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THE

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FM RESEARCH 2013 SALARY SURVEY

Comment his is the ninth FM World Salary Survey, and the second for which the polling took place in the first three months of the year of publication, rather than the last three months of the previous year. So what have we found? 2013 figures suggest more optimism about the potential for pay rises, albeit rises that will barely allow recipients to stave off the effects of inflation. We’re also reporting a changing job market increasingly influenced by the significant cutbacks in public sector spending seen over the past two years. Despite a double-dip recession and an ever-keener focus on FM’s cost to the organisation, the results of this year’s survey show that more people than last year managed to get a pay rise, although these were mainly rises of between 1 and 2 per cent. More private than public sector employees were likely to have received such a rise, but still, overall, 3 in 10 respondents said they had seen no change in their salaries last year. So there is precious little upward movement in pay – but we are reporting some interesting gender variations when it comes to the reasons FMs cite for staying with, or moving from, their employers. Indeed, there is evidence that more people decided to ‘stay put’ over the past 12 months rather than enter the jobs market. You’ll find more detail on these trends in figures presented over the next 10 pages. The format of the survey remains largely the same as it was when we launched it in 2004 and that’s deliberately the case. The questions we ask are designed to identify trends in salaries, benefits, training and qualifications in the facilities management sector and allow for an insight into how FM professionals feel about their profession. As ever, we’re very grateful to all of our readers who took the trouble to take part, so again, thank you for taking the time. We continue to benefit from a wide range of respondents from all FM employment types, age groups and salary ranges and that can only help to boost the value of the resulting data. Finally, congratulations to Chris Stone, whose name has been drawn randomly to receive the £250 prize for taking part. We’re always open to new ideas for any questions we should be asking in future polls, so please get in touch if you have anything to add.

T

“THE RESULTS OF THIS YEAR’S SURVEY SHOW THAT MORE PEOPLE THAN LAST YEAR MANAGED TO GET A PAY RISE”

This research was published by

Enjoy the survey, 17 Britton Street, London EC1M 5TP Tel: 020 7880 6200 Website: www.redactive.co.uk

Martin Read Editor, FM World

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2013 SALARY SURVEY

The majority of respondents to our survey continue to come from in-house facilities managers (Chart 1), although for 2013 there was a marginal up-tick in the number of responses from FMs employed by service providers. The ratio this year was 64 per cent in-house, 36 per cent outsourced – a percentage that has barely changed since our first survey in 2004, where it was 67-33. When compared to 2012 results, we anticipated a drop in the number of respondents working in central and local government, and this has indeed proved to be the case. Last year, governmentemployed FMs comprised 18 per cent of the total; this year it’s 13 per cent. This sizeable drop in government respondents suggests that the impact of the 2010 Comprehensive Spending Review has now been felt. Now, representing 15 per cent of the total, it’s the finance, banking and insurance sector that provides the plurality of all respondents. FM remains a practice formalised at the larger organisation, with 57 per cent of our survey sample working at organisations with 1,000 or more employees. However, close to 20 per cent of our survey sample work for organisations designated by government as small- to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – those with fewer than 200 employees. And there’s a widening gap between SME respondents and those at the larger organisations; just 11 per cent of our survey sample work for businesses employing more than 500, but fewer than 1,000. Almost a fifth of respondents were from small firms – those with 200 or fewer employees. The proportion of in-house respondents working in the property sector grew year on year, in particular those in property on the supply-side. This may reflect increased developer activity as the commercial sector slowly recovers. There remained a broad sweep of industries covered by those answering our poll – from oil, chemicals and mining to leisure, hotels and catering. Just over seven in 10 of this year’s salary survey respondents were men, with 29 per cent women.

