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I N F O R M I N G FA C I L I T I E S M A N A G E M E N T P R O F E S S I O N A L S

fm-world.co.uk / March 2017

TA ST E R E D I T I O N

TRUST DEFICIT Why is it so difficult to sustain FM contract relationships?

LET’S GET TOGETHER Is a collaboration standard needed to make contracts work?

DANGEROUS GAME The perils of client and provider constantly checking on each other

ON THE FRONT LINE The role of service personnel in keeping relationships alive


F M WO R LD

MARCH 2017

CONTENTS COM M UNI TY

2 2 PE R SPE C T IV E S The four most interesting and insightful opinions on FM this month 2 5 A BIT A BOU T YOU Adam Perkins tells tales away from the riverbank

KNOW LE DGE

26 THINK TA NK What are the current FM priorities in the world of retail?

ANA LYS I S

9 WO RKP LACE FUTURE S An emerging decentralised individualcentric world of work beckons

36 CROSSING OVER Making the switch from a service provider role to one in-house

28 M A RC H @ BIF M The people and projects currently informing BIFM activity

11 NEWS MAK E RS The stories proving most popular with FM World’s online visitors this month

35 GRIPPING STUFF Thistle Magnetic Plaster turns wall space into an interactive tool

3 9 GE R M WA R FA R E Can probiotic-based cleaners change the FM industry?

3 2 C A LL S TO AC T ION The events, surveys and discussions that deserve your attention

12 B EST O F BR ADFORD How the University of Bradford won the CIBSE Building Performance Awards

40 GE T D U ST- BU ST I N G Dealing with the hazards of dust in the workplace

15 CAUTI O US APPROACH Cautious optimism characterises the 2017 Business Confidence Monitor

41 INTO THE FOG Combatting norovirus outbreaks at work with ULV fogging

16 READ I NG THE DATA Bellrock’s strategic rationale for purchasing Concerto

42 TOO M U C H INFOR M AT I O N ? Using big data to deliver strategic energy savings

FM World’s in-depth analysis section 46 TRIED & TRUSTED The reasons why contracts fail are many and diverse, but lack of trust remains an abiding theme. Why is this still such a problem – and how can contractors make inroads in to one of FM’s most intractable problems?

50 DOMINO EFFECT If frontline FM operatives are given greater autonomy and responsibility, can this improve the flow of data from end-user to both client and provider, thus forcing immediate resolution to performance issues?

54 COMMON PURSUIT Better outcomes depend on the degree of collaboration between parties, but that is a difficult thing to quantify and to maintain. Will the newly updated ISO44001 standard change things?

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60 PARALLEL LINES The client-provider relationship increasingly involves subcontractors MARC H ’ S TO P I C working through an CLIENT / SUPPLIER overall FM provider RELATIONSHIPS rather than working directly with the client. What issues W Wdo W.such B I F M .O RG .U K / F M WJ O I N relationships involve?

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F RO NT D E S K A N A LY S I S

“Moving as a network is the only way to find the bandwidth we need,” Hinks told delegates

in retrospect. He pointed by example to the growth of giant ‘disintermediator’ businesses – Amazon, Uber, AirBnB, Google, Dropbox and the like – all ‘metalevel organisations “taking data and drawing out complex, integrated, synthetic analyses of what is going on”. Disintermediation, said Hinks, was when a third party “gets

PHOTOGRAPHY: WORKPLACE FUTURES

“TECHNOLOGY IS OFFERING A TRICK-ORTREAT MOMENT FOR A NEXT GENERATION, DATA AND SERVICELED FM MODEL” between you and your client, the supply chain or even your colleagues, operating the interface that you would traditionally have controlled and changing it into something they control through use of intelligence and data analytics at a macro rather than person-to-person level”. “How their customers travel, commute, purchase – the pictures these organisations are building put them in a position where they can seriously influence the service experience of consumers, allowing them the ability to curate their own work style and lifestyle.” This shift, said Hinks, “changes managers’ and leaders’ responsibilities; it shifts power to the democracy of ‘the network within organisations’; and it takes people off the corporate footprint.” Hinks’ view was that FM is

