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I N F O R M I N G FA C I L I T I E S M A N A G E M E N T P R O F E S S I O N A L S

fm-world.co.uk / August 2017

TA ST E R E D I T I O N

Design What’s in the new issue? It’s about the way facilities management teams communicate. Sounds good. What are you focusing on? How lean management can promote client/ provider dialogue. The way FM teams are structured. How apps are changing the way teams work. …and how to avoid communication breakdown Great! Where can readers nd it?

TEAM COMMS IN A DIGITAL AGE Tapping into the potential for new technologies to benefit FM relationships

Page 43 onwards.

KEEN ON LEAN Lean management theory and its use on FM contracts

TRAIT EXPECTATIONS Improving the personal bond between client and supply-side FMs

TOUCH AND GO How phone apps are changing the way FM teams communicate


F M WO R LD

AUGUST 2017

CONTENTS COM M UNI TY

2 2 PE R SPE C T IV E S The four most interesting and insightful opinions on FM this month

2 5 A BIT A BOU T YOU Kate Kilroy of Frank Knight on why she isn’t selling her own Cornish ice cream 26 THINK TA NK The supervisor’s role is changing as people expect more from the FM team

ANA LYS I S

7 GRENF ELL’S L E GACY The LGA and BESA call for a probe into the building industry’s ‘performance gap’ 10 TH E TAYLOR RE VIE W It sets out seven steps towards fair and decent work, but does it go far enough?

KNOW LE DGE

35 SECRET LIFE OF THE LIFT A lift used to be a box on a rope, but now it talks and we listen 36 THIS JUST IN… How internal newsletters benefit those working in an organisation

28 AU GU ST @ BIF M The people and projects currently informing BIFM activity 3 2 C A LL S TO AC T ION The events, surveys and discussions that deserve your attention

3 7 BU ILD ING IN AGIL I T Y Avoid the pitfalls when embracing flexible and agile work models

12 B I F M AWARDS 20 17 Are you one of the 48 finalists vying to win a BIFM Award?

3 8 IN FOR A PE NN Y What FMs should consider before creating unisex bathrooms at work

13 NEWS MAK E RS The stories proving most popular with FM World’s online visitors this month

3 9 SM OKE A ND F IR E DA MP E R S Two different items of fire safety kit that provide life-saving functions

16 TO P O F THE CLAS S Striving for FM excellence in the UK’s higher education sector

62 INT E R NE T OF PE O P L E How a microchip implanted in our hands could make life easier

FM World’s in-depth analysis section 44 TRAIT EXPECTATIONS Sometimes it’s not the deal that goes wrong; sometimes it’s personal. Focus more on traditional negotiating skills and you can get by with a little help from your friends.

48 LEAN COMMS What effect can the use of lean management tools have when suggested for the client as part of the FM service model? Vinci Facilities’ Gary Codling explains his company’s integrated approach and how it works.

52 IT’S GOOD TO TALK It’s a message that holds true for every business – but while the technologies we use continue to change constantly, the principles of structured communication remains paramount.

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56 TRANSMISSION POSITIONS How is the now ubiquitous AUGU ST ’ S smartphone affecting TO P I C the way teams ENSURING GOOD COMMUNICATION in the FM sector BETWEEN TEAMS communicate between AND CLIENTS themselves, their superiorsW and their W W. B I F M .O RG .U K / F M WJ O I N end-user clients?

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INSIDE

Grenfell: It’s time to overhaul building regulations Taylor Review: Does it go far enough? BIFM announces 2017 awards finalists Newsmakers: The month’s other top stories in short Carillion sees dip in profit as debts mount

FRONT DESK THE MO N TH’ S MOST I MP O RTA N T F M STO RI E S

G R E N F E LL TOWE R F I R E

IT’S TIME TO OVERHAUL BUILDING REGULATIONS W O R D S : H ER P R EE T K AU R G R E WA L

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PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY

07 10 12 13 14

t has been almost two months since a horrifying fire engulfed the Grenfell Tower council block, on the Lancaster Estate in West London, claiming the lives of at least 80 people. While the Department for Communities and Local Government and Kensington and Chelsea Borough Council both have sections of their websites dedicated to pages of advice for local people coping with the tragedy, what is happening on the ground seems less straightforward. A number of Facebook groups set up to rally support for the communities reveal that many of those directly

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affected are still having to advocate for even their most basic needs, repeatedly stating that they have been let down by the local council and the government. On more practical matters, new developments and announcements are taking place every day. One of those most relevant to the facilities management sector is the possibility that the government may call for a review of building regulations. Although this is likely, it had not been confirmed by the government as FM World went to press. Bodies such as Building Engineering Wthe W W. B I F M .O RG .U K / F MServices WJ O I N Association (BESA) and the Local Government

August 2017

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S U P P LY S I D E

BUSINESS NEWS

For more FM business news, analysis and contract wins, sign up for the FM World daily newsletter at www.fm-world.co.uk/news/e-zine

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CO M M E NTARY

CON TR AC T

PATIENCE MUST BE THE WATCHWORD G R A E M E D AV I E S newsdesk@fm-world.co.uk

Imtech fires up energy centre for Harrogate NHS Trust

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apita and Mitie have seen their reputations hammered over the past year by a string of disappointing trading updates. Both issued updates to investors in June, attempting to focus attention on steps taken to improve operations. Capita has been rationalising its business through disposals; the recruitment business was sold earlier in the year and the Capita Asset Services business sale was completed in the weeks after the trading update for £888 million – the proceeds went towards reducing debt across the wider business. Trading in its ongoing operations remained mixed, with IT services doing “better than expected”, but the property, employee benefits and learning services businesses had “yet to improve”. Mitie’s results for the year to March laid bare the issues dogging it. Reported revenues dipped by 1 per cent while operating profits of £107.6m in 2016 dissolved into a loss of £42.9m in 2017, prompting the cancellation of the final dividend; the fullyear payout was down by two-thirds to 4p a share. Within this the core FM business saw a 3 per cent rise in revenues, but this was offset by woes in its care arm. After a strategic review Mitie is refocused on FM business. Both Capita and Mitie are now under new management teams that have attempted to streamline their businesses and focus on core competencies to rebuild profitability and investor confidence. The least that a new management team can do for a company is to buy it time with investors. Indeed, both companies have seen a recovery in their share prices in recent months as investors try to time buying back in at the start of the recovery process, which if timed right can be one of the most successful investment strategies. Launching a strategic review, which is patently what both companies required after becoming too bloated and losing focus on their core strengths, buys further time. Hence why disappointing results such as these, which come as new initiatives are still bedding in, are often taken with a more relaxed viewpoint by equity market investors. The next time both companies announce trading to their investors they will be looking for signs of recovery. But turnarounds, such as those under way at Serco and G4S, take time, so further patience and understanding will be required.

“AFTER A STRATEGIC REVIEW MITIE IS REFOCUSED ON FM BUSINESS”

GRAEME DAVIES writes for Investors Chronicle fm-world.co.uk

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Imtech has won a contract with Harrogate District NHS Foundation Trust to maintain its new energy centre. Improvements to the hospital’s mechanical and electrical infrastructure will save the trust £15 million over 25 years (£635,000 a year) and benefit frontline patient care. Over the past 18 months Harrogate’s estates team and Imtech’s engineering teams have been working within the Carbon Energy Fund (CEF) framework to identify, design, specify and install many improvements to the mechanical and electrical systems across the hospital, with the guaranteed savings providing financial and carbon benefits. Engineers from Imtech Inviron, the firm’s technical facilities management arm, will guarantee the continual optimisation of the systems by implementing a planned preventative and reactive maintenance regime at the site. These initiatives include: Installing electrical infrastructure consisting of a high-voltage substation and generator network. Replacing old boilers with highefficiency dual fuel steam boilers combined with a CHP and waste heat composite boiler. Replacing old light fittings for energy-efficient LED lighting. Waste heat usually lost in the atmosphere is now rerouted to the hospital car park and reused in the underfloor heating system to W de-ice W W. B Ithe F Msurface, .O RG .Uthereby K / F M WJ O I N eliminating gritting costs.

