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2013 GUIDE TOCAREERS IN FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

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Highly interactive training programmes, all leading to industry recognised quali¿cations Why study with us? Blue-Eye Training has been providing tuition for facilities management quali¿cations since 1994. The highly interactive tuition format has proved to be the most effective learning method for students achieving quali¿cations. We genuinely care about supporting our students and have a proven track record when it comes to pass rates. Check out our student testimonials on line.

Providers of FM quali¿cations tuition since 1994 Level 2 and Level 3 Quali¿cations The Level 2 quali¿cations are particularly appropriate to supervisors and those who are either new to FM or who are wishing to develop their career progression. Level 3 quali¿cations are particularly appropriate to ¿rst line managers who are developing their management potential, their understanding of the FM industry and their ability to apply their knowledge in the workplace. Application of knowledge is the theme to all of these quali¿cations and learners can fully develop their management skills and the knowledge required to perform their job functions to their full potential. Whilst available to all, Level 2 and Level 3 quali¿cations are particularly appropriate to clients who wish groups of people to study together and learn practical workplace knowledge.

BIFM Level 4 Award, Certi¿cate and Diploma The British Institute of Facilities Management (BIFM) quali¿cation is particularly appropriate to middle managers who have practical experience of working in the facilities management ¿eld. The three different quali¿cations (Award, Certi¿cate and Diploma) allow a range of choices for the extent of subjects to be learned. With a range of mandatory and optional subjects, a package is available to suit all needs and learning directions. Distance learning tuition also available. Course information and pricing can be found on-line.

BIFM Level 5 Certi¿cate and Diploma Available as either a Certi¿cate or Diploma quali¿cation at level 5, this opportunity is particularly appropriate to experienced middle managers wishing to aspire to a higher management level who have a track record in managing FM operations. Blue-Eye Training tutors believe that the Level 5 is the most appropriate quali¿cation for managers working at this level. The programme is available to learners who already possess a high level of FM knowledge and experience and, via distance learning and workplace study, will apply this knowledge in tackling the assessment requirements. Start with the Certi¿cate programme and top-up to the Diploma at a later time.

www.blue-eye-training.co.uk 02392 363 397 enquiries@blue-eye-training.co.uk

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“Always supporting our learners” During the course of your study, Blue-Eye Training promises to:  Provide you with high quality training from industry professionals, specialists in their ¿eld.  Give you ongoing support, oneto-one coaching and mentoring.  Help and guide you in preparation for the various assessment formats.  Provide tailored solutions or bespoke programmes for organisations with 5 or more learners.  Offer you a range of learning options; from classroom-based learning, home study distance learning, workplace-based study and assignments.

Also able to support the UK Armed Forces. Approved Centre for Armed Services leavers. Provider number 3746

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FM NAVIGATING THIS GUIDE

CONTENTS

01 02 03 04 05 06 07

WHAT IS FACILITIES MANAGEMENT? ■ p6–7 What it is and whether it’s for you ■ p8 Different types of FM explained ■ p9 What you could earn ■ p10–15 FM and the wider business world ■ p16 A day as an FM

ROUTES INTO FM ■ p18-19 An introduction to the most common routes into FM for those switching from other careers including the armed forces, engineering and customer service

NETWORKING OPTIONS ■ p22-23 The networking organisations groups in FM ■ p24-25 Join the British Institute of Facilities Management ■ p28 Networking with the Rising FMs

FM CAREER PROFILES ■ p30-31 FM World’s Rising Stars of FM in 2012 ■ p3336 Profiles of rising facilities managers ■ p37 What FMs themselves say about the work they do

QUALIFICATIONS ■ p40–41 Careers path map ■ 42-43 Qualifications in FM ■ p44-45 Apprenticeships in FM ■ p48-49 Graduate programmes offered in the FM sector

SKILLS ■ p52-53 How customer service, time management, networking, and project management are an FM’s key skills ■ p54 What makes a good FM?

COMPANY PROFILES & FURTHER READING p56-59 Company profiles ■ p60 Education and training providers ■ p62 Recruitment agencies ■ p64-67 Links to further reading and information ■

Redactive Publishing Ltd 17 Britton Street, London EC1M 5TP 020 7880 6200 www.fm-world.co.uk EDITORIAL Tel: 020 7880 6229 email: editorial@fm-world.co.uk editor: Martin Read ⁄ news editor: David Arminas ⁄ sub editor: James Richards ⁄ editorial assistant: James Harris ⁄art director: Mark Parry ⁄ art editor: Daniel Swainsbury ⁄ picture editor: Sam Kesteven

ADVERTISING AND MARKETING email: sales@fm-world.co.uk senior display sales executive: Adam Potter (020 7880 8543) recruitment sales executive: Carly Gregory (020 7880 2755) PRODUCTION production manager: Jane Easterman production executive: Aysha Miah PUBLISHING publishing director: Steve Bagshaw

For exclusive online content including blogs, videos and daily news updates, visit fm-world.co.uk FM World Jobs – the best place to find FM career opportunities online visit fm-world.co.uk/jobs

Get up to speed quickly with FM news stories, sign up to follow us on Twitter visit twitter.com/fm_world Visit, then like us on Facebook to discuss issues in this guide. facebook.com/ fmworldmagazine

GUIDE TO CAREERS IN FM 201303

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CAREERS IN FM INTRODUCTION

‘FACILITIES MANAGER’ – A SINGLE JOB TITLE, BUT ONE OFFERING THE MOST VARIETY POSSIBLE his is the third consecutive year in which we’ve published a guide to the careers available in facilities management. You might think that no profession could see enough change as to justify three such guides in so short a period of time, but in fact it’s been a dizzying three years during which we’ve seen the final touches put to a robust training and qualifications structure, an increasing acceptance of the importance of FM to the country’s environmental ambitions – and a little sporting event known as the London 2012 Olympics, of which more later. So exactly what is facilities management? It’s all about providing, adapting and maintaining a workplace so that it is fit for purpose. By ‘workplace’, that usually means buildings and for buildings, read anything from office blocks, factories, theatres, stadiums… In fact, anywhere that people gather for work or pleasure needs managing and that’s where FM comes in.

T

Martin Read Editor, FM World @Martin_Read

VARIETY IS THE SPICE OF FM LIFE You’ll probably be contemplating your future career or considering moving out of your current line of work. In either event, the purpose of this guide is to explain what facilities management involves and help you work out whether it’s is the career for you. Excuse me for this next sentence, as it sounds wildly ambitious, but here we go: facilities management is a profession that gives you the potential to change the world through the decisions you make. If you think this is fanciful, consider the fact that by some estimates, 8 per cent of the British economy is made up by facilities management. FMs can quickly end up running portfolios of buildings both nationally and internationally, working alongside property professionals on huge change projects – and change, chiefly as a result of the IT revolution through which we’re all living, is all around us. Change the world? Quite possibly. As an FM, you can rise quickly to take charge of people and projects and do more in that capacity to help save energy and the wider environment than in almost any other sector of business.

FM rewards the sociable because you’re constantly interacting with people at all levels of the major organisations for which you could be working. FM rewards the organised because you’ll be managing different teams of people, contracts and projects at varying stages of completion. And FM rewards the laterally minded. Anyone for whom ‘lifelong learning’ is an enjoyable prospect will enjoy FM. Facilities managers run all manner of workplaces, but some of the most high profile examples of FM recently took place earlier this year during the Olympic Games. Managing the performance of innovative new buildings like the Olympic velodrome and aquatics centre means consulting on their design, project-managing the staffing and fitting-out of the buildings and managing the various technical staff and games makers that made this summer’s extravaganza such an amazing experience for visitors. As an FM, you could be involved in this kind of project in future. The variety that facilities management offers is astounding. You could be managing your own team, liaising with your subcontracted staff or talking to architects or designers, all in a single day’s work. One day you could be heating your workforce, making sure the lights stay on and taking care of the catering. The next you might be negotiating with security or cleaning contractors, planning to hold a conference or talking with the people who work in your facilities to understand what they really want from their workplace. Finally, another reason for us publishing three consecutive guides to the profession: So little is known about it among students and school-leavers. People have always managed workplaces, of course, but today the profession is much more defined. Indeed, the term ‘facilities management’ is barely 30 years old. From a young person’s perspective, this makes it’s a great time to get involved. Students entering the profession can help define the sector – and let’s face it, few other careers can offer that. We hope you enjoy learning about FM in this guide, and we encourage you to get in touch personally if you want any more information.

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FM WHAT IS FACILITIES MANAGEMENT?

1

WHAT IS FM? NEVER HEARD OF FACILITIES MANAGEMENT? LET US EXPLAIN. FIND OUT WHAT WE MEAN BY THE TERM, WHETHER YOU’D BE RIGHT FOR IT – AND, CRUCIALLY, WHAT YOU COULD EARN 06 MAKE A DIFFERENCE - BECOME AN FM 08 THE HARD AND SOFT OPTIONS 09 SALARIES IN FM 10 MIND MAP – THE EXTRAORDINARY REACH OF FM 12 FM AND THE WIDER BUSINESS WORLD 16 A TYPICAL DAY IN THE LIFE OF AN FM

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FM WHAT IS FACILITIES MANAGEMENT?

CHOOSE TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

t’s good news for you if being tied to a desk all day sounds like the worst thing in the world. Facilities management is much, much more than a desk job and we at FM World have lost count of the number of times we’ve had to explain that when it comes to FM,“no two days are the same”. Schools, offices, hospitals, libraries, stadiums, factories, museums, prisons, scientific laboratories, shops, business parks – if you can think of a facility, we can point to an FM team working behind the scenes to ensure that everything runs like clockwork. You’ll surely have tuned into the London Olympics this year; facilities managers were involved in everything from co-ordinating the opening ceremony through to manning the exits with purple-clothed ‘games-makers’. Of course, there have always been people managing workplaces. These used to be people sharing that part of the work with other roles within their organisations. Job titles included office manager,

I

operations manager, estates, technical services, asset or even property manager. The term ‘facilities management’ only came into being in the late 1970s and was introduced to the UK in the 1980s. One of the appealing things for many is that FM is such a young profession, yet to settle into a set structure. However, it has become much more of a defined profession in recent years as organisations and government alike have come to appreciate the cost, and value to their business, of the FM function. For anyone weighing up competing career options, here’s the thing: FM touches on so many aspects of an organisation that we’ve had great difficulty in constraining a diagram of it into a spread in this guide. (Nevertheless, we just about succeeded – see pages 10 and 11.) What’s more, if you are particularly enthusiastic about a career in which you can help the environment, FM is most certainly it. Decisions that you make can impact on your organisation’s

e gement Tim n a m a

Coo cal l an m d he a d!

Planning budgets

Goo d ne got iat io n s k ills

ltiu A ms ke r ta N ew gene r a of FM tion s

Fa s

Imagine there was a career choice that offered responsibility, variety and the ability to make a lasting difference to the people you work for and the environment. Facilities management offers all that and more besides

an t cha dr ew lleng a rd ing ing

CHOOSE FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

FM i youns a profe g ss ion

carbon footprint directly. In fact, the scope of FM has grown enormously over the past decade, driven by such influences as the shape of the economy, environmental legislation and sustainability. These days, facilities managers interact with people at all levels of their organisation and can be responsible for huge budgets. What’s more, because FM in the UK is more advanced than many other countries, there are good opportunities to work abroad. All of that is just for starters,

o N o t w the da ys ! s a me

and if any of it sounds like code for a cosy, behind-the-scenes existence, then you couldn’t be further from the truth. It’s also worth noting that workers supported by FMs aren’t just found in buildings; they’re often working at home, on the move or at any point between. The decisions FMs take daily can have an enormous impact on the lives of the entire workforce.

Why choose FM now? With the cost of energy rising sharply and the development

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of IT occurring at breakneck speed, the role of the facilities manager is taking on far greater significance. Unlike other property-related professions such as architecture and surveying, FM is a young profession. In terms of a standard profile, the typical facilities manager is a man in his forties or fifties, but that doesn’t take into account the fact that there’s a new generation of FMs in their twenties and thirties coming through in broadly equal numbers of men to women.

So what makes for a good FM? You’ll need to be a keen and energetic learner. Good procurement and negotiation skills are essential for an FM, as you’ll find yourself purchasing everything from plants, furniture, cleaning products and stationery through to the negotiation and implementation of millionpound contracts for security, maintenance or consultancy. You’ll be a multi-tasker, moving swiftly between planning next year’s budget, rehearsing a crisis management plan, climbing around the roof inspecting the air-conditioning system or, quite literally, fighting fires. Time management and a cool, calm head are essentials. There’s a skills shortage in the profession for outstanding FMs who can come up with good ideas as companies look for innovative ways to reduce costs and keep staff motivated in tough times. In other words, now is the perfect time to make your mark. Despite the recession and the focus on costcutting, sustainability is rising in importance in many organisations. FMs are increasingly recognised as the guardian of an organisation’s environmental and ethical policies. If going green is

your thing, you need to be in FM. Perhaps of greatest importance for first-jobbers is the fact that facilities professionals are proud of the responsibility they’re given in their jobs from day one. Take a look at section three of this guide for some great examples of proud facilities managers at all sorts of organisation. You may be building relationships with suppliers, walking the floors of your building to ensure your customers are happy and productive, or looking at ways that your organisation can become more sustainable – and the chances are that you will be doing it from that first Monday morning.

The true scope of FM After its staff, facilities management and property represent the biggest expenditure for most organisations. It’s at the very heart of an organisation, and is increasingly recognised as such. Yes, you may have to spend a fair amount of time planning to avoid crises and keeping facilities running – but you’ll also be leading projects that can have a huge impact on people, the workplace and the environment. What other career offers you that kind of variety? By choosing FM as your career, you’ll be choosing one of the fastest-changing, most challenging and rewarding jobs in the country. Over the page, we’ll be explaining it in more detail.

“FMS ARE OFTEN RECOGNISED AS THE GUARDIAN OF AN ORGANISATION’S ENVIRONMENTAL AND ETHICAL POLICIES”

TYPICAL FM WORK ● Co-ordinating catering, cleaning and maintenance work ● Keeping the heating running and the lights on ● Making sure that facilities comply with legislation ● Refurbishing and adapting facilities as the organisation’s main business model changes ● Keeping workers safe and secure ● Planning how the space that workers use is organised ● Dealing with the aftermath of major incidents such as fires and accidents ● Working with a team of architects and engineers to design a new headquarters for a blue-chip company ● Introducing a flexible working strategy so that ownership of desks is removed and everyone chooses a different desk when they walk in each day ● Integrating a new portfolio of buildings and people after a major acquisition ● Moving several hundred (or thousand) people to new premises over a single weekend ● Writing a security strategy to help avoid, or react to, a terrorist attack on your building ● Working with a sub-contractor to create a green roof ● Introducing a cycle-to-work scheme for employees ● Ensuring that your catering team reduces the distance that food travels from ‘farm to fork’, becoming environmentally friendly in the process ● Cutting the amount of energy and water a building uses ● Reducing the amount of CO2 a property produces ● Adapting the workplace to new forms of communications technology ● Creating new offices for your organisation in Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the US

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FM WHAT IS FACILITIES MANAGEMENT?

THE INS AND OUTS OF FM

UNDERSTANDING THE TERMINOLOGY Organisations can buy in soft or hard services, perhaps even in a bundle. And they can employ a facilities manager directly or through a contractor. Confused? Read on...

very organisation has someone in charge of their facilities. Smaller firms often attach the FM function to another employee’s main job, such as general or office manager. For larger organisations, ‘facilities manager’ is a dedicated role – in fact, it’s a position increasingly seen in smaller organisations, too. There’s no limit to the type of organisation in which FMs work. They can be in the public sector, private sector, charities and indeed outside of the workplace in areas such as social housing, ensuring that council houses are well-maintained, safe and fit for purpose. Whatever the organisation type, FMs can still be split into two basic types, client-side (in-house) or supply side (outsourced). See the box below for an explanation

E

THE TWO BASIC TYPES OF FACILITIES MANAGER ‘IN-HOUSE/CLIENT-SIDE’ FMS

‘SUPPLY-SIDE’ FMS

So called ‘client-side’ FMs are people employed directly by an organisation to be responsible for all aspects of the workplace, on one site or across many. Teams of client-side FMs provide all of the services themselves and also manage the relationship between the organisation and any third-party FM service company brought in under contract (for example, a cleaning or catering contractor). Almost two-thirds of FMs work client side.

Many organisations prefer to use a specialist FM provider to look after their facilities (this is known as ‘outsourcing’ the FM service). ‘Supply-side’ FMs are the people employed by these specialist providers. They’re tasked with working in, and managing, the facilities of that company’s clients. Supply-side FMs often liaise closely with client-side counterparts. Many work for firms offering suites of FM services (‘total FM’), and others work for specific service providers, such as cleaning or catering.

of how these two roles differ. However they’re deployed, FMs have a varied day-to-day role. One minute they’re dealing with broken light bulbs, the next shaping a future workplace. On any given day, they could be organising catering for a major function or planning the property asset register for the organisation’s entire property portfolio. When organisations outsource their FM requirement, they can choose to do so in a variety of ways. They can buy in single services through specialist contractors – for instance, one contractor each to provide catering and cleaning. Alternatively, they can buy FM in a ‘bundle’, giving a multi-service contractor the responsibility for supplying all of the FM services required. Some of these ‘total’ or ‘integrated’ FM providers do so via ‘self-delivery’ – directly employing all of the staff required across all of the FM services offered to the client – or they sub-contract to smaller niche organisations, managing that relationship so that the client organisation only deals with the one contracting organisation. However you cut it, the fact is that FM involves the delivery of a huge number of services. Fortunately, these can be broadly split into two groups: hard FM and soft FM.