Hinks’s focus on the ‘black swan’ phenomenon – dramatic change only identified too late – was not lost on his audience

at risk of having these giant disintermediators coming into the sector, automating such processes as compliance, liability and response management. FM firms would then be in a position where they were doing no more than “gigging” FM on the disintermediators behalf. “The threat is that FM service providers become marginalised as mere providers of commoditised service – making us just a part of the picture rather than a controlling element.” Hinks warned that developments such as as the Internet of Things, with the cataloguing and programming of anticipated maintenance, for example, would take the service close to ‘AIaugmented FM’, “where you would only need a para-professional FM to provide [service].”

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How, then, to respond? Technology, says Hinks, is presenting the FM sector with a trick-or-treat moment for a nextgen, data-led, service-led FM model. There is, he warned, “the near-term risk of losing control of key value and differentiation pinch points”. The FM sector needed to focus around the person rather than the building, “because the service you provide is coming from the technology in their hand”. A future next-gen FM model would demand common protocols and standards, “but the big lesson from all the disintermediation so far is that it requires industry-level coopetition to protect an industry overall.” A particularly far-sighted vision perhaps, but Hinks’s focus on the ‘black swan’ phenomenon – dramatic change identified too late – was not lost on his audience. Hinks suggested the entire sector having a shared vision and intent (“moving as a network is the only way to find the bandwidth we need”) and “an industry-wide innovation framework to sustain the shared focus that we need to become more than the sum of our parts.” It’s quite the vision for FM’s future, W W W.and B I Fwhether M .O RG the .U Ksector / F M WJ O I N could adapt was left unsaid.

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S U P P LY S I D E

BUSINESS NEWS

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CO M M E NTARY

ACQ UI S I TI ON

TRUMP ECONOMIC PLAN: PROMISE OR PERIL? G R A E M E D AV I E S newsdesk@fm-world.co.uk

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ever mind the seemingly semi-permanent concerns about straitened government budgets and low-growth economies in the UK and Europe, FMs who operate internationally have new headaches now as the impending Brexit negotiations and the advent of Donald Trump’s protectionist rhetoric in the US throw up some huge strategic issues. Both the UK’s withdrawal from the EU and Trump’s accession in the US could unsettle international businesses. First, the unknowns about UK access to the single market, and indeed many other global markets given the need to negotiate trade deals around the globe, might already be affecting investment decisions by companies. A so-called ‘hard’ Brexit, which sees the UK withdraw from the common market and also abandon the principle of the free movement of workers, poses big issues for companies who both operate in Europe and employ EU workers. If nothing else there is likely to be a hike in the cost of operating across the continent. For UK firms there might be the added risk that such extra costs could make them less competitive when coming up against EU rivals. So far the Brexit effect has been negligible for the UK economy. The slide in the value of sterling has given UK businesses that transact abroad a boost as their products and services have become cheaper. But the latest output figures from the services sector suggest a slowing of growth, and firms are also contending with returning inflation, both through wages and input costs – especially if those inputs are priced in overseas currencies. Across the pond, uncertainty has arisen with Trump’s ‘America first’ mantra. All the signs from his early policy pronouncements point to a protectionist America in terms of trade but also with an avowedly pro-business stance at home. For businesses operating in the US there could be benefits as business regulation is likely to be relaxed and taxation could shrink, but so could their supply of relatively cheap labour, a key component for many FM businesses. It is early days in the Trump presidency and so far stock markets in the US are enjoying the ride, soaring to record highs and renewed confidence and a strong dollar could lead to more overseas mergers and acquisitions activity.