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V I E W P O I NT PERSPECTIVES

Have your say

Visit fm-world.co.uk for longer versions of these comment columns Get in touch by email – editorial@fm-world.co.uk Topical, inspirational, angry or amusing – we consider all relevant comment

PERSPECTIVES 1

2

PHIL RUSSELL, Vinci Facilities

CHRIS PHILLIPS is a partner at Loch Employment Law

My employer cares, but how important is my health to me?

H

ealth is high on the agenda in the construction and FM industries. Employers have a duty of care, which means that they should take all reasonable steps to ensure our health and well-being. And men’s health is a real issue. The Men’s Health Forum clarifies the problem: one man in five dies before 65; men are more likely to die early of circulatory disease and there is a 37 per cent higher risk of dying from cancer; 67 per cent of men are overweight; four in five suicides are men; and men are more likely to smoke than women, drink at hazardous levels, and eat too much of the wrong things. In construction (data includes FM) the suicide rate is higher than any other industry, with a death every two days. Both sectors employ an ageing workforce; over half of employees are 45 or over and at least half of these are men. And this is the group that’s hardest to get to. From the launch of Mates in Mind, which aims to raise awareness of mental illness across 100,000 workers over the next year, through to an annual gathering of 300 business leaders as part of the Health in Construction

Workplace dress codes: time for a makeover?

I

was to determine whether it should be lawful for employers to require female workers to adhere to stereotypical standards of appearance. The Equality Act 2010 regulates such issues of discrimination in the UK. Although it aims to eliminate discrimination, indirect discrimination for example, where a particular workplace practice is imposed, can be justified if it is a proportionate means of achieving a legitimate aim. But many female workers are still pressed to wear high heels and certain types of clothing, calling into question the act’s effectiveness. ACAS has also produced guidance on appearance at work. While it may not have strict legal status, it is seen as a benchmark of best practice. British Columbia in Canada has passed a Workers’ Compensation Act that stops employers setting genderbased footwear requirements. equivalent requirements for The UK still has some way men and women.” to go before it can show a This lacklustre response truly acceptable face of good prompted the Commons’ practice in the workplace. Petitions Committee to This was co-authored by investigate. Its report, Meghan Vaillancourt, produced with the Women a graduate of Queen’s and Equalities Committee, University, Canada, and revealed that women still face originally discrimination, direct and W W W. B Iwas F M .O RG .U K published / F M WJ O on IN internationalworkplace.com indirect, at work. Its main aim n June 2017 a woman claimed she was sacked from her bar job in Hull after refusing to wear a bra. The bar denied the allegations, saying no one had been dismissed, but the woman said she had been let go after inappropriate sexual remarks were made. In January 2015 Nicola Thorp was dismissed from her London office job for refusing to wear high heels. She began a petition calling for reform of workplace dress codes. Six months and 150,000 signatures later, the government said: “Company dress codes must be reasonable and must make

Leadership Group, employers are engaging differently with their workforces, often using comedy to overcome scepticism and the ‘it’s not going to happen to me’ mentality. But how much responsibility are we taking?

“MEN ARE RELUCTANT TO TAKE TIME OFF” A Men’s Health Forum survey says men are reluctant to take time off, especially for mental health issues. A third wouldn’t take time off for blood in their urine, 40 per cent would ingore an unexpected lump, and 42 per cent would ignore chest pain. The most common cancer in men is prostate cancer – 25 per cent of all male cancer cases – that’s 40,000 new cases a year and the second biggest killer of men. I have prostate cancer – discovered by reading about England rugby player Andy Ripley, who died of it in 2010. After treatment my chances of survival after five years have been greatly enhanced because I acted quickly. Employers must continue to engage their workforce and we as employees must listen.