Supply side

CHART 1 IN–HOUSE RESPONSE TO SURVEY Accounts / finance / law 4% Architecture / interior design 1% Armed forces 8% Building services / engineering 14% Civil service including prison service 2% Construction 7% Customer services 6% Hotel and leisure 8% IT services 3% Office manager / administration 17% Property 6% Purchasing 1% Retail 3% Sales and marketing 3% Soft services such as catering or security 1% This is my first job after leaving full-time education 3% Other 13%

CHART 2 SERVICE PROVIDER RESPONSE TO SURVEY

Total FM and managed services 72% Consultancy (FM/Property) 7% Hard FM services 13% Soft FM services 8%

CHART 3 RESPONDENTS’ BIFM MEMBERSHIP LEVEL

Member 55% Associate 25% Certified member 11% Large enterprise corporate member 5% Fellow 2% Honorary fellow 0% Small enterprise corporate member 1%

Of the 36 per cent of respondents on the supply side (Chart 2), a sizeable majority (72 per cent) work for suppliers of total FM solutions. However, the rise in responses from total FM employees has been checked, having risen steadily over the past three years. Of the remainder, just 8 per cent indicated that they worked for a provider of solely soft FM services, while 13 per cent told us they were employed at a provider of hard FM services. Almost a third (32 per cent) of respondents from service FM WORLD | 2013 |3

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FM RESEARCH 2013 SALARY SURVEY

CHART 4 REGIONAL SALARY SURVEY ANALYSIS Director / Head of FM Regional or multi-site FM Senior FM (HQ / flagship site) Single-site FM Facilities assistant / office manager

Scotland Business development / sales Bid management Facilities supervisor Operational management (UK remit) Multi-site operations Commercial management Single-site operations

Director / Head of FM Regional or multi-site FM Senior FM (HQ / flagship site) Single-site FM Facilities assistant / office manager

Northern Ireland

Business development / sales Bid management Facilities supervisor Operational management (UK remit) Multi-site operations Commercial management Single-site operations

Director / Head of FM Regional or multi-site FM Senior FM (HQ / flagship site) Single-site FM Facilities assistant / office manager

North West

Business development / sales Bid management Facilities supervisor Operational management (UK remit) Multi-site operations Commercial management Single-site operations

Professional memberships

Director / Head of FM Regional or multi-site FM Senior FM (HQ / flagship site) Single-site FM Facilities assistant / office manager Business development / sales Bid management Facilities supervisor Operational management (UK remit) Multi-site operations Commercial management Single-site operations

North East

Up to £25,000 In-house

Provider

providers were working on a private finance initiative (PFI) or public-private partnership (PPP). This figure was actually higher than that recorded in our 2010 survey, despite more than two years of public sector spending cuts. It follows just 24 per cent of respondents being involved in PFI or PPP in last year’s poll. Almost a third of respondents working for clients – rather than providers – were in regional or multi-site FM roles in 2013. At 33 per cent, this was unchanged from last year. The proportion made up of directors or heads of FM also remained constant at 21 per cent. The remainder of the client-side answers came from single-site FMs (21 per cent), senior FMs (17 per cent) and facilities assistants and office managers (9 per cent). There was a large drop in the proportion of supply-side respondents coming from multi-site operations – from 46 per cent in 2012 to 30 per cent this year. The proportion in operational management roles grew from 21 per cent to 27 per cent over the same period, making the two functions almost equal in terms of representation. Other supply-side respondents came from singlesite operations (11 per cent), business development and sales roles (11 per cent), commercial management (9 per cent), facilities supervisor jobs (8 per cent) and bid management (5 per cent). Of those working on the client-side, 7 per cent were in local government and 6 per cent in central government or non-governmental organisations. Both these figures were down from 9 per cent last year, suggesting public sector cuts are starting to affect FM budgets.