“SO FAR STOCK MARKETS IN THE US ARE ENJOYING THE RIDE, SOARING TO RECORD HIGHS”

GRAEME DAVIES writes for Investors Chronicle fm-world.co.uk

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Servest buys Scottish pest control specialist Pro-Check Servest has acquired Dundeebased pest control specialist Pro-Check Environmental Services Northern Limited. Pro-Check has been providing pest control, cleaning, hygiene services and environmental solutions to local businesses and councils since 2000. Global facilities management firm Servest said Pro-Check, which operates mainly in Scotland, provided the chance to grow its geographical coverage. The Pro-Check Environmental Services Northern team will be joining Servest and founder Jim Devaney will take on the role of Scotland area manager. Servest chief executive Rob Legge said the acquisition would allow Servest to offer clients extra pest services and expertise. “The move forms a part of Servest’s growth strategy and will help develop our already successful pest control division,” he said. “The acquisition marks an exciting start to the year as we continue to grow.” Servest acquired building services contractor Arthur McKay in October and Catering Academy Ltd in November. Servest operates internationally, with corporate head offices in Bury St Edmunds, UK, and W W W. B I F M .O RGJohannesburg, .U K / F M WJ O I N South Africa.

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V I E W P O I NT

Have your say

PERSPECTIVES

Visit fm-world.co.uk for longer versions of these comment columns Get in touch by email – editorial@fm-world.co.uk Topical, inspirational, angry or amusing – we consider all relevant comment

PERSPECTIVES 1

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BILL HANCOX is director of facilities management at Edge Hill University

AMANDA MCCLOSKEY is sales and marketing director at CIS Security

A life less ordinary

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ot everyone who works in the FM sector actually aspires to have a career in FM. Many of our colleagues simply work in the FM environment to pay the bills, as a stop-gap, by chance, or simply to make ends meet. As managers and leaders we should ensure that we do not fail to recognise that it’s perfectly reasonable and acceptable to work within FM and not have the aspiration to become a manager, head, director, or CEO. Like many of those reading this, I have encountered a significant number of talented people who make an invaluable contribution to the workplace and the customer experience. They work very hard as individuals and also as part of a wider team. They perform exceptionally well in their work environment, and they are a great cultural fit. They love where they work and they love what they do, but they don’t have a real desire to anything other than ‘their job.’ I have long held the belief that we should invest in all of our people – not just those who show real ambition and who make it clear that they wish to progress. I wouldn’t dare to argue that we shouldn’t recognise, develop

Gender: a better balance

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in Security and WIFM, but modernisation will be slow unless as an industry we make a significant effort to even things up. Encouraging more women into the industry is an objective of mine for CIS Security. We are making progress, with a steady increase in female recruitment over the past few years; 14 per cent of our staff are women. We want to get a better balance, hence our target of 20 per cent in our 2020 business plan. Our clients express a desire to include more women in their teams. Many say they appreciate the diplomacy a woman can bring to a conflict situation. And many women who have joined us are often surprised when the roles exceed their expectations in terms of job satisfaction. UK retailers are now piloting the introduction of more family-friendly shift patterns. Shorter shifts mean increased staff and increased costs for a business, but given especially in the corporate that there is no precedent for sector, have evolved with this, we have no visibility of a focus on softer skills, the long game. I suspect it will diplomacy and customer have cascading benefits for service. A first impression a business that could offset lasts, and it is important to the extra costs involved. I get the team balance right. hope that the security and FM There are several industry can from these bodies attempting to effect W W W. B Isectors F M .O RG .Ulearn K/FM WJ O IN initiatives. change, notably Women he latest gender diversity research from the Security Industry Authority (SIA) says 9 per cent of security operatives are women. There has been so much positivity in the FM sector about the potential for what can be achieved in areas such as well-being within this changing FM landscape. The BIFM ThinkFM event has been pivotal in promoting this. It has me thinking about how the private security function should be evolving and the part that the gender gap closing can play in this. Perspectives on how to operate effective security,

and retain talent, and we should certainly develop the potential of those snapping at our heels, but we should also not lose sight of all of our less obvious colleagues who are making a difference – regardless of their role.

“WE SHOULD INVEST IN ALL OF OUR PEOPLE – NOT JUST THOSE WHO SHOW REAL AMBITION” Everybody has a slightly different perspective on and definition of personal development. For some it is career-focused and trainingintensive. For others it might be more vocational or experiential. There are some who welcome any chance to develop, even if that personal development isn’t directly related to their appraisal or even their career. All of the aforementioned groups/categories can and do make an invaluable contribution to the business. So what more could/should we do to support and develop those who just want to be the best at what they do now?

