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ENJOY THE

breath-taking beauty

& THE

country lifestyle

OF THE BRAZOS RIVER

Secluded in one of the scenic bends of the Brazos River, Laprada Landing offers an escape from the rigors of the city. Located 40 miles west of downtown Houston, Laprada Landing feels worlds away with dense stands of mature trees and sweeping vistas overlooking the Brazos. The unspoiled, natural beauty of the tracts offers a pristine piece of the rural Texas countryside without having to sacrifice the amenities of city living. Laprada Landing, located just south of Fulshear, is easily accessible from Westpark Tollway and FM 1093. Laprada Landing offers tracts ranging from Âą60 - 105 acres, each with its own unhindered view of the Brazos River. With varying tree coverage, each tract has its own features that set it apart from the others with no two being exactly alike. There is ample opportunity to build and create your own sense of place.


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HWY 99

Interstate 10

Westpark Tollway

FM 1093

FM 723

Stratman Rd

Laprada Trace

(Formerly Montgomery Rd)

r ive

sR zo

Bra

359 HWY

Bois D’Arc Ln

Winner Foster Rd

Secluded in one of the scenic bends of the Brazos River, Laprada Landing offers an escape from the rigors of the city. Located 40 miles west of downtown Houston, Laprada Landing feels worlds away with dense stands of mature trees and sweeping vistas overlooking the Brazos.

Beadle Ln

The unspoiled, natural beauty of the tracts offers a pristine F othe r mrural o r e Texas infor m at i o n cwithout o n t a chaving t piece of countryside to sacrifice the amenities of city living. Laprada Landing, ROLLER located just southMIKE of Fulshear, is easily accessible from 346-0222 Westpark Tollway and(281) FM 1093. M I K E @ M OV E W E S T. N E T


Hello Neighbors and Friends,

06 LETTER FROM TH E PUB LISH ER

It’s spring again and we’re proud to present our spring, 2018 issue to you, our readers. If you’re like me, by now, you’ve had your fill of winter’s cloudy and sometimes wet and rainy days. It’s refreshing to feel the sun again. It’s also refreshing to see all of the progress that has occurred since we published our last issue. What progress you ask? Lots, we say. Changes are occurring every day as our area evolves, and we are pleased to chronicle some of it in this issue of Fulshear Magazine. In this issue, you’ll read about how the community pulled together to help their neighbors overcome the damage caused by Hurricane Harvey. Also, you’ll see how one homeowner addressed their flood damage by raising their home. The end of winter brought us a brand new HEB grocery store and you’ll learn all about the two men behind the project and their highly successful property development group, Read King.

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Here, you’ll discover how Fulshear’s school children are using rocks to encourage one another as they become “learners, leaders, and productive citizens” within their community. You’ll also find out about how the Children’s radKIDS program, led by our Fulshear Police Department, is building bonds of trust through engagement with the youngest citizens in our community. We continue with our celebration of Fulshear’s historic past as we bring a well-deserved focus to one of our area’s most beloved former Mayors, Viola Randle, who is a living testament to the history of Fulshear. We also deliver an overview of Fulshear’s historic railroad “Switch House” that stands as a monument to Fulshear’s founding as a railroad town. We’re glad to bring you an article featuring Commissioner Meyers’s perspective on mobility and some of the plans he has to improve our area’s infrastructure. Through this article, we’ll provide some important insights into all of the efforts and achievements of our County Commissioner. Of course, there’s more for you in this issue of Fulshear Magazine. Take your time and read the depth of the information compiled here. We are certain that you’ll learn about your home town in a deeper way as you read about our past, our present, and most of all, the brightness of the future for our entire area. One last thing, please support the businesses that support Fulshear Magazine. It is because of their commitment to advertising with us that we are able to bring you this issue of the Fulshear area’s finest publication, Fulshear Magazine. On behalf of George Lane and all of the talented and dedicated staff with Fulshear Media Partners, please accept our sincere thanks for allowing us to compile and share stories of our great city for the past three years. We hope that you enjoy reading Fulshear Magazine as much as we have enjoyed bringing it to you.

See you in the fall! Daniel McJunkin

PUBLISHER - FULSHEAR MAGAZINE

Photo Credit: iStock.com/Toltek


FULSHEAR ACE HARDWARE

Welcome Spring

The right brands. The right kind of service. Right down the street. Since we opened, our wonderful neighbors around Fulshear have responded with great enthusiasm. You’ve counted on us for the best brands and friendly service and expert advice for your projects, yard, garden, grilling, painting and everything else around your home. You’ve found thoughtful gifts and the finest in home décor right under our roof at Main Street Home & Gift. You’ve welcomed us with open arms, and you better believe we’re going to keep doing the same for you. We understand the Fulshear friendly way, because from our owners to our associates, we’re from here. So come in, take a look at our outstanding selection of goods, and say hi to your neighbors. We’ll be right here.

8411 FM 359 (Main Street)

Two blocks north of the main downtown intersection FulshearAceHardware | AceHardware.com


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On the Cover

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Photo Credit: iStock.com/Spondylolithesis

Letter from the Publisher

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MAGAZINE STAFF

Hurricane Harvey

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DANIEL M c JUNKIN

Grande Dame of Fulshear

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KATIE MECHAM

Viola Gilmore Randle

Rocks with a Message

More Than Roads

Art Director

JENNI M c JUNKIN

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Huggins Elementary School

Happiness & Healing at Higher Ground

Publisher

Media Director

JACLYN RITTER Editor

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SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND

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Chamber Consultant

Associate Editor

DON M c COY

Building the Infrastructure for Our Area’s Future

Charming Snakes Developing Community How Read King is Enhancing the Lifestyle of Fulshear

radKIDS - Fulshear Police Department

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PRODUCTION STAFF BONNIE M c FERREN

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Bookkeeping

TRACY MILLER Accounting

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JOSEPH SONNIER IT Consultant

Helps Inform and Empower our Youth

There’s Just Something About Old Fulshear - Part 2

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• Oh, The Romance of it All • Staying on Track

Steinhauser’s

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS LORI MAGYAR DANIEL M c JUNKIN JACLYN RITTER SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND

Three Generations of Service & Quality

Encore for the Arts

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Zucchini Bolognese

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Spring Recipe

Laprada Landing

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CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS JEFF HEGER DANIEL M c JUNKIN RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY JACLYN RITTER

A New Style of Country Living

Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce Directory

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FULSHEAR MEDIA PARTNERS, LLC GEORGE LANE & DANIEL M c JUNKIN Principals

WWW.FULSHEAR.COM

FULSHEAR MAGAZINE 281-973-0633

4017 Penn Lane, Fulshear, TX 77441

© Copyright 2018 - Fulshear Media Partners, LLC All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.

Photo Credit: iStock.com/Brbnkseaj

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H URRICA N E H A RV EY

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WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY

ON

August 25th, 2017, Hurricane Harvey barreled onto the Texas shore with unpredictable amounts of wind and rain. Closely monitoring the radar, the city of Fulshear prepared the best they could. As the hours drove on and the storm neared, citizens hunkered down for what was to come. The storm came and went, but the damage to our properties, our memories, and our pride remained. Our city officials, firemen, and police worked around the clock, putting their jobs above their own families and homes. Churches and organizations quickly gathered and distributed needed supplies. Neighbors helped neighbors, and even strangers, gut and rebuild their lives.

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We know the work is no where near done. It is still a long road ahead. Despite the devastation, there were countless signs of good that happened around town. There are a lot of unsung heroes in our midst. At times like this I feel words just aren’t enough. These pictures, taken by our photographer Rhonda Kuykendall, speak so much louder than anything I could write. Fulshear banded together in an incredible way, and these images are proof.


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Friends of a Fulshear family, Teresa Beckmeyer and Lynn Gaston, organized an effort in their small town of Mitchell County, to gather supplies for those effected by the hurricane. They approached local business, newspapers, and radio. After four days, an 18-wheeler, owned by Strain Ranches, departed Mitchell County and entered Fulshear carrying precious cargo: 2,000 gallons of bleach, over 16,000 bottles of water, 150 hammers, 156 shovels, 84 brooms, 648 pairs of rubber gloves, trash bags, duct tape, wasp spray, and face masks. Fulshear volunteers spent days making sure these generously donated items went to those in need.

Tommy Kuykendall, David Narveson, Teresa Beckmeyer, Jimmy Browne, Rhonda Kuykendall, Debra Sabrsula, Laurie Cuthbertson, Jeremy Strain, Tanner Strain and Cole Beckmeyer

Taina Po, disaster nurse doctoring up a foot.

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Cole Beckmeyer standing alongside tools graciously donated by an elderly man from Colorado City, Texas


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Anna Giuliani, Emily Macek, Haley Macek, Shelby Macek, and Addison Roose set up a lemonade stand in Cross Creek Ranch to raise funds for Huricane Harvey relief. These four young residents were recognized for their service and were given a proclamation at a city council meeting.

Red Cross command center, located at Fulshear High school. (Lto R): Lauren Ashley, Fulshear Principal Danny Ward, Rhonda Kuykendall, Jana Muma, Randy Katz, Manuel Zamora, Tricia Krenek, Joshua Jensen, Texas State Guard Lt. Autro Lehtonen, Dale Olson, Kaye Kahlich, Sarah Camacho, Mark Wilson of the Red Cross, Tracey Jensen


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Lto R - Tommy Kuykendall, Tracey Jensen, Rhonda Kuykendall, Commissioner Andy Meyers, Kaye Kahlich, Tricia Krenek, Constable Wayne Thompson, Don McCoy and Chief Deputy Robert VanPelt


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Grande Dame of Fulshear

VIOLA

F UL SHEA R M A GA ZI NE

GILMORE RANDLE


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rom Fulshear’s rural, small-town days in the twenties and thirties to its economic boomtown days of 2018, Viola Randle has shared in its rich and lively history. With church box suppers and Juneteenth celebrations, with the entrepreneurship of running her own business, and with serving as Fulshear’s first black mayor, Viola’s life embodies the story of our town. Comprising major economic and historical milestones that bear her signature, Viola’s life provides a snapshot of a segregated Texas town that overcame racial conventions for the benefit of all who live here. Her story also bears the unique stamp of how one woman can make a difference for her race and for her community.