Hard and soft FM Hard services are those to do with the physical fabric of a facility – its windows, doors, boilers, anything

that is mechanical and electrical. Soft services are typically those provided by people, such as security, catering and cleaning. As one FM insider explains it: “Hard FM is anything with a plug on it. Soft FM is anything with a hand on it.” Another FM once described the difference thus: “If you turned a building upside down, what falls out is soft FM and what stays in place is hard FM”. Simplistic, perhaps – but memorable. In fact, even the big FM companies differ in how they define what comprises soft and hard FM. Why? Because FM is a young industry with a variety of origins. Plenty of current facilities managers migrated into the sector from some other aspect of building services, while companies that once dealt solely with cleaning now offer catering and security services as well. As the sector has matured, so has the definition of the services involved. The good news for people considering a career in the sector is that it is still evolving, and new FMs can have a hand in taking it to the next level.

Soft FM Cleaning Catering Security Mailroom Health & safety

Hard FM The building fabric: Heating and ventilation Lighting IT infrastructure Waste management Energy management

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FM WHAT YOU COULD EARN

SALARY & BENEFITS MALE/FEMALE RATIO IN FM 70/30

Despite tough economic conditions, facilities management still offers competitive salaries and benefits for those wishing to make a career in the sector. The table below provides a snapshot of the various roles and typical earning potential. Salaries rise with experience and vary according to function, location and type of employer. The highest salaries are typically in London and the east of England. Facilities assistants starting out in the industry can expect to earn from £20,000 on average.

FACTS & STATS: TWO THIRDS OF FACILITIES MANAGERS WORK CLIENT SIDE *

70

(*STATS FROM FM WORLD 2012 SALARY SURVEY)

FM World publishes an annual salary survey to identify trends in salaries, benefits, training and qualifications in the FM sector. Respondents to the FM World 2012 Salary Survey were 70 per cent male. The gender gap has decreased over the years and this continued trend indicates that the gender make-up of the industry is changing to attract more women. More than 65 per cent of female respondents to the 2010 survey are earning up to £45,000 compared to 51 per cent of men. Men are the higher earners, controlling the salaries above £61,000 – 22 per cent of men earn more than £61,000 compared to 14 per cent of women.

30

TYPICAL SALARIES ACROSS THE UK Position/function

In-house

FM Service Provider

Facilities assistant/ office manager Facilities supervisor Facilities manager Senior facilities manager Multi-site FM Business development/sales Bid management Commercial management Director/head of FM

Up to £35,000 dependent on experience

Up to £43,000 dependent on experience Up to £35,000 £36,000-£60,000

£26,000-£45,000 £26,000-£76,000 £26,000-£76,000

£46,000-£91,000+

£46,000-£76,000 £36,000-£91,000+ £36,000-£91,000+ £36,000-£75,000

BENEFITS/BONUSES COMPANY CAR/ ALLOWANCE PETROL ALLOWANCE PENSION SCHEME HEALTH PLAN GUARANTEED BONUS PERFORMANCERELATED BONUS PROFIT SHARE/ SHARESAVE PAID OVERTIME GUIDE TO CAREERS IN FM 2013  |09

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FM MIND MAP

A MIND MAP CAPTURING THE EVOLVING ROLE OF THE FACILITIES MANAGER (AS OF MARCH 2012) FM consultant Martin Pickard’s extraordinary diagram details the sheer breadth of the FM role, showing just how extensively the function relates to all aspects of an organisation’s operations

WHAT FACILITIES MANAGERS DO…

KEY:

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FM FM AND THE WIDER BUSINESS

FM’S WIDER ROLE FM and workplace design Facilities managers play an increasingly important role in the strategies surrounding workplace design. Technology and the changing demographics of the workforce are making the way workplaces are specified more important. This all has to be balanced against the need to control ever-increasing real estate costs. FMs are directly involved in the continual assessment of how well a workplace serves an organisation. In practice, this means judging the likely impact of changes and weighing that up against the cost. From an infrastructural perspective, there’s the way that buildings are wired up to work with the latest communications technologies. For some, blanket WiFi coverage is essential; for others, the cabling necessary to allow for new high-definition video conferencing is an important requirement as part of a plan to minimise travel costs by getting more people to liaise virtually rather than face to face.

In all of this, the FM must act as a facilitator of change, while ensuring that the dayto-day activities that keep the organisation functioning continue unaffected. Workplace design includes major ‘fit-out’ projects in which, for example, old office rooms are discarded in favour of an open plan approach. Here, the FM’s role can range from consultant, carrying out surveys of individual workers, through to liaison, engaging with the design company appointed to carry out the work. Depending on the organisation, the FM will play a strategic role, controlling the change project and working with other departments including HR and corporate real estate in order to see the project through in terms of the new workplace and its impact on the individuals that use it. It’s important to emphasise the need for an FM to be able to engage with people across the organisation, from the receptionist right up to the chief executive. Increasingly, a connection is being made between the business strategy of an organisation and its

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Facilities managers are the oil that keeps an organisation’s engine going, with the role increasingly important on its own and in tandem with other departments. Here, we look at the connections between FM and other departments both internally and externally

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“FM’S APPRECIATION OF OPERATIONAL PERFORMANCE ACROSS ALL ASPECTS OF THE BUILDING MUST BE FACTORED INTO DESIGN DECISIONS” As well as some of the colourful design issues, there’s the need to liaise with colleagues in the IT department to get the right equipment to desks; the procurement department to get the right price for the project; and the HR department to deal with the many issues involved with changing the workplace environment for your workforce. Workplace design projects will almost certainly surprise you in their complexity. Space you may have assumed would always be required for the photocopiers, for example, may not be needed in the new way of working. Flexibility, communication and collaboration are key elements in most workplace design projects.

FM and the wider property role

routine operational requirements. Facilities managers are in a position to have great influence in this area. As well as offices, what about using so-called ‘third spaces’ – serviced offices or even coffee shops? How about working from home? What impact could that have on the amount of work space your organisation requires, and thus its property costs? With all these decisions, the FM is involved at a practical level, considering such pragmatic issues as acoustics and the need for people to concentrate individually versus the need for collaboration between workers.

Facilities managers need to be good communicators for a variety of reasons, none more so than the need to interact with the other major departments in the organisation for which they work – in particular, property services or ‘corporate real estate’. Increasingly, FMs are expected to have a hand in all aspects of an organisation’s involvement with its building, from liaising with surveyors (when looking for new premises), architects (when planning new facilities), construction managers (when those new facilities are being built) and project managers (for a variety of reasons, from construction through to workplace planning). The point made by many is that in all such projects, the one constant remaining in place when all the others have moved on to other projects is the

facilities manager, representing the requirements of the building occupier at all stages.

Leaps and bounds Such close involvement in this work is a relatively recent development. In the two decades since facilities management as a term first came to be accepted, the wider property profession has moved from resisting the input of FM professionals to an acceptance that FM is in fact a critical link in the property chain. Today, there are external factors poised to make the title of facilities manager all the more important. Chief among these is the government’s move to force any construction project in the government’s own property portfolio to be built using building information modelling (BIM) – essentially, using data on the performance characteristics of a building’s components when specifying the components in a new build. Because facilities managers are involved in all aspects of managing a building, their appreciation of the operational performance across all aspects of the building is now an essential element that must be factored into the design decisions an architect needs to consider when looking at the proposed new building. Another government initiative, ‘Soft Landings’, is so-called because it requires the companies involved in the construction process to see through a period after handing over to the building owner and occupier in which any operational problems are identified and acted upon. The overall effect of these policies is to put the

facilities manager up front, making them a facilitator and decision maker. The government’s move to BIM for new build projects will kick in from 2016, but it will – initially, at least – be reserved strictly for new-build projects in the public sector. More likely for the typical FM is the managing of extensions or rebuilding on existing premises. Here, the facilities manager is the custodian of the building site or portfolio, playing a fundamental role in a new project as the information and data holder. But they’re also responsible for the health and safety of all the existing users, defining boundaries to make sure users can carry out their day-to-day business without being impacted by the new work.

Building bridges The FM has to bring together a range of professionals from the planning stage through project safety planning. The FM is the one person likely to work with everybody involved in the design, costings and finishings. For new-builds, the involvement of FM is less well-established and it is common to hear stories of people referring to FM far too late in the design process. There is growing recognition that FM is part of the team and would interface with all these other professionals, but there is still a fight for it to be recognised at the beginning of a new-build project rather than being brought in halfway through. Building information modelling and the government’s soft landings policy should help. GUIDE TO CAREERS IN FM 2013 |13

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FM FM AND THE WIDER BUSINESS

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FM and architectural design Facilities management was a critical component in the delivery of the London 2012 Olympics, helping ensure the smooth running of what is generally accepted to be one of the most successful Olympic Games ever. But while FMs were involved in the managing of facilities during the games, the lesser-told story is of their involvement at the design stage of some of the games’ most iconic buildings. Iain Murray, group strategy director at Europa Support Services, points to the velodrome in particular. “When it was originally designed, it had a different roof design, which was changed on the recommendation of the builder, not the architect,” says Murray. “The architect would have been very much in there with the contractor. But the whole team, including the FM, would have been involved in the discussions about maintainability

and accessibility after handover. You wouldn’t expect a junior facilities manager to be involved at that level, although they may be on the team. But the head of FM would be working collaboratively and commenting on design, accessibility and maintenance costs at the end of the project.” This trend to involve FM earlier in initial design has become more noticeable over the past four years since the beginning of the recession, says Iain Murray. “People do not want to find that when they’ve refitted, rebuilt or re-occupied space that it has a higher cost of occupancy than was expected. They want facilities managers involved at an early juncture,” he says. “I’d be very surprised if mature businesses in the UK are not including facilities managers in their deliberations.”

FM and the environment For anyone with a passion for saving the environment, look no

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“YOU COULD ENSURE THAT STAFF EAT HEALTHILY BY ORDERING ORGANIC FOOD OR BY APPOINTING SPECIALIST CATERING CONTRACTORS” further – facilities management offers you a career in which you can keep your finger on the pulse of energy management. Issues of sustainability in business are big news, so if you want to have a measurable effect through your work on the overall carbon footprint of the UK economy, FM is the career for you.

FM and the law As legislation has cascaded down on to business, everything from government incentives to introduce energy-efficient infrastructure projects (the ‘green deal’) through to corporate social responsibility (CSR) reporting has an FM angle. Government objectives for the reduction in carbon use by the year 2050 are extraordinary and made all the more so when you consider the fact that 80 per cent of the buildings currently in operation will still be in use then. FMs are at the frontline in this fight. There is so much to consider – it’s not just the emissions in your organisation’s buildings but that of its supply chain, too. To prove your organisation’s environmental credentials, you’ll need to be sourcing from organisations with efficient systems themselves. From basic retrofitting of solar panels and ground-source heat pumps through to proving the case for more efficient forms of boilers, FMs can also be involved in measuring the ‘embedded carbon’ in their buildings (the amount of energy used in the construction of the components used in the building).

FM and human resources FM and HR are increasingly close bedfellows in an organisation, the result of, among other things, the need for FM teams to be adequately trained. This is a result of many pieces of legislation that organisations are legally bound

to comply with. But also when it comes to the introduction of flexible working, for example, and a change in the way that individuals interact in and out of the business. Then there is the behavioural aspect of the FM role and the health of the workforce. Facilities managers can be involved in ensuring that staff eat healthily through the use of organic food or the appointment of specialist catering contractors. Deciding on what cycling facilities to make available to workers is also part of the FM remit; you may even be called on to specify plants that absorb chemicals in the workplace. Duncan Young, sustainability manager at Lend Lease’s London headquarters, was involved in making sure cycling facilities, including secure lockers and showers, were part of the organisation’s specification for its new building. “The main thing for us is the health and wellbeing of

our employees,” says Young. “We believe that healthy employees are more productive.” This in turn feeds back into an organisation’s corporate social responsibility.

FM and the future The fact that FM is such a large and impossible-to-ignore element of an organisation’s expenditure means that it is always in the sights of people looking to keep a lid on costs. Yet the most exciting aspect of how the FM role has developed in recent years is that is now impossible to disconnect it from the way an organisation is managed. FM is becoming an unavoidable element in any organisation’s strategic planning. Those thinking of entering the profession now will be in the ideal position to have significant and rewarding roles in the future. After 30 years of development, the role of facilities manager has never seemed so attractive. Martin Read is the editor of FM World

GUIDE TO CAREERS IN FM 2013 |15

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FM

ONE DAY AS AN FM

PERSONAL BEST One day as an FM. Ready, get set....

You’re on a site visit. The organisation is looking to expand, and your role is to evaluate suitable premises in the local area. Today, you’re talking with a local estate agent about a property just half a mile from your existing site. It looks OK and there’s enough space for your organisation’s plans, but you have reservations – is the telecoms infrastructure good enough?

You’re down on the ground floor of your building. The organisation you work for wants to introduce a new department, so you’re planning how this might be introduced. Right now, it’s a question of phone lines, desks and natural light. You’re thinking of using new LEDs in order to light up what’s historically been a dimly-lit part of the premises. Can you make use of this hitherto under-used space? You’ve asked a supplier to come in and discuss how that might be done.

In a week’s time, your firm will be hosting a delegation from one of your major clients. This means getting your on-site caterers to prepare and provide a three-course lunch for 60 people. It’s your job to make sure that everyone’s needs are met and that you can accommodate everyone. Also, how many people will you need on the day? You’re working with the in-house chef to calculate how you’ll get the food from the kitchens to the 15th floor

12:00 A meeting with your finance director to review and discuss preparing documents to put out to tender for new contractors. The current maintenance contract is coming to an end so it’s time to think about getting the best deal

You’ve arranged to meet with your cleaning service provider. It’s time to assess whether they’re meeting their objectives, and discuss whether you’re recycling enough

11:15

13:20 14:45

10:30

15:00

9:00

START 8:00

Arrive early to check your emails and check the industry’s voices on social media and Twitter

Another day done, but tonight you’re out networking with fellow FMs. You’re heading to an event themed around encouraging cycling among the workforce. And tomorrow? Tomorrow will be an entirely different day…

You’re on your ‘rounds’ checking in with the reception helpdesk. Here’s where you can find out what kind of problems your building users are reporting.

FINISH 19:30

16:10 17:30 18:00 Time for a quick catch-up with your security manager as his night staff come on duty. You’re considering introducing a new card-swipe system and pick his brains about the pros and cons

It’s an emergency – the heating system has broken down. Your maintenance contractor is on their way, but meanwhile you need to get a member of your team to explain the situation to the various department heads

You’ve been charged with the responsibility of boosting employee engagement – part of your masterplan involves getting green fingered with a potted herb garden on the roof terrace

The day’s over for most of the building’s users, but you’re conducting a special project to cut the building’s carbon emissions by 20 per cent. Now’s the perfect time to prepare for your meeting with the specialist consultant

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FM WHAT IS FACILITIES MANAGEMENT?

2

OTHER ROUTES INTO FM WITH A COMPREHENSIVE QUALIFICATION STRUCTURE, IN PLACE, NOW IS A GREAT TIME FOR STUDENTS TO COME INTO FM – BUT IT’S ALSO A GREAT CHOICE FOR THOSE CONSIDERING SWITCHING CAREERS 18 SWITCHING OVER TO FM

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ROUTES INTO FM TRANSFERRING FROM ANOTHER JOB

MAKE YOUR MOVE Not happy with your current job and thinking about doing something else? Whatever your background, your existing skills and experience are likely to find a natural home in facilities management ooking to make your second, even perhaps your third choice of career? If so, you’ll want to know that FM is a long-term option. In which case, it’s worth considering that FM is relatively recessionproof – if organisations are not expending their property portfolio when the economy is good, they are maintaining their existing workplaces when times are bad. Whatever part of the economic cycle we’re, good facilities managers will be in high demand. So what business sectors are already proven paths into FM? Here are a few examples.

L

From hospitality It’s all about people in FM, and that makes prior experience in the hospitality sector a valuable

commodity. Take the BBC’s Media City facility in Salford (pictured), where members of the FM team were deliberately sourced from organisations such as airlines, hotels, even Manchester United Football Club. Both the BBC and its FM service contractor realised that for each individual BBC team to work as efficiently as possible, facilities personnel needed to be ‘embedded’ with them, able to slot into the teams and anticipate their needs. They were employed for their people skills, not their FM skills (the latter have been added ‘on the job’). For many, facilities management is increasingly seen as the domain of ‘generalists’ – people who are highly competent as managers and communicators who can bring in specialists

for any technical requirement (for example, legal compliance consultants and specialist building service engineers). People from a hospitality background are in a good position to exploit their existing people and project-management skills in an FM environment.

From the armed forces While it’s true that plenty of former defence personnel go into security positions when they leave the service, the engineering and management skills attributable to ex-army personnel can also find a good home at a management level in FM. For a start, many of the country’s largest FM service contractors actually provide FM for defence-sector sites – making ex-army personnel a natural fit to help provide the FM service on such a contract. The armed forces was shown to be the third-largest former professional background of facilities management

professionals in the 2012 FM World Salary Survey, with 10 per cent of the sample having come from that background. It’s clear that FM is fast becoming an obvious path for current servicemen and service leavers. (If you’re ex-army, you can look at the table on the right of this spread to work out at what level of qualification you might already be at within FM.)