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“MANY [CLIENTS] APPRECIATE THE DIPLOMACY A WOMAN CAN BRING TO A CONFLICT”

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F M -WO R L D.CO.U K / B I F M - N E W S

6 0 SECONDS WITH...

Stephen Roots BIFM chairman and Head of FM at Matalan

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s a long-time advocate of all things FM, Stephen Roots stepped into the role of BIFM chairman in January this year having previously served as deputy chairman under his predecessor Julie Kortens. Having earlier this month welcomed two new members to the BIFM Board following our recent election, we challenged him to answer a series of quickfire questions to discover why he is so passionate about facilities management, what it takes to be a successful FM, and his hopes for the profession.

What made you choose FM as a career?

Like many others, I didn’t choose FM as a career. I started my professional life as a quantity surveyor working on measured term contracts in the mid-1990s and then was appointed as regional facilities manager for the North West Employment Service portfolio when the contract was won by Atkins FM. This was my first experience of soft FM and it was certainly a steep learning curve!

What do you wish you’d known about the industry before you joined?

Just how diverse the industry is and how it has so many touch points in all organisations. When I first started practising as a FM, the key drivers were service delivery (which is still relevant) and space management. As

I’ve progressed, the focus has changed from space to technology and is now moving towards people.

What does it take to be successful in FM?

Being able to listen to customers and stakeholders and take those issues to create solutions that add real value.

What are the most enjoyable aspects of your job?

I’m lucky in that I work with many different clients in both the public and private sectors. The opportunity to experience changes and improvements in working practices, and then analysing how these can be adapted to bring best practice to a completely different sector, means that I never stop learning. In respect of my BIFM role, the best aspect is the opportunity to give something back to the industry.

Who’s influenced your career most and why?

I’ve worked with some fantastic people over the past 20 years, but Les Stephenson and Dean Bennett gave me my first break in the FM industry and helped instil in me a real sense of professionalism, which I hope I still carry today.

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given?

When you are with a client, listen to what they

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family and driving over to the North Wales coast, a long walk along the beach, a decent pub lunch and then the kids falling asleep on the drive home is hard to beat.

have to say. Let them be the major contributor to the conversation.

What’s the skill you’d most like to have?

I am so envious when I see music being played live. I’d have loved to be able to play the guitar.

What’s your greatest work achievement?

I always keep a pad of scrap paper to jot down ideas whilst I’m talking, a picture of my children, my coffee cup (the biscuits are kept in the drawer!) and my iPad.

Being elected by my peers to serve as BIFM chairman is pretty much up there, but I always take pride when a client acts upon my advice and implements something which sometimes may be seen as a major step towards a new FM strategy.

What are you passionate about?

What’s the best/worst quality in a leader?

What’s on your desk?

Enabling people to realise their potential. The greatest buzz I get is when I see someone I have helped go on to do great things.

Who’s your business hero?

Richard Branson has to be admired for what he has achieved and how Virgin is now one of the world’s most recognised brands. His ability to accept that you have to fail at times along your journey, and that you don’t learn to walk by following rules but by trying and trying, falling over and learning from your mistakes.

The best quality is being able to show that you trust and value your team; the worst quality is those who use fear to implement their instructions.

What are your career ambitions?

I want to build on the fantastic work done by Julie Kortens over the last 2-3 years and help the Institute to maintain its position as the definitive voice in the FM industry and to be the first-choice professional body for those working in the FM environment. From a personal perspective, I’d like to continue working with Describe your perfect stakeholders developing day away from work. innovative solutions for their With two children under the businesses that add value age of 10, a perfect day would the.U best start with a lie-in! But packing W Wand W. Bprovide I F M .O RG K / Fpossible M WJ O I N image of FM delivery. the car with the dog and the