Sharecropping & Chores

On July 26, 1924, and with the help of a midwife, Viola Gilmore Randle was born on W.J. Walker’s farm, located just south of Fulshear near Bois d’Arc and Walker Lane. Her parents, Joseph Gilmore and Minnie Gibson Gilmore, were sharecroppers on the Walker farm, which meant they rented the land in order to farm it. As Viola explains it, “It’s supposed to be farming half and half. You give half the crop to the landowner, and you keep the other half.” Growing up in a sharecropping household meant that all family members, including Viola and her two brothers, worked alongside their parents. “I had to pick potatoes, pick cotton, and chop cotton. That was the only way that you survived back in that time.” Cotton was usually picked in the fall, which meant sharecroppers were not paid until after the crop was picked. “Sometimes,” she says, “You’d come out of debt but, most times, you didn’t quite make it.” While she remembers her young life as good, she also remembers it as demanding. “The hoe that I used for cotton was small enough for my hands to grip and short enough for me to keep my balance, but that cotton sack was long and hard to pull. It fit across my chest with a strap, and the fuller the sack got, the heavier and harder it was to pull.” Aside from work on the farm, Viola walked everyday to a segregated two-room schoolhouse off Bois d’Arc Lane, near Mount Pleasant Church. She carried her lunch in a jelly bucket and studied at night by Kerosene lamps. (see article on the history of Fulshear schools, “Reading, ‘Riting, & ‘Rithmetic” in Fulshear Magazine - Vol 2 No 2, page 59)

The Gilmore family supplemented their income with eggs from their chickens. They also picked other farmers’ potatoes, beans, and peanuts. For meat, they raised hogs. In fall, when the first norther blew in, they would butcher the hogs. “Seems like it was always the coldest day of the year.” Her parents made sausage, bacon, and ham, all hung from sticks in the smokehouse with a fire lit beneath them. That meat would carry them through the winter months. Viola claims that they wasted nothing and that her mother had the skill to take almost nothing and make something delicious out of it. “She could take just plain old bacon and make the best soup you ever tasted.” When asked if she could replicate the recipe today, she shakes her head ruefully and says, “I’ve tried since I’ve been grown to make it taste like hers, but I can’t do it.”

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“Most of the time, we would take extra clothes with us to school, so that we could change after class and go back to work in the field. Then, of course, you still had chores to do after you got home.” The young Miss Gilmore’s chores included bringing in the wood for the stove, feeding the chickens, milking the cows, and helping her mother with dinner. She shakes her head and laughs. “I must say that, to this very day, I hate quilting, shelling peas, and putting up fruit and vegetables.” She does admit, however, that her parents instilled a wonderful work ethic in her life. “That was my parents’ greatest gift to me,” she claims…“that I Had to work. I didn’t get anything on a silver platter.” She and her brothers even made their own toys. “We’d get stick brooms, and they would be our horses. We were satisfied with what we had.”


Trips to Town

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On weekends, the Gilmore family would venture to Fulshear for a few supplies. There were not many readymade clothes available in town, so they made most of their own clothes at home. At that time, Fulshear had a cotton gin, a train depot, a dipping pen for cattle, three general stores, a grist mill, a post office, a hotel, and a couple of cafes. Most of those cafes were, of course, off limits to black folks. While, before WWII, there were more black people living in Fulshear than white people, life for the citizens was anything but equal. Speaking of those cafes, Viola says, “You could go as far as the door but not go inside.” It appears that Liddie Davis’ ice cream stand and Walter Woods’ barbecue stand—both located where the Shell station sits today—were the only places she remembers that blacks could eat. Viola says, “I think Liddie Davis made her ice cream at home and carried it to her stand to sell.” According to Fort Bend County historical documents— “It was said that the savory smoke of Mr. Woods’ shop would waft through the streets of downtown Fulshear with everyone eagerly awaiting Walter’s call of ‘It’s not R-B-Que. It’s Bar-B-Que. Come and get it while it’s hot’. Liddie Davis could be found on the porch in front of the mercantile stores run by Briscoe and Harris and the Mayes saloon serving her fried fish and homemade ice cream. While frying fish on her portable clay ‘furnace’, she would continue to turn the crank on the ice cream maker that contained the custard she had cooked the night before.”** There was also Jess Allen’s Café on the west side of Main Street, between today’s Country Mart and Subway. Whites, Hispanics, and Blacks could all eat there, but each had their own divided section.

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While trips to Fulshear were fun weekend diversions, traveling all the way into Rosenberg was a special treat for Viola. “That was going to another city, and we didn’t do that often.”

Box Suppers & City Celebrations JUNETEENTH

Viola has attended Greater Zachary Baptist Church in Fulshear for over sixty years. When she was younger,

there were four black churches in town, and services were held in rotation at each one. The congregants brought baskets of food and, after preaching and singing and testimonies, everyone put their baskets together and shared a meal. A couple of times a year, Box Suppers were held on church grounds. Ladies would decorate individual boxes and fill them full of delectable food for two. The boxes were then auctioned off to the highest bidder, where the winner and the young lady who had provided that particular box would enjoy an amiable afternoon together. Viola still smiles coyly as she remembers those suppers. “My beau Lloyd eagerly purchased mine.” The carnival came to town every fall, “after the crops came in and we got paid.” Located where City Hall sits today, carnival operators set up a tent with chairs and a big screen to show movies. There, Viola watched movies featuring famous Hollywood cowboys, such as Roy Rogers and Trigger, or the Lone Ranger and Tonto. Ferris wheels, merry-go-rounds, and cotton candy added to the fun-filled afternoons. Her community also looked forward every year to the June 19 or Juneteenth celebration, as it is known, held by Fulshear Lake, complete with a rodeo, a dance, and a big barbecue.

So Proud to Have Lived in Fulshear

As a child, Viola loved living in Fulshear but, once grown, she wanted to move on. After she married Lloyd Randle in 1941, she discovered, to her dismay, that he had no desire to move away. While, at the time, she felt stuck in Fulshear, she now feels very differently about her fate. “Now, I am SO proud I didn’t ever leave Fulshear.” While she and Lloyd farmed and raised cotton, they knew it was not enough to provide for a family. Lloyd went to work for Cardiff Brothers Rice Farm in Katy, where he worked for over twenty years. Viola did domestic work for $.50 a day, finally working her way up to $1.00 a day. The jobs they both held, away and at home, did not just cover an eight-hour time period. The work was, according to her, “Can to Can’t. Sunup to Sundown.” With full-time jobs, plus chopping cotton and corn, she and Lloyd were finally able to move into the town of Fulshear. While Lloyd passed away after fifty years of marriage, Viola still lives in the house they purchased and remodeled in the 1950s.

is the oldest known celebration commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States. Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that the Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free. Note that this was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation—which had become official January 1, 1863. The Emancipation Proclamation had little impact on the Texans due to the minimal number of Union troops to enforce the new Executive Order. However, with the surrender of General Lee in April of 1865, and the arrival of General Granger’s regiment, the forces were finally strong enough to influence and overcome any resistance. *


A Fulshear Pioneer

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In the 1970s, while Lloyd was then working for Uncle Ben’s Rice near Highway 6 and Eldridge, Viola bought a truck and started a trash hauling business called Randle’s Pickup Service. She also became an operator for a Texaco gas station, built on the site of the town’s old train depot that sat on the south side of FM 1093. She was one of the only blacks in Fulshear to run a business at that time. In 1977, Viola, along with a dedicated and civic-minded group of individuals, spearheaded the effort to incorporate Fulshear as a city. After incorporation, Viola, knowing that she wanted to help both her race and her community, decided to run as the first black person on City Council. She served on the council for ten years, served as mayor pro tem under Francis Smart’s mayoral term, and then became Mayor of Fulshear in 1995, serving two terms, each term lasting two and a half years. She was the first black mayor and only the second female mayor of Fulshear. Zerlean James, long-time resident of Fulshear, has this to say about Viola’s Randle’s public service to the community, “I think she enlightened us and gave us courage that blacks could make it. She was our pioneer.”

Making a Difference

Some of Viola’s biggest accomplishments as mayor were passing ordinances that would help clean up Fulshear; naming many of the streets in town, including Huggins Drive; and naming Francis Smart Park. Because there was no place for senior citizens or small groups to meet and no park or playground for local children, she also formed the Irene Stern Community Center (see Irene Stern article, Fulshear Magazine - Vol 3 No 2, page 18). “We needed a community center,” Viola says. “And we needed a playground.” She made it happen.

The property owner deeded additional land over to the cemetery where there are over 200 graves, and now, with 3.9 acres and plenty of room for more burials, the Fulshear Black Cemetery received its historical marker on May 29, 2013. The Fulshear Lion’s Club contributed the beautiful entry sign and gate, and proceeds from Bike For Mike provided much of the fencing.

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While still on City Council, Viola helped to clear the way that allowed for more burials in the historic Fulshear Black Cemetery. The cemetery, located on what was part of the original Churchill Fulshear plantation, had been there since the 1800s, and many slaves, as well as local relatives of the black population, were buried there. While a private property owner was attempting to restrict more burials on the land, Viola brought a class-action suit for the black community, hired an attorney, and won on the line of reasoning that “their burial ground could not be denied to the citizens.” The result of this lawsuit legally defined the Fulshear Black Cemetery as belonging to the Fulshear Black Cemetery Association and was recorded as such in 1995.


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Viola

IN THE NEWS

FULSHEAR

BLACK

CEMETERY Marker Number: 17257

MARKER TEXT: Oral tradition says that this cemetery began as a slave cemetery on the plantation of Tennessee native Churchill Fulshear. Many early burials are unmarked, and the oldest headstone is that of Rebecca Scott in 1915. In addition, midwives, a chef, a horse trainer and cowboy, the first colored school house founders, business men and women, two local entrepreneurs, religious leaders, and veterans from WWI to the Vietnam War are buried here. The rural landscape of the rolling hills and trees surround a variety of headstones made of fieldstone, granite, marble, steel, homemade concrete, wood and resin. The cemetery is evidence of the rich heritage of the people in this area. Historic Texas Cemetery - 2010 Marker Property of the State of Texas

“Please Don’t Kill It. Don’t Kill Old Town Fulshear”

As far as the almost incomprehensible growth that Fulshear is now undergoing, Viola says, “This was just rice farms, peanuts, and cotton. Now, the town’s all lit up at night.” But she, like many others who know that progress means growth, but who also hope for responsible and sustainable systems in place, says, “I know this growth is coming. I just hope it won’t kill old town Fulshear.”

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Her Legacy

When asked if she made a difference in this town, she answers, “Yes, I made a difference. I am proud of Fulshear. One day my grandchildren and nephews can say, ‘That was my grandmother or that was my aunt that did that.’” And we, too, can say that, “Yes, that was Viola Gilmore Randle who did that.” d * www.juneteenth.com/history.htm **www.fortbendcountytx.gov/modules/showdocument.aspx? documentid=12648 Fulshear Black Cemetery marker provided by Texas Historical Commission


ROCK S W ITH A M ESSA GE

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Rocks with a

MESSAGE

encourages

HUGGINS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS TO

OWN

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CELEBRATE

THEIR

UNIQUENESS

FIND

KNOW

OWN way.

SPEAK;

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your

You don’t have to FOLLOW the crowd.

when to

KNOW when to

LISTEN.

BLEND IN when you NEED to. STAND OUT when you have the CHANCE.


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here are many life lessons shared in the inspiring children’s book, Only One You. In this book, author Linda Kranz, tells the story of a little fish named Adri, who is preparing to venture into the big ocean all by himself. Before he does though, his mom and dad have some important life lessons they want to share with him. They remind him that he has choices, and how he chooses to navigate the ocean is ultimately up to him. By the end of the story, little Adri learns the most important lesson of all—

“There’s only one YOU in this great big world. Make it a BETTER place.”