From engineering Building service engineers are critical to the future of FM, just as FM is critical to the future of building service engineers. Two issues dominate: first, ensuring that all the mechanical and electrical components of a building are working optimally is of increasing importance to organisations fixed on cost control and making the most of their investment in equipment such as boilers and air-conditioning. Second, the targets set by government and organisations to reduce carbon footprints by 2050

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Right: An indication of where armed forces personnel may rank in FM

BIFM MEMBERSHIP

Your Rank

Grade

HANNAH WILLIAMS

NATO Rank Code

Experience route

From elsewhere With FM’s broad remit, it’s perhaps not surprising to hear that at least some of your experience should be valuable in an FM role, whether you’ve already worked in catering, security or even in an educational role. If you’re not sure whether you’re a natural fit, turn to page 52 to find out about the broad skillset required.

Certified CBIFM

N/A

Diploma in FM at QCF Level 4 or 5 and 3 years’ general management and 2 years’ FM experience in rank

OF5 OF4

Member MBIFM

5 years’ FM experience and 3 years’ managerial experience in rank

Diploma in FM at QCF Level 4 or 5 and 3 years’ general management and 2 years’ FM experience in rank

OF3

Member MBIFM

5 years’ FM experience and 3 years’ managerial experience in rank

Diploma in FM at QCF Level 4 or 5 and 3 years’ general management and 2 years’ FM experience in rank

OF2 OF1

Member MBIFM

5 years’ FM experience and 3 years’ managerial experience in rank

Diploma in FM at QCF Level 4 or 5 and 3 years’ general management and 2 years’ FM experience in rank

OR9

Certified CBIFM

N/A

An FM-related qualification at Level 6 (degree level) or equivalent and minimum 3 years’ FM experience in rank

OR8

Member MBIFM

5 years’ FM experience and 3 years’ managerial experience in rank

Diploma in FM at QCF Level 4 or 5 and 3 years’ general management and 2 years’ FM experience in rank

OR6

Associate ABIFM

2 years’ facilities management experience at nonmanagement level

One year’s facilities management experience and an FM-related qualification at Level 3 or above

OR4 OR3 OR2 OR1

Affiliate

SHUTTERSTOCK

The BBC’s Media City, where FM is embedded (top, left); M&E in action (above)

Qualifications and experience route

OF10 OF9 OF8 OF7 OF6

OR7

are hugely ambitious and will demand innovative new ways of managing and introducing energy sources. If you want to put your engineering skills to good use in the most environmentally effective way, FM is for you.

REQUIRED CRITERIA

Entry level grade – not assessed

Commissioned Officer – NATO Codes OF1 – OF10 Non-commissioned Officer – NATO Codes OR1 – OR9 *Please note that this grid is a general guideline for entry routes into BIFM membership; membership boundaries are not fixed. All entry routes are subject to the normal assessment according to the membership grade. If you believe you are eligible for a higher grade of membership than specified in the online membership application form, or to talk through your membership options, please contact our membership team.

GUIDE TO CAREERS IN FM 2013  |19

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polish up your team with our training South Thames College - 2012 Winner of the Sholom Gorden Award for Services to the Cleaning Industry. Courses available for existing and new staff: • Advanced Facilities Management Apprenticeship • Intermediate Facilities Management Apprenticeship • Cleaning and Support Service Skills • Business Administration • Customer Service • Team Leading

Do you have large contracts to fulÄl?

Are you struggling to ðnd qualiðed cleaning staff? We can link up with local job centres and also offer training into employment for the unemployed. Contact Mary Schramm at South Thames College on 020 8918 7518 mary.schramm@south-thames.ac.uk

www.south-thames.ac.uk/employers

Founded and led by Martin Pickard, FM Guru is a team of senior facilities management consultants and trainers with extensive experience of operating at top levels in major organisations around the world as both FM customers and service providers. The FM Guru team provide advice, support and inspiration to those involved in facilities management through consultancy, project support and bespoke training courses working for both facilities clients and service providers. For many years, the FM Guru team has been writing articles, preparing handouts for training courses and giving tips and advice to those involved in

FMGCareers.2013.020.indd 38

facilities management. A small selection of the material they have produced is provided on the FM Guru web site in the hope that people will find them useful. These resources are provided as a contribution to the development of professional facilities management and for your personal learning and development activities. Please feel free to look around. Martin Pickard Managing Director FM Guru Training & Consultancy Advice, Support & Inspiration

www.fmguru.co.uk

17/10/2012 11:47


FM WHAT IS FACILITIES MANAGEMENT?

3

NETWORKING OPTIONS FACILITIES MANAGEMENT IS A PARTICULARLY SOCIABLE PROFESSION. LEARN ABOUT WHAT YOU CAN GAIN FROM LINKING UP WITH THE SECTOR’S MANY NETWORKING GROUPS 22 NETWORKING OPTIONS FOR FMS 24 THE BRITISH INSTITUTE OF FACILITIES MANAGEMENT 28 NETWORKING OPTIONS FOR YOUNG FMS

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NETWORKING WITHIN THE BIFM

THE LINKS EFFECT Not only do facilities managers have access to a strong qualifications structure (see page 39 onwards), but they also have access to a wealth of networking options through membership and active participation with the organisations representing the profession, both directly or indirectly s the membership organisation for individual, group and corporate facilities managers, the BIFM is the first port of call for anyone looking for professional support. (For details of what the institute has to offer, turn to page 24.) FM is a highly engaging profession, made all the more so by the need for FMs to interact at all levels of their organisations as well as externally with suppliers. The BIFM’s range of more than 20 networking groups are staffed by volunteers and cover geographical regions and topic-specific special interests. Regional networking groups are split into London, the Home counties, the East, the Midlands, the North – with the North West and North East branches, the South and the South West. There are also separate regional groups in Ireland and Scotland. Similar to regional groups, the BIFM’s special interest groups (SIGs) organise events, both educational and social, and provide a platform for members

SHUTTERSTOCK

A

to raise queries or get in touch. Some are based on the type of facility being managed, others on the issues that affect the FMs, whatever the facility type. So, for instance, there are SIGs for FMs working in the retail sector and education establishments, and plenty of others besides. The latter group has links to the Association of University Directors of Estates, the Association of Colleges and the Independent School Bursars Association – further widening the networking potential. Similarly, the BIFM’s health and safety SIG works in partnership with The Health and Safety Executive (HSE). The procurement SIG provides a forum for discussion and exchange of views between buyers, sellers and end users. Its objective is to support recognition of the value of effective procurement in organisations. The catering and hospitality SIG provides a platform for members to seek expertise and guidance in the catering and hospitality industry,

while the people management SIG offers advice on people management, best practices and regulations. For BIFM members with a professional interest in workplace innovation, the workplace SIG holds networking events in the form of talks, site visits and social gatherings, covering issues of architecture, design, real estate and technology. There’s a risk and business continuity management SIG providing support and advice on issues of risk, compliance and business continuity, while the sustainability SIG is committed to the Global Alliance for

Building Sustainability, working for sustainable development. There’s also a specific Women in FM group that puts on events to encourage development and networking opportunities. The Women in FM programme consists of a series of forums and social events for fellow FMs. Members can learn from others’ experiences and hear about new opportunities in the sector.

A global reach An international SIG provides a forum for FMs responsible for, or interested in international FM practice. Their links offer

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CASE STUDY

Rise of the FM networkers arlier this year, we at FM World brought 35 of the industry’s top young talents together in one event: the Rising Stars of FM 2012. Our aim was to celebrate the diversity of the sector’s up-andcoming practitioners. So, in collaboration with the BIFM Rising FMs special interest group (SIG), we took over one of the floors of the newly built Heron Tower for a champagne reception. (For more on this, see p.30.) Apart from being a great way to applaud their achievements, this event was testament to the power of networking. Many of the winners have since stayed in touch, and continue to contribute to the BIFM through the Rising FMs SIG. For us, it was a great opportunity to think about why each Rising Star was chosen and ask what this says about the wider sector. Some made the list for the way they’d made significant projects bear fruit, others for the impact they had on their colleagues and others still for the enormous responsibilities they’d taken on. But one of the main characteristics was the will to contribute; evidence of an enthusiasm for volunteering really caught the judges’ eyes, with a sizeable majority of our final list being active members of either the BIFM or FMA, or both. In some cases, the candidate was active on the committees for the BIFM’s various special interest groups. This appears to be a sentiment shared by our readers (FM World is the membership magazine of the BIFM and distributed to the 12,800+ TYP YPICAL YP members). When we ANSW NSWERSS FROM FMS NSW asked them to name TO THE QUES UESSTION: ST “WHAT ST WHAT the top traits of a fastISSUES AREE YO YOU OU DE DEALING moving professional WITH ITH RIIGHT IGHTT NOW? W? in this sector, nearly a quarter of respondents cited the ability to form close working relationships as more important than nearly all other attributes.

E

MERGING SEPARATE OPERATIONS

Watch a TV programme about careers in facilities management www.bifm.org.uk/careersinfmTV

RESTRUCTURING THE FM DEPARTMENT

COMMUNICATION ISSUES

MAINTENANCE PROJECTS the opportunity to network with more than 18,000 facility professionals throughout 67 countries, as well as those based locally in the UK. Finally, there’s a group for young FMs called Rising FMs – you can read more about their activities on page 28. For more information on any of the BIFM groups, visit bifm.org.uk/groups

DEVELOPING SHARED SERVICES

CONVINCING SCEPTICAL SPACE TO MANAGEMENT SETTING UP CLIENTS CHANGE PROJECTS PROCEDURES

“THE WORKPLACE SIG HOLDS NETWORKING EVENTS IN THE FORM OF TALKS, SITE VISITS AND SOCIAL GATHERINGS” GUIDE TO CAREERS IN FM 2013 |23

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FM NETWORKING OPTIONS

What does BIFM membership involve? With over 12,500 members, and the aim to advance the profession, the British Institute of Facilities Management (BIFM) is the professional body for the sector representing and promoting the interests of members and the wider FM community. Perhaps it’s time you considered where BIFM could take you.

What are the benefits of membership? Membership of Europe’s largest FM institute is a mark of professional quality and recognition, signifying your level of expertise and experience. This applies whether you are considering FM as a career, are new to the industry, or a seasoned professional. Being a member demonstrates professional status and shows prospective employers a commitment to continuing professional development (CPD). We help our 12,500 members

thrive in their careers in many ways, including: ● Knowledge and information The BIFM is dedicated to keeping members at the forefront of the FM industry’s developments, keeping them updated with all the latest issues affecting the sector while offering a range of resources to enable them to deliver excellent FM ● Professional and personal development Through membership, there is access to a range of free and discounted opportunities to help develop careers and add to skills and experience. Members get access to the BIFM’s online CPD system to record ongoing learning, much of which is sourced from the BIFM’s comprehensive suite of career development tools and information ● Professional recognition The BIFM membership grades take into account your level of experience and qualifications, offering a range of grades to denote your professional abilities. By achieving the assessed grades

of membership you are signalling to peers and current and potential employers your aptitude for facilities management.

Networking with the BIFM Membership of the BIFM gives unrivalled access to fellow professionals to share best practice, gain experience and build networks. FM has always been a people business, and networking through the BIFM is a great way of seeking new challenges or meeting prospective employers – people who, due to your membership, can be confident in your abilities and commitment to the industry. Networking opportunities are available on a national, regional and special interest basis.

Special Interest Groups BIFM is renowned for its many Special Interest Groups (SIGs), each of which meets regularly to discuss issues relevant to a particular specialism (see list on page 25). SIG events typically take place on weekday evenings and are often hosted at exceptional examples of newly built or refurbished facilities. Almost all of these events are free and hundreds are held across the country each year. For more information or to join BIFM, email membership@bifm. org.uk, call 0845 058 1358 or visit www.bifm.org.uk/joinus

As the professional body for FM in the UK, the British Institute of Facilities Management (BIFM) represents and promotes the interests of its members and the wider FM community. Its mission is to advance the FM profession. Here’s why you should consider joining

SHUTTERSTOCK

LAUNCH YOUR CAREER TODAY 24| GUIDE TO CAREERS IN FM 2013

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BIFM AT A GLANCE

Professional Development Qualifications in facilities management Qualifications in facilities management are available at all levels, from new entrants through to senior strategic FMs. All BIFM qualifications are flexible and have been designed by FM professionals and employers. Learners choose a level and depth to suit their current situation and select optional units to match development or professional needs. Qualifications are aligned with BIFM membership grades (see box below) and are a great way to advance your knowledge and skills, but to also demonstrate your professional ability. Learn more about all BIFM qualifications on page 42-43.

Training BIFM Training offers a wide range of courses on all aspects of FM and developing leaderships skills, from supervisory to senior management levels. Introductory courses are available if you’re new to FM as a career.

What grade of membership? We have five membership grades that symbolise a member’s level of experience and expertise in FM. As your experience and expertise grow, you can upgrade to a higher grade of membership: BIFM GRADE STRUCTURE – APPLICABLE FROM 2011

1 2 3 4 5

Affiliate

Affiliate – Entry-level grade, suitable for those with an interest in, or who are new to FM.

Associate (ABIFM)

Associate – Applicable to those with two years’ FM experience or an FM-related qualification at Level 3 or above with at least one year’s FM experience.

Member (MBIFM)

Member – Entry is by either a vocational or qualification route; for those with an FM-related qualification at Level 4 or 5 with three years’ general management experience – with at least two years’ FM experience, or with five years’ FM experience, which includes three years’ managerial experience.

Certified Member (CBIFM)

Fellow (FBIFM)

Certified Member – The highest direct entry route to membership, recognising significant professional experience and qualifications in FM. Those with an FM-related qualification at Level 6 (Degree level) or above and with three years’ or more management and FM experience may be eligible for this grade. Fellow – Highest professional grade of membership, recognising a high level of professional experience and influence in a senior role, together with a significant contribution to the FM industry.

Membership benefits ● FM World, our fortnightly industry-leading magazine ● Weekly BIFM newsletter ● Range of e-news bulletins including the FM World Daily, Workplace Law and Building Services ● Free Good Practice Guides and knowledge resources ● Free quarterly resource pack from Barbour EFM ● Access CPD, training and networking events through regions and SIGs ● Online CPD system to plan and record your professional development ● Discounted BIFM Careers Service ● 20 per cent discount on BIFM Training courses ● 32 per cent discount on BIFM SkillSet online courses ● Interactive social networking on the BIFM website, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook ● Attend events, such as ThinkFM, at a member rate

Special interest groups (SIGs) ● Catering & Hospitality ● Charities ● Education ● Health & Safety ● International ● People Management ● Procurement ● Retail ● Rising FMs ● Risk & Business Continuity Management ● Sustainability ● Women in FM

GUIDE TO CAREERS IN FM 2013  |25

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www.bifm.org.uk Email:membership@bifm.org.uk FMGCareers.2013.026-027.indd 2

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As a professional body for facilities management we are trusted by over 12,500 members to represent their interests and help them in their career Is it time you joined us? Whether you are considering Facilities Management as a career, are new to the industry or a seasoned professional, we have a grade of membership to suit you: Affiliate Associate (ABIFM) Member (MBIFM) Certified (CBIFM) Fellow (FBIFM)

Reap the rewards of membership As a member you will be able to demonstrate that you are serious about FM and be able to: Further your professional development Network with like-minded individuals Access information and knowledge to stay at the forefront of FM Get the professional recognition you deserve

Stand out with a BIFM Qualification in Facilities Management Whether you want to develop your existing skills in your current role or work towards a new position, a professional BIFM Qualification in Facilities Management can add considerable value to your skill set and knowledge. Through our qualifications you can: Gain respect Gain recognition Develop your skills Increase your knowledge We have a range of qualifications to suit everyone, from school leaver to those wanting to study for a Masters. You can fit the size and level to suit your needs, and decide how you prefer to study: be it face-to-face, evening class, distance learning or online learning.

Contact us to find out where BIFM could take you?

Tel: 0845 058 1358 Twitter: @BIFM_UK FMGCareers.2013.026-027.indd 3

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FM NETWORKING WITH THE RISING FMS

E H T N I JO

S R E Y L F H G I H

experienced people. “We like to keep our events flexible – we know how busy most FMs are – so attendees had a choice of activities across the afternoon. In the main hall, we had recruitment companies running workshops and information stands from recruiters, employers and training providers.”

Personal growth

Want to know where the best and brightest young FMs are? Your first stop should be the BIFM Rising FMs Special Interest Group, says chair Samantha Bowman and deputy chair Claire Akin

Rising FMs won the ‘BIFM SIG of the Year’. Now, Samantha Bowman FBIFM, chair, and Claire Akin MBIFM, deputy chair, offer an insight into why Rising FMs consistently attracts tomorrow’s high-flyers: “I think the word that best describes us is ‘dynamic’. We’re a young group, with a huge variety of backgrounds and experience. There’s always a lot to talk about, in terms of our careers, as well as the burning issues we’re facing in our jobs.”

AKIN FALOPE/SAM KESTEVEN

Keeping your skills sharp In 2007, a group of promising young professionals got together. They had two things in common: they were all at the early stages of their career, and were all dead set on carving out a career in the facilities management sector. So began the BIFM ‘Rising FMs’ Special Interest Group (SIG). The group has grown into one of the most popular and successful SIGs in the BIFM. Five years after its inception,

“We take continuing professional development (CPD) very seriously, and have a series of events based around the BIFM core competencies. “We keep our fingers on the pulse by tailoring the themes

towards what’s happening today, because we believe that’s what our members want and need. We’ve just had ‘Business continuity for the Olympics’ and ‘People Management’, and coming up, we’re looking at the government’s Soft Landings programme and Building Information Modelling (BIM), which we think is going to be huge.”