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March 2017


K N OW H OW

FIVE POINT PLAN

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unified approach is needed to develop a comprehensive strategy for combatting both physical and cybersecurity threats more holistically. As more devices are designed to connect and share information within today’s smart buildings, the physical security team needs to incorporate the IT team in its proposal, design, implementation discussions and decisions. Collaboration isn’t a one-way street. If the IT team hasn’t involved the physical security team in its cyber assessments and incident response processes, the business suffers. Everyone in the physical security team should know where the critical technology resources are, and should have been involved in plans to protect those assets. While security cameras are generally overseen by a physical security team, the Internet of Things allows for cameras to be connected with other devices, systems or networks that would traditionally not be under the team’s remit. It is important to get ahead of the inevitable convergence between IT and physical access as cybersecurity concerns escalate. The first step is to establish a communications channel and develop the relationships and processes to make it work. Many facilities are still running on old legacy access control systems that are often not updated until after a security breach. Moving to a more sophisticated IP-based access control system that incorporates physical and cyber or IT security principles brings greater advantages to a site. But security teams must not work in isolation from one another.

SE C URE T E C HNO LOGY

STRENGTH IN UNITY As devices are increasingly being designed to connect and share information, physical security and IT teams need to work more closely together, explains Chip Epps from security firm HID Global

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Do the physical and IT security teams ultimately report in to the same organisation or a chief security officer? If not, they should, so that the CSO or organisation leader can get a complete overview of the site’s security and take the necessary steps to enhance security, whether this is for physical security or IT security.

Has the IT team implemented more advanced security policies that incorporate location attributes, or data often available from physical access systems? Monitoring who is entering your building and facilities and what your employees are accessing requires a cohesive approach. IT teams need to make sure that their systems are integrated with physical access control systems to accurately track employees and visitors within a building, thus providing greater context in analysing user behaviour and activity.

Is there a regular forum to discuss and approve projects that cross the line between the teams? Security cameras, for example, fall under the domain of the physical security team. But now IoT connects these with other devices that formerly might not have been considered under the domain of the physical security team. Having devices like cameras connected to other systems and networks can deliver significant value by turning data into actionable intel – but can also open you up to broader public exposure and risk.

Are team members participating in any cross-functional projects with members from the IT or physical security team? Collaboration on projects that combine implementing IT and physical access control solutions is critical to helping develop a robust, holistic approach to an organisation’s security strategies. This will also nurture an organisational culture of bringing IT and physical access control teams together.

Is there collaboration on corporate compliance training or is there a separate curriculum/ content? Making sure the physical and IT security teams are trained together to develop security practices throughout the site is imperative. By working together on compliance, teams can discover where their domains cross over and whether there are any gaps in either their practices or regulations.

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K N OW H OW

FIVE POINT PLAN

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What is ULV fogging?

Even with a regular cleaning regime, dirt, grime and bacteria can build up in the premises, particularly in hardto-reach places. ULV fogging is a technique that treats large areas in a short space of time by generating a visible mist formed of tiny droplets of disinfectant measuring 5-50 microns in diameter.

HE ALT H & SAFE T Y

PREVENTING A WINTER ILLNESS OUTBREAK AT THE OFFICE

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How does it work?

The droplets of disinfectant used in ULV fogging ensure maximum coverage and a fast drying time, providing a quick and effective treatment for businesses. The process is also commonly used in large spaces such as office facilities, hotels, or in the food industry to quickly sanitise areas, including soft furnishings such as couches and curtains, that are hard to fully cover with manual cleaning alone. Ultimately, it helps keep the downtime for a business to a minimum.

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What else do FMs need to know?

It is important for staff with norovirus or other illness symptoms to notify their workplace and stay away from work until at least 48 hours after the symptoms have ceased, so that it is not spread. If staff become ill, or report back complaining of possible symptoms that are symptomatic of gastroenteritis then a rapid-response fogging of a high-level disinfectant is highly recommended. It is always desirable to remove an infectious reservoir before it becomes an outbreak. This proactive approach, coupled with deep cleaning, also helps to demonstrate due diligence and goes a long way to ensuring compliance with workplace health and safety standards.