PUTTING A HUGGINS HOUND

Twist

ON THE PROJECT

Huggins principal, Janice Harvey, had one request when it came to the project – find a way to incorporate the school’s new “house system.” During those first few days of school in the fall of 2017, Huggins hosted a “sorting party.” Similar to how incoming students at Harry Potter’s

Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry get sorted into Gryffindor, Hufflepuff, Ravenclaw and Slytherin, students at Huggins were sorted into houses by color – red, green, blue, purple and yellow. Each house is paired with one of five character traits – Courage, Friendship, Loyalty, Determination, and Gratitude. Each house is heterogeneously grouped K-5. Even staff members are taking part in the fun!

“The purpose of the house system at Huggins,” says Principal Harvey, “is to develop a school climate where students are excited to learn the necessary skills to become life-long learners, leaders, and productive citizens.” “The five houses work in synergy and with healthy competition. Teams compete in team-building activities, community projects, and exhibit the Huggins Essentials to earn points for their house. Every nine weeks, a house is declared the winner, and, at the end of the school year, there will be an overall winner.” While this is new to Huggins, Mrs. Harvey hopes to continue this system for many years to come.

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Mom of two boys, and Vice President of Huggins Elementary School’s parent organization, Friends of Huggins, Kristie Warr was inspired when she saw a school in Newburgh, Indiana incorporate Only One You into a school-wide art project. The art teacher at the Indiana school read the book aloud to her students and encouraged them to show their own individuality in the form of rock art that was then to be displayed outside for all to see. Kristie approached Janice Harvey, principal of Huggins Elementary School, to discuss the possibility of bringing this same activity and lesson to Fulshear. In the fall of 2017, Kristie and Friends of Huggins, with the help of many volunteers, made it happen!


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BUILDING A

Garden

What an undertaking this project was! Kristie, with the help of the school and numerous volunteers, was able to map out a plan and a rough timeline to make the magic happen. Alleyton Resource Company was kind enough to donate roughly 11 tons of bull rock. Volunteers spent hours cleaning and sorting the rocks. The rocks were then painted with a base coat of red, green, blue, purple, or yellow to represent the five house colors. Over the course of two weeks, Kristie led class by class to pick out their very own rock, and she provided sharpies of every sheen and color to let their imaginations run wild.

The students were then led to the newly created rock garden at the school’s main entrance, where they were asked to place their rock in a place of their choosing. At the end of those two weeks, 660 colorful rocks were added to the rock garden. Each rock was as unique as the student who decorated it. From this point forward, incoming kindergarteners will be sorted into a house and provided a rock to add to the growing garden. Fifth graders preparing for junior high will be given a choice. They can take their rock with them, or they can choose to leave a small piece of themselves with their alma mater.


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Community

BUILDING A “Each individual rock represents a student at Huggins,” says Mrs. Harvey. “The garden represents our school community.” She adds, “I hope that students take away the feeling that they are part of a family and gain a sense of responsibility to their community where they live, work, and play.”

Both Kristie Warr and Misty Carter, the school’s librarian, read Only One You aloud to the students. While they all took away something different from the book, the overall message was loud and clear – we are all unique. Elementary school is that first step of many into the real world. It is the first time our children venture outside of our constant care and watchful eye, outside of our safe homes. It is the first time they start the journey of finding themselves. This book and school project serves as a powerful reminder that each student is unique, each student is special, and each student is a part of this great community. Now it is up to them to choose what kind of splash they want to make in the great big ocean that awaits them. d

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Courage FRIENDSHIP -Loyalty DETERMINATION - Gratitude -


Happiness & Healing at

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One resident’s response to the devastation caused by Hurricane Harvey WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY & JACLYN RITTER

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Jo Douglass opened her front door on September 1, 2017, she was not prepared for what she was about to witness. Immediately, she was hit by a pungent odor, stale and dank air that had sat stagnant for over a week. After catching her breath, Jo began to take in the magnitude of what had happened. All her floors, walls, and furniture were soaked. The house was in complete disarray. Hurricane Harvey had made itself an unwelcome guest at the Douglass household.

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Finding Fulshear Jo, and her husband Doug, lived in the Alief area in the early 70’s. It was a great place to live, but they both knew they wanted more – more land for the kids to explore, more space for their imaginations to run, and more of the idyllic country lifestyle. It was while helping a friend move in 1976 that all those “wants” became a possibility. Down the street from her friend’s new home sat a house with a ‘for sale’ sign in the front yard. As of January 1977, that house off Penn Lane near Bois D’Arc, became the new home of Doug and Jo Douglass. “There were only maybe five houses on the street at the time, but our daughter, Stacey, and son, Joey, were quick to find the other kids in the neighborhood,”

remembers Jo. With three and a half acres, they got the kids horses and taught them the meaning of hard work and responsibility. Even after Doug’s passing a few years back, Jo still finds happiness in the home and town that raised their children. In fact, the area means even more to her now than it did before.

“Fulshear has changed and grown so much since we moved into the area in the late 70’s, but I have loved living in Fulshear, both back then and still today.”

The Water Began to Rise In both 2015 and 2016, Jo saw water enter her beloved home, but it only seeped into two rooms before quickly receding. Both times, she refinished and refurbished


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those two rooms. The water that came with Hurricane Harvey, that wreaked havoc on Texas the week of August 25th, proved strong, unrelenting, and ruthless. “It rained all day Saturday,” recalls Jo. “Around 5am Sunday morning, while lying wide awake in bed, I received a phone call from my mother who lives with me. She was calling from her bed at the other side of the house. She told me that the water was starting to creep into the room. Honestly, I had assumed it would eventually stop and not go any higher, like it had the past two years.” Over the course of an hours’ time, the water began to rise quickly and the weatherman on tv was talking about several more days of rain still ahead. It then dawned on Jo that this time was going to be different. “I quickly grabbed a few things from the house and threw them in trash bags. I didn’t have time to search for boxes or suitcases. The driveway was completely under water, so I ran to my truck and pulled it up close to the house, helped my mother in, and we left.”

Now What? “I had thought my mother and I would be back in our house in a week or so, but I did not know the severity of the damage done,” says Jo. However, a few months prior she had already set the groundwork for what was about to come. After many years of close calls, and two years in a row of water entering the house, Jo had hired a general contractor and, in June, had already begun the process of lifting her home. “I didn’t want to worry every time it rained,” adds Jo. “I had already signed the contract, but had made the decision not to start till after the new year. The process takes weeks, and my family always gathers at my house for the holidays.” Sadly, Harvey hit and altered these plans. While it may seem like Jo had been dealt a lousy hand, there is more to this story. For several years, Jo has been struggling with asthma, allergies, and other respiratory

problems. On several occasions, Jo has been admitted to the hospital for damage to her lungs. All this time it had been a mystery as to why she was so ill. “If we had gone ahead and lifted the house in June, it would have been less invasive because it would have been preventative. If it was not for the severity of the water we took in from Hurricane Harvey, we would not have taken off all of the sheetrock around the house.” Jo continues, “It was while taking off that sheet rock that we discovered black mold in my walls.” It turns out that for all those years of “close calls,” mold was to blame. Even though the rain never entered the home, it was coming close enough to the foundation that it got into weep holes along the sides of the house and gradually soaked up the exterior sheathing (the space between the brick exterior and the interior sheetrock) and the insulation. Over time, that black mold climbed nearly three feet up all four sides of Jo’s home. She was literally surrounded by it. Through this whole process, Jo has been nothing but grateful for the miracle of good timing.

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While the mold-covered walls will be removed and replaced, Jo’s general contractor, Daniel Boucher, with Fort Bend Builders, has helped her navigate through the elevation process. “The general rule of thumb,” says Daniel, “is to find the flood’s highest water line and add 10 inches.” Jo’s house took in 6-8 inches of water. Just when they had settled on raising the house 2 feet, Jo chose to be more aggressive and go up 3 feet. The piers under Jo’s home were put in many years ago for stabilization by the company Olshan Foundation Solutions. “My contractor and I chose to use Olshan again, because they have always stood by their warranty and have been a pleasure to work with many times in the past,” says Jo. Olshan was able to use their own piers they had put in before, and add a few more to make the house as stable as possible for the lift. Due to a small addition at the back of her home, that was not connected to the house’s foundation, Olshan had to connect the two foundations and administer steel beams so that the two slabs would lift even and level.


A total of forty jacks were used underneath Jo’s home. On October 10th, 2017, over the course of eight hours, her home was lifted in 8-inch intervals using a “Unified Lifting System.” Each 8-inch interval is referred to as a “push.” After each push, the Olshan team crawled into the tunnels they had dug under the home and laid wood 6x6’s in an interweaving pattern, called cribbing, next to the jacks to create a backup to ensure a safe elevation. This is an extremely important step regarding safety when it comes to structural elevation. Piers were then placed where the jacks resided, and all the dirt removed to form the tunnels was pushed back underneath the house. A new foundation was poured around the perimeter. Jo chose Austin stone to create a skirt around the elevation and to hide the crawl space, which is the place between the earth and the foundation. “I know you can find companies to do this cheaper, and maybe even faster, but this is not something to mess around with,” adds Jo. “It needs to be done right the first time.”

Why Consider

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ELEVATING Your Home?

In recent years the Houston area has been hit by hurricanes Alicia, Allison, Charley, Ike, and Harvey. Fulshear and Simonton were also heavily affected by the Tax Day flood and Memorial Day flood of 2016.

While it would be easy to say that this kind of flooding is unlikely to happen again, it would be better for the community to think ahead and prepare for what may very well be a new trend in our area’s weather system. According to FEMA, “one of the most common retrofitting methods is elevating a house to a required or desired Flood Protection Elevation (FPE). When a house is properly elevated, the living area will be above all but the most severe floods (such as the 500-year flood).” There are 3 ways to elevate a home: an in-ground lift, grade up to 5 feet, and elevating over 5 feet. Homeowners more often choose to lift their home between 2 and 4 feet.

Fulshear Resident for Life For Jo, the decision was simple. “I never considered moving or tearing the house down and rebuilding. The hassle of lifting and repairing is worth the peace of mind knowing that there is no need to worry every time a raindrop falls from the sky. After all, this is the house that my late husband and I raised our two kids. We have over forty years of great memories in that house. I don’t ever want to move.” d

The process of elevating a home can take anywhere from sixty to ninety days, not including landscaping. The cost is based on the square footage of the slab or foundation of the first floor of a home. Lifting a home is just one of the options for homeowners looking to reduce their risk of future flooding. No matter what you decide, it is important to do your research, find a team you trust, and do it right the first time.

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Jo and builder Daniel Boucher reviewing plans.


MORE THAN

R OA D S

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Building the Infrastructure for Our Area’s Future

a road, but lacks the will or funding to take on the task, it is often the County Commissioner that pushes the ball forward to get the attention of the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). In order to make things happen, Commissioner Meyers typically works to expedite mobility projects as he coordinates the various elements of funding, designing, engineering, securing right-of-way, and gaining public support for various projects. Often it falls to the County Commissioner to know which buttons to push in order to secure the necessary permits and approvals to get things done.