Access all areas “In the spirit of the champagne reception at the Heron Tower, we’ve planned a great range of ‘open building’ events for 2013. Our core program has also been enhanced with a range of great social networking opportunities. “Also, in July 2012 we held our second annual careers day at University College London. More than 100 FM professionals attended, all at different stages of their careers – we had new starters alongside some seriously

“I think the word that best describes us is ‘dynamic’. We’re a young group, with a wide variety of backgrounds”

“We think that Rising FMs is all about growth. Our aim is to give members the confidence to be a public representative of both the SIG and the sector. In practice, this could mean speaking at events, contributing in practical workshops, or building their own personal network among their peers. This alone could lead to all sorts of opportunities. “At each CPD event, a member has an opportunity to address the others with a presentation entitled ‘About the Job’. Members can also nominate their own buildings and facilities departments by hosting an event at their site. “The great thing is, if you’re a member of the BIFM, you get all this for free. If you’re already a BIFM member, and you feel like you’re missing out, join us by logging into www.bifm.org.uk and changing your preferences. Come and find out what the fuss is all about!” Rising FMs welcomes contact from individuals or organisations who want to work with the committee to achieve their aims, particularly those who feel able to support the committee as speakers, venue hosts or corporate sponsors. To learn more about Rising FMs go to www.bifm.org.uk/risingfms, email membership@bifm.org.uk, or contact the BIFM Membership Team on 0845 058 1358.

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CAREER PROFILES DON’T TAKE OUR WORD FOR IT – READ WHAT YOUNG FACILITIES MANAGERS MAKING NAMES FOR THEMSELVES IN ORGANISATIONS UP AND DOWN THE COUNTRY THINK OF THEIR JOBS 30 THE RISING STARS OF FM 32 FACILITIES MANAGERS’ CASE STUDIES

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CAREER PATHS PROFILES

Dean Botton Kicked-off career working with Brigaders and Major Generals PAGE 32

Kate Smith Integrates helpdesk, comms and security PAGE 32

Kate Morris-Bates Has a national portfolio of 6,000 sites PAGE 36

HIGH AND MIGHTY

The UK’s best young FMs prove how varied the role is You see here the young facilities management professionals crowned the ‘rising stars of FM’ in May 2012. The 35 people in this picture represent the results of a search and judging process carried out over three months. If you are considering a career in FM, the range of skills and abilities represented here is

instructional (you can read more about some of the people who’ve deployed them in the following pages). There’s the man who put his computer programming skills to work by writing software for the management of helpdesks, the woman who’s undertaking a huge re-organisation for a national retail chain, a man who spent the

summer of 2012 responsible for more than 4,500 people providing services across the Olympic venues, someone responsible for the facilities management of Heathrow’s Terminal 5 (but who has since moved on to manage the King’s College London portfolio), and a man whose role has included working with the police and anti-

terrorism experts. Those making our final 35 include many who started in FM as teenagers through to those who have transferred across having decided that their initial career choice was not in fact the right one for them. FM consultants were also recognised on the night. These

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Kerry Whitebread From working behind a bar to regional facilities co-ordinator PAGE 34

Stephanie Kendall Manages facilities for seven London buildings PAGE 35

Daniel Hawkins

are people with experience of providing the facilities service who now work for consultancies providing advice on major change projects for some of the biggest companies in the country. All aspects of FM project work is represented here, from major office refurbishments to recycling and tender initiatives, deployment

of performance management strategies, risk assessment surveying, expenditure control and energy management programmes. The event took place at the Heron Tower, the tallest building in the City of London – and one managed by the BIFM’s Facilities Manager of the Year at the time, Chris Stoddart. The Heron Tower

is an example of the high profile building that you can aspire to manage, but the people making this list of up-and-coming FMs are carrying out their work in a wide variety of positions in organisations that are high profile for reasons other than the workplaces from which their products or services are offered. If there’s one thing our

search for the rising stars of FM confirmed, it’s that variety of the spice of FM life. We haven’t the space in this guide to profile all of our rising stars, so we’ve picked out a select few. But you can read about all of them online – go to our digital edition at tinyurl.com/fmprofiles and read from page 24.

PETER SEARLE

Head-hunted to lead flagship integrated FM contract PAGE 36

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CAREER PROFILES CASE STUDIES

Flexibility and diversity Dean Botten WORKS AS: Area FM, City Facilities Management

HOW DID YOU FIRST GET INVOLVED IN FM?

I came through a temporary job in the FM department of a charity called SSAFA Forces Help for military personnel past and present. I’d always been interested in property maintenance and being able to work on a building with brigadiers and major generals keeping the standards up gave me a great knowledge base. WHEN DID YOU FIRST REALISE THAT FM WAS THE CAREER FOR YOU?

Probably when I started to see the routes of progression in terms of having a career that was going to be both challenging, offered the chance to travel – and pay well, of course! I remember reading job adverts in FM World advertising roles in Australia, Hong Kong and the Middle East. This consolidated my decision to pursue FM, as I’d love to work abroad one day.

do when I left school. I knew I wanted to work in central London and I suppose it’s fate that I ended up in FM!

WHAT KIND OF JOB HAD YOU BEEN LOOKING FOR?

WHAT DO YOU ENJOY MOST ABOUT YOUR JOB?

I had no clue what I was going to

The flexibility and diversity of it

Making my customers happy makes me happy Kate Smith

PHOTOGRPHY: SAM KESTEVEN/AKIN FALOPE

WORKS AS: UK operations director, Johnson Controls Global WorkPlace Solutions

HOW DID YOU FIRST GET INVOLVED IN FM?

My first job with FM in the title was when I started working on an in-house FM helpdesk for a large public broadcasting corporation. Previously, I’d worked in catering and hospitality while at university, and went through the brewery trainee manager programme. At the time, I had the choice of

WHAT DO YOU DO?

I manage the team that delivers hard and soft services in southeast London to our client, Asda. The contract is split into retail and distribution and I work on the distribution side.

from contract management to helpdesk services, communications, employee engagement, assurance and security. WHAT DO YOU ENJOY MOST ABOUT YOUR JOB?

two job offers: to manage a wine bar or move into FM. Obviously, I went for the FM option!

Making people happy. If my team and my customers (and my customers’ customers) are happy, then I’m happy.

WHEN DID YOU FIRST REALISE THAT FM WAS THE CAREER FOR YOU?

WHAT KIND OF PEOPLE WOULD EXCEL IN THE WORK YOU DO?

I’d never heard of facilities management when I left school or university. I spent the first decade trying to explain to friends and family what it was that I did. In recent years, FM has finally established itself as the credible and respected profession that it is. I now rarely get those blank looks when I say I work in facilities management. I joined the industry 14 years ago and very quickly realised it was a career path I would enjoy – I don’t know of another that allows you to use and develop such a broad skill set.

Every FM role is different, requiring different skills and approaches. There isn’t one model to fit all FM jobs. The diversity of the roles means we’ve been able to attract an incredible mix of people into the industry. My experience has been of flexible workplaces that are supportive and attractive to all. FM used to be about consistency, now consistency is taken as a given and there is a relentless drive for continuous improvement. A diverse team of people will contribute new and different ways of thinking.

WHAT KIND OF JOB HAD YOU BEEN LOOKING FOR?

I had absolutely no idea what kind of job, let alone career I wanted. I think at the time, I wanted to be the prime minister! WHAT DO YOU DO?

I work on a large financial services account, which involves the leadership and integration of account operations support teams,

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all, I could never sit at my desk from nine-to-five and do the same thing every day. In FM, you get involved with all levels of a business, from HR finance to operations. You become the ‘go-to guy’ – the individual who people contact to find out how to get something done quickly, which is great in terms of career progression.

You also have to be a negotiator and a diplomat, as costs are always paramount in any business. Getting that little bit extra out of a contractor always helps. A lot of the time, you end up in the middle of heated discussions that need resolving.

WHAT KIND OF PEOPLE WOULD EXCEL IN THE WORK YOU DO?

Never turn down any opportunity to showcase yourself. Part of this profession is about being a ‘yes man’, taking a task on and owning it. Ask your boss about giving you projects to do – most managers will be impressed that you’re asking for more responsibilities.

Being an FM, you have to be able to communicate with people from all walks of life and from all levels of a business, whether that’s the chief executive, or an apprentice who’s just started out.

Studying for engineering, moving to FM Rishi Sharma ma WORKS AS: Senior consultant, FM consulting sulting team, Davis Langdon on

HOW DID YOU FIRST GET INVOLVED IN FM? INVO

This ggoes back to my time at unive university, when during the summ summer holidays I would look for work wo to help fund my studies. I was employed by a number of organ organisations and worked as a recept receptionist, security guard, chef’s assistant, gardener, and helpd helpdesk supervisor. WHE DID YOU FIRST WHEN REALISE THAT FM WAS REAL THE CAREER C FOR YOU?

Durin my interview for the role During gr of graduate FM consultant, which st is strange, as I thought I knew wh it was that I was being what in interviewed for. Instead, I le learned there were so many p possibilities within FM. WHAT KIND OF JOB HAD W YO BEEN LOOKING FOR? YOU

Iw was looking for a graduate posi position that would offer me the same kind of challenges that I had faced when studying engineering at uni university. I had applied to a numb number of graduate positions across several different industries.

WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE FOR NEWCOMERS TO FM?

WHAT HAVE BEEN YOUR MOST SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENTS TO DATE?

One of my biggest achievements was when I was seconded out to a client’s site to provide directorlevel leadership for their FM provision, while producing an in-depth analysis of how FM services could be enhanced and delivered in the future. There were many obstacles to overcome, from resolving snagging issues for a multi-million building, to establishing new FM contracts, to developing client relationships with building users. This was an amazing experience, which taught me a lot about myself and what I could handle. WHAT DO YOU ENJOY MOST ABOUT YOUR JOB?

It’s the satisfaction I get from helping a client achieve their goals – the knowledge that we’ve met their goals and expectations. Similarly, the variety and knowledge that no two days are the same is what keeps everything so interesting and vibrant. GUIDE TO CAREERS IN FM 2013 |33

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CAREER PROFILES CASE STUDIES

Creating a warm environment Kerry Whitebread WORKS AS: Regional facilities co-ordinator, Mitie

The variety. You don’t know what you may have to deal with one week to the next. It can be very exciting and gives you a great sense of achievement when you’ve overcome a big challenge. WHAT KIND OF PEOPLE WOULD EXCEL IN THE WORK YOU DO?

HOW DID YOU FIRST GET INVOLVED IN FM?

I used to work in a pub, which was where I got my first taste of delivering face-to-face customer service and being in charge of creating a warm atmosphere. WHEN DID YOU FIRST REALISE THAT FM WAS THE CAREER FOR YOU?

When I realised it involved the perfect amount of customer interaction, where every day would bring something different, and I would rarely be stuck at my desk for too long. WHEN DID YOU FIRST MOVE INTO YOUR CURRENT ROLE?

I moved into my current role nearly three years ago at the age of 20. WHAT DO YOU DO?

I’m a regional facilities co-ordinator with a portfolio of three client sites containing about 700 customers. I manage a team of cleaners, porters, receptionists and one other facilities co-ordinator. WHAT DO YOU ENJOY MOST ABOUT YOUR JOB?

Anyone who enjoys being the host or enjoys organising events; people who aren’t satisfied with the nineto-five office lifestyle, who would rather be up and about meeting new people, and getting stuck in.

Working with talented people is extremely satisfying Tom Robinson WORKS AS: Training development manager, Mitie

THE THREE MOST IMPORTANT ATTRIBUTES OF A SUCCESSFUL FM ARE... ● Good at reading people and

anticipating their needs ● Confident to talk to people and can build good relationships ● Thrives under pressure, or enjoys controlling what otherwise could be chaos. WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE FOR NEWCOMERS TO FM?

You can start off anywhere and easily work your way up as long as you’ve got the drive. So don’t be afraid to start off cleaning or on a reception desk – that experience will benefit you in a few years’ time when you’re managing multiple sites or multiple clients. WHAT EXCITES YOU MOST ABOUT THE FUTURE OF THE FM SECTOR?

We are establishing ourselves as the people who can completely transform the culture and the atmosphere in an office.

WHEN DID YOU FIRST REALISE THAT FM WAS THE CAREER FOR YOU?

Pretty early on, I realised the real difference training and development can make. In the front-of-house arena, behaviouralbased training is crucial in injecting passion, enthusiasm and a genuine sense of five-star service into a team. I think there’s an opportunity to infuse hotel and hospitality practice into FM – a challenge that I relish! WHAT KIND OF JOB HAD YOU BEEN LOOKING FOR?

Anything involving people! After spending several years selfemployed in a completely different field, I was craving the creativity and interaction that training brings. WHAT DO YOU DO?

First, I have overall responsibility

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for our internal front-of-house training and development. Second, I work with several of our clients and other companies, consulting on organisational behaviour and cultural development, in the UK and around the world. This is all in the behavioural arena, in areas such as one-team working, leadership and five-star service. Essentially, it’s about developing a living and breathing culture that allows people to perform at their best. WHAT HAVE BEEN YOUR MOST SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENTS TO DATE?

We’ve won some fantastic awards recently, as a testament to our high-performing teams and managers – personally I was delighted to be among the ‘40 under forty’ and ‘Rising Stars of FM’. The icing on the cake, though, has to be winning the National Training Award – with some previous winners such as The Metropolitan Police, Jaguar, Pret a Manger and Orange, we were humbled to be among such prestigious company.

WHAT DO YOU ENJOY MOST ABOUT YOUR JOB?

The variety and the challenge are certainly the things that get me up in the morning. But above all, it’s the people. It’s the fact I to work with some exceptionally talented people is a real joy – the fact I get to make a difference for them and the way they work, I consider to be a true privilege.

Keep an open mind and challenge the status quo INTO YOUR CURRENT ROLE?

I moved into my current role as operations manager in November 2010 following a spell as a regional facilities manager prior to that.

WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE FOR NEWCOMERS TO FM?

WHAT DO YOU DO?

First, specialise in your field. Become an expert, the person who people go to for advice. When that’s established and you’ve got a name for yourself, you can start to broaden your horizons and gain knowledge and experience in general FM. WHAT EXCITES YOU MOST ABOUT THE FUTURE OF THE FM SECTOR?

The fact that there’s a future! Considering the massive strides the industry has taken over the last decade, it’s inspiring to think that the next 10 years will be just as exciting.

Stephanie Kendall WORKS AS: Operations manager, Amey

HOW DID YOU FIRST GET INVOLVED IN FM?

If I am honest, I had no idea what facilities management was until I joined Amey. I was an economics graduate looking for an interesting career in a successful company. I came across Amey in one of the graduate employer listings, where it was promoting its Leadership Graduate Program. It grabbed my attention so I decided to apply and fortunately I was successful. That was nearly five years ago now and I haven’t looked back. WHEN DID YOU FIRST MOVE

I currently manage one of Amey’s accounts in our built environment division. We have seven buildings in central London, which are occupied by our public sector client. My role is to oversee the effective delivery of the facilities management services, working to budget targets and managing stakeholder relationships. I manage a team of five, including a facilities manager, two maintenance engineers and two administrators. WHAT HAVE BEEN YOUR MOST SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENTS TO DATE?

Being promoted to operations manager was a big achievement for me at the time. It was a step up in terms of responsibility and it was the first time I’d managed a team. 2012 has also been a good year for me; I was delighted to be named as one of FM World’s Rising Stars back in May. It means a lot to be recognised by my peers. WHAT KIND OF PEOPLE WOULD EXCEL IN THE WORK YOU DO?

I think someone with an open mind and the ability to challenge the status quo would excel in this environment. In FM, it is becoming increasingly important to demonstrate an innovative approach to service delivery. I think the most important attribute is the ability to get on with people, that’s what really lies at the heart of our business. GUIDE TO CAREERS IN FM 2013 |35

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CAREER PROFILES CASE STUDIES

A national portfolio, a group ethos Kate Morris-Bates WORKS AS: Head of FM shared services, co-operative group

HOW DID YOU FIRST GET INVOLVED IN FM?

to this type of role – she was right!

I have had involvement in some shape or form with FM ever since I got my first job after university in 1999, working in operational risk management. I got my first dedicated FM role in 2007, following an organisational restructure when my then-boss asked me to head up the corporate FM team. This team was responsible for winding down an aged estate in preparation for moving into a new head office. She felt my risk management skills would be suited

WHEN DID YOU FIRST REALISE THAT FM WAS THE CAREER FOR YOU?

After the first three months of being in a full-time dedicated FM role. I liked everything about it, and it was a complete revelation! It was an opportunity to apply the theory of risk management at the coal face of the business, while developing myself in other areas. WHAT DO YOU DO?

I’m a member of Co-operative

Push yourself hard and FM will give you what you want Daniel Hawkins WORKS AS: Group manager, Compass Group

Estates business executive, as head of the newly created, group-wide FM function. This comprises a 250-strong team, supported by supplier teams covering all of the Co-operative family of businesses (retail and banking). I have a national portfolio, which covers 6,000 premises including retail, warehousing, customer contact centre and office space. I’m accountable for a full range of FM asset, operational and business services, plus further accountability for leading the corporate premises

FM World magazine, mostly because of the extremely high level of talent within that group. It really hit home what an achievement that was when I was standing shoulder to shoulder with the best in our industry.

was given the opportunity to get back into a full FM role with Compass Group. As they say: you don’t know what you’ve got ‘til it’s gone.