£26,000 £35,000 2012 data

£36,000 £45,000

£46,000 £60,000

£61,000 £75,000

Compared to last year’s data: Increase

£76,000 £91,000 Decrease

£91,000

Same

The 2013 survey saw a significant increase in the number of respondents who describe themselves as having attained BIFM associate status (Chart 3); from 20 per cent in 2012, that figure is now 25 per cent. Meanwhile, for the second year in a row, we recorded a drop in the number of respondents describing themselves as having BIFM member-grade status – 55 per cent this year, compared to 63 per cent in 2012. We also saw another increase in the number of certified members taking part, continuing the trend we identified in 2012. As the number of BIFM respondents has stayed relatively constant, it seems that BIFM members are taking advantage of wider membership status possibilities. 37 per cent of respondents also indicated their membership of other professional bodies, with the Institution of Occupational Safety & Health (IOSH) continuing to be the most popular (36 per cent). 15 per cent of respondents also belong to the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), while

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2013 SALARY SURVEY

Director / Head of FM Regional or multi-site FM Senior FM (HQ / flagship site) Single-site FM Facilities assistant / office manager

nearly twice as many people indicated that they were members of the Facilities Management Association (FMA). 9 per cent are members of the Chartered Institute Of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE) and 8 per cent the Chartered Management Institute. We also recorded a small increase in the number of respondents citing membership of the Chartered Institute of Purchasing & Supply (CIPS). However, it’s clear that BIFM members look to a wide variety of other membership organisations, with close to a quarter (24 per cent) citing membership of organisations not on our named list. Among those cited are the Energy Institute, Institute of Mechanical Engineers, Institute of Engineering and Technology, Chartered institute of Management Accountants, Institute of Plant Engineers, and Institute of Swimming Pool Engineers among them. Between them, London and the South East continue to provide a sizeable plurality of respondents (Chart 4) – 52 per cent of the 2013 total, marginally up on 48 per cent last year. Otherwise, there is a consistent pattern to regional representation with the North West accounting for 12 per cent and the Midlands a further 10 per cent. However, just 7 per cent of respondents come from Scotland or Northern Ireland, less than should be the case for the survey to be proportional to UK population. White British people make up 85 per cent of all respondents, and that figure rises above 90 per cent when people from other white backgrounds are added to the mix. This remains broadly in line with the population of the country (according to the 2001 census, 8 per cent of the population is from ethnic minority groups.) Having stayed constant for the last two years, the number of respondents aged 35 or under increased this year to represent 23 per cent – up from 18 per cent in 2012. There was a corresponding dip in the number of respondents aged 36 to 45 (31 per cent, from 35 per cent), while the number of those aged over 46 per cent stayed the same. This is a potentially encouraging sign that more people are coming into the sector from an early age.

Salaries, bonuses and expectations Salary remains the most important reason for FMs choosing a job (Chart 16), with seven in 10 citing it in their top four factors. The availability of challenging or interesting work was the concern of 54 per cent, job security, 41 per cent, and location 41 per cent. (Perhaps counter-intuitively for the FM profession, just 7 per cent put ‘physical working environment’ in their top-three reasons for working somewhere.)

Midlands

Business development / sales Bid management Facilities supervisor Operational management (UK remit) Multi-site operations Commercial management Single-site operations

Director / Head of FM Regional or multi-site FM Senior FM (HQ / flagship site) Single-site FM Facilities assistant / office manager

Wales and South West

Business development / sales Bid management Facilities supervisor Operational management (UK remit) Multi-site operations Commercial management Single-site operations

Director / Head of FM Regional or multi-site FM Senior FM (HQ / flagship site) Single-site FM Facilities assistant / office manager

South East

Business development / sales Bid management Facilities supervisor Operational management (UK remit) Multi-site operations Commercial management Single-site operations

Director / Head of FM Regional or multi-site FM Senior FM (HQ / flagship site) Single-site FM Facilities assistant / office manager

East of England

Business development / sales Bid management Facilities supervisor Operational management (UK remit) Multi-site operations Commercial management Single-site operations

Director / Head of FM Regional or multi-site FM Senior FM (HQ / flagship site) Single-site FM Facilities assistant / office manager

London

Business development / sales Bid management Facilities supervisor Operational management (UK remit) Multi-site operations Commercial management Single-site operations