BUT, WHAT HAVE YOU DONE FOR ME LATELY? Commissioner Andy Meyers

WRITTEN BY DANIEL McJUNKIN PHOTOGRAPHY BY DANIEL McJUNKIN

I

t’s no secret that Fort Bend County is among the fastest growing counties in the state of Texas. If anyone knows about the changes of the of our area, both past and future, it’s Fort Bend County Precinct 3 Commissioner Andy Meyers. Elected in 1996, Commissioner Meyers has been an active witness to the growth that has occurred during his tenure. As Commissioner, Andy has identified many opportunities and fought many battles, all in an effort to secure the best future possible for the voters in his precinct, as well as for Fort Bend County.

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Commissioner Meyers lacks a crystal ball. However, he does what he can to see into the future and prepare for the many Texans who have not yet arrived. These up and coming Texans are anticipated to double the population of the Lone Star State within the next thirty years.

MOBILITY IS A TOP PRIORITY FOR THE COMMISSIONER If you drive a car in Fort Bend County, you should thank your County Commissioner. That’s because as Commissioner Meyers points out, while most roads are built by developers, all of the roads in Fort Bend County are maintained by the County. Sometimes it takes an extra push to get things done. For example, when the State of Texas needs to take action of

Since his election in 1996, Commissioner Meyers has accomplished many things for the voters in Fort Bend County, many of which tend to fly below the radar. While some accomplishments may be remembered, most will slowly fade from public memory over time as their outcomes are simply a part of the Commissioner’s job. The projects that Andy has built are evidence of the enduring impact he has had on the lives of those in Fort Bend County’s northernmost precinct.

THE “METRO RIGHT OF WAY” In case you didn’t know it, Fulshear originally operated as a railroad town from 1888 to 1999. The railroad went through Fulshear and into Houston. FM 1093 was built along the railroad right-of-way. When the railroad pulled out, Houston METRO purchased the right of way and took up the tracks. The Westpark toll road was ultimately built along the “Metro Right of Way.” Commissioner Meyers, having helped to create the Fort Bend Toll Road Authority in 1997, successfully convinced the Harris County Toll Road Authority to work with the Fort Bend Toll Road Authority to extend the road beyond Highway 6 as it had originally been planned. Commissioner Meyers subsequently pushed for Fort Bend Toll Road Authority to purchase the Metro Right of Way from Houston METRO, and ultimately prevailed - an accomplishment which has allowed for much smoother road planning and construction for FM 1093, as well as for the Westpark Tollway extension.


THE WESTPARK

T O L L W AY

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The current extension of the toll road took place after Fort Bend County secured the railroad right-of-way. Presently, the right of way extends well beyond Fulshear to Eagle Lake. By securing the METRO Right of Way, Commissioner Meyers ensured that road access would be provided to property owners on both sides of the Westpark Toll Road in the new areas being built.

WIDENING

FM 1093 In the case of Fulshear’s primary corridor, FM 1093, you can thank Commissioner Meyers for anticipating the need, and then leading the charge, to ensure that the current expansion would happen. Presently, it has taken at least ten years, many approvals, and a creative funding plan to coax TxDot off dead center.

Intersection of FM 1093 and FM 1463. Courtesy of Aero Photo - aerophoto.com

According to Commissioner Meyers, the road-widening project is being built without any property tax. Instead, he used a little-known and seldom used mechanism known as a “toll equity agreement,” in combination with sales tax revenue from certain County Assistance Districts, to fund the County’s portion of the road. According to Commissioner Meyers, this approach had never been used in this way before. In fact, he says that no other county in Texas has tried it. Most drivers will never know that without Commissioner Meyers’ unique approach, the expansion of FM 1093 might never have gotten off of the ground. It is important to point out that the FM 1093 expansion is an ongoing ‘phased’ project that will ultimately increase the road width from two lanes to four lanes through James Lane, west of Fulshear’s downtown.

MOBILITY BOND SUCCESSES

Texas Heritage Parkway, Cross Section

Anticipating the needs within Precinct 3 and working with his colleagues on Commissioner’s Court, Commissioner Meyers has successfully pursued the passage of the 2007, 2013, and 2017 mobility bond programs. These bonds, which fund virtually all of the County’s road building projects, are the sole reason these projects proceed in Fort Bend County. Examples of some local projects being built include improvements such as the Spring Green Roundabout, as well as the Cane Island Parkway, which will be completed this summer.

Working with the cities of Fulshear and Katy, as well as a number of property owners and developers, Commissioner Meyers has been deeply involved with the creation of the Texas Heritage Parkway. This is a long-planned, 6-mile long, north-south road that will link FM 1093 at McKinnon Road in Fulshear, to I-10 at Pederson Road in Katy. It is being built with the right of way being donated by the property owners, who will also be paying for roughly half of the road’s construction costs. If all goes well, the road should be completed by 2020. The road will feature the first-ever use of “roundabouts” on a thoroughfare in Fort Bend County. The roundabouts will eliminate the need for traffic signals, as well as overpasses. Tunnels under the intersections will allow for pedestrian tunnels to access walking trails along the right of way. Texas Heritage Parkway, Roundabout

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TEXAS HERITAGE PARKWAY


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DRAINAGE AND FLOOD CONTROL

Commissioner points out that, “The Fort Bend Drainage District was formed by the county to maintain the county drainage system of bayous, creeks, streams, and manmade drainage structures.” He goes on to say, “The County Judge and Commissioners serve as the District’s Board of Directors. Special Districts, such as Municipal Utility Districts (MUDs), Levee Improvement Districts (LIDs), and the Willowfork Drainage District are the entities that constructs flood-control and drainage structures.” Commissioner Meyers has requested county funding of a Watershed Drainage Study to help the county improve its flood-control system. He believes a large reservoir upstream on the Brazos River will help minimize flooding along the river, and a levee closing the western end of the Barker Reservoir will prevent the U.S. Corps of Engineers from flooding homes next to the Reservoir.

GIVING BACK Andy admits he likes to benefit his constituents. Through his flagship group “Fort Bend Charities”, Andy has raised and distributed over $1 million and touched the lives of many in need. His successful annual fundraiser, known as “The Fort Bend Rancher’s Ball”, allows Commissioner Meyers to support a number of organizations such as Simonton Christian Academy, Katy Christian Ministries, The Katy FFA, and the Fort Bend County Fair. Commissioner Meyers is also a Director and President of the Women’s Pregnancy Center.

Commissioner Andy Meyers and staff member Robert Pechukas

According to his staff member, Robert Pechukas, “Andy is actively involved in the Katy FFA, a supporter of our veteran community, and is an advocate for those who are less fortunate in the community.” Robert goes on to say, “He’s a big contributor to Simonton Christian Academy. In fact, I think he’s their biggest donor on an annual basis.”

HIS GREATEST

CHALLENGES? When asked what his greatest challenges have been, Andy says, “Essentially, trying to deal with the growth that we have. The growth has been so rapid that it’s really, really tough to keep up with providing adequate roads, adequate mobility, and adequate services. It takes so long to build a road. It took me ten years to build 1093. In that period of time, we added 150,000 people to this area - while I’m building a road. That’s a lot of people.”

THE GREATEST THREAT TO

GROWTH?

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Andy is proud to have founded the Fort Bend Arts Festival, which celebrates the arts in Fort Bend County Schools. Commissioner Meyers supports education through his involvement with the Fine Arts Festival. He says, “I know that we have some incredibly talented young kids that are great artists, and they really don’t get much exposure, recognition, or any rewards. And so, I decided that the arts are some of the things that enrich our lives.” The 5th Annual Arts Festival and Parade is set for Saturday, April 28, 2018 at the Cinco Ranch Library.

THE COUNTY

COMMISSIONER’S

JOB

Andy says of the hindrance to growth, “It’s going to be the traffic congestion, not just in Fort Bend County, my precinct in which I have the power to do something, but regionally. Interstate 10 is a parking lot. That’s about the only east-west thoroughfare that we really and truly have. Also, we’re going to have to do something about the Westpark Toll Road. We’re already looking at various things, and I keep urging my fellow commissioners in Harris County to make a direct connection from our Westpark Toll Road to Beltway 8 going north.” He continues, “I know it’s expensive, but they have the money, it’s just the ‘will.’ They’re generating $120 million in extra revenue a year off the toll road system, and my deal is - use some of that money to build that direct connector ramp.”

A County Commissioner represents the voters in his precinct. The most basic responsibility a Commissioner has within his precinct is to manage and provide for certain infrastructure elements, such as the roads, bridges, and drainage within their precinct. But, there is much more to the job. Each Commissioner has their own staff, sets their own precinct agenda and spends their own budget in order to best serve the evolving needs of their constituents.


A NEW ROAD Commissioner Meyers helped to create the Highway 36A Coalition and is the current past Chairman of the group. The coalition advocates for Port Freeport becoming the only deep-water port on the entire Gulf Coast of the U.S. More importantly, the group is also building support for a new rail line from Port Freeport to the only rail hub on the Texas Gulf Coast in Rosenberg, Texas and an improved SH 36 and new SH 36A that goes from Port Freeport to SH 6 just north of Hempstead. Their goal is to bring greater economic opportunities to our region and the state of Texas. Of Hwy 36A, Andy says, “One of the things that would help with economic development of Fort Bend County would be to have a business corridor that would accommodate future commercial businessl development along with the

COMMISSIONER’S

COURT

idea of building a rail line to the rail hub in Rosenberg. As you take more of that freight traffic off our roads and put it on a rail line, you provide an alternative for some of the freight traffic that goes around Houston instead of through it.”

A COMMISSIONER’S

MISSION Commissioner Meyers shares the reason that he is a commissioner, and it is all about meeting the needs of his constituents. He says, “My mission is to make this the most livable and enjoyable place to live in the US.” Andy sums up his focus on serving the people he represents in Precinct 3 by saying, “We’re just trying to help create a more enjoyable life for our citizens - crafting a place people desire to be and choose to stay.” d

All decisions of governance and operations of the county are by a majority vote of the 5 members of Commissioners Court. The County Judge is the presiding officer of Commissioners Court and executes all agreements approved by Commissioners Court.”

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CH A RM IN G SN A K ES

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Charming

SNAKES Local snake expert educates on the importance

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of snakes in our complex ecosystem

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

Photo by Clint Pustejovsky


landscaping bricks, and mulch (especially pine mulch). Therefore, it is important to wear gloves and use a rake or, Clint’s tool of choice, the potato hoe, to lift or move items in the yard.

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There are over 100 species and subspecies of snakes in the state of Texas. Fifteen of those are venomous. Looking at southeast Texas, specifically, there are roughly 45-50 different species, of which only six are venomous: the timber rattlesnake, pigmy rattlesnake, western diamondback rattlesnake, western cottonmouth, southern copperhead, and the Texas coral. “We have no problem identifying specific birds, insects, or dogs. We see them as individuals.” Clint continues, “So why is it that we lump all snakes together?” Snakes are not going anywhere; they are a fact of life. So, why not take the time to learn a little bit about them so we can better identify them?

