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I N F O R M I N G FA C I L I T I E S M A N A G E M E N T P R O F E S S I O N A L S

fm-world.co.uk / November 2017

TA ST E R E D I T I O N MENTAL HEALTH What those responsible for the workplace can do

BRACE FOR IMPACT The projects winning recognition at this year’s BIFM Awards

DIGITAL DIMENSION What the electronic communications code means to you

MOVING FORWARD Four BIFM award recipients, four decades of experience – and four takes on the profession’s growing influence


F M WO R LD

NOVEMBER 2017

CONTENTS COM M UNI TY

2 2 PE R SPE C T IV E S The four most interesting and insightful opinions on FM this month 2 5 A BIT A BOU T YOU How Sarah Thomson’s passion for great ingredients led her Vacherin

35 PICTURE PERFECT ArtLifting empowers artists facing homelessness and disability

26 THINK TA NK FM leaders agree that the sector must develop more ethical goals

ANA LYS I S

7 M AKI NG HE ADWAY A survey reveals “highly disturbing” facts about mental health in the workplace 10 LI TTLE LOVE FOR THE LE V Y The controversial Apprenticeship Levy is not finding favour with employers

KNOW LE DGE

36 UP AND RUNNING A poorly executed mobilisation will cause problems down the line

28 NOV E M BE R @ BIF M The people and projects currently informing BIFM activity

3 7 WINTE R D R AWS O N How facilities managers should prepare for the big freeze

3 2 C A LL S TO AC T ION The events, surveys and discussions that deserve your attention

1 2 CU STO M ERS, N OT COL LE AG UE S A counter-intuitive look at the bond between occupiers and landlords

3 8 BE ATING BAC TE R I A Up to 80 per cent of chronic infections are biofilm-related

13 NEWS MAK E RS The stories proving most popular with FM World’s online visitors this month

3 9 LE T ’ S COM M U NICAT E Code changes to installing telecoms on third-party property

16 A NATUR AL E VOLUTION Dean Wetteland of Norse Commercial Services discusses joint ventures

43 IN LOC KD OWN Locksmiths now need training in more areas than just lock mechanics

FM World’s in-depth analysis section 48 ASCENT OF FM The four recipients of this year’s individual BIFM awards each came to prominence during a different decade of FM’s progression from ad hoc discipline to fully formed profession.

54 AWARDS DASHBOARD Just like the FM profession it celebrates each October at London’s Grosvenor House hotel, the structure of the scheme evolves; 2017 saw enhancements to the categories.

56 BRACE FOR IMPACT FM’s influence on an organisation’s performance, on the environment, and on both customer and employee experience was emphasised through this year’s winning and highly commended entries.

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60 SOCIAL CLIMBERS Through its Impact on Society category, the BIFM Awards seek to boost awareness N OVE M B E R ’ S TO P I C of the broader social THE BIFM role that FM is clearly AWARDS 2017 WINNERS in a position to fulfil. This year’s winners showed how W Wthat W. B Ilink F M .O RG .U K / F M WJ O I N is growing ever clearer.

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INSIDE 07 10 12 13 14

Mental health: are we making headway? Levy-paying firms ignore apprentice scheme Skewing the owner-occupier dynamic Newsmakers: The month’s other top stories in short Interserve launches performance improvement plan

FRONT DESK THE MO N TH’ S MOST I MP O RTA N T F M STO RI E S

WOR KPLACE W E LL- BE I N G

MENTAL HEALTH: ARE WE MAKING HEADWAY? W O R D S : H ER P R EE T K AU R G R E WA L

PHOTOGRAPHY: ISTOCK /SHUTTERSTOCK

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recent survey by Business in the Community (BitC) revealed that 15 per cent of employees face dismissal, disciplinary action or demotion after disclosing a mental health issue at work. The Mental Health at Work report examined the findings of a YouGov survey of more than 3,000 people. The figures are almost twice the number identified in BitC’s first survey of the issue published in 2016. Although the latest report shows there have been some incremental improvements, there are still some

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V I E W P O I NT PERSPECTIVES

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VR: rendering offices obsolete?