HOW WOULD YOU LIKE YOUR CAREER TO DEVELOP?

I would like to move into the developing markets, where FM delivery isn’t as mature as in the UK. Working in an environment that isn’t so mature forces you to think outside the box; to bring that experience back to the UK would see the development of new delivery methods here also.

WHAT KIND OF JOB HAD YOU BEEN LOOKING FOR?

Something that constantly gave me the opportunity to develop, adapt and be challenged. Being a facilities manager will give you everything you want out of a career if you push yourself hard enough. WHEN DID YOU FIRST REALISE THAT FM WAS THE CAREER FOR YOU?

WHEN DID YOU FIRST MOVE INTO YOUR CURRENT ROLE?

WHAT HAVE BEEN YOUR MOST SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENTS TO DATE?

It was a realisation that really hit home when I moved out of a full FM delivery environment to manage a single service operation. I soon found that I couldn’t help but get involved in the wider management of the property I was delivering services to. Thankfully, I

Two years ago. I was asked by Compass Group to lead the mobilisation of a new IFM contract with Logica. Following the achievement of my objectives on that contract, I moved on to be the account manager for one of the flagship contracts, GE Capital.

Being approached by an organisation is extremely flattering, especially when the role they want you to take on is much larger then your current role. But my most significant achievement by far is being named as one of this year’s Rising Stars of FM in

THE THREE MOST IMPORTANT ATTRIBUTES OF A SUCCESSFUL FM ARE...

Organised, effective communicator, and a good sense of humour. WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE FOR NEWCOMERS TO FM?

Seek out some strong mentors and role models.

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occupancy strategy, maximising space efficiency through workstyle change. WHAT HAVE BEEN YOUR MOST SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENTS TO DATE?

Securing this role and seeing people who have worked with me for a number of years progress and mature into really influential figures in the team and, in some cases, the industry. HOW WOULD YOU LIKE YOUR CAREER TO DEVELOP?

I’d like to help more struggling or newly created FM teams turn themselves around into high performers. WHAT KIND OF PEOPLE WOULD EXCEL IN THE WORK YOU DO?

FM is an industry that thrives with a diverse workforce – there is no single type of person who excels in this industry. It is a people based industry and people by definition are diverse. That’s the fun part of it. THE THREE MOST IMPORTANT ATTRIBUTES OF A SUCCESSFUL FM ARE...

Customer focused, determined and believers in the value of FM.

365 days of light-bulb moments

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST CAREER CHALLENGE TO DATE?

Ann-Marie Mitchell

My team and I have had to manage unpredictable and unexpected issues at any time because the facilities are operational 24 hours a day and 365-days a year. What is normally a basic job, such as changing a light bulb, becomes more complicated when it’s needed in a resident’s room. Every job has to be planned carefully.

WORKS AS: Principal operations manager, Amey

WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE FOR NEWCOMERS TO FM?

I would advise them to network across the business, both up and down the line and, if time allows, a day shadowing your teams to see what challenges they face. WHEN DID YOU FIRST REALISE THAT FM WAS THE CAREER FOR YOU?

I used to be a military wife and through this I gained an understanding of how properties are managed. I got a job managing the company houses of a global oil company and I enjoyed being able to work in a range of services.

FM, whatever the weather Stuart Auger WORKS AS: Society facilities manager, Midlands Co-operative Society

WHEN DID YOU FIRST MOVE INTO YOUR CURRENT ROLE?

I studied hotel and catering and spent the first 15 years working in these roles, before being approached for an FM role in Birmingham. I had to learn all about FM very quickly.

WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE FOR NEWCOMERS TO FM?

Get out and meet your peers. The variation of roles within FM is staggering and you’ll be hardpressed to find someone who does exactly the same job as you. The best way of learning is to see how different people do FM in different buildings with different customers. WHAT KIND OF PEOPLE WOULD EXCEL IN THE WORK YOU DO?

We have to know a great deal about a number of things, but more importantly we have to know where to get the answers – quickly.

WHAT DO YOU ENJOY MOST ABOUT YOUR JOB?

I love the challenge of the unpredictable British weather. Sudden downpours, floods and heatwaves make our buildings work hard – but you cannot beat the excitement and challenge. GUIDE TO CAREERS IN FM 2013 |37

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making every day

a better day When you outsource your services to Sodexo, you’ll join over one million people whose lives we enhance every day. As experts in On-site Service Solutions, we provide a range of facilities management services that will help you concentrate on what you do best. We quickly become key players in your team and our experience ensures that we’ll be talking your language in no time at all. In fact, we’re ready to talk to you today. Call us now on 020 7404 0110 or visit us online at www.sodexo.com Visit www.sodexojobs.co.uk to register for career opportunities

FMGCareers.2013.038.indd 2

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FM WHAT IS FACILITIES MANAGEMENT?

5

QUALIFICATIONS FM HAS A ROBUST QUALIFICATION STRUCTURE DESIGNED TO ENABLE ANY STUDENT AT ANY STAGE OF THEIR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT TO FURTHER BOOST THEIR SKILL SET 40 THE FM QUALIFICATIONS MAP 42 QUALIFICATIONS AND APPRENTICESHIPS 48 TRAINING SCHEMES AVAILABLE TO GRADUATES

SPONSORED BY

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QUALIFICATIONS & TRAINING TRAINING MAP

QUALIFICATIONS AND

BIFM QUALIFICATION DETAILS

TYPICAL SALARY RANGE

QUALIFICATIONS AVAILABLE

TYPICAL JOB TITLES

L

Facilities Assistant

Office Manager Technician / Administrator Facilities Administrator

Premises Manager Office Manager / Contract Manager

Level 2 apprenticeships

Level 3 apprenticeship in FM (see page 45)

BIFM Level 4 qualifications in FM

BIFM Level 2 qualifications in Facilities Services

BIFM Level 3 qualifications in FM

IOSH Managing Safely Level 4 apprenticeship in FM (see page 45)

Up to £25,000

£25-35,000

• For first-line managers and supervisors in facilities management; designed to develop an understanding and knowledge of FM matters industry. Also suitable for new recruits to the industry

• Typically for those working at an operational management level, but also suitable for those aspiring to stretch and develop themselves. • No set entry criteria, but you will probably have a background in facilities management or related fields

Office Assistant

Please note that the figures published here are broad guidelines based on responses to the FM World Salary Survey, which is conducted annually. Figures vary outside of these ranges depedent on region and on whether the role is in-house or with an FM service supplier • For school leavers new to FM or who have identified FM as a career of choice and wish to have a qualification to aid them in starting their career. Individuals wishing to switch careers to FM may also benefit from this entry-level certificate

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4 National Qualification

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CAREER DEVELOPMENT Facilities Manager Contract Manager Technical Sales Team Leader

Area Facilities Manager Regional Director Head of Department

BIFM Level 5 qualifications in FM Level 5 apprenticeships in FM (see page 42)

Batchelor’s degree in FM BIFM Level 6 qualifications in FM

£30-50,000

£45-65,000

• For specialist FMs, typically those at a middle or senior management level responsible for more specialised and complex functions. Students are likely to be heading up single or multi-site operations, hard and/or soft service provision, partner relationships, performance management and major projects

Level 5

• For senior, strategic FMs likely to be responsible for: strategic review and development of FM service provision; corporate governance and risk; driving innovation and change; financial performance; corporate responsibility and sustainability; property and procurement strategy.

Level 6

Regional Director Head of Department Head of Global / EMEA FM

MBA, Msc or Postgraduate in FM BIFM Level 7 Qualifications in FM

£60-90,000+

• For senior facilities management professionals; stand-alone qualifications that are also integrated and form part of the Masters in Applied Facilities Management programme, which is delivered and awarded by Liverpool John Moores University

Level 7

Framework Level GUIDE TO CAREERS IN FM 2013 |41

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QUALIFICATIONS & TRAINING LINDA HAUSMANIS

BIFM QUALIFICATIONS

etting a qualification is a great way to develop your skills, enhance your knowledge, demonstrate competence and advance your career prospects. In these challenging economic conditions, employers are looking for staff who can help them meet business objectives efficiently, effectively and with professionalism. By studying for a qualification in facilities management, individuals develop expertise, skills and knowledge and demonstrate commitment to their career. Besides having better employment and career prospects, and greater financial rewards, qualified staff also perform better, which boosts

G

BIFM qualifications The BIFM qualifications in facilities management are nationally recognised qualifications regulated by the exams watchdog Ofqual. Developed in consultation with leading FM employers and stakeholders, endorsed by Asset Skills and accredited within the Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF), the qualifications carry substantial weight, and are used as a benchmark of excellence in the industry. All qualifications on the QCF have the following features:

● A level that clearly describes the level of challenge of the qualification ● A designated size: award, certificate and diploma. Awards consist of 1 to 12 credits, certificates 13 to 36 credits, and diplomas 37 credits and above.

Although the BIFM develops and awards the qualification, the teaching is delivered by recognised centres accredited by the BIFM. The accreditation process ensures the centre has the necessary support and systems to provide learners with a good experience.

BIFM level 2 stage: new recruits Towards the end of 2012, the BIFM will commence awarding qualifications in facilities services. Aimed at new industry recruits, these qualifications will introduce the learner to core principles of facilities management.

The level of challenge of the BIFM Level 2 FM qualifications is comparable to GCSE grades A*-C level BIFM level 3 stage: first line and supervisory managers In January 2013, the BIFM will be awarding new level 3 qualifications in FM. These qualifications will be aimed at staff already working in cleaning,

ISTOCK

Linda Hausmanis, head of awarding organisation at the British Institute of Facilities Management (BIFM), looks at the options for professional development available to facilities managers

their on-the-job confidence and job satisfaction. Their new skills can also be applied to new roles and challenges, making them more attractive to prospective as well as current employers. In other words, individuals who take the initiative to better themselves through qualifications get ahead. Professional qualifications and membership of a professional body are a proven way to increase earnings. A report published in 2008 by the Chartered Management Institute, on behalf of the members of the Consultative Committee for Professional Management Organisations, found that, on average, professional qualifications and memberships added £152,000 to lifetime earnings. There are a range of FM qualifications available to allow everyone from school-leavers to directors to develop their FM knowledge base and skill set.

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BIFM qualifications

Qualifications and credit framework equivalent QCF Level

Equivalent qualifications

7

Masters degree

6

Bachelors degree

5

Foundation degree

4

Certificate of higher education

3

A-Levels

2

GCSE (Grades A*-C)

BIFM Level 7 in FM WhoWho is itisfor? it for? Strategic Strategic headhead of facilities/estates of facilities N/A

Certificate

Diploma

BIFM Level 6 in FM Who is it for? Senior, strategic facilities managers Award

Certificate

Diploma

BIFM Level 5 in FM CHALLENGE

Who is it for? Specialist facilities managers Award

Certificate

Diploma

BIFM Level 4 in FM Who is it for? Operational facilities managers Award

Certificate

Diploma

BIFM Level 3 in FM Who is it for? First-line and supervisory managers Award

Certificate

Diploma

BIFM Level 2 in facilities services Who is it for? New entrants Certificate SIZE catering or security, for example, with less than two years’ experience, who want to advance up the managerial ladder.

The level of challenge of the BIFM Level 3 FM qualifications is comparable to A-levels First-time managers seeking an FM qualification as well as graduates, who want to gain an overview of FM and improve their work prospects, may be interested.

This qualification is designed to ensure that learners develop knowledge and skills immediately transferable to the workplace, in areas such as managing services, projects and sustainability. The focus is on practical and work-based assessments rather than examinations, so students can apply their learning to reallife workplace scenarios.

Advanced levels At the higher levels, there are qualifications aimed at operational managers through to senior FMs. Depending on previous working background, higher-level qualifications can also support career changers

wanting to transition into FM. For example, many people leaving the armed services have found they can make a successful move into FM after completing a level 4 FM qualification.

BIFM level 4 stage: operational managers Designed for FM professionals with two or more years’ experience of managing at operational level, the BIFM level 4 qualifications provide a broad understanding of FM. Equipping learners with the ability to identify and address complex and non-routine problems, they are ideal for anyone responsible for

The level of challenge of BIFM Level 4 is comparable to a Higher National Certificate managing day-to-day operations, support services, contractors and key supplier relationships, budgets, health and safety and FM projects. As with all BIFM qualifications, learners can choose to study for an award, a certificate or a diploma. The only mandatory unit for all three sizes of qualification is the ‘overview of FM’. Diploma GUIDE TO CAREERS IN FM 2013  |43

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QUALIFICATIONS & TRAINING LINDA HAUSMANIS

students have the greatest flexibility in the subjects they study and can choose from units such as ‘Risk Management in FM’, ‘Sustainability and Environmental Issues, and the Impact on FM’ and ‘Procurement and Contract Management for FM’.

BIFM level 5 stage: middle or senior managers Level 5 is for FM professionals working at a middle or senior management level with several years’ experience. Designed to develop the learner’s ability to identify and address complex problems, plan and deliver solutions and exercise autonomy and judgement in their area, level 5 is best suited to those heading up functions such as: ● Single or multi-site operations ● Hard and/or soft services ● Partner relationships ● Performance management ● Major projects with

capital spend ● Compliance in health and safety. Across the award, the certificate and the diploma, the mandatory unit of study is ‘Operational and FM Strategy’. Certificate and diploma learners must also study the ‘Managing People in FM’ unit. Optional units include ‘Managing Health and Safety in FM’, ‘Providing Leadership and Management in FM’ and ‘Managing FM Projects’.

The level of challenge of BIFM level 5 FM qualifications is comparable to a foundation degree

BIFM level 6 stage: senior managers Level 6 is for facilities professionals reporting directly to the senior management team, who are responsible for strategic decisions or are influential in the process. This qualification equips learners with greater ability to take responsibility for planning and delivering plans to underpin substantial change or development and exercise broad autonomy and judgement. They are best suited to those responsible for: ● Strategic review and development of service provision ● Corporate governance and risk ● Driving innovation and change ● Financial performance, corporate responsibility and sustainability, and property and procurement strategy.

The level of challenge of BIFM level 6 FM qualifications is comparable to a bachelors degree The mandatory unit of study for the award, the certificate and the diploma, is ‘Strategic FM’. ‘FM Governance and Risk’, ‘Quality Management and Customer Service in FM’ and ‘Financial Management in FM’ are all mandatory units at the diploma level. Optional units include ‘Strategic FM Support Services Operations’ and ‘Developing Strategic Relationships in FM’.

BIFM level 7 stage: senior managers/heads of estates In April 2012, the BIFM launched its level 7 qualifications (the certificate and the diploma) in FM for senior professionals wishing to develop their practical

and academic understanding. For the certificate, learners are required to study the ‘Strategic FM and Business’ unit, which covers the influences and drivers on FM from a strategic business level. The other compulsory units include ‘Managing Staff and Customers’, which explores how to develop and implement strategies for improving customer service and relationships.

The level of challenge of BIFM Level 7 FM qualifications is comparable to a Masters degree For the diploma, compulsory units include: ‘Knowledge and Information Management,’ which is about developing strategies to manage knowledge and information and apply theoretical concepts to initiate strategic change, and legislation, finance and risk, discussing the purpose of corporate governance and an organisation’s ethical responsibilities to its stakeholders.

Masters, MBAs and Postgraduate Diplomas The BIFM level 7 qualifications are stand-alone qualifications, but also form an integral part of further study to achieve a Masters in Applied Facilities Management, a programme which is delivered and awarded by Liverpool John Moores University School of the Built Environment, which started in September 2012. Additions are being made to the BIFM level 7 qualifications and from January 2013 the updated level 7 certificate and diploma will form an integral pathway as part of the MBA in Facilities Management delivered and awarded by

Sheffield Hallam University. Other higher education institutions providing FM qualifications such as a Postgraduate Diploma in FM, an MSc in FM and an MBA in FM are: College of Estate Management, Sheffield Hallam University, Heriot-Watt University, Leeds Metropolitan University and University College London. As well as attracting mainly middleto senior-level managers who are keen to enhance their career prospects, these courses may also appeal to graduates who recognise FM as a growing profession. Courses are typically offered on a modular basis through a blended approach of taught sessions and/or distance learning to accommodate entrants holding down a demanding full-time job. BIFM

BIFM membership Successful completion of a qualification has the added benefit of enabling the learner to join the BIFM as a member. If you have an FM qualification at Level 3 (and in future, Level 2), you may be eligible to join BIFM at ‘associate’ grade (ABIFM) dependent on your experience. With a Level 4 or 5 qualification and a number of years of management experience you may be able to join at member grade (MBIFM). And if you hold a qualification at Level 6 or above, and have three years’ or more management and FM experience, you may be eligible to join at Certified Grade (CBIFM).

Want to know more? The BIFM is dedicated to helping the advancement of the FM profession and would like to talk to you about how qualifications can support and develop your career. Please contact 0845 058 1355, email qualifications@bifm.org. uk, or vist www.bifm.org.uk/ qualifications

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APPRENTICESHIPS

A non-degree alternative Diane Smith, talent manager at Babcock International Group says: “Babcock is an organisation that manages large, complex estates, for both public and privatesector clients. As such, it’s essential that our people are equipped with the appropriate skills to deliver our services in a safe and professional manner. Therefore, the value of professionally qualifying our people and providing a clearly defined professional pathway can never be underestimated. “The higher-level apprenticeship has two main benefits: it serves as an additional development opportunity for existing employees and recognises the wealth of experience and knowledge they hold. It’s also an exciting way to get into the sector straight from school, as a non-degree route to a professional career. This is a welcome alternative to the limited choices presented to young people today. “We hope that the qualification will raise the profile of FM, and contribute to its recognition as a profession of choice rather than an off-shoot of normal business. This will enabling FM to be seen as an appealing career choice.”