S

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER

nakes - love them or hate them - are a vital part of our ecosystem. Clint Pustejovsky has dedicated much of his life to these reptiles. At the young age of three, he recalls seeing his first snake. By age eight, he was handling them and studying them. In 2002, Clint formed his own business, Texas Snakes & More, to educate the community on these slithering serpents and to disprove many common misconceptions about them. He does this through lectures, his website, his books and pamphlets, and even by attending snake-themed birthday parties with a few of his footless friends. After 50-plus years of study and observation, Clint has earned his nickname -

“The Snake Man.” “I see snakes differently than most,” says Clint. “I see how they fit in nature and help keep the balance. I find them remarkable.” He adds, “Snakes are an important piece of a large puzzle. Therefore, we need to learn how to coexist with them. I am passionate about educating the community about these creatures, so that they are not so much feared but appreciated and respected.”

The Sighting Snakes can be anywhere. They can be found in the center of your yard on a cool spring day, looking to catch some sun to help them digest their first big meal of the year. They can be found hiding under flagstone,

Look before you lay, as that awesome sun-tanning spot you found may already be taken. Lastly, familiarize yourself with the look and characteristics of the venomous snakes in our area. “Next time you encounter a snake in your yard,” says Clint, “I strongly urge you to take a step back, take a deep breath, and just observe. Take the opportunity to study where they go, what they do, and how they behave. If at a safe distance, go ahead and take a picture to better identify the species of snake.” Clint encourages everyone to make a “field guide” of their own yard, documenting the types of wildlife that roam their piece of the world, no matter how big or small. This is a great way parents can

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Photo by Ashley Tubbs

The best way to protect yourself from an unfortunate snake encounter is to wear closED--toed shoes when out in the yard.


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get their kids outdoors, exploring and learning about the world around them.

CH A RM IN G SN A K ES

“It is important to remember that snakes are looking for a mate or food,” says Clint. “Not you or your family.” He advises, “Either walk around the snake or, if you must, relocate it.”

The Bite Photo by Wendy Naranjo

Clint has been bit hundreds of times by nonvenomous snakes throughout his long career. These bites require no more attention than a cut or scrape. However, a bite from a venomous snake requires immediate action.

PRE-HOSPITAL PROTOCOL FOR

Venomous Snake Bite

Common Snake

Misconceptions ONE TWO THREE • • Cottonmouths are highly aggressive and will attack you.

• • If the snake has a triangular head, they are venomous. • • Snakes travel in pairs.

• Move away from the snake and stay as calm as possible. • Do not catch or kill the snake. Instead, if safe to do so, take a picture of the snake. • Call 911. • Remove all constricting items such as rings, bracelets, and watches. • Keep affected area extremely elevated above the heart for copperhead and cottonmouth bites, and level with heart for rattlesnake bites. • DO NOT: Take anything by mouth, apply heat or ice, apply a tourniquet or constriction band, or attempt to suck out the venom. Texas averages roughly 2,000 venomous snake bites a year. Of those bites, 0 to 3 a year result in death. There are two different types of venom: hemotoxic and neurotoxic. Hemotoxic venom targets the circulatory system, essentially destroying red blood cells, disrupting blood clotting, and may cause tissue damage. Neurotoxic venom affects the central nervous system, damaging the nervous tissue and causing paralysis.

Photo by Clint Pustejovsky

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Dr. Spencer Greene has treated close to 700 snake bites during his years practicing toxicology in Southeast Texas. He is the go-to doctor when it comes to all things involving snake bites. “This man has a passion for helping those bitten by snakes,” notes Clint. “Just the same as I have a passion for educating people about them.” He adds, “Unless you are in shock or unstable, children should go to Texas Children’s Hospital, and adults should go to Ben Taub, so that they can be seen by Dr. Greene.” It is because of people like Clint and Dr. Greene, that snakebite deaths are rare.

The Appreciation Clint likes to start his lectures off by making the bold statement that, without snakes, we would have no milk. After watching kids and adults alike scramble for a few minutes trying to piece the two together, Clint continues to explain that if we had no snakes, the rodent population would grow beyond control. Rodents would


eat all the grass and grain, leaving cows and goats to slowly starve. “It’s a real attention grabber,” chuckles Clint. Still not convinced that snakes are fascinating and beneficial creatures? If you are one of those who hate that loud and relentless song of cicadas, then you will be thrilled to know that copperhead snakes see this vocal insect as candy. A copperhead’s tongue can pick up the track of the cicada larvae underneath the ground. When it comes time for these little guys to take flight, watch out, because the copperheads will be ready to dance and pounce. Scientists are learning that a substance as toxic as snake venom can be used to save lives. According to Science Alert’s writer, Peter Dockrill, researchers at Rice University have formulated a nanofiber hydrogel infused with snake venom. The hydrogel, called SB50, incorporates venom produced by two species of pit viper, to effectively stop bleeding, even in patients who take anti-coagulant medications that thin the blood. This fast-acting hydrogel may save the lives of those undergoing emergency surgery, by preventing harmful blood clots from forming.

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In Fulshear, the most common venomous snake is the coral snake. Did you know that the coral snake is the only egg layer of the venomous snakes? The Western Rat Snake can climb pretty much anything it wants to. They like to live underneath the insulation in our attics because the insulation keeps them cool in the summer and warm in the winter.

Still being tested is the use of copperhead venom to destroy cancer cells within a mass. Scientists are finding encouraging results, especially in breast cancer cells. What a game changer this might be for cancer patients!

Photo by Wendy Naranjo

According to an article by Meera Senthilingam for CNN, two drugs - eptifibatide and tirofiban - “based on venoms from the dusky pygmy rattlesnake and sawscaled viper, respectively, were approved in the late 1990s to treat other heart conditions, such as angina.” Snake venom essentially has been shown to attack the molecules within the human body to treat or cure diseases and neurological disorders. Clint donates snakes to the Natural Toxin Research Center to aid in medical research incorporating snake venom. It is because of this ongoing research that snake toxins are becoming more prominent and appreciated in the medical field.

Clint strongly believes that fear of snakes is a learned behavior, not an innate behavior. Often, children are taught early to view all snakes as bad. However, more often than not, we fear what is unknown– our fear comes from a lack of understanding. The best way to counter that fear is to educate yourself on the matter. “Snakes are an observable science,” says Clint. “Sure, you can read all about them in books, but it has been through 50 years of observation that I have learned the most about snakes. Still to this day, if I run across a snake, especially one that has not seen me yet, I grab a chair, sit back, and watch.” d For more information, check out CLINT PUSTEJOVSKY’S webpage at www.texassnakes.net

Fast Facts on

TEXAS SNAKES Fastest snake: - Coachwhip -

Longest snake: - Texas Indigo Biggest girth:

- Western Diamondback -

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The Understanding


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RA D K IDS

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Fulshear Police Department Helps I NF O RM and E M P O W E R Our Youth WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY

IT

is often difficult to talk with our children about the realities of the world we live in. As parents, we know that the world is not always a safe place. We try to shield our kids from some of the harsher realities as long as we possibly can. Still, some discussions are important. How do we approach the topics of drugs and guns? What do we teach them about strangers, abduction, or violence? What is appropriate information based on their ages? These are common questions parents ask themselves. While we hope that our children are not faced with any of these situations, what happens if they are? Will they know how to react or what decisive steps to take? The more educated and empowered our youth are, the safer they will be.

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As of January 2018, the Fulshear Police Department began offering radKIDS® to the community. “Since its inception in 2000, radKIDS®, Inc. has been committed to providing education that enhances the ability of children and parents to utilize knowledge, skills, and power to protect themselves from violence and harm.” According to radKIDS.org, “radKIDS® does not tell your child what we hope they will do, we actually teach, train and empower children with real skills so they can recognize, avoid, resist, and if necessary escape violence or harm in their lives. Education is the only thing that can change fear into power, and radKIDS® can and does give children opportunity and power to live safer in our world today.” Sergeant Miller, with the Fulshear Police Department, attended a weeklong radKIDS® class in Friendswood, in order to become an instructor. The class was led by radKIDS® CEO/Executive Director, Stephen M. Daley. Three age groups are currently being offered here in Fulshear: 3.5-5, 5-7, and 8-12. Classes are held at the Irene Stern Center off of Katy-Fulshear Road. “I hope to offer each class a minimum of twice a year,” says Sergeant Miller.

Sergeant Miller, with the help of fellow Fulshear Police Officer, Officer Alonso, discuss a wide range of topics over the course of the four-week class, but there are three main lessons, outlined in the handbook, they hope all their radKIDS® remember:

1. 2. 3.

“No one has the right to hurt you because you are special” “You don’t have the right to hurt anyone, including yourself, unless they are trying to hurt you, and then you can stop them.” “If anyone does try to hurt you, trick you, or make you feel bad inside, it’s not your fault, so you can tell someone.”

Just some of the topics discussed in the radKIDS® curriculum are: defining an emergency, dialing 911, strangers and tricks, school safety, drug safety, bullying, gun safety, fire safety, phone safety, car safety, and many more subjects. While books and PowerPoints can certainly help teach these topics, radKIDS® emphasizes the importance of practicing real life scenarios. Through practice, the right choice or action becomes instinctual if a dangerous situation ever presents itself in real life.


One of the biggest takeaways from this class is the importance of designing a family emergency plan. The instructors encouraged the kids to make a plan with their parents for multiple scenarios, such as the house is on fire, or a stranger is at the door. Making a plan helps take away a lot of confusion and uncertainties in the heat of the moment. The radKIDS were also encouraged to create a password with their parents. If someone other than the child’s parent is trying to pick them up from school, the

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN

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TATTLING & TELLING TATTLING:

when you try to get someone in trouble

TELLING:

when you try to help yourself or others from danger or harm

park, or somewhere else, that individual must use the secret password created by the family, or the child will not get in the car with them for fear that it may be a trick. What a simple, yet powerful solution! Local radKIDS mom, Amanda Muzzy, was eager to put her son in the first class offered by the Fulshear Police Department. “My son admires police officers and hopes to be one when he grows up. Having the opportunity to learn these lessons and skills from them will impact him more, and likely stick more, than him just hearing this from me.”

“radKIDS are COOL kids empowered in their own safety.” - radKIDS® CEO/Executive Director, Stephen M. Daley -

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Fulshear’s first radKIDS® class was offered from January 27 to February 17, for kids ages 5-7. They learned to define what an emergency was and how they can help if one arises. One by one, Officer Alonso helped each kid dial 911 on a phone. While this seems so simple, practice takes away the fear and uncertainty if an actual emergency takes place. The radKIDS learned what information the dispatcher needs, as well as how to properly identify someone. Practicing these simple tasks can mean life or death not only for the child, but for a family member or for a friend in need, as well.


RA D K IDS

52

radKIDS know

that it Is not what people LOOK LIKE that makes them

scary or dangerous,

it is what they DO and how they TREAT US that makes them

good or bad

Officer Alonso was eager to assist Sergeant Miller with the program because he is passionate about the subject matter; in fact, so much so that he signed his very own daughter up for the first class. “Having kids of my own,” says Officer Alonso, “I know sometimes it’s hard to bring up certain topics. This course has helped me learn how to discuss these topics with my own kids. I know that the group environment, which makes for a more fun environment, helps these important lessons stick, more so than my kids just hearing me give another boring lesson at home.” He continues, “At the end of this course I really hope kids learn that they have a voice and should use it - even if it is just letting an adult know something doesn’t seem right. I want them to know it is okay for them to get loud and tell someone ‘No.’” “Our children can only make choices based on what they know and what they believe,” says program director, Mr. Daley.