Studies show that using ULV fogging significantly reduces the number of potentially harmful pathogens, as it can cover areas that manual cleaning can’t reach. A final wipe… The fogging technique can Ultimately, both routine also include a disinfectant with cleaning and deep ‘Reactive Barrier Technology’ cleaning are essential to keep areas sanitised for for premises to remain long periods. This is more operational, hygienic and effective than commonly used compliant, as is a thorough bleach-based cleaners, which understanding of the basics of kill pathogens at the time personal hygiene. ULV fogging they are applied, only for the is one of the key weapons surface to be immediately in the arsenal for specialist recontaminated with viral cleaners to help keep your particles from someone’s facility outbreak-free. hand. With Reactive Barrier If you’re unsure about how Technology, pathogens that regularly your premises require land on the surface are deep cleaning, or which deactivated so you get a far services are required, then greater level of protection to consulting a professional who break the cycle of infection. can conduct a hygiene audit This is particularly effective be helpful W W W. B I F Mcan .O RG .U K / FinMcreating WJ O I Na in stemming the progress suitable strategy. of an outbreak.

Alongside their conventional cleaning and hygiene practices, office and facilities managers now have a secret weapon to help keep at bay outbreaks of infections such as norovirus – Ultra Low Volume (ULV) fogging. Luke Rutterford, technical manager at Rentokil Specialist Hygiene, explains

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igures from Public Health England show that more people this year were struck down with norovirus during the Christmas season than in any of the past five years – the infection rate figure was 71 per cent higher than for the same period last year. Norovirus (or ‘winter vomiting bug’) has a very low infectious dose – one only needs to have a few viral particles to become infected. Regular cleaning and good employee hygiene play a vital role in preventing the spread of such illnesses, but if an outbreak takes place, to get the site back to normal as fast as possible there is Ultra Low Volume (ULV) fogging.

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Why is ULV fogging used?

ULV fogging is carried out by a trained specialist hygiene technician outside normal operating hours or while the facility is empty. The technician uses a specialised ULV fogging machine and a disinfectant solution that has been carefully chosen, tested and validated to ensure it is the most effective against the target pathogens and suitable for the particular environment.

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March 2017


ENABLING PRODUC TIVE ENVIRONMENTS FOR PEOPLE AND BUSINESS

Keeping it sweet

How the breakdown of the client / contractor relationship can be avoided

FRONTING UP How more autonomy for managers could lead to better outcomes

IN TRUST WE TRUST Why one of the most common words in FM is so hard to come by

TO ACCESS THE FULL VERSION OF FM DIGITAL MEDICINE WORLD MAGAZINE, More data demands JOIN BIFM more data-savvy FMs – W W W. B I F M .O RG .U K / F M WJ O I N

are they emerging?


FAC I LITATE

CL I EN T/ P ROV I D ER R EL AT I O N S H I P S

the outset if both parties are to avoid issues at the end of contracts, he adds. “During the negotiating, there needs to be an open and honest discussion from clients about what they’re expecting from their service provider. It’s then the provider’s turn to manage expectations and to pre-empt possible outcomes based on their experience and expertise to date.” Having an open relationship means both parties know what to expect, and suppliers can be more open about prices instead of underpricing initially to win the contracts, he adds. But, says Mike Wingrove, head of facilities and real estate at law firm Dentons, it’s important that such relationships are built up at the right level. “You might find that at the outset of contracts the negotiations commence with the sales or business development team and the actual operational team are not in front of the client until the agreement is live, so any relationship that has been built up has not necessarily been built up with the right people. “We only engage in any discussion or presentation with the operational team in attendance to mitigate that potential loss of communication or understanding.” He also believes the middle period of a contract is where things can break down, and uses three-plus-two-year deals to encourage providers to maintain performance – an example of how the industry is responding to past failures. Clients and suppliers alike should also make provision for when things do go wrong, says Bowen. “Make it clear when it goes out to tender that if they’re not successful then this is how the handover will be done,” he says. “That should make it clear for the supplier too, and the clearer the specification is the better the price will be, because they tend to take out a bit of insurance against anything that they think is ambiguous.” Wingrove, meanwhile, says he insists on writing contracts himself rather than using standard ones presented by providers, with one aim being to allow for a swift termination if things don’t work out.