Up to £25,000 In-house

Provider

£26,000 £35,000

2012 data

£36,000 £45,000

£46,000 £60,000

£61,000 £75,000

Compared to last year’s data: Increase

£76,000 £91,000 Decrease

£91,000 + Same

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FM RESEARCH 2013 SALARY SURVEY

CHART 5 SERVICE PROVIDER SALARIES BY FUNCTION

INTERGRATED FM FIRMS

£91,000+ £76,000-£90,000 £61,000-£75,000 £46,000-£60,000 £36,000-£45,000 £26,000-£35,000 up to £25,000

7% 13% 14% 13% 23% 23% 7%

CONSULTANCY (FM / PROPERTY)

£91,000+ £76,000-£91,000 £61,000-£75,000 £46,000-£60,000 £36,000-£45,000 £26,000-£35,000 up to £25,000

25% 8% 25% 25% 17% 0% 0%

Good career prospects were cited by 50 per cent of those questioned, a figure that remains mostly unchanged from the results of 2012. In terms of actual remuneration, there remains little sign of a thawing in the FM pay freeze (Chart 6). 27 per cent of those responding to our 2013 survey expect to see no change in their salary at their next review, while a further 47 per cent expect a rise of under 2 per cent – or less than the current level of inflation. This combined total of 74 per cent of respondents expecting no significant rise in pay was up slightly from the 72 per cent recorded last year. The proportion expecting a rise in excess of 4 per cent was down from 10 per cent last year to 7 per cent in 2013. However, the percentage anticipating a rise of between 3 and 4 per cent at their next review was up marginally from 17 per cent in 2012 to 18 per cent in 2013. Three in 10 respondents saw no change in salary level at their last pay review, as the global economic downturn maintained its grip on the labour market. This was a higher proportion than last year, but not as high as the 36 per cent recorded two years ago. In 2008, just 7 per cent suffered a pay freeze. The most common result of a pay review this time around was an increase of less than 2 per cent, with 41 per cent falling into that category. However, there was a rise in the proportion receiving a rise of between 3 to 4 per cent; 19 per cent in this bracket, compared to 17 per cent in 2012 and 15 per cent the year before. In 2013, a total of 8 per cent of survey returners received a pay rise in excess of 4 per cent, while an unfortunate 2 per cent saw their salary decline. The difference in pay awards between the client and supply side is notable. Among

HARD FM

£91,000+ £76,000-£90,000 £61,000-£75,000 £46,000-£60,000 £36,000-£45,000 £26,000-£35,000 up to £25,000

10% 11% 0% 37% 32% 10% 0%

client-side respondents, 31 per cent saw no change while 37 per cent saw an increase of between 1 and 2 per cent (Chart 9). For client-side respondents with post-graduate qualifications, 36 per cent saw no change in their salary and 43 per cent saw an increase of 1 to 2 per cent. On the supply side, 49 per cent of respondents got a pay increase of between 1 and 2 per cent and 28 per cent of respondents saw no change at all (Chart 9). For supply side respondents with a post-graduate qualification, 41 per cent received an increase of 1 to 2 per cent while 37 per cent of respondents with a post-graduate qualification saw no change at all. It’s interesting to note that, when compared to their supply-side counterparts, there are marginally more client-side FMs in the £26-£35k, £36-£45k and £46-£60k salary bands. However, as salaries continue to rise beyond £60,000 the balance tilts sharply in favour of the supply side, with more than twice as many service contractor FMs as client-side FMs reporting salaries in the £61-75k and £76-90k and beyond. Gender-wise, the majority of women respondents, 38 per cent, fall into the £26,000 to £35,000 earning category – a percentage that’s nearly double that of men. However, as earnings rise, so does the likelihood of men earning more than women, with twice as many men than women earning in the most senior bands (£76-£90k and £91k+). More women than men received a pay rise in excess of 3 per cent, with three times as many women managing to obtain a rise of 5 per cent or more. When supply-side responses are broken down by type of supplier, it may not be too surprising that the largest number of high-salary earners –