EDUCATION & PERSONAL EMPOWERMENT ARE THE KEYS TO

SUCCESS. The Fulshear Police Department is dedicated to providing Fulshear’s youth with the information and skills needed to protect themselves. Sergeant Miller and Officer Alonso carve away time outside of their 12- hours shifts to teach kids that they are special, and that they are valuable. “If I only help prevent one child from being abducted, abused, or bullied,” says Sergeant Miller, “then it is all worth it.” d * For more information about Fulshear’s radKIDS program and how to sign up, email SERGEANT MILLER at, lmiller@fulsheartexas.gov * For more information about radKIDS®, go to radKIDS.org or like radKIDS-Children’s Safety Education on Facebook

“radKIDS is a not-for-profit educational organization dedicated to providing realistic choices and options to children and parents concerning overall safety in the world today. It is our mission to provide realistic choices, through education, for children to avoid and/or escape violence or harm in their daily lives.” - radKIDS® CEO/Executive Director, Stephen M. Daley -


Christy Bohlen

Rachel Durham

Kimberley Feinartz

Asha King

Rhonda Pholman

Johana Quijano

Edlow Schwing

Barbara Valentine

(832) 795-1915

(832) 857-4550

(281) 229-2213

(281) 788-0511

(713) 294-9691

(832) 434-0206

(713) 367-4862

(281) 546-0942


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There’s Just Something

Part 2 - Oh, The Romance of It All WRITTEN BY SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY

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ABOUT


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As promised in the last issue of Fulshear Magazine, we are pleased to offer the second article in our series that highlights some of downtown Fulshear’s charming historic homes. So continue with us, if you will, as we stroll the old streets and explore some of our town’s hidden treasures.

OH , TH E ROM A N CE OF IT A LL

Built with Romance in the Soul Built around 1900 by Mitch Mayes, this house—always referred to in town as The Old Walker Home—is one of the oldest residences in Fulshear. After Mitch’s cousin sold the house in 1936 to W. J. and Flossie Walker,* four generations of Walkers, including W. J.’s mother, Mrs. Maddy McJunkin, enjoyed living in this home.

CHAIN OF PROPERTY TITLE: 1936 • George Mayes sold the house, to W. J. and Flossie Walker.

1975 • The Walkers sold the house to Flossie’s great niece, Mary Shamel (Teta) and her husband W. L. Shamel.

1986 • The Shamels sold to Rodger and Carol Riggs. Left: Georgia Francis Walker Meier (Faffy) with her daughter, Penny (1945). Right (L to R): Maddy McJunkin Walker, Mary Katherine Walker Shamel (Teta), Georgia Frances Walker Meier (Faffy), Bubba Bentley

A large house, with 4,600 square feet, The Old Walker Home was built from east Texas cypress wood, with long timbers that reach all the way from the ground to the top of the third floor. A wraparound porch originally graced the front of the house, and a screened-in sleeping porch ran the length of the second story in back. Inside, the home’s beautiful architecture includes ten-foot ceilings, transoms over doorways, and hand-blown windows. Behind the massive front door, a vestibule once showcased a desk chair from the Churchill Fulshear plantation, as well as a nine-foot, gold-leaf mirror that was original to the Louisiana governor’s mansion. According to the Walker’s granddaughter, Penny Meier Tucker, The Walker Home was ‘the place’ for social gatherings, including serving as host for the Fulshear Ladies Bridge Club. Penny fondly remembers Flossie’s quest for the best and latest recipes in order to serve the perfect cake for the weekly event. According to Penny Meier Tucker, Fourth of July brought on the biggest party of the year. • ”As many as fifty family members and friends picnicked on the front lawn.” • “Many guests would sleep on the screened-in sleeping porch upstairs and receive an early morning wakeup call from the neighborhood rooster.” • ”Watermelons would be purchased in Hempstead and cooled in the Walker grocery store cooler.” • ”There was always a bake-off, and the prize usually went to Flossie’s coconut cake.” • ”In the late afternoon, many would go for a goose-bumpraising swim in the Poorman’s rice pond.” • ”After the icy dip, the veranda provided for sweet iced teas, rocking chairs, and laughter.”


Seasonal Gatherings

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Christmastime celebrations brought a 14-foot tree that touched the ceiling and a special family recipe for eggnog. Dinners in the dining room would entertain twenty people seated around the immense table. The Walker Home brought grace and beauty to the town of Fulshear and—as Penny Tucker so poetically summed it up—

“Whoever built that house had romance in his soul.”

Present-Day Owners

The Shamels, who then owned the property on Second Street, had recently put the house on the market. At first glimpse, both Carol and Rodger felt at home. “It was fate,” they both believed, and Carol adds, “I felt warm and at home here. We have never once doubted our decision to buy and move here.” When they moved in, there was no city water, so residents had to provide their own from wells dug in the yard (which, thankfully, The Old Walker Home already possessed). However, they also learned that they were required to install a new septic system—a costly project, which almost nixed the sale and would ultimately destroy the beautifully landscaped yard. After the two couples came to an amiable agreement, the Shamels paid for the septic system replacement, and the Riggs spent the summer re-plugging the lawn grass. While some of the decorating choices, such as brightly colored living room walls and shag carpeting, were not what the Riggs would have chosen, they decided to only replace the indoor-outdoor carpeting in the kitchen. Today, Carol laughs about how they stuck with those vivid colors for so long. “We lived with a bright blue living room and coral dining room for ten years!”

Gracing the front yard when they moved into the house were two big water oaks, but, shortly thereafter, one tree succumbed to disease, and the other was struck by lightning. They knew this was so, because there was a knock on the door one evening from a firefighter, informing them that their tree was on fire. Due to the fact that both Rodger and Carol worked long hours in Houston as computer programmers, they didn’t really get to know Fulshear or its residents until many years later. Carol put it this way: “Basically, we slept in Fulshear for twenty-five years.” Now, however, Carol wants to be involved in this community where she lives and is currently on the Economic Development Board for the City of Fulshear. She wants to help with efforts to protect the town’s history, while still encouraging controlled growth. “I’m excited that people are trying to promote the historical significance of Fulshear.” Additionally, because she cannot see herself in a suburban neighborhood, she plans to stay here, claiming with a broad smile, “I will probably die right here in Fulshear.” d *The Walkers were the grandparents of Herc Meier, Fulshear’s fire chief. Special thanks to Herc’s sister, Penny Meier Tucker, for her photographs and recollections.

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Rodger and Carol Riggs fell in love with The Old Walker Home the moment they laid eyes on it. Both Carol and Rodger lived and worked in Houston, but would venture out to Fulshear on the weekends for barbecue at Dozier’s or a hearty sit-down, family-style meal at the Womack House. While normally keeping to a direct route along FM 1093 or FM 359, they ventured off the beaten path on this one particular day back in 1986 and, instead, took a turn down Second Street.


ing

eth ts Som

COM M UN ITY

01

Ju U T s ’ e r e Th A B O

STAYING ON

TRACK WRITTEN BY SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND

With a hiss of brakes and a screech of steel wheels against iron rail, the SA&AP pulls in to the Fulshear Depot. Fulshear Depot and Section House courtesy of Terry Crockett

WHAT’S IN A NAME? This is the story of a house in town whose name is the subject of a bit of controversy and speculation. While modest and rather austere in outward appearance, it still brings out the local citizens’ best in fiery rhetoric, contention, and a fair amount of embellished lore.

F UL SHEA R M A GA ZI NE

History often chooses to hide beneath the cover of rumor and innuendo and faulty remembrances. The truth is there; sometimes it just takes a bit of digging to bring it up to the light.

A railroad switch is a mechanical installation that enabled trains to move from one track to another, such as at a railway junction, or where a spur or siding branches off. Housed in towers, these switch levers are entirely mechanical and required significant physical strength to operate. A section house, on the other hand, was used primarily to house rail workers, as the one in Fulshear did in the early 1900s.

You may have seen the big blue box of a house as you drive north out of Fulshear and pass Frances Smart Park on the west side of FM 359. Or, you may recall all those years when it held court on Front Street and towered over railroad tracks that are now long gone. Some folks refer to the blue square structure as the Switch House. Some people call it the Section House. So, what’s in a name? Quite a lot, apparently. Fulshear Section House - photo by Rhonda Renee Photography


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Records indicate that the house was built by the San Antonio & Aransas Pass Railroad (SA&AP) shortly after 1890, when the town of Fulshear was established and platted, and that the original inhabitants were railroad worker Sam Horton, his wife Annie, and their son and two daughters. Helen Horton, daughter of Sam and Annie, passed on to her great-grandchildren the stories and remembrances of her life in that railroad house. She told them that, every school day, she and her father would ride the pump-handled handcar four miles down the track to the Simonton School Photo of handcar from handcar.com (what is present day Studio 1093). In the afternoon, Sam Horton would climb aboard that handcar once again and, pumping the see-saw beam that gave it motion, would ride the rails to retrieve his daughter at day’s end.

- Section House Photo courtesy of Terry Crockett

THE STORIES THIS RAILROAD HOUSE HAS TO TELL Before 1937, Maggie & Cornelius Mossly, the godparents of longtime Fulshear resident Zerlene James, lived in the house. According to Zerlene, the house at that time was painted a dark yellow and was known locally as, “The Yellow Dog.” The sunset gold with brown trim was a standard color for the Southern Pacific lines (which at two different periods controlled the SA&AP). This would correspond to the dark yellow & brown color of the SP Switch Tower in Flatonia.

Photo by Rhonda Renee Photography

The Self sisters (Patsy Sabrsula & Lois Vincek) lived here with their parents around 1946. Patsy remembers a second story balcony across the front of what she says was more of a blue-gray façade than the darker blue of the exterior today. She and her two sisters had their bedrooms upstairs, while her parents’ bedroom was on the first floor. She also remembers, without much fondness, the outhouse in the backyard. “I definitely do remember that the bathtub was inside but the toilet was not.”

- Railroad Switch Levers Photo courtesy of Ken Stavinoha

In the 1980s and early ‘90s, the house was owned by the John Atkinson family, who painted it the darker blue we see today. With quirky features, such as a closet built out of an old dynamite box and uneven floorboards, John’s wife Kathryn also liked to tell of how, upon removing layer upon layer of wallpaper from the main living area, she found shocking pink walls beneath. This gave rise around town to some whispered speculation that the Section House may also have strutted its stuff for a period of time as a …hrrumph… brothel.

- Railroad Switch Towers Photo courtesy of Ken Stavinoha

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In the late 1940s, Humble Oil owned the house and rented it to the Hollier family. Young Charles Hollier lived there while he attended junior high school. He, too, remembers that balcony on the outside of the second floor, because he would sometimes sleep out there on hot summer nights.


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Section House Move - Photo by Rhonda Renee Photography

HISTORY ON THE MOVE

MORE STORIES TO TELL

In 2017, the Section House began a laborious journey from its original location on Front Street to the Francis Smart Park on the northern edge of town. The city purchased the building, and house mover Barney Pfeffer and his team were hired to undertake the arduous task of lifting the house from it’s support blocks, loading it onto a specialized trailer, and hauling it a mile up the road.