Battery power charges ahead

VISHU RAMANATHAN is CEO of Buildout

ANNABEL MORRIS is a senior marketing executive at Service Works Group

n 2014 Facebook bought Oculus Rift with the vision of virtual reality (VR) in every home. Each day, we’re closer to VR becoming a staple of our routines. We work and socialise online with Skype and Google Hangouts, and in the near future, we may do these things exclusively virtually. Instead of going into an office each day, we’ll plug into our workplace from home. We’ve already seen a trend of ‘WeWorkification’ as flexibility and mobility have become more valuable for the modern workforce. Business owners don’t want to be locked into long leases. VR could take this trend further, making the market for office spaces in the future centre on short-term rentals versus permanent HQs for companies. And as more team members choose to work remotely from their virtual office, meeting spaces will likely be almost exclusively rented on an hourly basis. This would change the definition of what it means to work remotely: workers could physically be in one place and still convene with colleagues in another. So what will the office look like in 20 to 30 years’ time? To what extent will physical

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network of devices must account in their budgets for battery replacement. Dutch innovators have created an energy cell that can provide 24 hours of power to a sensor but can be recharged with just four hours of low light. What’s more, it could last for 50 years, transforming the potential of the IoT and sensors in remote environments. Batteries have also been developed that can recharge using energy from solar power; Washington University has announced the creation of a batteryfree mobile phone that uses energy harvested from radio frequency signals. Recognition of the importance of batteries has led to a surge in development to improve their efficiency. But any limitations caused by short life spans are offset by the results they achieve. The savings gained using being channelled into battery sensors in terms of preventive capacity and efficiency. maintenance and energy and Now, a standard lithiumoperational efficiency greatly ion battery, commonly outweigh the inconvenience used to power a wireless of changing batteries. sensor, could last up for Sensors and smartphones two to three years while a are key components in FM. smartphone operates for less While the demands placed than a day on a full charge. on sensor and mobile tech These short timeframes are outpacing current require frequent attention functionality, to ensure functionality, Wand W W. B I F M .O RG .U K / Fsuch M WJdevices O I N are propelling FM to new heights. organisations with a large here has been much discussion of the benefits IoT brings to building management. FMs can now create a network of sensors to enable them to remotely track the status of assets, from soap dispensers to boilers. When the sensors are integrated with FM software, the process of dispatching an operative can be automated. The operative can access the alert from a smartphone, and view the job in real time. This relies on battery power to supply each wireless device, and at last more development is

presence still matter in business? Do we need to be in the same place to establish rapport and trust? Many formal business transactions are actually better suited to taking place virtually; when a CFO provides financial analysis to his firm’s

“THERE WILL ALWAYS BE THE NEED FOR PERSONAL BUSINESS INTERACTIONS” leadership it may be better understood through VR delivery. But there will always be the need for personal business interactions. In a virtual world where everything is doable remotely, being together will then be even more special, which means optimising experiences for in-person connections. We envision office spaces with pods where people can work alone or use VR to plug into meetings in other locations. There will be meeting areas to connect with colleagues and unwind. Offices overall will provide a better experience for those who work there.

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“SENSORS AND SMARTPHONES ARE KEY COMPONENTS IN FM”

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V I E W P O I NT

T H E T H I N K TA N K

S O C I AL E NT E RP RISE S

THE ONLY WAY IS ETHICS The Fireplace Award has been set up by property charity the Ethical Property Foundation. It evaluates organisations by working practices and a range of ethical policies. We asked what ethical practices you think should be prioritised. And what can the sector gain from a focus on wider social value?