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“MANY FEMALE WORKERS ARE STILL PRESSED TO WEAR HIGH HEELS”

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V I E W P O I NT

SEEN AND HEARD

I hear astonishing things in workshops e.g. “do you really expect us all to get up and go to a meeting room every time we want a meeting...” @OSELAND

“We’re too busy delivering projects to spend time planning” Translation: we enjoy firefighting, we’d much rather do that than be proactive @LYNNELYNNE185

“What does the #workplace have to do with people?” – Unnamed human resources executive

Ideas and comments made around the sector this month

FM@LARGE “We’re here in a room full off workplace believers. We’re not hard to convince. We e need to go to the places where here conversations ns need to be.” IAN ELLISON OF 3EDGES ON THE NEED TO BREAK OUT OF THE WORKPLACE PRODUCTIVITY ‘ECHO CHAMBER’

NOTED&QUOTED “IN A WORLD IN WHICH THERE IS SO MUCH SPACE ON DEMAND, WHAT THEN IS THE IDENTITY OF A BUSINESS?”

@MJSTEGS

NIGEL OSELAND ON THE ODDEST THINGS HE’S HEARD IN #FACMAN. SEND YOUR EXAMPLES TO @OSELAND ON TWITTER…

I LOVE #FACMAN. I CAN’T SWITCH OFF. AND THAT’S WHY THIS AND EVERY OTHER FIRE DOOR IN THIS HOTEL MAKES ME SO SAD. #FIRESAFETY #FMONTHEROAD @PEESIMPKINS

LENDLEASE’S ALISON WEBB GETS EXISTENTIAL AT THE RECENT STODDART REVIEW EVENT

“Over the last 2-3 years we’ve had different guardian companies coming to the market who are not really very good – they’re acting like cowboys” STUART WOOLGAR OF GLOBAL GUARDIANS ON HIS VIEW OF THE PROPERTY GUARDIAN INDUSTRY. WOOLGAR HAS BEEN INVOLVED IN A LONDON ASSEMBLY HOUSING COMMITTEE INVESTIGATION INTO THE ROLE OF GUARDIANSHIP IN THE VACANT PROPERTY MARKET.

“WE NEED GOOD MEETINGS, NOT FULL MEETING ROOMS. THAT’S THE BUSINESS OUTCOME WE’RE LOOKING FOR” LEESMAN UK MD CHRIS MORIARTY ON THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN UTILISATION STUDIES AND DESIRED OUTCOMES

“The new apprenticeships provide a vehicle for people to develop their career in FM, whilst gaining hands-on experience. We expect to see an increase in upskilling the current workforce through the apprenticeships; they provide those in the industry a fantastic opportunity to develop their skillset through a TO ACCESS THE FULL structured programme.” VERSION OF FM KATIE NIGHTINGALE OF KIER, AND PART OF THE TASKFORCE DEVELOPING WORLD MAGAZINE, THE TRAILBLAZER APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAMME IN FACILITIES MANAGEMENT, JOIN BIFM ON THE LATEST DEVELOPMENTS AND

W WHERE W W. BAPPRENTICESHIPS I F M .O RG .U KMIGHT / F M WJ O I N PROGRESS NEXT

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INSIDE

36 37 38 39 41

How to improve FM communications through newsletters Starting agile working: 5 top slip-ups Unisex bathrooms: What FMs need to know What’s the difference between smoke and fire dampers? Case in Point – products put to action

KNOW HOW THE L ATE ST L E A RN I N G A N D BE ST P RAC TI CE

LIFT MA INTENANCE

THE SECRET LIFE OF THE LIFT

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eikki Haasmaa, senior vicepresident at Kone, a lift manufacturer based in Finland, recently explained that an elevator “used to be a single box on a rope, but now it communicates and we listen”. Haasmaa was describing Kone’s latest collaborative effort with IBM’s Watson system. Watson is a computer

system developed with the capability of analysing natural language and responding to questions in the format accurately. What does this mean for lifts? Kone’s 24/7 Connected Services project sets out to analyse real-time data from lifts, such as speed, vibration, temperature and humidity, doors closing and noise levels, turning it into real-time