Sometimes, old buildings have stories to tell. Sometimes, we just need to stop for a moment and listen.

The complicated process was defined and controlled, in great part, by nature, itself. Inclement weather, with days of rain-soaked ground, and even a few active bees delayed the removal of the big blue building. On one corner of the house, four 8-foot tall beehives were discovered with thousands upon thousands of bees living inside. The bees were carefully vacuumed out by regional beekeepers and relocated to new hives in another part of the county.

F UL SHEA R M A GA ZI NE

While the distance to its new home was only about a mile, the journey took five hours to complete. Now, in its permanent location, city leaders are discussing various ideas for the building’s future. One idea would be to transform the railroad house into a museum to celebrate Fulshear’s history. There is hope that stories of the building and its unique journey to Francis Smart Park will peak the public’s interest in its preservation and restoration. City leaders also hope the house will serve as a cultural focal point for the northern end of the downtown area.

One thing that can be said about this old Section House is that it has romance in its very walls. From its years of shaking as the railcars clattered down the track, from the colonies of bees who have “waggle” danced their way into its walls and built combs filled with honey, and from the diverse collection of family narratives and memories that have passed down the generations, romance is alive and well in this house.

SO, PULL OFF THE ROAD, SOMETIME, AND APPRECIATE THE BIG, BLUE HOUSE. • Take a moment to realize how much history that old building has seen; • Contemplate how many momentous changes and small Texas-town events have swirled around its boxy exterior; • And ponder the many great stories those old boards have yet to tell. d

The fading squall of the train’s whistle trails on the night air like a dying tale… *Thanks to Ken Stavinoha, of the Eagle Lake Railroad Museum; and Bill Archer, railroad enthusiast, for their extensive knowledge, information, and contribution to this article. *Thanks to Terry Crockett for his photographs and information about Charles Hollier. *Thanks to Ramona Ridge for information on the bee removal and on historic characteristics of the house.


STEIN H A USERS

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• Steinhauser’s •

Three generations of Service & Quality F UL SHEA R M A GA ZI NE

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY

Family owned businesses are the backbone of our American economy. According to Business Week, about 40% of U.S. family owned businesses become second generation businesses. Surprisingly, only 13% are passed down successfully to a third generation. Steinhauser’s, a modern-day general store for those who live and love the country lifestyle, has earned the right to include themselves in this rather small percentage. What’s the secret to their success? Good ‘ol hard work driven by deep rooted passion.


• A l l i n t h e Fa m i ly •

in the grain – crawling, tunneling and burying themselves in it. For them, Steinhauser’s was an endless playground.

H. H. Steinhauser was the very best business man. He put his whole heart and soul into his seed store in Flatonia, Texas. Mr. Steinhauser was not out to make millions, he just wanted to be the best in his business. Customers were friends and his store was the hot spot in town. His son Lloyd grew up watching his dad educate customers on proper techniques and identifying the proper merchandise to raise healthy horses and livestock, as well as maintaining thriving lawns and gardens. Lloyd learned the “ins-and-outs” of the business at an early age.

As they got older, the children found themselves acquiring more and more jobs around the store. After school it was straight to the store to pick up a few hours. As David recalls, this was the routine all the way through high school. The day after graduation, David found himself back at Steinhauser’s, only this time he was a fulltime employee. “This is truly all I’ve known,” David notes. “It is not a glamorous job by any means, and you don’t get into the feed business to get rich, but it is what I really enjoy.”

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In 1965 the Sealy Oil Mill went up for sale. H.H. Steinhauser purchased the mill, not with the intention of running it, but in helping his son start his own business. Originally a cotton seed processing business, H.H. expanded it to a retail feed store in 1969. In 1971 Lloyd was ready to take the reins and purchased the business from his father. Lloyd was proud to run Steinhauser’s. His entire childhood prepared him well for the road ahead. The journey was not always an easy one, but he and his wife Virginia’s strong work ethic and business skills pulled them through. Together, the couple passed these positive attributes on to their four children.

• S e rv i c e Pa r t n e r e d w i t h Q u a l i t y • H.H. Steinhauser insisted on carrying nothing but the finest feeds in the industry. Not only that, he also provided first class service to all of his customers. Lloyd, David and Mike Steinhauser have continued the family tradition of service and quality at all nine of their locations. In fact, if you do not see what you are looking for in store, they will do their best to find it and order it. They even have you covered for all of your bulk feed and delivery needs! “We know that we are not the only people doing what we are doing – there are other places people could go and buy our products,” says David Steinhauser. “People often choose where to shop based on quality of service over anything else, and we want to be the one customers choose.”

David and Mike Steinhauser have chosen to follow their father Lloyd and join the family business. “From a very young age I knew that this is what I wanted to do,” says David Steinhauser. “I never really considered anything else.” The love and pride the Steinhauser family has for their business shows to any and all who walk through their doors. How else can one open nine successful locations in such a short period of time?

• G r ow i n g u p i n t h e S t o r e • David Steinhauser cherishes the time he spent growing up in the store. His dad was his idol. “I can remember getting up each morning as a kid, excited to join my parents at the store for the day,” shares David. At the beginning it was all in fun. David and his siblings had no problem keeping themselves entertained while their parents were busy with customers. They enjoyed playing

• Learning from the Best • The success of the Steinhauser brand is attributed to strong family ties. While Lloyd, Mike and David run different locations, they operate as a team when overseeing the company as a whole. “My grandfather was one of the hardest working people I have ever known,” remembers David. “He truly came from nothing and in turn created a life for himself and future generations.” H.H. Steinhauser never expected instant gratification. He knew that success comes from hard work, passion and sacrifice. David says proudly, “Mike and I learned what it takes to run a successful business from our father and grandfather.” With their dedication and attention to service, Steinhauser’s will certainly continue the legacy and see a fourth generation! d

STEINHAUSER’S • Built by Quality Products & Great Customer Service • www.steinhausers.com

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Mike, Kyle, Lloyd and David Steinhauser

Steinhauser’s knowledgeable employees are able to answer questions and point you in the right direction. They provide so much more than just a product, they share experience and tried and true practices.


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Life-long Love of the Arts nstilling a life-long love of the arts. That is the simple mission of Encore Arts, now bringing its brand of arts programming and education to Fulshear. What started out as a kind of artists’ cooperative in 2001, a collective of artists sharing studio space began offering classes for children in performing and visual arts to meet a growing demand for arts instruction in the Katy area. The children’s classes became so popular, the Katy Visual & Performing Arts Center (KVPAC) non profit was founded. A non-profit community organization, KVPAC grew to an Arts organization offering programming for all ages. In 2017, KVPAC served 35,000 people by community outreach (70% served free of charge) and 14,000 students and audiences through tuition based classes and theatrical productions. After seventeen years, the organization’s move to Fulshear came as a surprise to some, but Executive Artistic Director Gregory Magyar says it’s a very natural step. “We had long been looking for a location that would give us more visibility. With so many young families moving toward the Fulshear area, we knew it was a good time to follow that movement to be with the families we serve and have the opportunity to be right at the heart of the city.” Shedding the familiar KVPAC name, the organization will now call itself Encore Arts, a nod to the community theatre program, the Encore Players, which took KVPAC to the national stage in the 2017 American Association on Community Theatres biennial play festival. Encore Arts will, in fact, be located near the heart of Fulshear at 7926 FM 359 next door to the old Switch House, currently being restored by the historical society. Magyar says that what makes Encore Arts a true community organization, are the programs that appeal to a broad range of ages and experience levels. “If you’re brand new to the arts, there’s a place here for you to learn. But the same can be said for skilled artists and performers. There’s a place here for you to excel and hone your craft.” Another unique feature of Encore Arts is the after-school schedule that can accommodate

the busy student. “We have a lot of students who have to give up theatre in school, for example, because their athletics schedule just won’t allow them to do both. Encore Arts will only require one evening a week to rehearse a production during the school year, making theatre accessible to them without having to give up another activity.” With the anticipation of building a more permanent home, Encore’s classes will be held at the quaint farmhouse at 7926 FM 359, with theatre performances being held in venues around the Fulshear area. The community theatre production of Peter/Wendy, and the student production of The Lion King Experience, KIDS were both recently held at the Fulshear United Methodist Church. “Obviously we’re very anxious to once again have our own performance venue,” says Magyar, “but this has been a great way to introduce ourselves to the community, and Fulshear has made us feel very welcome.” Already this spring are plans for more art classes, and a number of productions including The Diviners, Thoroughly Modern Millie, and Sunny Goodenough. The summer schedule released mid March, offers classes on a weekly schedule throughout the entire summer break for kids ages three to eighteen.​​ There are many opportunities for volunteers to become involved in the Arts, call 281-829-2787 for more information or email info@kvpac.org. d

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I

WRITTEN BY LORI MAGYAR


ZUCCH IN I B OLOGN ESE

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Zucchini

BOLOGNESE WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER

These last few months I have been on a serious search for new recipes. Anyone else feel like they make the same ten dishes on rotation? I hit a recipe rut. I skimmed through my cookbooks, scanned through magazines, and scoured the internet. I found a recipe that seemed simple, had the potential to be kid friendly, and was even timely. Meghan Markle, an actress from the popular drama series Suits, has been in the news a lot lately. People all over the world are excited about her upcoming wedding to Prince Harry. However, the latest buzz has been about her cooking, in particular, her famous Zucchini Bolognese recipe. She claims that a long and slow cook of zucchini makes for a creamy delicious sauce for pasta. Well, this I had to see! I followed the recipe precisely. Over the course of 4 hours I watched as my zucchini softened and turned to mush. While I was still skeptical on whether my kids or I would find this tasty, I was in awe by how easy the recipe is. For 4 hours the zucchini takes care of itself. Then squeeze some lemon, add some freshly shaved parmesan cheese, a pinch of red pepper flakes and ta-da, it is done!

F UL SHEA R M A GA ZI NE

At this point though, I still had not tasted it. As I am taking pictures of the final product for you, our readers, to see, my kids are already turning their nose up to the unrecognizable pasta. “Where is the red sauce?” “Why is there green stuff in it?” Alright, I will give it to them, it may not look like anything I have made before, but if it is worthy for a soon-to-be royal, it is certainly worth a try! Then I heard it. The words every mother loves to hear. “Oh, this IS good.” Success! My kids loved it, my husband loved it, and I loved it. Just as Meghan said, the zucchini cooks down and forms a creamy sauce that you would assume is only possible with the help of a lot of butter and cream, when in fact it is comprised of only zucchini, lemon, parmesan, salt, and pepper. This Bolognese is tasty, easy to cook, and practically royalty! Enjoy! d


Zucchini

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BOLOGNESE

INGREDIENTS Total time: 4 hrs. 10 mins. Recipe from delish.com

• 1 tbsp. olive oil • 1 onion, chopped • 5 medium zucchini, chopped • 1/2 c. water • 1 bouillon cube (I used beef bouillon) • 3/4 lb. rigatoni • Juice of half lemon • 1 c. grated Parmesan • Pinch red pepper flakes

PREPARATION Makes 4 servings

1. In a large pot, or Dutch oven, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add onion and cook until soft. Stir in chopped zucchini, water, and a bouillon cube. Season with salt and pepper.