“WE DO SEE SOME VERY AWKWARD EXITS OR POOR PERFORMANCE TOWARDS THE END BECAUSE THEY DON’T THINK THEY’LL GET THE NEXT PIECE OF BUSINESS”

“Contracts in the past have often contained terms and conditions that have bound them together when the social contract between the two parties has long since passed,” he says. Those without sufficient knowledge should seek legal advice, or at least sound out peer group networks, he adds.

Interpersonal skills

It’s also vital for clients and service providers to learn lessons when things haven’t worked out. “It’s very easy for clients to blame the outgoing contractor for doing a bad job, but they don’t often look at what they should have done differently, or thought about how they can protect the contractor going forward,” says Sutherland. “I always ask the incumbent when I’m doing a tender what they need from the client that they’re not currently getting, and I feed that information back. But do they take that on board? I’m not sure they do.” Often the real lesson is about interpersonal skills, says Hallard. “Our research shows that in 85 per cent of cases where outsourcing fails it does so because of poor relationship management. “The whole outsourcing industry is all about the client and service provider really understanding each other, and acknowledging that the service provider has to make a profit. There’s often a huge lack of understanding or care on the buyer side that the service provider is there for a reason as well. That can cause quite a few problems if you don’t

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have intelligent enough buyers and relationship managers in place.” Yet there are signs that the industry as a whole is learning the lessons of failed contracts over the past decade. “Certainly over the last few years we’ve seen the introduction of an intelligent client function, which recognises the importance of that contract management relationship and what the client needs to do to drive value out of it,” says Sutherland. “It’s usually a mixture of performance measurements and relationship management, and it gives the best line of communication for the contractor. They know who the best person in that organisation is to support them to get to other decision-makers or to help them understand what they’re supposed to be delivering.” Wingrove also thinks the sector is making progress. “There’s certainly been a learning curve, which has developed into new ways of working with service providers,” he says. “We have a lot of poachers who have turned gamekeepers now, so people working in in-house, clientside FM roles have become significantly more knowledgeable. Respect and mutual understanding of differing objectives is certainly better understood, and that leads W W W. B I F M .O RG .U K / F M WJ O I N to a far better working relationship.”

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FAC I LITATE

ISO44001

P H OT O G R A P H Y: RICHARD GLEED

APPROACH ou don’t have to dig that deep into new contract announcements before finding a phrase along the lines of ‘We look forward to collaborating closely with our new partners to extract maximum value for both parties’. Much like ‘innovation’, it is a term thrown around freely and easily. But inasmuch as true innovation can lead to a business changing product or way of working, true collaboration can lead to drastically different relationships and unlock that previously hidden

value. But just what separates true collaboration from false, and how does an organisation embrace it? There’s an international standard that is designed to help. Based in large part on its forebear BS11000, and steered by the Institute of Collaborative Working (ICW) with assistance of a range of experts and firms from different sectors, ISO44001 is intended to help replicate the mutually beneficial relationships frequently found between individuals with organisations. At the heart of the standard’s ideal is a belief that relationships between organisations are all too often hindered by not being thought about until a contract has been signed. It contends that without being assessed beforehand, effective collaboration cannot be represented by an agreement, so the standard outlines two complementary models that form a framework to establish a collaborative working relationship. The high-level structure outlines 10 factors that must be thought through: scoping out the needs and objectives of the relationship; understanding the context of each organisation; identifying the

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leadership structure, planning and operational awareness assessments; and concluding with performance evaluation and the next steps for improvement. Similarly, the life cycle assessment moves through an eight-step process that begins with operational awareness where vision, value, leadership and objectives are defined and runs through separate stages for internal assessment, partner selection and value creation, through to exit strategy activation. Neither model, nor the standard as a whole, provides a prescriptive process, but rather serves as a guiding structure on how to go about embedding the principles of collaboration within a relationship. All well and good, but should FMs require such a thing or can it not just be created through the natural way of things, say, through good old common sense?

TO ACCESS THE FULL VERSION OF FM Business DNA WORLD MAGAZINE, “Sadly, the evidence is that if it is common sense, people in our industry don’t have it,” JOIN BIFM says Martin Pickard, managing director of W W W. B I F M .O RG .U K / F M WJ O I N the FM Guru Consultancy. “We have a huge


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FM World March 2017 taster edition  
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