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conversations between the lift data is abnormal enough and Kone’s central server. to call out an engineer. While Kone has developed This proactive action could a website with the ability rectify problems days before to translate numbers into anything actually goes wrong. conversations (which can Pre-empting faults through quirkily be listened to in real conversations between audio format), the real machines? Sometimes there innovation is in the ability for are moments in which you the system to acknowledge realise the future is really abnormal data readings, such here; this is one of them. as a slightly faster or slower machineconversations.kone.com speed, and determine if the W W W. B I F M .O RG .U K / F M WJ O I N

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K N OW H OW EXPL AINER

PAUL THORN is managing director at Washware Essentials

U

nisex bathrooms have been making headlines on both sides of the Atlantic. Although they have often faced opposition, they are likely to become more common. So what are the implications from an FM perspective?

Why install a unisex bathroom?

The main argument in favour of genderneutral toilets is that they can reduce waiting times for the ladies’ room. Queues form because women generally take a longer time to use the bathroom (time-saving urinals aren’t an option) and need to do so more frequently than men (because they menstruate and tend to have smaller bladders) – and yet men’s and women’s bathrooms have always tended to be the same size. Installing washrooms that accommodate users of both UNISEX BATHROOMS genders can help bring about what’s come to be known as ‘line equality’. Unisex bathrooms are also an issue in the trans community. Deciding which bathroom to use can be a daily source of distress for non-binary people, who can often face discrimination and verbal or even physical assault for using what others perceive to be the ‘wrong’ bathroom. Unisex bathrooms can also make life easier for parents who need to accompany a young child of the opposite gender to the bathroom. There are clear cost benefits to installing a unisex bathroom. By combining facilities, you’ll free up space that can be used for more profitable purposes, and you’ll Paul Thorn looks at the legalities also have fewer overall facilities to maintain and clean. Unisex surrounding unisex bathrooms, toilets also do away with the issue and offers some practical of male cleaners entering female advice on how they can be bathrooms, and vice versa. designed and maintained There are also ‘soft benefits’ to gender-neutral toilets. Enhancing user experience can bolster your brand and bring in more repeat custom and there are rules that can make doing so position you as an inclusive organisation, trickier than you might assume. The main which makes for excellent PR and branding. provision, set out in the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992, is that gender-neutral toilets must be in a The legalities separate room (rather than a cubicle) with There are compelling moral arguments a door that locks from the inside. The cost on both sides of the debate – but what implications of installing each toilet in its does the law say? Not much, although

UNISEX BATHROOMS: WHAT FMS NEED TO KNOW

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own room instead of in a cubicle means that savings from combining bathrooms could be quickly negated. Schools were among the first to adopt unisex facilities. In fact, the now-defunct Department for Education & Skills actively encouraged unisex bathrooms. Its ‘Toilets in Schools Guidance’ claimed that they can help cut bullying and vandalism. The DfES’s replacement, the Department for Education, states that although current regulations do not allow for unisex toilets, they should be revised. Otherwise, existing legislation doesn’t make much provision for unisex loos, so if you decide to take the plunge see, for example, the following information from the Health & Safety Executive, and the Building Regulations Part M.

Design considerations

A unisex bathroom that accommodates users of all genders will need to be larger than a single-sex bathroom. The fact that each stall must constitute a separate room also means you will have to factor in additional space. One of these will need to be enlarged and reserved for disabled users. Because each toilet room will potentially used by women, each one should contain a bin for sanitary waste, and you may also wish to provide baby-changing units depending on the nature of your facility. Installing urinals will help cut waiting times. To help preserve the modesty of your users, urinals can be installed behind a partition wall, screening them from view.

TO ACCESS THE FULL VERSION OF FM One of the key criticisms of combined toilet WORLD MAGAZINE, facilities is that they could lead to a rise in JOIN BIFM sexual assaults. While this isn’t likely, you Practical considerations

may choose toWJ theO I N W Wto W.assign B I F M security .O RG .Ustaff K/FM vicinity to put users’ minds at ease.


