Movie actress Paulette __ Orthodox Church artwork Passenger In __ of; as a substitute for Gangster Actor Michael

64 Dutch cheese 65 Tim Daly’s sis 66 Toothed-leaved birch tree 67 Actor Johnny DOWN 1 Prescriptions, familiarly 2 Press clothes 3 __ it up; have a ball 4 Patella 5 Found a total 6 Nourish 7 Mischief maker 8 Trainee 9 Go into 10 Schemed 11 Chauffeur-driven car

12 Related 13 B  rooklyn hoopsters 21 Raced 23 Fall flower 25 St. __ of Assisi 26 German WWII submarine 27 Extend to 28 Davis or Midler 29 Debtor’s note 31 Noted English racecourse 32 Stop 33 Despised 35 In the __; sure to be won 36 Reed or Linn 38 Move furtively 39 Foot digit

42 44 46 47 49

50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 60

321 E. Clayton Street

SUNDAY CROSSWORD - Answer online Nov. 12

I ntrude, as on a spinal nerve Gathered close together In __; unwilling to face reality Wet dirt About, on a time line Drill or awl Mr. Romney Sore Part of speech Trait carrier Assistant Gather Get rid of “Where __ I go wrong?”

Life: a delicate balance between caffeine & alcohol. 256 E. Clayton St • 706-549-0166 • Mon-Sat Noon-2AM

ACROSS 1 Soothing ointment 6 “__ the night before Christmas...” 10 Give the cold shoulder to 14 Normal 15 Marathon 16 Window glass 17 “Winnie-thePooh” author 18 Large kitchen appliance 19 A single time 20 Drool 22 Palmer of golf 24 Boy Scout’s shoulder band 25 Thin cigars 26 __ up; illuminates 29 Honking birds 30 Neighbor of Canada: abbr. 31 Uncanny 33 Clear the slate 37 Actress Ward 39 Covered with lather 41 Flat-bottomed boat 42 Molars and canines 44 Beginning; start 46 Actress West 47 Raise with a pulley 49 Ne’er-do-wells 51 On a rampage 54 Overfill 55 Entangle 56 Throws into chaos 60 Correct text 61 Enthusiastic

63 P  otato-exporting state 64 Ceremony 65 Was dishonest 66 Tendon 67 Talk back 68 Not difficult 69 Exodus leader DOWN 1 Totals 2 Continent east of Russia 3 Soothe; relax 4 Disappear 5 Lift 6 Engagement 7 Sea breaker 8 Highest club

9 L  egislative body of 100 10 Freeloaders 11 Capital of Vietnam 12 Dad’s brother 13 Requirements 21 Pompous fools 23 Late Kennedy matriarch 25 Leaks out 26 Intense craving 27 “I’ll believe it when __ it” 28 Strong wind 29 Enormous 32 Barnyard perch 34 Pinnacle 35 Fly high 36 Rams’ mates

Two words meaning great advertising Call 706.433.3001 to find out how.

38 Sports players 40 Shouts 43 Garden tools 45 Industry that hotels rely on 48 Breathe in 50 __ apartment; one-room flat 51 Swerves 52 Kolkata, __ 53 Leaves out 54 Slaphappy 56 Perishes 57 Skillets 58 “...sweet land of liberty, of __ I sing...” 59 Mother pigs 62 By way of

P U Z Z L E S P O N S O R


Thursday, November 8, 2012

Terry believes business is part of the community.

PUZZLES

search keywords on our website and twitter ›› Major in MANAGEMENT

INFORMATION SYSTEMS

make smart choices about alcohol.

It’s more than technology…

11

be a

uhs.uga.edu/aod/NCAAchoices.html

SATURDAY CROSSWORD - Answer online Nov. 13

ACROSS 1 Learn by __; memorize 5 Makes gentle 10 Puncture 14 Gung-ho 15 Popeye’s Oyl 16 Castro’s land 17 Fires, slangily 18 Soaked through 20 Golfer Ernie 21 Actor Douglas 22 Slip away from 23 Kick out, as tenants 25 Get __ of; eliminate 26 Baby hooters 28 Washes off 31 Goes out with 32 Eyeglasses, for short 34 Drink like a dog 36 Let fall 37 Blackboard writer’s need 38 Sandwich shop 39 Suture 40 Like a chimney flue 41 Actor Matt __ 42 “You __, you lose” 44 Peaceful 45 Toilet paper layer 46 Sheets, pillow cases, etc. 47 Bert’s “Sesame Street” buddy 50 Upper room 51 Smallest twodigit number 54 Item in a Chinese stir-fry 57 Macho one