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2013 SALARY SURVEY

CHART 6 YOUR SALARY INCREASE AT LAST REVIEW? Increase 1-2%

SOFT FM Increase 3-4% Increase 5-6% Increase 7-10% Increase 11 plus% No change 2012 2011 2010

Decrease

£91,000+ £76,000-£90,000 £61,000-£75,000 £46,000-£60,000 £36,000-£45,000 £26,000-£35,000 up to £25,000

0% 0% 42% 8% 17% 25% 8%

those above £76,000 – work for FM and property consultancies. Organisations specialising in hard FM were more likely to have employees earning in excess of £76k, with soft FM specialists least likely to have earners in this bracket. The widest spread of salary bands came from employees at total FM providers, while FM consultancies saw the largest number of earners in the £46-£60k and £61k-75k brackets. The 2013 survey shows that more people than last year achieved a pay rise of between 1 and 2 per cent. This year, more private than public sector employees posted such an increase, a figure reversed last year when more public sector employees got rises of this magnitude. This year has also seen nearly twice as many private sector employees posting increases of between 3-4 per cent as their public sector counterparts, reflecting the change to the remuneration landscape brought about by increased pay restraints across the public sector. The good news is that there’s been a marked increase in the number of people expecting a pay rise, albeit one of between just 1 and 2 per cent. When the current inflation rate of 2.8 per cent is taken into account, these rises will still leave people effectively earning less than they were a year ago. For 2013, there’s also a larger number of FMs expecting to see a pay rise of between 3-4 per cent, although of course, such a rise would itself be marginal, when the effects of inflation are taken into account.

Bonuses More than half of respondents were in receipt of a bonus last year, but the figures are of most interest when broken down by employee type. Those in the

Respondents

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

CHART 7 WHAT WAS THE MAIN REASON FOR JOINING YOUR CURRENT EMPLOYER?

Fresh challenge – 29% Better long-term prospects – 15% Better salary / benefits package – 13% Was unemployed – 12% Senior position – 10% The company had a good reputation – 9% Job was in a more convenient location – 6% Merger / acquisition of employer etc – 5% Employer decided to outsource FM – 1%

public sector were more than twice as likely not to receive a bonus as those in the private sector, while bonuses from £1,000 and £10,000 were much more likely in the private sector (indeed, three times as many private sector respondents than public sector respondents received a bonus of between £1k-£5k). Looking at the value in terms of gender, 37 per cent of female respondents got no bonus and 4 per cent of female respondents got bonuses of £30,000+, compared with only 1 per cent of male respondents. So the gap between male and female is much less when looked at in terms of bonuses. In terms of age, no one in the 18-25 age group received a bonus at all, whereas the older groups, aged 36 to 45 and 46 to 55, received bonuses up to the £30,000+ level.

Benefits The quantity and quality of benefits have taken a hit over the past few years, but in truth, there is precious little difference to report in 2013. Understandably, FMs at service providers continue to be nearly three times as likely to have a FM WORLD | 2013 |7

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FM RESEARCH 2013 SALARY SURVEY

CHART 8 WHAT DO YOU EXPECT YOUR SALARY INCREASE TO BE AT YOUR NEXT PAY REVIEW? 2013 47%

Increase of 1-2% Increase of 3-4% Increase of 5-6% Increase of 7-10% Increase of 11% or more

3% 3% 1%

No change Decrease

By age, it’s interesting that the highest number of FMs receiving company car – or car allowances – are in the two youngest age brackets, 18-25 and 26-35. This contrasts with the availability of health plans, which are of most value to – and are most frequently awarded to – employees aged 46 and over.