ENABLING PRODUC TIVE ENVIRONMENTS FOR PEOPLE AND BUSINESS

It’s good to talk An emphasis on strong communication between all parties can be critical to the successful performance of the FM function

KEEN ON LEAN Contract performance in a world of lean management

TEAM STRUCTURE What set ups best promote optimal communications?

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How apps are influencing the way teams talk


FAC I LITATE

T E A M CO M M U N I C AT I O N S

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ood communication sounds so easy to achieve. A bit of common sense, a shared objective, and a twist of close proximity, and hey presto, good communication should just flourish. But within the working environment there are a number of factors adding complexity to communication. Hierarchies, structures, compliance procedures, office politics, and many other things all abound to make something as simple as one person engaging with others a lot more difficult than it needs to be. It’s an issue across sectors and professions, but it is one that is particularly pertinent within facilities management. By its very nature, the FM function requires a broad mix of communications between various parties. Manager to staff member, provider to client, frontline staff member to frontline staff member – the profession is filled with different lines of communications. And if those lines aren’t functioning properly an order might be missed, a new policy might be fudged and, in some cases, a contract might be lost. Ensuring good communication is critical to all operations. So how, with all these overlapping and conflicting objectives and various levels of seniority, can it be catered for and designed to ensure that from the top to the bottom and across departments, communication flows free and easy? Dave Grimshaw, general manager at Skanska, says: “It is having the right level of structure and management so you can go down from general manager level through to operations managers and

“I THINK SO MANY ORGANISATIONS OUT THERE ARE ALIGNING THEIR COMMS TO THEIR CULTURE AND THAT’S REALLY INTERESTING” supervisors and the actual engineers. Off the back of that, it’s then creating an organisational chart so that everyone on the team understands the structure.” By mirroring that organisational structure in the operational model of the helpdesk, Grimshaw and his colleagues are able to enable effective and efficient communication between the team in the office sending out the work orders and the team of engineers out on the road carrying out the jobs across a sizeable geography. But it is not just that remote communication, aided by a CAFM system that enables data to be sent and accessed at a touch of a button on a smartphone, that is key to managing the contract to a high standard. Building strong personal relationships across the team is just as crucial.

TO TALK Strengthening relationships through structure

“On the particular contract that I work on, we work in areas, so the helpdesk person links to the engineering team that work in that specific area. That helps aid the communication and the bond,” says Grimshaw. “The helpdesk people then go into the meetings where the engineers meet once a week, so you’re able to put a face to a name and that then helps the day-to-day

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FAC I LITATE

CO M M U N I C AT I O N T ECH N O LO G I E S

TRANSMIS e fth h t n o e g er outa w o p a ok? e o v l a e k We ha a t meone o s n a c – oor Lucy he

re – on t

W

!

How is ubiquito our now us smar tp a ffe c t i n g the wa hone y teams in the F M se ctor commu nicate b etween themsel v superio es, their rs a end-use nd their r cli Jamie H ents? ar investig ris ates

e’ve come a long way since smoke signals, the telegram and the can and string. It’s 2017 and the snowballing nature of technological innovation has resulted in a plethora of communication technologies available to streamline work processes – something the facilities management sector is exploiting to great effect. But how are FMs communicating with each other and their teams? Is the sector fully embracing the technology, or is there still resistance? Are face-to-face meetings dead? Does the CAFM system fully meet the evolving requirements of a dynamic FM team? Or should FMs just tweet their teams from now on? Communication platforms were previously restricted to in trays, emails and intranet systems designed for practical use rather than aesthetics. For FMs and their ability to manage work orders or to connect with their teams – a number of whom could be working across a large site, or even at a different location within an organisation’s portfolio – a more instant and portable form of communication is required. The explosion in use of personal mobile devices over the past 15 years and the tumbling cost of data transfer has meant that even the once ubiquitous two-way radio has been usurped. Instant messaging apps such as WhatsApp and Yammer now have an almost universal appeal, allowing the smartphone user – and that’s now most of us – to send messages, images and other files to a person or a group anywhere in the world immediately. Traditional CAFM systems have also evolved, with data

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he case

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FM World August 2017 taster edition  
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