Adding some gravitas pprenticeships in FM are available at Levels 2 and 3, and also at the higher Levels 4, 5 and 6. This will provide a gateway into the profession for eager, talented school-leavers keen to progress to senior manager level, as well as career changers. FM was one of the sectors being supported to develop higher-level apprenticeships because it is integral to the economy and offers a world of opportunity for schoolleavers and career changers. The project is being led by Asset Skills, in partnership with: ● BIFM ● Sheffield Hallam University ● Building Engineering Services Training ● Leeds College of Building ● The Manchester College ● The Training and Learning Company ● Westminster Kingsway College.

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Employers can access the higher-level apprenticeships (4-6) for their teams through delivery partners Sheffield Hallam University, Building Engineering Services Training (BEST), Leeds College of Building, Manchester College, the Training and Learning Company, and Westminster Kingsway College. Employers increasingly feel that apprenticeships are as valuable as a university degree for helping young people to prepare for and progress in the workplace. They are the perfect bridge between academic theory (the focus of a degree) and the practicalities of the workplace.

Useful contacts ● www.bifm.org.uk/ apprenticeships ● www.assetskills.org ● www.apprenticeships.org.uk

Kerrie Jones, workforce development manager at Carillion, believes that apprenticeships help meet the changing needs of clients who continually seek out new and innovative ways of doing things. “We have a mix of public and private sector clients who are always looking for different ways of operating, delivering quality and introducing new initiatives that will help them to reduce cost. Many of our people doing the Level 3 qualification have gone back to their day jobs and made changes, found better, more efficient ways of doing things. This can only be a win-win situation for the client, for Carillion, and for the apprentices.” She also suggests that the involvement of a professional body, like BIFM, adds further gravitas to the qualification, the sector and will likely encourage more young people to want to sign up.

Bridging the gap At the launch event for the higher apprenticeship scheme, Angela Gill, employer account manager for the National Apprenticeships Service, spoke of businesses “engaging with apprenticeships to grow managers for the future, filling skills gaps in their organisation and bring in younger people into an ageing workforce”. GUIDE TO CAREERS IN FM 2013  |45

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Advance your career with part-time and flexible FM courses including the only FM MBA in the country Whether you’re currently managing in-sourced or out-sourced facilities, or providing facilities management services to other organisations, our courses can help improve your career potential. At Sheffield Hallam University, you can study the only MBA in Facilities Management in the country. Or you can choose from our part-time undergraduate degrees. All courses are delivered part-time by distance learning and block study. We are a recognised BIFM centre. This means on achieving the Undergraduate Certificate or Foundation Degree in Facilities Management, you will also gain the respective level BIFM Diploma in Facilities Management. We are also launching a BIFM level 7 Certificate and Diploma in Facilities Management, which will form a pathway to the MBA in Facilities Management from January 2013. In addition, we have opportunities for higher level apprentices with our Foundation Degree in Facilities Services and BA (Honours) Facilities Management top-up degree. Plus our dedicated research centre enables us to deliver leading-edge and bespoke accredited education, plus consultancy and training services.

Contact our course leaders for an informal conversation. Mel Bull – MBA course leader 0114 225 3240 m.bull@shu.ac.uk Ian Ellison – undergraduate course leader 0114 225 4652 i.ellison@shu.ac.uk

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Or for general information Email sbs@shu.ac.uk Phone 0114 225 2820 www.shu.ac.uk/fm

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‘Part-time study allowed me to ease back into an academic learning environment and gradually regain my confidence and skills, and apply them into my working life. I also found that if I was required to complete a field work report as part of a module I could use my workplace as an environment where I could gather rich data which assisted with my report writing.’ Matt Walker, senior facilities manager, DTZ (Debenham Tie Leung) Ltd.

‘The knowledge and experience I have gained has had significant impact in terms of my career. My newfound ability to operate at a greater strategic level, to use appropriate business language and demonstrate senior leadership behaviour has facilitated rapid advancement in terms of career position and remuneration.’ Gary Pyle, works for an outsourced service provider

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‘Studying for the MBA in Facilities Management has been hugely beneficial in my daily work. It has given me a different outlook and offered me an opportunity to really start challenging my own way of thinking.’ Hazel Hedicker, facilities service manager, NHS Foundation Trust

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QUALIFICATIONS & TRAINING GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMMES

GRADUATION STATIONS Facilities management service providers offer graduate programmes designed to take those with relevant higher educational qualifications into a defined FM management role directly from university

sk a facilities manager over the age of 40 how they discovered the industry or what attracted them to work in FM and few will tell you that they earned their place through a graduate development scheme. But this state of affairs is changing rapidly, with the balance shifting as more young managers enter the profession having undertaken the combination of work placement and training offered by facilities management service

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providers via their graduate development programmes. Like their counterparts in other sectors of business, FM service providers are keen to identify management talent early on. Graduate development schemes typically combine training for qualifications aligned to the BIFM qualifications programme (outlined on page 43), along with work placements that enable graduates to understand what goes into the typical working day of a facilities manager.

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are purely a period of paid employment, aimed to give the graduate experience in a working environment. Others are rotation programmes, offering hands-on experience leading to a professional qualification, funded and supported by the contractor.

Mitie challenging

Anyone can apply for a graduate placement, providing they have the relevant qualifications. Most firms ask for a minimum 2:1 bachelors degree in business or engineering; others may require a BIFM qualification in addition.

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Set your compass Compass Group’s programme is typical. It offers an accredited FM apprenticeship programme including a Level 3 NVQ Key Skills and a technical certificate. FM apprentices and graduates work for Compass’ specialist support services division Eurest Services FM, undertaking a series of courses on budget management, people management, FM health and safety and leadership and management skills. Compass takes on graduates in a variety of facilities-related disciplines, ranging from security to retail and support services in healthcare. The advantage of such programmes is that the contractors that operate the schemes will have several divisions, giving the graduate the

“ANYONE ENTERING FM VIA A GRADUATE SCHEME IS LIKELY TO BENEFIT FROM A FAST-TRACKED CAREER PATH AS A RESULT OF THE GUIDANCE ON OFFER” opportunity to specialise in a certain field. In addition to Eurest FM in business, Compass also operates in the education, healthcare and sports and leisure sectors.

ISS this your future? Similarly, ISS’s facility service graduate scheme aims to maximise candidates’ potential by tailoring their graduate programmes based on the differing strengths of participants. Some placements

Mitie tends to focus more on getting the feel of different departments, with five different placements amounting to a year’s worth of experience. Graduates will spend two months in three different overhead functions, including sales, operational HR and procurement, and threemonth periods in hard and soft FM environments. However, graduates are not simply thrown into a working environment – Mitie provides off-the-job training covering aspects such as finance, account management and leadership skills. At the end of the scheme, a permanent position is offered in an operational role.

Emcor skills Emcor’s graduate development programme requires a longerterm commitment, including two years following the BIFM certificate programme, before three years working in a managerial role. Through this, the company says that its graduate will achieve full chartered status with the BIFM. Graduates can apply for a place on a graduate scheme by writing directly to the firm, but some companies prefer to use recruitment services (Mitie, for example, recruits candidates through Milkround and Graduate Recruitment Bureau services). A standard year or two-year graduate scheme with a contractor is a more common process, but in recent years the emphasis has been on education, with contractors putting faith in successful

candidates by sponsoring them through FM-related degrees. Mitie has sponsored seven graduates through FM-related degrees at Sheffield Hallam in recent years. In addition, one-year industry placements are commonplace within business degrees. Mitie has a partnership with the University of the West of England, taking on undergraduates for a year in industry. The intention is for the candidates to return to Mitie upon completion of their degree. Most graduate programmes are regularly reviewed and adapted based on feedback. Compass has worked on the improvement of their programmes and introduced a 12-month programme linked to the FM level 3 apprenticeship, including a number of workshops, project work and work-placed assessments and designed to integrate more closely with BIFM qualifications.

The select few It’s worth mentioning that spaces are limited on these schemes, with even the largest service providers offering (in some cases) fewer than 30 graduate scheme placements a year. Also, the process of hiring a graduate can be long. Applications are typically submitted a year prior to the placement, with candidates potentially asked to sit vigorous psychometric and verbal reasoning tests and attend assessment days. Anyone entering FM through a graduate scheme is likely to benefit from a fast-tracked career path as a result of the guidance on offer. You may need to prove that you’re prepared to move around the country, and a driving licence is often a requirement, but the key attributes required are an aptitude for learning and a willingness to adapt to the diverse working environment of an FM, coupled with that degree in business or engineering. GUIDE TO CAREERS IN FM 2013 |49

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FM

Facilities Management

Email info@lcb.ac.uk Website www.lcb.ac.uk

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FM WHAT IS FACILITIES MANAGEMENT?

6

THE SKILLS YOU NEED OK, SO NOW YOU KNOW ABOUT FM AND HOW YOU COULD BE INVOLVED – BUT WHAT MAKES A REALLY GOOD FACILITIES MANAGER? TAKE A LOOK AT THE SKILLS YOU’LL NEED TO SUCCEED 52 DO YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES? 54 WHAT MAKES A GOOD FM?

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SKILLS SKILLSET

NETWORK ING

Netwo rking p lays a la other rger ro profes le in FM sions. is cons As a re than m tantly latively any evolvin young the ad g, FMs vice of indust a re ry that p m eers th ore lik where an tho ely to long–s se in o seek tandin develo ther p g educ pment rofess ation a ions, pathw nd care It stan ays on er ds to re ly chan ason t netwo g e s lo hat an wly. rking a FM sh s part and on ould se of his e that or her e n e essent eds to Improv ial skill be dev ing you set, eloped r netw your jo like an orking b more y othe techniq effectiv r. that is u e can he ely and transfe lp you give yo rable t do Often, o u a a ny role valuab indust . le tool ry bod netwo ies or c rking s onfere ession people nces b s betw the ch uild in een se ance t ssions The Br o have to allo itish In a c w o s ff t itute o ee and region f Facilit conver al and ies Ma specia sation. opport nagem l intere unity t ent’s st grou o conn p The sp s o e ffer an ct with ecial in excelle your p terest engage nt eers at groups in area a local e n courag s of sp level. or cate e mem ecific in ring, in bers to terest, a infor such a Most o mal or s energ f us fe formal el intim y of peo s etting. idated ple we by ent don’t k indust e n r ing a ro ow, ev ry. It he en if th om full lps to re probab ey’re in memb ly feeli the sam e r ng the that ev certain e same a eryone ly gets nd afte else is easier. and ta r t h A e ft ken ho first tim er you me a fe ’ve bee e, it see th w busin n to a e same few ev e s s fa cards, ces an ents them. y d natu ou’ll st This is rally gr art to how p avitate ersona t l netw orks are owards built.

SKILLS TO PAY THE BILLS A great FM can organise a fit-out while devoting time to paperwork, charm suppliers into giving them a better deal, before heading off after work to a networking soiree... Demanding? You bet facilities manager’s role is to maintain the working environment for workers. As you’ve read in the previous pages, an FM runs sites as diverse as offices, hospitals, depots and barracks, serving all ages, races, colours and creeds. It can be a challenging role, with every position completely unique to the workplace it serves. The skills outlined on these pages form an essential toolkit with which you can survive – and excel. Dealing with many different people from different backgrounds requires tact, warmth, sincerity and a great sense of humour. You need to be a strong leader, making your team feel valued, and a good reader of people, such as when you’re

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trying to ascertain best value in contract negotiations. Allocating enough time to get everything done is also vital; surprises are a daily occurrence for FMs, so being organised enough to keep all the balls in the air is a must. Since an FM is a people person, they’re naturally sociable types. In the industry, therefore, there are lots of opportunities for after-hours networking, which as well as being great for your career is also a way to relax while picking up valuable tips from your FM colleagues. You don’t need to be an expert in these four skills to start your career; you’ll learn a lot along the way. But having a natural dose of common sense is very helpful.

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TIME MANAGEMENT

Doing work now to sav e time later is a simple but pithy definition of tim e management. It’s the pra ctice of dividing our time acr oss the tasks we need to do, in order to meet dea dlines and respond to unexpected events wh ile regular tasks are com pleted to schedule. If we approach time-m anagement in a structu red way, we can make our working lives much eas ier. We will be able to increase the quality of the work we do, because we’ll have mo re time to spend on the tas ks that require more effo rt and concentration. Thi s can reduce the stress of com plex roles and leave mo re time for doing the tas ks that really matter. A facilities manager has a wide remit over many business service s – catering, maintenan ce, washrooms and courier s, for example. Each are a has its own patterns of reg ularity and in-built dea dlines. For example, certain ma intenance can only be conducted after workin g hours, while couriers need to be dispatched before the end of the workin g day to meet a day delivery. Annual inspections, say for legionella, must also be scheduled in order to comply with legislation. Negotiating service leve ls and prices with supplie rs or budgets for the upc oming year might take an hour or so in front of a spread sheet, while a routine boiler inspection may demand your presence in a spe cific part of the building for an hour or so.

T N E M E G NA A M T C E PROJ

st and intere s r e f f ects. ent o prosp nagem excellent a m a t c ful as y and proje ccess od pa eer in nge be su as go A car o ll t ide ra e d w w y as g – an eed a n in l d il n variet w a rants o be is dem r, ent eed t But it anage ou’ll n y m , e of y t ll g c e ran essfu proje a wid s succ . s t ial ls s c c il e n je r k a s d ro in of to ad g age p and f d t n n s a r a e m trollin ly d To r con to un quick o f e n r v le s a a h o le work onsib You’ll able t ilding e resp reas. es bu ou’ll b d ent a h y r lu e e u f c s o if n g d cau ct in and e nts be s. If a proje ary derst n n li u t accou ip e o c t dg i-dis need ct bu a mult d enough you’ll proje anage an inery, m h s r c o a our e t d t or m vise y bject to un ill nd ad the su also need a t s itor w t u c c o li a ab t a so contr u u may d b o , o Y . n o . g igatio team shove draft tial lit es to law to poten h com s n basic u ct o p je n pro when isatio ills. M, the lved, organ ple sk F o o f v e o in p s t d be c o e ed s o p y n g s a ya alw be ho uires o man nt req n also e a c m Like s t le u nt e ally, b geme natur mana ome c y a m These ime. with t

LS INTERPERSONAL SKIL

industry, service-based agement is a an m es tering. But iti ca cil Fa e to retail or nt comparabl a chef, or re nt to some exte ce of a shopping er ag an m FM’s e th an unlike general public, will be on the general e th ey whose focus th of a facility, be er us e th line, a is n customer a productio kers, people on or w e any t, fic or of sh ic, In publ prehensive. the list is com ides ov pr n tio sa warehouse… ni ga cilities your or fa e th g in us person er. is one is your custom provide, an FM y services to an m tion. sa ni With so ga or an in l known faces el w t to os m ng e of th fortable talki e person’, com h to ug ro th You’re a ‘peopl ht nist rig from receptio ing social st ra all employees, nt co m utive, drawn fro ucation. the chief exec nt levels of ed d with differe an s ge part lar a up background e mak conversations ce -fa -to ve ce gi people Fa important to ily routine. It’s ning and te lis of an FM’s da terms of they expect in d good an s es the attention en lit of po gh standards hi in ta g eye in ain in m to ch as mainta ple actions su listening e u’r yo manners. Sim at th re a customer su as re n ly. ca us t contac e matter serio t and taking th es at qu th re r ea ei id th e to ld be th ur mind shou ants w c ifi Foremost in yo ec sp l with is an individua t yourself the customer thy, you can pu pa em h ug ro rstand de un and needs. Th d on an the other pers g them. in ct in the shoes of fe af be problem might usiasm how a certain ith more enth ch the issue w oa pr ing the ct fe af You will ap is it w appreciate ho to le ab e will it ar if you question and the person in u. working life of yo faith in ur customers’ strengthen yo

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KEY QUALITIES ● Ability to multi-task ● Good people skills ● Patience ● Flexibility ● Ability to hit deadlines ● Problem-solving skills ● High level of enthusiasm

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SKILLS WHAT MAKES A GREAT FM?

WHAT MAKES A GREAT FM? So you know what an FM does and how you can become one. But what skills do you need to really make a splash in the profession?

It’s mid-winter. There’s ice all over the reception steps, the catering company is demanding to know the numbers for the Christmas party, you’re moving offices on 4 January – and black smoke has just started pouring from the generator. Like any profession, there will be tough days. But as a facilities manager, people will look to you to keep a level head in times of crisis. Your remit will be broad, covering many functions from reception, catering, security and, yes, mechanical and electrical. As the saying goes, in FM, “no two days are the same”. So how will you survive? What do you need to know to make it as an FM?

Time management There are some skills that overlap with other professions – time management, and organisation – that you’ll need in spade loads to deal with unexpected events while not dropping the day-to-day stuff. But FM is fundamentally a service role. On a given day, you could visit every corner of a site, full of working people. In terms of the exposure level, you’re up at the top. The ability to communicate with many different people, from different backgrounds, from the cleaning staff all the way up to

the board of directors, and keep smiling, is non-negotiable – even when the roof is falling in. Literally.