18%

27% 1%

FMs and the job market

2012 Increase of 1-2%

44%

Increase of 3-4%

17%

Increase of 5-6%

6%

Increase of 7-10%

2%

Increase of 11% or more

2%

No change Decrease

28% 2%

2010 Increase of 1-2%

32%

Increase of 3-4%

18%

Increase of 5-6%

3%

Increase of 7-10%

1.4%

Increase of 11% or more

3%

No change Decrease

42% 1%

2009 Increase of 1-2%

40%

Increase of 3-4% Increase of 5-6% Increase of 7-10% Increase of 11% or more

20% 3.4% 3% 1%

No change Decrease

32% 0.7%

company car or car allowance than their client-side counterparts, because they are considerably more likely to need to move from site to site to perform their duties. The 2013 survey shows a marked increase in the amount of overtime earned by FMs on the supply side and a jump in the number of client-side FMs getting access to a health plan – up from 50 per cent last year to 58 per cent this year. However, when both client and supply sides are taken into account, the percentage of respondents receiving a guaranteed bonus is down from 7 per cent to 4 per cent.

Last year we reported that facilities professionals were, by nature, likely to pursue job changes frequently in a bid to improve their pay, conditions, and breadth of experience. We found that weak economic conditions had led to a slowing in the rate at which they were moving between employers. In 2012, just 16 per cent of respondents had been with their employers for two years or less. This year the figure is 25 per cent, reversing a three-year decline. A positive spin on this about-face would be that the jobs market has improved, and that FMs are finding more opportunity to move; an alternative reading is that more of these FMs have been forced into finding new jobs. It’s been a consistent feature of previous salary surveys that supply-side employees can be seen to switch roles more often than their in-house counterparts. However, while this remains the case in 2013, our survey also shows that the length of time an FM stays with his or her service provider peaks at between 4 to 6 years; in-house FMs are much more likely to stay with their employer longer than that. A quarter of respondents to the 2013 survey expected to leave their current employer within 12 months, a figure significantly higher than the 14 per cent who had joined their employer in the past year. Whether this reflects growing opportunities or ambitions set to remain unfulfilled, only time will tell. A lack of career opportunities was the main reason given by those intending to leave their employers within a year, cited by 26 per cent. This figure has grown steadily since 2010, perhaps showing the ambitious nature of a new generation of FMs. Other common reasons given for seeking a new employer include being unhappy with pay and benefits (cited by 17 per cent), expecting redundancy (8 per cent) and planning retirement (7 per cent). This year, 13 per cent of respondents told us that they expected to be moving on from their existing employer within six to 12 months (down from 16 per cent), and as with 2012, a further 10 per cent said that they expected to leave within 12 to 18 months. 43 per cent of respondents did not expect to be with the same employer beyond two years, just

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2013 SALARY SURVEY

CHART 9 PAY RISES RECEIVED BY SUPPLY-SIDE FMS

slightly less than the 45 per cent of last year. Of the reasons cited for wanting to leave their employers, the spike this year is in supply-side FMs seeking to avoid expected redundancy; nearly twice as many more supply-side than client-side FMs cited this as their reason to seek pastures new. Otherwise, there is little difference between both FM types when it comes to the drive to find new employment; 25 per cent cite lack of career opportunity, and 16 per cent, unhappiness with pay and benefits; whichever the employer type, there’s little difference. Across both employment types, lack of career opportunity was the major push factor in tempting respondents away from their former employers. This was given by 26 per cent as their main reason for leaving their most recent organisation. Redundancy caused 17 per cent to leave, while 13 per cent were headhunted. Just 2 per cent cited the stress of their previous job as the main reason for switching employers, with more women than men citing stress as a reason. However, as per last year there is an interesting gender gap; fewer women than men are likely to cite lack of opportunity or unhappiness with pay as their reasons for leaving. Instead, lack of job security is an almost exclusively female concern. Women are also much more likely to leave if they feel that they are not involved or communicated with – more than three times as many women than men expressed this as their reason for looking elsewhere for employment. Men, by contrast, are much more likely than women to leave their job in frustration when an expected change to their role does not materialise. Only 16 per cent of respondents to the 2013 poll expect to be with their employer at the end of this decade, although this year’s survey showed that 11 per cent of respondents had been with their companies for 14 years or more – proof that, for some, job longevity is still important Although salary is given overwhelmingly as the most important factor in a job, it barely registers as a reason for staying with an employer. Just 7 per cent of those respondents who expect to stay with their employer for at least another twelve months say that salary is the main reason why. Instead, 47 per cent of those who say they plan to stay loyal for at least a year, say they enjoy the job, the responsibilities, and working for their employer. Job security as a reason for staying with an employer was an important issue for 22 per cent, down from 25 per cent last year and 33 per cent the year before. Either people feel they are less threatened, or have acclimatised to the downturn and are willing to take their chances. Reasons given by FMs for joining their current employer vary only slightly depending on