58 59 60 61 62 63

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Foundation Elevate Weapons Jacuzzis Possessed Usually benign growth

DOWN Runner’s contest Egg-shaped Hollywood Asner & Koch Subjects Warn Soft-furred weasel cousin 8 Christmas __; December 24 9 __ up; arrange

10 B  urns with hot liquid 11 Ballerina’s skirt 12 Not up yet 13 Commanded 19 Harness straps 21 Doctor’s bags 24 Biden, for short 25 Schroder or Santorum 26 Likelihood 27 Merchandise 28 Depend 29 Basic 30 Beauty shop 32 Oxford or loafer 33 Mrs. Nixon 35 Yearn 37 Snug & comfy

Underground at: 140 E. Clayton St. • (706) 549.9933

38 40 41 43 44 46 47 48

49 50 52 53 55 56 57

Show courage Shoe bottoms Fender blemish Gives one’s views Used a sieve __ up; bungle Recedes “As ye sow, so shall ye __” Space agcy. Cut of pork Shade trees Home of twigs Expert Uncooked Computer from Apple, for short

SUNDAY CROSSWORD - Answer online Nov. 14 ACROSS 1 Traveler’s lodge 4 “Remember the __!” 9 Stir-fry pots 13 Frog’s cousin 15 High-powered surgical beam 16 Actor Richard 17 Mix with a wooden spoon 18 Bawled 19 “__ want for Christmas is...” 20 Very detailed 22 Preserve 23 Gently curled, as hair 24 Bread for a Reuben 26 Like a salty solution 29 Chemistry, biology, etc. 34 Strong string 35 Reads quickly 36 Samuel’s teacher 37 Sounded a bell 38 Informal street talk 39 Fishing worms, for example 40 “Roses __ red, violets...” 41 Ornamental bird feather 42 Keep a cooking turkey moist 43 Street vendors 45 India’s dollars 46 Needle hole 47 Chest 48 Long tale 51 Golfer’s top 56 Was in debt

57 58 60 61 62 63

Chris of tennis __ up; absorb Nary a one Come apart Create Country singer __ Campbell 64 Base stealer’s move, often 65 Fellows DOWN 1 “__ all Greek to me” 2 Memo 3 Tack 4 Wall recess 5 Stooge’s name 6 Huge continent 7 Encounter

Celebrating 35 years in Athens!

8 T  elling a waiter what you’d like 9 Lose courage 10 Make eyes at 11 Hardy cabbage 12 Make a tiny cut 14 Sketching 21 Cause of misery 25 “__! We Have No Bananas” 26 Thin piece of leather 27 In the know 28 __ up; in a row 29 Phony deals 30 Walking stick 31 Discontinue 32 Upper crust 33 Locations

35 38 39 41

42 44 45 47 48 49 50 52 53 54 55 59

 peak disparagS ingly of Pullman cars Christening __ one’s trade; work diligently George W. __ Benumb Steal cattle Uninterested Anthem, e.g. Absent GI Autry or Barry Egg-shaped Mr. Strauss Wander __ back; recant Barbie’s beau

Are you Mild, Hot, or Extra Hot? thetacostand.com | facebook.com/TheTStand


12

PLAY

The Red & Black

search keywords on our website and twitter ››

Drag show provides queer space for students BY SARAH ANNE PERRY The Red & Black Entertainment on campus can be a drag. The University’s Lambda Alliance will present its annual fall drag show, titled “Don We Now Our Gay Apparel.” The event showcases performances from local and student drag artists. “This is going to be a lot of fun,” said Jon Hurst, coordinator for the LGBT Resource Center. “You can come see an amazing show with national entertainers, regional entertainers and these amazing students who are stepping out onstage to do incredible numbers.” Beyond its entertainment value, however, the show serves as a platform. “People can walk around this campus for four years and not know that there are queer people here,” said Raquel Willis, a senior journalism major from Augusta. “And that, I think, is a problem. [The show] definitely is an affirmation that we’re here, this is our culture. Something we have to do on a daily basis is create a space for ourselves within this huge hegemonic space that doesn’t necessarily always give us our platform to speak or to express ourselves.” Willis serves as executive director of Lambda Alliance at the University. Lambda is a student organization created to support and advocate for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and allied community in Athens. Its Speakers Bureau combats misconceptions about the queer community. “Our goal is to be a safe space where people can talk about issues, have meaningful discussion, and then in turn go out and advocate for our community,” said Jonathan Dickens, a sophomore linguistics major from Atlanta and Lambda’s secretary. “Just try to educate people about ‘What is the queer community?’ Because you know, the visibility that we do get, like in the media, is very stilted and is not really representative of what is actually