Networking And having good people skills isn’t confined to office hours – an FM who’s going places is a great networker, comfortable at industry events, talking to your peers. Building your own network can pay serious dividends – as you expand your career together, you act as an important resource for each other. These skills can be nurtured and with practice will become second nature – but it’s learning how to listen that will take you far. In the words of one of the Rising Stars of 2012 (see panel), “I was trained as an engineer and the first thing we were told was – you’ve got two eyes, two ears and one mouth; they’re to be used in that ratio.” FM

VIEW FROM THE STARS eron Tower in the City of London played host to FM World’s ‘Rising Stars of FM’ event earlier this year. At the event, the winners were asked what it was about the job they’d use to convince young people to make a career in the sector. A couple of key themes emerged – variety is unquestionably the spice of life for an FM, so anyone worried about being tucked away in an office somewhere would find FM appealing. Second, if you’re happy with a fast-track to responsibility, then FM is a career you should most certainly consider. The feeling was that, unlike other professions, young FMs can find themselves promoted to responsible positions early on their careers, "if they’re smart enough”, as long as they’re ready to listen to the advice of their more experienced colleagues. And that’s where having an open and logical mind was also recommended. Much was made of the job's potential to provide ‘adrenalin pumping’ situations, while Kerry Whitebread thought the job would appeal to anyone who had a talent for creating a warm environment. Many rising stars thought potential new recruits should realise that FM is, in fact, one of the fastest growing sectors of the economy, a result of the environmental and cost-control issues facing businesses generally. And there was a call for the gadget-friendly and those with an IT bent to consider the profession. Tristam Slater emphasised how technology in buildings was helping to make the management of state-of-the-art building infrastructure a genuinely rewarding career choice. Lee Griffin perhaps summed it up best: “Stop thinking – just go for it! FM is fluid, dynamic and one of the most diverse sectors out there. It’s got great people, great challenges and offers great rewards.”

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Offers a great variety of work

Offers a fast-track to responsibility

James Richards works as FM World’s sub-editor

Great for those with logical mindsets

“HAVING GOOD PEOPLE SKILLS ISN’T CONFINED TO OFFICE HOURS; AN FM WHO’S GOING PLACES IS A GREAT NETWORKER”

Gives you challenging work

Good for the sociallyminded

Good for those keen on the green agenda

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FM WHAT IS FACILITIES MANAGEMENT?

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COMPANY PROFILES FIND OUT ABOUT THE ORGANISATIONS AND EDUCATION ESTABLISHMENTS THAT EMPLOY AND TRAIN FACILITIES MANAGERS 56 FM CONTRACTOR PROFILES 60 EDUCATION AND TRAINING PROVIDERS 62 RECRUITMENT AGENCIES

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COMPANY PROFILES LISTINGS

BIFM TRAINING BIFM Training, managed by Quadrilect Ltd, is the official training arm of the BIFM, and offers a range learning and development services IFM Training is the official training arm of the British Institute of Facilities Management and is delivered via a partnership arrangement with Quadrilect Limited. BIFM Training’s wide range of learning and development services are designed to introduce you to the profession and support you as you progress through your career, and includes short courses; formal qualficiations; e-learning packages; higher level executive programmes and consultancy solutions. Quadrilect Ltd also manages BIFM Training [Quadrilect Ltd] – one of a number of BIFM Recognised Centres that are accredited to deliver the BIFM qualifications in facilities management. Attendance on BIFM Training short courses provides the tuition for these qualifications. In this dynamic and fast-paced industry, Continuing Professional Development (CPD) is vital as it demonstrates both your professional experience and your commitment to lifelong learning. BIFM Training offers a programme of up to 50 short courses, including a set of core FM programmes ranging from foundation to advanced level, as well as those covering various specialisms of FM. All programmes are mapped against the benchmark BIFM competencies and attendees receive a CPD certificate of attendance. These courses are increasingly being recognised internationally, and many are formally recognised by other professional institutes and awarding bodies too. They also provide you with an excellent opportunity to meet fellow professionals, and if you are a member of the BIFM, you get a 20% discount on our courses. A formal qualification will greatly enhance your career prospects in today’s competitive environment, and we can deliver something to suit you whatever stage of your career. BIFM Training [Quadrilect Ltd] offers first class tuition through attendance on the BIFM Training short course programme and with the help of our expert trainers who are both subject specialists and experienced practitioners, you’ll be fully supported throughout your qualification. You’ll experience a fully rounded and highly practical learning programme with skills that are immediately transferable to the workplace. Our flagship foundation training programme ‘Understanding FM’ is perfect for industry newcomers and this intensive yet enjoyable three-day course can also be attended as part of an ILM level 3 Qualification in FM, which involves some online learning modules and work-based assessments that are completed in your own time after the course. Don’t be put off by the word ‘work-based’ as these qualifications are open to everybody regardless of whether you’re in employment or not and we will provide you with the tutorial support necessary to complete your unit assessments. As a pre-course taster or supplement to the Understanding FM course, we also offer a four-hour e-learning package titled ‘Getting Started in FM’ which will provide you with a highly-practical hands-on guide to good practice FM based on ‘real-life’ expertise.

B

Provider name: BIFM Training [Quadrilect Ltd] Address: 3rd Floor, 112 High Holborn, London WC1V 6JS Website: www.bifm-training.com Telephone: 020 7242 4141 Contact: Martin Davies, director of training Email: info@bifm-training.co.uk Locations: London and Edinburgh Courses offered and entry requirements: Institute of Leadership and Management ILM Level 3 Award and Certificate in Facilities Management For anyone new to FM or with less than two years’ experience in an FM role, or first line managers seeking an FM qualification. The British Institute of Facilities Management BIFM Level 4 Award, Certificate and Diploma in FM For experienced operational managers BIFM Level 5 Award, Certificate and Diploma in FM For facilities managers at middle management level who have considerable experience BIFM Level 6 Award, Certificate and Diploma in FM Aims to develop the strategic skills and knowledge for facilities professionals working at or aspiring to senior positions in FM At the time of going to print, the BIFM is developing new level 2 and 3 Qualifications in FM and as recognised centre for BIFM Qualifications, we plan to deliver these when they are launched in 2013. Other qualifications ILM Level 2 Award in Leadership and Team Skills ILM Level 3 Award in Leadership and Management NEBOSH National General Certificate in Occupational Health & Safety (Level 3) How to apply and course dates: Call: 020 7242 4141 Email info@bifm-training.co.uk Type of study offered: Courses are delivered face-to-face using a selection of 4* hotel venues and many of our programmes are available for in-house delivery in the UK and overseas where organisations require a more cost-effective, individual solution. E-learning options are also available.

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XENON GROUP Qualifications are an essential part of the facilities professional’s toolkit. Courses will suit both newcomers and experienced FMs ualifications are an essential part of the facilities professional’s toolkit. By studying for an FM qualification with the Xenon Group, you can benefit from the wealth of experience offered by experienced tutors, network with your fellow students and gain practical advice and support that you can put to work. The first three students to complete the BIFM’s new Level 4, 5 and 6 diploma qualifications all studied with the Xenon Group. Since the new FM qualifications were launched in March 2010, we have successfully maintained a 100 per cent pass rate on all assignments submitted. And we have added the IoSCM qualification in supply chain management and the IOSH Managing Safely qualification to our repertoire to give you even more opportunities to become a fully qualified facilities manager. Research by FM World magazine reveals that facilities professionals with an FM qualification tend to earn more than their unqualified counterparts and are more likely to get promoted within their own companies. More employers in the FM sector are also looking for facilities professionals with a recognised qualification under their belt, so it could improve your career prospects and finances. Put simply: an FM qualification puts you at the head of the queue, making you instantly more employable and boosting your earning potential.

Q

An FM qualification with the Xenon Group will give you: ● Improved career prospects and increased job satisfaction ● An edge in a competitive employment marketplace ● The ability to demonstrate your commitment, not only to facilities

management, but to your long term career prospects ● An opportunity for networking with tutors and fellow students in different fields ● Increased accuracy, efficiency and effectiveness in your role ● Increased capacity to adopt new technologies and methods and increased innovation in strategies and processes ● Greater flexibility and responsiveness to change and improved softer skills such as time management, communication and leadership. Some students are reluctant to commit to training as they imagine it will be very expensive, will mean having to travel, or spend a lot of time away from home; or they simply don’t have the time with work and other family commitments. But at Xenon, the ILM Level 3 and BIFM Levels 4,5 and 6 are taught by either a two-day workshop once a month in Leeds or a weekly evening class in London, supported by electronic workbooks and a comprehensive tutorial programme, so you can study in your own time and pace. Xenon also runs a unique social networking site exclusively for the use of students, where you can access peer support and network with other students studying at all levels. Distance learning courses are available for all of the ILM and BIFM qualifications.

Provider name: Xenon Group Address: 5 Carrwood Park, Selby Road, Leeds LS15 4LG Website: www.xenongroup.co.uk Telephone: 0845 474 0054 Contact: Paul Ellison – business development executive Email: paul.ellison@xenongroup.co.uk Locations: Leeds and London Courses offered and entry requirements: Our commitment is to provide our students with the most positive developmental experience possible Our trainers are all practicing industry experts in their specialism. Institute of Leadership and Management Level 3 in FM – Award, Certificate and Diploma The ILM Level 3 in Facilities Management is designed for newcomers to FM, first-line FM managers, and facilities co-ordinators/assistants. Distance learning available. The British Institute of Facilities Management Level 4 in FM– Award, Certificate and Diploma Aimed at experienced operational managers Level 5 in FM – Award, Certificate and Diploma Aimed at middle/senior facilities managers with significant operational and some strategic experience Level 6 in FM – Award, Certificate and Diploma Aimed at senior level facilities managers/directors Institute of Supply Chain Management The Xenon Group is the only training provider to offer a qualification in procurement, accredited by the Institute of Supply Chain Management, specifically aimed at Facilities Managers. This qualification can be completed independently or as part of a BIFM Level 4 or 5 in FM. IOSH IOSH Managing Safely course is aimed at managers. How to enrol and course dates: Call 0845 474 0054 or visit our website. Courses are 6-18 months. Type of study offered Campus-based from Leeds and London, on-site training, distance learning (for all of our ILM and BIFM qualifications) and blended learning.

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Helping people achieve. It’s the key to our success. Every day, our employees play an integral role in creating healthy and productive work environments that help people achieve more and businesses perform better. We are trusted to manage more than 1.8 billion square feet of facilities globally for some of the world’s largest companies. $VD)RUWXQHFRPSDQ\ZHEOHQGÞQDQFLDOVWDELOLW\ZLWKDQHQWUHSUHQHXULDOVSLULWDQGDUHDOZD\VORRNLQJIRU like-minded Account Leaders, Commercial Directors, Facilities Managers, Engineering Managers, and support functions including IT, Finance and HR. :HRIIHUDFRPSHWLWLYHVDODU\DQGFRPSUHKHQVLYHEHQHÞWVEXWPRVWLPSRUWDQWO\RIDOO unlimited opportunities for professional development and personal growth.

Find out more at www.johnsoncontrols.com/careers 7922b0912

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JOHNSON CONTROLS The success of Johnson Controls is thanks to our 162,000 employees… ohnson Controls is a global diversified technology and industrial leader serving customers in more than 150 countries. Our 162,000 employees create quality products, services and solutions to optimise energy and operational efficiencies of buildings, lead-acid automotive batteries and advanced batteries for hybrid and electric vehicles and interior systems for automobiles. Our commitment to sustainability dates back to our roots in 1885, with the invention of the first electric room thermostat. Through our growth strategies and by increasing market share we are committed to delivering value to shareholders and making our customers successful.

J

Our business Johnson Controls delivers products, services and solutions that increase energy efficiency and lower operating costs in buildings for more than one million customers. We are a leading provider of equipment, controls and services for heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, refrigeration and security systems. We have been involved in more than 500 renewable energy projects, including solar, wind and geothermal technologies. Our solutions have reduced carbon dioxide emissions by 15 million metric tons and generated savings of $7.5 billion since 2000. Many of the world’s largest companies rely on us to manage a total of 1.8 billion square feet of their commercial real estate.

Our people

Company Name: Johnson Controls Address: Tower 1, Royal Pavilion, Wellesley Road, Aldershot, Hampshire, GU11 1PZ Telephone Number: 01252 346450 Contact: Talent Acquisition Team Website: www.johnsoncontrols.com Email: ukcareers@jci.com Location: Locations globally Number of employees: 162,000 Number of vacancies: Around 1,500 globally Major clients: Barclays, BBC, Bristol-Myers Squibb, GlaxoSmithKline, Motorola and Verizon Areas of work offered: Facilities management, engineering, consulting, projects, real estate, support functions Work experience offered: Not currently Employee training funded: Yes Starting salary in region of: Competitive, and dependent on position Other benefits: Pension, healthcare, health insurance, holidays, company car (depending on role) How to apply: Visit our website www. johnsoncontrols.com/careers and apply online via our careers pages

The success of Johnson Controls is enabled by the commitment and dedication of our 162,000 employees around the world. With our continued growth focus, we are a company where employees can express ideas, make a difference and build their future. Our workplace emphasises integrity and ethics. We are customerfocused, continually looking to innovate and enhance our products, services and solutions. To help our employees grow, we believe it’s vital to strengthen their engagement and develop their skills and capabilities through our award winning leadership programmes. This is done in an environment that welcomes diversity of thought and experience.

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COMPANY PROFILES LISTINGS

EDUCATION AND TRAINING PROVIDERS Provider name: BIFM Training [Quadrilect Ltd] Address: 3rd Floor, 112 High Holborn, London WC1V 6JS Website: www.bifm-training.com Telephone: 020 7242 4141 Contact: Martin Davies, director of training Email: info@bifm-training.co.uk Locations: UK and overseas Course(s) offered: ILM Level 3 Award and Certificate in Facilities Management BIFM Level 4, 5, 6 qualifications in FM ILM Level 2 Award in Leadership and Team Skills ILM Level 3 Award in Leadership and Management NEBOSH National General Certificate in Occupational Health & Safety (Level 3)

Provider name: Leeds Metropolitan University Address: School of the Built Environment and Engineering, Faculty of Arts, Environment and Technology, Leeds Metropolitan University The Northern Terrace, Queen Square Court Leeds LS2 8AG Website: www.courses.leedsmet.ac.uk/main/course.htm?ban=MSCFM Telephone: 0113 812 7643/0113 812 7648 Contact: Roy Whitaker or Chris Garbett Email: r.s.whitaker@leedsmet.ac.uk/c.garbett@leedsmet.ac.uk Courses offered: All of the following are online distance learning courses: BIFM Qualifications Levels 4, 5 and 6 Foundation Degree in Facilities Management Bachelors (BSc) in Facilities Management Masters (MSc) in Facilities Management

Provider name: Liverpool John Moores University, School of the Built Environment Address: LJMU, Byrom Street, Liverpool L3 3AF Website: www.ljmu.ac.uk or www.ljmu.ac.uk/BLT/afm/122882.htm Telephone: 0151 231 2777 Contact: Faculty of Technology & Environment Email: taeadmissions@ljmu.ac.uk Courses offered: Msc Applied in Facilities Management

Provider name: College of Central London Address: 2nd Floor, Karen House, 1-11 Baches Street, London, N1 6DL Website: www.central-college.com Telephone: 020 7490 3270 Contact: Nicolas Kailides or Julian Burton Email: fm@central-college.com or ccl@btopenworld.com Courses offered: BIFM Level 5 Award/Certificate/Diploma BIFM Level 6 Award/Certificate/Diploma in Facilities Management

Provider name: UCL (University College London) Address: Bartlett School of Graduate Studies, Central House, 14 Upper Woburn Place, London WC1H 0NN Website: www.bartlett.ucl.ac.uk/graduate/ programmes/postgraduate/mscdiplomafacility-environment-management (London) • www.bartlett.ucl. ac.uk/graduate/programmes/postgraduate/mscdiploma-facilityenvironment-management-singapore (Singapore) Telephone: 020 3108 9018 Contact: Ian Lewis, Bartlett Post Graduate Officer Email: bartlett.pgclerk@ucl.ac.uk Courses offered: MSc Facility and Environment Management

Provider name: Training and Learning Company (TLC) Address: Axis 19, Axis Court, Riverside Business Park, Mallard Way, Swansea Vale, SA7 0AJ Website: www.tlc-uk.org Telephone: 01792 700611 Contact: Ellie Lewis Email: ellie.lewis@tlc-uk.org Courses offered: BIFM Level 4 Award, Certificate and Diploma BIFM Level 5 Award, Certificate and Diploma in FM Facilities Management Apprenticeship Level 3 Facilities Management Apprenticeship Level 4

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Provider name: Xenon Group Address: 5 Carrwood Park, Selby Road, Leeds LS15 4LG 33 Queen St, City of London, EC4R 1AP Website: www.xenongroup.co.uk Telephone: 0845 474 0054 Contact: Paul Ellison – business development executive Email: paul.ellison@xenongroup.co.uk Courses offered: Institute of Leadership and Management Level 3 in FM BIFM Level 4, 5, 6 in FM

Company name: Blue-Eye Training Address: 68 Kings Mede, Horndean, Hampshire, PO8 9TH (Training courses held in Newbury) Website: www.blue-eye-training.co.uk Telephone: 02392 363 397 Contact: Gavin Horrocks, training director, or Sue Potter, student support manager Email: info@blue-eye-training.co.uk Courses offered: BIFM Level 2 qualifications in FM ILM FM Level 3 Award, Certificate in FM BIFM Level 4 Award, Certificate, Diploma in FM BIFM Level 5 Certificate, Diploma in FM Bespoke foundation programmes

Provider name: The University of Greenwich Address: School of Architecture and Construction, The University of Greenwich, Avery Hill Campus, Avery Hill Road, London SE9 2PQ Website: www.grenwich.ac.uk Telephone: 020 8331 9304 Contact: Mark Mulville Email: m.mulville@gre.ac.uk Courses offered: MSc Facilities Management MSc Real Estate MSc Project Management

Provider name: South Thames College Address: The Centre for Employers and Enterprise, Tooting Centre, 71 Tooting High Street, London, SW17 0TQ Website: www.south-thames.ac.uk/ employers Telephone: 020 8918 7518 Contact: Mary Schramm Email: Mary.Schramm@South-Thames.ac.uk Courses offered: South Thames College, incorporating Merton College, is a leading supplier of training to the cleaning and facilities industries. With access to training sites around the UK, our experienced experts can guide your staff through a vast range of funded and partially funded qualifications, including BICS, QCF and apprenticeships

Provider name: Sheffield Hallam University Address: City Campus, Howard Street, Sheffield, S1 1WB, UK Website: www.shu.ac.uk/fm Telephone: 0114 225 2820 Contact: Mel Bull (Postgraduate)/Ian Ellison (Undergraduate) Email: m.bull@shu.ac.uk/i.ellison@shu.ac.uk Courses offered: Undergraduate Certificate in FM and BIFM level 4 Diploma Foundation Degree in FM and BIFM level 5 Diploma BA (Honours) FM Postgraduate Certificate/Postgraduate Diploma/MBA in Facilities Management BIFM Level 7 Certificate in Facilities Management BIFM Level 7 Diploma in Facilities Management

Provider name: Leeds College of Building Address: Higher Education & Construction Management Faculty, North Street, Leeds, LS2 7QT Website: www.lcb.ac.uk Telephone: 0113 222 6061 Contact: HECM Faculty Admin Team Email: marketing@lcb.ac.uk Courses offered: Level 3 Facilities Management Apprenticeship, Level 4 & 5 Facilities Management Higher Apprenticeship Level 4 & 5 Facilities Management & Building Services Higher Apprenticeship BIFM Level 4, 5 & 6 in Facilities Management.