Increase of 1-2% – 49% Increase of 3-4% – 12% Increase of 5-6% – 4% Increase of 7-10% – 3% Increase of 11% or more – 3% No Change – 28% Decrease – 1%

CHART 10 PAY RISES RECEIVED BY CLIENT-SIDE FMS

Increase of 1-2% – 37% Increase of 3-4% – 24% Increase of 5-6% – 3% Increase of 7-10% – 2% Increase of 11% or more – 1% No change – 31% Decrease – 2%

CHART 11 BONUSES RECEIVED BY SUPPLY-SIDE FMS

None – 45% Up to £999 – 6% £1000 - £4,999 – 22% £5,000 - £9,999 – 13% £10,000 - £14,999 – 6% £15,000 - £19,999 – 2% £20,000 - £29,999 – 2% More than £30,000 – 3%

CHART 12 BONUSES RECEIVED BY CLIENT-SIDE FMS

None – 44% Up to £999 – 14% £1000 - £4,999 – 28% £5,000 - £9,999 – 6% £10,000 - 19,999 – 4% £15,000 - £19,999 – 2% £20,000 - £29,999 – 0% More than £30,000 – 1%

FM WORLD | 2013 |9

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CHART 13 DO YOU AGREE WITH THE FOLLOWING STATEMENTS? My employer:

Agree

Offers excellent succession planning and career opportunities

Disagree

2013 SALARY SURVEY

Always encourages equal opportunities and diversity Has a high turnover of staff Has a high degree of staff morale and a strong sense of belonging Does everything to empower staff wherever possible in order to make their own decisions Has a strong public image and performs well against competitors Offers exit interviews to all staff who leave the company Offers a competitive salary and package compared to other organisations in the facilities market Offers staff the opportunity to work flexibly, both in terms of time and location, where possible 20%

40%

CHART 14 BACKGROUND BEFORE FM – MALE

60%

80%

100%

CHART 15 BACKGROUND BEFORE FM – FEMALE

employment type; a fresh challenge was cited by 29 per cent as the main reason for joining their current employer, while a further 12 per cent made their move in order to take up a more senior position. Both of these figures were broadly in line with results from last year’s survey, but there is a notable gender divide here. More women than men joined their new company as a result of seeking a fresh challenge, while taking up a more senior position was more than twice as likely to be important to men. Whatever the gender, better long-term prospects were sought by 15 per cent when joining their current employer. While 16 per cent of survey respondents had been promoted in the last 12 months, the same proportion had not been promoted for at least four years. More than a third had not been promoted within their current organisation. Asking about whether people have received promotions, the answers have been quite telling: 48 per cent of respondents have never received a promotion, 17 per cent received one within the last 12 months and, for 13 per cent of people responding, it has been over four years since they last received a promotion. It illustrates that those working in the FM sector rarely change their roles, indicating the sector may have become more static in recent years. A fifth of respondents to the 2013 survey had been in the FM industry for 20 years or longer, while a little over a tenth were in their first four years as an FM.