JOHN BOWEN

R E A DE R P OLL

AVOIDING DISCRIMINATION IN ETHICAL AMBITION

SURVEY RESULTS

I think that it is good to have some cohesive debate on the subject and that doing so might bring more focus on the possibilities that could be exploited. Some aspects are often already in place, for example, if you look outside of the big cities most employees do come from the local community; in one of the teams that I am currently working with only one out of 23 lives more that five miles away. Restricting your choice to local suppliers can be more difficult. The nearest specialist suppliers might be miles away and you want the best you can afford so restricting yourself geographically has to be balanced against ethical ambition. There is also an issue for the public sector whereby procurement regulation requires open competition in certain circumstances. There is a similar issue in recruiting employees whereby restricting applicants to local ones could be viewed as discrimination and the dichotomy of wanting to be ethical when to do so requires you to act outside the law which is, in turn, a breach of ethics will no doubt continue to rattle around for some time yet. Waste management is getting better, but there are still instances of front-end recycling not being carried through the system due to the inability of local authorities to process certain types of waste.

Given the difficulties involved in developing and sustaining ethical policies and working practices such as funding community projects, local hiring/purchasing, paying the Living Wage, and policies on carbon and waste, we asked what practices you think should be prioritised. Here is your verdict:

45.45%

36.36%

Rates of pay and rights of representation for employees

Engagement with the local community

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18.19%

W W W. B I F M .O RG .U K / F M WJ O I N

Ethical procurement policies

JOHN BOWEN, FM consultant fm-world.co.uk

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INSIDE

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Mobilisation – how does it work? Preparing for winter Beating the bacteria The new electronic communications code Safety on tap

KNOW HOW THE L ATE ST L E A RN I N G A N D BE ST P RAC TI CE

A RTWOR K

THE BIGGER PICTURE

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rtLifting is an American business that empowers artists who face homelessness and disability by selling their artwork to businesses for display. In its fourth year of trading, the company has placed artworks with corporate clients including Google, Microsoft, LinkedIn, Staples, Bain & Co and BCG. When working as a social worker, co-founder Liz Powers found that a lot of the art produced in shelters and disability centres was thrown away. Conscious of those she was working with asking for “an opportunity, not a handout”, she started ArtLifting to give these artists a platform to show their talents. Airlifting’s artists submit an application and go through a curation process, after which they can then can sell their work through the AirLifting website. Every artist earns 55 per cent of the profit from the sale of their work; 1 per cent from each sale goes to a fund that provides art supplies to art groups nationwide. ArtLifting uses the remaining 44 per cent “to further our mission”. “We realise that in order to make sustainable change, we need to run a financially sustainable business,” says Powers. “I’ve seen artists secure housing, gain confidence, and overcome obstacles through the sale and celebration of their art. I’ve seen that validation permeate other areas of their lives and create positive change. Some may have more energy to complete job applications; others may be more motivated to stay healthy. The stories of these artists continually inspire me. Instead of defining people by their circumstance, we should define them by their talent.” www.artlifting.com

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K N OW H OW

TECHNICAL EXPL AINER

JASON SAVILLE is commercial director at BRITA Vivreau

DRINKING WATER

SAFETY ON TAP

Ensuring that drinking water equipment is safe requires a high-quality system complemented by a stringent e sanitisation regime, says Jason Saville

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pecifying drinking water equipment is an important decision for FMs. Without appropriate mechanisms there is the potential for a proliferation of bacteria and contamination – particularly threatening in a healthcare setting with vulnerable patients. Below are six crucial considerations for FMs when choosing a system:

Micron filters: By choosing

appropriate filters, FMs reduce the chances of bacteria entering the drinking water system while also enhancing the taste of the water. In a healthcare environment we recommend a system with a 0.2-micron filter before water is dispensed through the sanitised nozzle area and a 0.5-micron filter for the mains-fed water inlet. This allows little to no bacteria to travel either way. Filters should be changed every six months.

PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY IMAGES

Self-cleaning nozzle:

Water that accumulates at the tap nozzle collects bacteria. Research has shown that after 120 minutes bacteria is liable to travel back up and into the water system. In a hospital this could be very serious. FMs working in the healthcare field should consider a system that heats up the nozzle to 110°C every 90 minutes and prevents bacteria travelling through the

dispense nozzle into the cooler he co coole olerr itself – acting as a thermal disinfectant. Hospital patients are encouraged to drink at least a litre of water a day, so bacteria risks must be minimised, particularly for those undergoing chemotherapy.

Ice bank refrigeration:

Temperature plays a prominent role in the spread of bacteria. It is important to invest in high-performance ice bank refrigeration, which helps water to remain cool and is capable of delivering large quantities of chilled water each hour. once at the beginning of the day and once at the end using sanitising wipes or spray. Don’t forget to clean the drip tray lid and inside the drip tray using either sanitising wipes or hot soapy water and a non-abrasive cloth. Regularly service systems to stop rust, sludge, and slime developing.

Networking water:

A system with a master control unit (MCU) that pumps water through the building will ensure that it is fresh and reduces the chances of stagnant water, which encourages bacteria growth. This type of system networks drinking water in the same way as the internet would be networked. Adequately insulating the pipes that distribute the water also minimises the spread of unwanted germs.

Internet of Things technology: Some systems

Conclusion: Effective

specifying of drinking water equipment can ease the pressure on FMs and leave them confident that staff and guests (or patients) are protected from germs and can stay well hydrated with safe, high-quality drinking water. If in doubt, consult the company that installed the equipment if it offers this service – or read the wide range of information provided by the Health and Safety Executive and the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers.

are equipped with IoT technology to provide filter or service change alerts to both the building’s FM and the maintenance team to highlight requirements such as filter changes. Some control management systems (CMS) are designed to monitor the performance of the MCU using IoT technology. The CMS is W W W.www.vivreau.co.uk B I F M .O RG .U K / F M WJ O I N an essential tool to ensure

Removable dispense nozzle: Whereas a self-

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cleaning nozzle is necessary in critical care, in a commercial setting a removable dispense nozzle enables appropriate sanitisation. It is recommended that sanitisation is carried out

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optimum performance of the system particularly when each MCU controls multiple drinking water dispenser points in one building.

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FAC I LITATE

B I F M AWA R D S 2017 - T H E I N D I V I D UA L W I N N ER S

A B I F M AWA R D S S P E C I A L

MOVING

TOWARDS

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November 2017


The four recipients of this year’s individual BIFM awards each came to prominence during a different decade of facilities management’s progress from ad hoc discipline to fully formed profession. Martin Read met all four to paint a picture of the sector’s ongoing development

PHOTOGRAPHY: AKIN FALOPE

EXCELLENCE

he thing that strikes you most about all four of this year’s BIFM Awards individual category recipients is an innate enthusiasm – for their current roles, certainly, but also their choice of profession more broadly. What particularly resonates this year is how all four combine to link every stage of the profession’s development. Our recipients each started their first defined FM role in a separate one of the four decades during which facilities management has been a recognised business activity in this country: Marilyn Standley, who was helping define the profession during the 1980s, becoming the BIFM’s first chair in 1993; Andrew Smart, who started out as a labourer before rising to key positions of influence in the 1990s;

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Mike Gibson, who has never looked back since embarking on the ENGIE graduate programme in the 2000s; and Conrad Dinsmore, a perfect example of the new generation of professional FMs coming out of university and making their mark during the 2010s. This breadth of experience is helpful in uncovering not just what has changed, but what has remained constant about the way FM is both perceived and delivered. All four talk of frustration in dealing with those whose misconceptions about the sector can limit how effective FM can be; but conversely, all four – including Marilyn Standley, on the cusp of retirement yet still passionate about the sector – talk of the huge opportunity for intelligently delivered facilities management services to help organisations transcend any productivity, environmental and wellbeing problems. It’s also noteworthy that the word ‘professionalisation’ is present in each interview transcript - at all age levels, there is a sense that, from qualifications frameworks to engagement with associated professions, facilities management is making its mark more effectively in 2017 than it ever has before. Clients are more accepting of the value FM can bring, even if full definitions of that value remain difficult to spell out comprehensively. Over the following four pages you’ll learn more about their stories and get a sense of their perspectives on how FM is W W W. B I F M .O RG .U K / F M WJ O I N seen and delivered in 2017.