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COMPANY PROFILES LISTINGS

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANCIES Company name: Michael Page Facilities Management Address: Birmingham, Bristol, Leeds, London, Manchester, Nottingham Website: www.michaelpage.co.uk Telephone: 0121 230 9421/07887 731 593 Contact: Richard Insley – regional manager – facilities management Email: richardinsley@michaelpage.com Michael Page Facilities Management specialises in the recruitment of FM professionals from junior management to board level across the UK. With a network of offices, our specialist consultants are ideally placed to provide a tailored and consultative service. Recruiting in all areas of FM and building services, we recruit successfully for FM service providers, in-house property and FM teams, private practice and consultancies.

Company name: Cobalt Recruitment Address: The Quadrangle, 180 Wardour Street, London, W1F 8FY Website: www.cobaltrecruitment.co.uk Telephone: 020 7478 2500 Contact: Claudio Rojas or Ryan Coombs Email: info@cobaltrecruitment.com Cobalt recruits for permanent and temporary FM professionals at all levels of seniority within the FM market, with operations and contract management being our core strengths. We work with major service providers and managing agents, as well as specialist consultancies, and we also handle client side roles. To discuss your next career move, please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

Company name: Maxwell Stephens Limited Address: Golden Cross House, 8 Duncannon Street, London, WC2N 4JF Website: www.maxwellstephens.com Telephone: 0207 484 5009 Contact: Peter Forshaw Email: jobs@maxwellstephens.com Maxwell Stephens is a renowned UK professional services agency that specialises in facilities management recruitment. Founded by Peter Forshaw in 2006, it has rapidly excelled during this brief time to become a leading voice of the industry. Operating throughout the UK, our vision of providing a ‘best in class’ service to our clients and candidates remains unclouded.

Company name: Clifton Chase Property Recruitment Address: 4th Floor, 69 Wigmore Street, London, W1U 1PZ Website: www.cliftonchase.com Telephone: 020 7000 3953 Contact: Alistair Carter Email: alistair.carter@cliftonchase.com Clifton Chase Property Recruitment is an independent recruitment consultancy to the facilities and property sector. We recruit across the UK from junior management to director level, providing recruitment solutions for both interim and permanent requirements. We pride ourselves on our consultative approach and understanding of the businesses and individuals within the FM sector.

Company name: The Management Recruitment Group Address: Three Tuns House, 109 Borough High Street, London, SE1 1NL Website: www.mrgpeople.co.uk Telephone: 020 8892 0115 Contact: Michael Hewlett, business sector director Email: michael.hewlett@mrgpeople.co.uk Our FM team of seven specialist recruiters provide the full array of campaign methodologies including search and selection, advertised search and interim appointments. We partner with organisations across both the public sector (higher education and healthcare) and corporate real estate (critical engineering, retail and creative/media sectors). We represent both in-house ‘intelligent client’ teams, in addition to many of the UK’s leading service providers.

Company name: Catch 22 Address: 36-38 Botolph Lane, London, EC3R 8DE Website: www.c22.co.uk Telephone: 020 7220 8900 (London) or 0113 242 8055 (Leeds) Email: london@c22.co.uk or leeds@c22.co.uk Catch 22 has been helping clients and candidates get together since 1982, so you can be sure that we have the right resources whether you’re looking to fill a key role or you’re hunting for that next important career step. Our expert team handles a broad spectrum of job briefs across facilities and property management operations, including permanent, contract and interim assignments. Our goal is your satisfaction so we listen carefully to what you want and then suggest the best possible opportunities to suit you.

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Company name: Johnson Controls Address: Tower 1, Royal Pavilion, Wellesley Road, Aldershot, Hampshire, GU11 1PZ Website: www.johnsoncontrols.com Telephone: 01252 346 450 Contact: Talent Acquisition Team Email: ukcareers@jci.com The success of Johnson Controls is enabled by the commitment and dedication of our 162,000 employees around the world. With our continued growth focus, we are a company where employees can express ideas, make a difference and build their future. Our workplace emphasises integrity and ethics. We are customer-focused and continually seek to innovate and enhance our products, services and solutions.

Company name: Phoenix Resourcing Services Address: 1 Alie Street, London, E1 8DE Website: www.prsjobs.com Telephone: 0845 8887788 Contact: Richard Snarey Email: info@prsjobs.com Phoenix Resourcing Services are one of the leading suppliers of temporary and permanent staff solutions to the building services, facilities management, social housing, support services, and energy and environmental industries. With a network of five branches covering the UK, we endeavour to create and build a comprehensive understanding of your company, your USP and cultural fit.

Company name: Green & Kassab Recruit Address: Global House, Portland Square, Portland Road, Worthing, West Sussex BN11 1QH Website: www.gkrecruit.com Telephone: 01903 234134 Contact: Nick White, head of recruitment Email: info@gkrecruit.com Green & Kassab Recruit is a leading provider of interim and permanent recruitment services supporting a number of public and corporate private sector organisations nationwide. Our business has been providing interim healthcare management professionals for over 15 years, primarily supporting the NHS. Our FM and Estates division provides recruitment expertise to a number of other industries, including banking, energy and defence.

Company name: Finegreen Associates Address: Universal Square, Devonshire Street North, Manchester, M12 6JH Website: www.finegreen.co.uk Telephone: 0845 130 4006 Contact: Gavin Grubb Email: gavin.grubb@finegreen.co.uk The Finegreen estates and facilities team works in partnership with in-house facilities departments and outsourced FM Service Providers. We are one of the most established and trusted recruiters within both the public and private sectors. Our specialist consultants cover all aspects of the FM industry, including property management, operational delivery, business development, compliance and project management.

WE CAN HELP YOU FIND

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FURTHER READING RESOURCES

FURTHER READING BOOKS

USEFUL FACILITIES MANAGEMENT BOOKS

BIFM GOOD PRACTICE GUIDES

Paxman, D, 2007. Facilities Management in Practice Describing FM at the coal-face from the perspective of one of FM’s pioneers, it was written to help people on both sides of the commercial fence to gain a better understanding of FM solutions.

The BIFM publishes a series of informative guides covering many aspects of FM. A range of titles is available with guides priced at £10 each.

Booty, F, 2009. The Facilities Management Handbook The Facilities Management Handbook continues its status as an invaluable resource to those working in facilities management, whether just starting out or as seasoned campaigners and practitioners.

Nutt, B and McLennan, P, 2000. Facility Management: risks and opportunities This book helps to build up a distinctive body of FM knowledge and practice. It examines the key issues – from PFI to e-commerce – with expert opinions from major players in FM

McGregor, W and Shiem-Shen Then, D, 1999. Facilities Management and the Business of Space Looks at the strategic and tactical issues surrounding the management of work environments and the processes and tools used to assess space demand, audit existing space use, and plans for change.

Friday, S, 2003. Organisation Development for Facility Managers Tracing the DNA of FM businesses is a guide to the planning and structure of an effective FM organisation. Written in 2003 from a US perspective of FM, it has principles that are entirely transferable to other FM environments.

The Good Practice Guide to...

PROCURING AND RUNNING CATERING CONTRACTS good practice guide no.1 revised August 2010 retail price £10

● Managing

Vacant Property ● Procuring and Running Catering Contracts ● Selecting FM Software ● Procuring and Running Cleaning Contracts ● Inclusive Access and the DDA ● FM Procurement ● Security Management ● Procuring and Running Guarding Contracts ● Implementing a Sustainability Policy ● Project Financial Appraisal ● Refurbishing Office Interiors ● Managing Fire Safety ● Commercial Removals ● Customer Care ● Risk Management ● Business Continuity

Wiggins, J, 2010. Facilities Manager’s Desk Reference Provides relevant and practical information on principal FM services and the development of strategic policies. It will also serve as a useful overview for students studying for their professional qualifications.

www.bifm.org.uk/ goodpracticeguides

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Shah, S, 2007. Sustainable Practice for the Facilities Manager This book explains the facilities manager’s role in incorporating sustainability into the whole life-cycle of a building – from initial briefing to final disposal. It focuses on offices, retail and manufacturing sectors.

Atkin, B, 2009. Total Facilities Management This third edition continues in a highly relevant style, providing an accessible text bridging the gap between the theory of FM and its implementation. There are new chapters on facilities planning, building intelligence and information systems management.

TRAINING THE BRITISH INSTITUTE OF FACILITIES MANAGEMENT If you are new to FM and considering it as a possible career, the BIFM is the place to start. Get professional recognition and access to networking opportunities and knowledge resources in addition to many other advantages. www.bifm.org.uk networkwithbifm.org.uk

INSTITUTE OF LEADERSHIP & MANAGEMENT The ILM is the UK’s largest management body, combining industry leading qualifications and specialist member services. Since 2007, it has worked with the BIFM on co-branded FM units for QCA Level 2 and 3 vocational qualifications. www.i-l-m.com

FM WORLD GUIDES Duffy, F, 1997. The New Office An essential reference for architects, interior designers and FMs. It gives readers insight into the future of office architecture by combining the author’s training in architecture and knowledge of new organisational design. The book covers 20 reallife case studies of companies in the US, Europe and Japan.

Becker, F and Steele, F, 1995. Workplace by Design An expert analysis from 1995 of how facilities design can be used as part of a broader FM strategy to support organisational goals. The book shows how team environments, non-territorial offices and other strategies can support business objectives.

THE ROYAL INSTITUTION OF CHARTERED SURVEYORS (RICS) RICS is the world’s leading professional body for qualifications and standards in land, property and construction. Graduates with degrees approved by RICS and who have relevant employment experience can become chartered surveyors within the facilities management faculty by completing the RICS Assessment of Professional Competence (APC). This work-based training scheme usually lasts for two years. www.rics.org/

The FM World salary survey identifies trends in salaries, benefits, training and qualifications in the sector, while giving an insight into how FM professionals feel about their industry.

The FM World Buyer’s Guide is a source of suppliers to the industry. www.fm-world.co.uk/resources/ buyersguide

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FURTHER READING RESOURCES

FURTHER READING ONLINE Website Every working day, FM World’s news team publishes the latest news about the sector. You can also use the site to find out about specific FM topics, events and best practice, as well as feature articles on FM matters. www.fm-world.co.uk

SOCIAL MEDIA Some key Twitter accounts to follow. This is just an example list, but following a selection of the following will soon bring you into orbit with the rest of the very active FM ‘twitterati’. @FM_world FM World Fortnightly in print and daily online, FM World is the magazine of the British Institute of Facilities Management.

Facebook Keep up to speed with FM World’s news, features and online content here. We post videos straight on to the page from various interviews, events and conferences. www.facebook.com/ fmworldmagazine

@BIFM_UK The BIFM (British Institute of Facilities Management) @BIFM_CEO Gareth Tancred Chief executive officer, BIFM @BIFM_Ismena Ismena Clout Chairman at the BIFM, key account manager for powerPerfector @Martin_Read Martin Read Managing editor of FM World @thefmguru Martin Pickard Principal of FM Guru Training & Consultancy

Twitter Read the news stories and comments here, and join the debate. www.twitter.com/fm_world

@rfm_pc Paul Crilly Managing director at Not Just Cleaning @matttuckerLJMU Matthew Tucker Facilities management lecturer, researcher and international speaker

@bifmtraining BIFM Training Over 40 courses, including formal qualifications and accredited programmes, from the official training arm of the BIFM

● FM World Think Tank Check back

for the fortnightly FM World poll question and debate, as featured in each issue.

@Jkortens Julie Kortens Head of corporate services, Channel 4 @FMCoach Liz Kentish FM coach, working with people in facilities management @LarchLucy Lucy Jeynes Managing director at Larch Consulting

● British Institute Facilities

Management The BIFM group has nearly 10,000 members, with new discussions and networking opportunities daily.

@bowenjohnj John Bowen FM procurement specialist @fairsnape Martin Brown “Built Environment Improvement advocate, blogger, speaker and consultant”

#Hashtags Keep in the loop with the debates on twitter. Search any of the following hashtags, but note that some are specific to events taking place in the sector and are date specific. #fm #facilities #facilitymanagement (as it’s known in the US) #workplacedesign #BIM #ThinkFM #WorkplaceFutures #Hospitality #Maintenance

Other facilities-related LinkedIn groups include: ● Facilities management association ● Talent in FM – stars in FM

● Facilities management

professionals international ● Facilities management group

● Corporate real estate and facilities

management professionals ● Facilities management network

● The FM network

● Facilities management careers

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GLOSSARY OF TERMS

VIDEO A selection of short videos introducing FM and those who practice it.

profession. You can read all of the interviews,and watch highlights of each interview at tinyurl.com/historyoffm

Business Channel programme on FM A thirty minute programme broadcast in October 2012 explaining the wider value of FM. tinyurl.com/businesschannelfm

Careers in Facilities Management A programme broadcast in October 2012 discussing FM as a career choice. www.bifm.org.uk/careersinfmTV

BMS = Building management system: computer-based control system installed in buildings that controls and monitors the building’s mechanical and electrical equipment. CHP = Combined heat and power.

World FM Day 2012 The FM World team took to the streets of London to speak to eight different FMs, celebrating the diversity within the sector. www.youtube.com/ fmworldmagazine

CSR = Corporate social responsibility: CSR applies to all aspects of corporate responsibility; community, social, environmental, workplace, governance. CSR practitioners talk about corporate ‘opportunity’ – highlighting the opportunity/risk dimension of responsible business practice.

catering, cleaning, parking, security, hospitality and more. TFM = Total facilities management: a type of FM contract encompassing a comprehensive suite of services in one over-arching deal: cleaning, catering, security, maintenance, etc. For more definitions, visit: tinyurl.com/fmbuyersguide2012

JOBS IN FM

DEC = Display energy certificate: public buildings must have Display Energy Certificates (DECs) to give details about their energy efficiency. ● jobs.fm-world.co.uk/

HVAC = Heating, ventilation and air-conditioning.

● www.prospects.ac.uk/links/

jobvacs ● www.bifm.org.uk

KPI = Key performance indicators: markers that lay down how well a service is being delivered. The business channel – what is FM? A background into the industry. bit.ly/r6HAea

A History of FM A series of interviews on those involved in the early days and the development of the facilities management

Rising Stars of FM Discover how the up-and-coming found their way into facilities management, and what qualities they feel constitute a good facilities manager. tinyurl.com/risingstarsoffm

PFI = Public finance initiative: a way of creating ‘public–private partnerships’ (PPPs) by funding public infrastructure projects with private capital. SLA = Service level agreement: the standards agreed between client and contractor on what services should be delivered, when they should be delivered and how they should be measured. Soft FM = Services, other than building and engineering (hard FM), which support the operation of the facility. Soft FM typically includes

● www.careerstructure.com

TRADE ASSOCIATIONS ● The Facilities Management

Association. Includes a section specifically for young facilities managers (www.fmassociation.org.uk) (www.fmassociation.org.uk/ymf) ● Specialist FM for private and NHS hospitals. Health Estates and Facilities Management Association (HEFMA) (www.hefma.org.uk) ● Specialist FM for schools, colleges and universities. The Association of University Directors of Estates (AUDE) (www.aude.ac.uk) GUIDE TO CAREERS IN FM 2013 |67

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www.facebook.com/fmworldmagazine www.fm-world.co.uk www.twitter.com/FM_World

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2013 Guide to Careers in FM  

2013 Guide to Careers in FM