Background and education

Accounts / finance / law 5% Architecture / interior design 1% Armed forces 11% Building services / engineering 22% Civil service including prison service 3% Construction 9% Customer services 3% Hotel and leisure 8% IT services 3% Office manager / administration 7% Property 6% Purchasing 1% Retail 3% Sales and marketing 2% Soft services, such as catering or security 4% This is my first job after leaving full-time education 2% Other 10%

Accounts / finance / law 2% Architecture / interior design 0% Armed forces 0% Building services / engineering 2% Civil service including prison service 0% Construction 4% Customer services 12% Hotel and leisure 12% IT services 1% Office manager / administration 30% Property 5% Purchasing 0% Retail 3% Sales and marketing 5% Soft services, such as catering or security 3% This is my first job after leaving full-time education 6% Other 18%

The 2013 survey suggests a slight fall in the number of facilities managers coming into the profession from either office administration or building services (Charts 14 and 15), but these two sectors still account for a full 30 per cent of those crossing into FM. The armed forces continue to provide a significant number of new FMs, representing 8 per cent of the total – although even more, 9 per cent, have moved into FM from the hotel and leisure sector. Just shy of 8 per cent have a background in construction, while 4 per cent were previously employed in a single service such as catering or security. Those formerly in customer services make up 5 per cent, slightly down on last year’s figures despite many FM firms talking up the need to bring people with customer experience into the profession. (Some of the more unusual roles held by respondents before becoming an FM include taxi driving, equine business management and milk production). The number of respondents saying that FM was their first and so-far only profession after leaving full time education is up from 4 per cent to 5 per cent, an encouraging, albeit small, sign that more young people may be deciding on a career in FM rather FM WORLD | 2013 |11

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FM RESEARCH 2013 SALARY SURVEY

than coming to it as a second or third job. On the supply-side, far more people have a building service engineering background (21 per cent) than client-side (14 per cent), while marginally more supply-side than in-house FMs have a military background. Those from the construction and hotel and leisure sectors are also more likely to be plying their trade as an FM on the supply side. Former office managers are nearly three times more likely to take up an in-house FM role than a supply-side position, while 8 per cent of supply-side FMs came from a cleaning or catering background, compared to 1 per cent of client-side FMs. Gender differences include the fact that those coming into FM from the armed forces are almost exclusively male, with the same almost true of building service engineering (22 per cent male, 2 per cent female). Four times as many women than men come to FM from office administration and customer services roles, while close to three times as many men than women were previously employed in the construction sector. Clearly, some old gender stereotypes die hard. Just shy of two thirds of our survey sample had more than nine years’ experience in FM, with 21 per cent having more than twenty years’ experience. 48 per cent said that they held IOSH qualifications and 36 per cent IOSH, replicating almost exactly the figures from last year. 17 per cent have, or are studying for the mid-ranging BIFM qualifications (Levels 4, 5 or 6), a figure up from 14 per cent in 2012. We also saw an increase in the number of people with ILM Level 3 qualification, while close to twice as many respondents had either a higher level certificate or diploma in FM. A significantly lower proportion of survey returners held or were attaining non-FM graduate degrees in 2013 – 20 per cent, down from 25 per cent in the previous year. FM-related degrees were held or being studied for by 7 per cent.

Conclusions The demographic changes to the sector that we noted last year are continuing to take effect, but despite an increase in optimism among FMs about the probability of their pay rising, our 2013 survey shows that there has been precious little improvement to pay and conditions. The effects of the 2010 Comprehensive Spending Review can now be clearly seen, with significant numbers of supply-side FMs moving more frequently, some clearly seeking to avoid redundancy. There is more data from our 2013 survey that we do not have space to publish here; over the course of the coming weeks we will publish additional details in the form of news stories.

CHART 16 MOST IMPORTANT FACTORS IN A JOB?

Career prospects

Salary

Location

Degree of responsibility

Job security

Training

Challenging / interesting work

Fringe benefits / perks

Physical working environment

Recognition

Relationship with colleagues

Holiday entitlement

Final salary pension

Health cover 2012 2011

Opportunity to work flexibly

2010 2009

0%

10%

20% 30%

40%

50%

60% 70%

80%

12| 2013 | FM WORLD

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2013 FM World Salary Survey  
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