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FAC I LITATE

B I F M AWA R D S 2017 - I M PAC T C AT EG O R I E S

BRACE FOR IMPACT FM’s ability to positively influence organisational performance, the environment, and the experience of both customers and employees is no mystery within the sector itself – but this year’s winners graphically demonstrate just how powerful the FM’s impact can be

I M PA C T O N C U S T O M E R E X P E R I E N C E

MACRO

CABLE CAR’S CUSTOMER CARE A STRATEGIC PRIORITY

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tanding as the first ever urban cable car in the UK, the Emirates Air Line places a unique set of challenges on Macro, with the contractor required to fulfil all of the safety and regulatory requirements imposed on any Transport for London (TfL) transport provider while also meeting the needs of customers using it as a tourist attraction. Since its 2012 launch the Emirates Air Line cable car has carried more than eight million passengers, consistently ranking the highest out of all TfL’s modes of

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FAC I LITATE

B I F M AWA R D S 2017 – I M PAC T O N S O CI E T Y

Through its Impact on Society category, the BIFM Awards seek to link people’s awareness of FM to the broader social role it is clearly in a position to fulfil. The extraordinary organisations recognised in this year’s awards show how awareness of this link is growing ever clearer

SOCIAL THE RECYCLING LIVES BACKSTORY

CLIM

The Golden Hill scrap metal and skip hire business was owned and operated by Recycling Live’s President, Terry Jackson, father of current CEO Steven Jackson. Following a period of acquisition and a name change to Preston Recycling, Steve Jackson was introduced to Terry Waite CBE and inspired to find a new way to help tackle homelessness; ‘Recycling Lives’ was born. The Recycling Lives UK social welfare charity was designed to be funded by the commercial success of Recycling Lives Ltd, a new entity created by absorbing Preston Recycling Ltd. Steve Jackson and family invested £3 million to build the first Recycling Lives centre in Preston. Opened in 2009, it houses individuals who would otherwise be homeless (as well as many other community focused projects). The Recycling Lives’ charitable arm is instigated.

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Recycling Lives in numbers

10%

The board of Recycling Lives has committed to creating a social value equal to or greater than 10% of the company's annual sales

BERS C

onnecting waste management services to a broad range of social value outputs is the brilliantly executed idea that helped aptly named Recycling Lives claim this year’s BIFM Award for Impact on Society. A long-established waste management firm providing waste and recycling services for clients such as BT, Wates, and Beaverbrooks, Recycling Lives has over the past few years introduced a social welfare charity arm through which it has been able to offer rehabilitation and a route back into the workforce for offenders. The

firm has also introduced a surplus food distribution operation that delivers to organisations as diverse as well-women centres, children’s centres, homeless shelters, pre and after-school groups, and pensioners’ groups. Recycling Lives’ social mission links to the prison service’s academies programme, with men and women given the opportunity to ‘earn and learn’ while still in prison. Undertaking recycling processes such as dismantling waste electrical or electronic items into component parts, participants are provided with training that improves their chances of finding employment when released.

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150

Number of offenders employed through HMP Academies on workshops to dismantle waste electrical or electronic items to component parts while training, earning an enhanced wage and developing core life and work skills

800,000 Number of meals distributed by Recycling Lives – in partnership with national charity FareShare – since its launch in October 2015

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50%

Sales growth enjoyed by Recycling W W W. B I F M .O RG .U K / F M WJ O I N Lives over the past two years.


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FM World 06 November 2017  

Taster edition of the November FM World magazine.