going on.” The drag show is an extension of the safe space Lambda creates. Although the University’s queer community is less visible than it would like to be, the show is usually wellreceived. “I don’t think I’ve ever heard anything negative about the drag show,” Willis said. “They’re definitely a hallmark of Lambda and a hallmark of the UGA queer student community. The reactions are generally very positive.” The show receives recognition from the University even outside of the queer community, Dickens said. In the past, it has been nominated for and won SOAR awards from the Center for Student Organizations. This year’s show will engage even more of the University community, featuring a performance by Pamoja Dance Company. This year, by professional drag queen Penny Tration, the season five fan pick for “RuPaul’s Drag Race,” will serve as guest emcee. Drag culture in Athens has also been growing, making the student show more acceptable. “It’s really picked up over the years,” Willis said. “I feel like there’s a drag show every week. Now there are different venues that have drag shows. Those are kind of the hub of LGBTQ culture a lot of times. Those are places where we really get to see our people and really get to mingle and have fun and kind of congregate in this queer space.” Local drag celebrities Diego Wolf, Extasy Grey and Bros B4 Hoes will perform on Thursday. Some of these drag queens and kings got their start at Lambda. For Hurst, drag is essential to queer culture. “It’s really important to understand the connection of drag, of this idea of gender illusion with queer community,” he said. “We’re talking about the beginning of the modern LGBTQ rights movement in this country. This started and happened with drag queens and gender illusion. So they’re kind of like the stars of our community.”

EAT UP!

DON WE NOW OUR GAY APPAREL WHEN: Nov. 8, 7 p.m. WHERE: Tate Grand Hall PRICE: $10 general admission, $5 with student ID

Still, not everyone goes into drag with an agenda. “For a lot of people that I know, transgender people here in Athens, gender and gender identity definitely weren’t at the forefront of their minds when they started,” Willis said. “For me, it was just a personal stepping stone to being that person who can transcend potential adversity or transcend these boxes that society has forced us all into, or at least tried to. I don’t think people generally go in for these hard-set, serious reasons; a lot of times, people just want to have fun. They just want to make people laugh or make people cry or make people just excited.” Hurst added that not all drag performers are transgender. “We often miss the artistry or the performance aspects of the drag,” he said. “Some of this is just about an outlet to perform and be very creative. We live in a society that has all of this other junk around gender and sexuality that makes it hard, but at the end of the day, this is about a performance piece.” In fact, Hurst said, the performance aspects of drag probably appeal to more people than one might expect. “I think a lot of people, if we were able to remove some of the stigma around this, would love to come do drag,” he said. “I bet you there’s a lot of people at UGA that would say, ‘I would love to come do that, if only people wouldn’t think X, Y and Z about me if I did.’”

search: Penny Tration››

HILARY BUTSCHEK/Staff

Squash There’s nothing like squash. Nothing like saying the word squash. Nothing like trying to describe the taste of squash. Finally, there’s nothing like the variety squash offers. In this collection of squash recipes, that versatility of the vegetable is highlighted. Butternut Squash Macaroni Ingredients: 2 cups butternut squash soup 2 tablespoons flour 2 tablespoons butter 2 cups elbow noodles Cherry tomatoes (optional) In a saucepan melt butter. Add flour and stir. Once combined, add butternut squash soup and continue stirring over medium heat until combined. Keep stirring until soup has thickened. Cook elbow noodles in boiling water then drain and add to sauce. Combine noodles and soup. Serve with sliced cherry tomatoes if desired. Squash Casserole Ingredients: 4 cups sliced yellow

squash ½ cup chopped onion 35 buttery round crackers, crushed 1 cup shredded Cheddar cheese 2 eggs, beaten ¾ cup milk ¼ cup butter, melted 1 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons butter Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Place squash and onion in a large skillet over medium heat. Pour in a small amount of water. Cover, and cook until squash is tender, about 5 minutes. Drain well, and place in a large bowl. In a medium bowl, mix together cracker crumbs and cheese. Stir half of the cracker mixture into the cooked squash and onions. In a small bowl, mix together eggs and milk, then add to squash mixture. Stir in 1/4 cup melted butter, and season with salt and pepper. Spread into a 9 x 13 inch baking dish. Sprinkle with remaining cracker mixture, and dot with 2 tablespoons butter. Bake in preheated oven Recipe courtesy of Rosecart on allrecipes. com. — Hilary Butschek

search: Squash ››

November 8, 2012 edition of Th Red & Black  

November 8, 2012 edition of Th Red & Black

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you