3. When the sauce is almost ready, take the lid off to allow it to reduce down a little bit. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add rigatoni and cook according to package instructions. Drain pasta. 4. Season sauce with salt and pepper, then stir in lemon juice, parmesan and red pepper flakes. Fold in rigatoni noodles. Serve and enjoy.

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2. Reduce heat to low and cover pot. Cook for 4 hours, stirring frequently. The zucchini will start to fall apart and become mushy.


LA PRA DA LA N DIN G

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A NEW STYLE OF COUNTRY LIVING F UL SHEA R M A GA ZI NE

W

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF HEGER

hat was it about the city of Fulshear that drew you in? For many, it was Fulshear’s small town feel and undeniable charm. It is here where families can acquire sizable property and experience a bit of the country, all while being a short drive away from the city and its multitude of amenities. As Houston continues to push westward and Fulshear grows, open acreage become harder to come by. Nestled along a bend in the Brazos River, Laprada Landing offers that much needed escape from busy city life. This Highland Resources property, located just three miles southeast of Fulshear, is unlike anything else. With 720 acres divided into just nine tracts, buyers will

have the unique opportunity to let their imaginations run wild. The vast views of wildlife, flowers and mature trees draped in delicate Spanish moss overlooking the river, paint a picture of nature at its finest. Whether it be intended as the family ranch, or a second home away from downtown, Laprada Landing is what everyone is talking about.

LAND RICH IN HISTORY

Laprada is no ordinary piece of land, it is part of Texas’ rich history. Its unique narrative begins in 1824 when David Randon and Isaac Pennington acquired land from Stephen F. Austin, joining the prominent group of


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“THE MORE TRANQUIL A MAN BECOMES, THE GREATER IS HIS SUCCESS, HIS INFLUENCE,

HIS POWER FOR GOOD. CALMNESS OF MIND IS ONE OF THE BEAUTIFUL JEWELS OF WISDOM.”

While they could easily sell to a residential developer who would likely strip away the property of its charm, displacing the wildlife and thinning out the trees, Highland has chosen to divide the acreage into nine tracts, ranging from 60 to 105 acres. “We have owned this property for over thirty years, so we have had a long time to think about its future,” says Charles Wolcott, President and CEO. “It was never in the cards to do a development property, it is just too pretty.” In fact,

they have incorporated protective covenants within the deed to ensure that the location remains secluded and not built up like the tightly packed communities nearby. For example, only one residence is allowed per 60 acres and every home site must be set back off the road a minimum of 300 feet. Highland is so proud of the property’s legacy, that they have taken it a step further and applied through the Fort Bend Historical Commission for a historical marker. They are pleased to say that just recently they have been accepted. The marker will be called the Randon and Pennington Grant of 1824. Charles is pleased knowing that it is no longer hearsay, it is proven historic record. “We hope that by acquiring this historical marker people see the deep history tied to the property and that they are not just buying a piece of ranch land, but a piece of Texas history.”

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Texas’ first settlers – the Old Three Hundred. Randon and his wife Nancy McNeel ran a successful plantation on the property until 1859 when they sold the land. After being passed through a few more hands over the years, Highland acquired the 2,000 acres in the late 1970’s. After thirty years of cattle ranching operations, the decision was made to market the southernmost 720 acres.

JAMES ALLEN


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NATURE AT ITS FINEST

LA PRA DA LA N DIN G

“We are excited to be involved with this property,” shares Gloria Catalani, operations manager at Highland. “I even find myself escaping the city and relaxing amongst the vast wilderness just to get away from the day to day strife.” This comes as no surprise because the aura of Laprada Landing is truly magical. There the air smells sweeter, the grass is greener and the stars seem to shine brighter. Situated on newly named Laprada Trace, a county road that dead-ends within Laprada Landing, buyers can rest assured that there will be no through traffic. Majestic pecans, live oaks and water oaks cover the property. In the spring, the area is draped in color thanks to the beautiful Texas wildflowers. “The river is the large selling point – the gem,” says Charles. There are no land locked tracts. All nine front a large stretch of the Brazos and have buildable home sites. The land is perpetually preserved and protected from dense development as portions of this property are within floodway and floodplain delineations that were finalized by FEMA in 2014. Highland was looking for a name as unique as the property itself – something evocative of the feel of the land. Laprada is a play on words of the Spanish word la pradera, meaning meadow. The name has since been trademarked as to remain unique to the property.

PRIME LOCATION

“We want to be different than anything else in the area, but still blend in,” notes Gloria. “We are working to create understated country elegance in a unique and secluded location.” Located right around the corner from the highly sought after Fulshear area, and only 40 miles west of Houston, there will be no sacrifice of the desirable amenities city living brings. Residents will be minutes from local stores and restaurants. This kind of property is hard to find. Laprada Landing is a place you can go to escape, to breathe, to be closer with nature – and call home. A place with as rich a history as this is meant to be preserved and enjoyed. It is now time for a new generation to be part of that legacy. d

Energy Corridor

10

8

ay Westpark Tollw

Sugar Land

59

For more information about LAPRADA LANDING contact

MIKE ROLLER at (281) 346-0222

RE/MAX REALTY WEST

36

90

Houston

MIKE@MOVEWEST.NET

99

Fulshear

The Galleria

610

Bra z

r ve Ri os

F UL SHEA R M A GA ZI NE

Katy


73

Member

DIRECTORY

WW W.F ULSHEA R .COM

FULSHEAR AREA Chamber of Commerce


74

MEMBERS * CHARTER MEMBERS

CITY OF FULSHEAR

(281) 346-1796 www.fulsheartexas.gov

DHK DEVELOPMENT, INC.* (713) 961-0033 www.dhkdev.com

FULSHEAR

BUSINESS PARK

FIRST FINANCIAL BANK*

FULSHEAR BUSINESS PARK*

(281) 346-0221 www.csbec.com

(281) 346-2794 www.rbratcliff.com

FMP FULSHEAR M E D I A •PA R T N E R S

FULSHEAR MEDIA PARTNERS, LLC

HOUSTON METHODIST WEST HOSPITAL

(281) 973-0633 www.Fulshear.com

(832) 522-0319 www.HoustonMethodist.org

LEGACY FORD

(281) 342-5611 www.legacyfordtx.com

JOHNSON DEVELOPMENT

CROSS CREEK RANCH* (281) 344-9882 - www.crosscreektexas.com

MD Anderson

(832) 334-3738 www.mdanderson.org

WCA

(832) 456-1412

WESTON LAKES COUNTRY CLUB* (281) 346-1967 www.westonlakes.net


MEMBERS

* CHARTER MEMBERS

75

GREATER FORT BEND EDC

(281) 340-7902 www.fortbendcounty.org

BLESSINGTON FARMS*

(281) 793-6111 www.blessingtonfarms.com

HIGHLAND RESOUCES, INC.

katy christian magazine

(713) 335-4756 www.highlandresourcesinc.com

(281) 777-9790 www.katychristianmagazine.com

WELCOME WAGON INTERNATIONAL

(800) 779-3526 www.welcomewagon.com

MEMBERS

* CHARTER MEMBERS

(832) 437-1983 www.ahugaway.com

INFRAMARK

BRISCOE MANOR LLC

(281) 238-4700 www.briscoemanor.com

(281) 646-2364 www.inframark.com

Fulshear Modern Dentistry

(281) 919-6820 www.fulshearmoderndentistry.com

KATY REAL ESTATE ENTERPRISES DBA: KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER REALTY (281) 220-2100 www.katytxhomes.com

WW W.F ULSHEA R .COM

A Hug Away Healthcare, Inc.


MEMBERS

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CH A M B ER DIRECTORY

76

MEMORIAL HERMANN

MOVE IT SELF STORAGE

(832) 229-6662 www.memorialhermann.org

RANDLE LAW OFFICE LTD., L.L.P.*

(281) 346-0919 www.moveitstorage.com

SEcond baptist church (713) 465-3408 www.second.org

(281) 657-2000 www.jgradyrandlepc.com

Taylor Morrison

(281) 780-4652 www.taylormorrison.com

MEMBERS * CHARTER MEMBERS

heb grocery company (281) 295-3300 www.heb.com

pro pest

(281) 345-7737 propestbugs.com

BRONZE, COPPER, NONPROFIT M E M B E R S + R E S I D E N T I A L PA R T N E R S

* CHARTER MEMBERS 1ST TEXAS HOME HEALTH*

ADVANCIAL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

AMERICAN SERVOIL CORP.

24 HOUR FITNESS

AG/CM INC.

AMP LENDING

4A PRINTS

ALANIZ SCHRAEDER LINKER FARRIS MAYES, LLP

AMPED PRESCHOOL RESOURCES

8 BROTHERS BARBEQUE

ALENA HEEDE

ANDREW VAN CHAU

(281) 829-9314 - www.first-texas.com

F UL SHEA R M A GA ZI NE

(469) 693-2893 - www.24hourfitness.com (713) 489-9723 - www.4APrints.com (979) 488-1127 www.facebook.com/8brothersbbq/

9ROUND

(281) 394-9719 www.9round.com/fitness/Katy-TX-x2392

A MIGHTY FORTRESS LUTHERAN CHURCH (281) 533-4121

ACT OF LIFE

(713) 991-5433 - www.actoflife.org

ACTIONCOACH OF TEXAS

(832) 871-7217 www.actioncoach.com/kevinalft

(281) 679-1133 - www.Advancial.org (361) 443-4572 - www.agcm.cc

(281) 833-2200 - www.alaniz-schraeder.com

ALL-TERRA ENGINEERING

(713) 574-2371 - www.all-terra.com

ALL NATIONS SPORTS ACADEMY

(888) 999-9091 - www.ansacademy.org

ALPINE ENGINEERING & CONSTRUCTION

(281) 346-1504 - www.amservoil.com (281) 391-5363 - www.AskMortgagePros.com (713) 369-5215 - www.preschoolresource.org Andrew.VanChau@hotmail.com

ANTHONIE’S MARKET GRILL

(281) 533-9134 - www.anthonies.com

APPY CHICKS

(832) 271-7229 - www.appychicks.com

(281) 953-0044 - www.alpinecompany.us

ARNIM & SONS INC / EVO PAYMENTS INTERNATIONAL - (832) 451-9025

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION

ARTS FULSHEAR INC*

(713) 314-1313 - www.alz.org

(281) 756-7446 - www.artsfulshear.org

AMERICA WE LOVE

ASPEN UTILITY COMPANY, LLC

(877) 840-4872

(281) 578-1000


BRONZE, COPPER, NONPROFIT M E M B E R S + R E S I D E N T I A L PA R T N E R S

* CHARTER MEMBERS

BB&T

CENTRAL FORT BEND CHAMBER

BEAT STRONG FITNESS & NUTRITION

CHAMPION RESTORATION

DAMSEL IN DEFENSE

BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU OF GREATER SOUTH TEXAS

CHASE BANK

DAN LOONEY DBA GOOSEHEAD INSURANCE

(281) 668-3217 - www.beatstrong.com

(713) 868-9500 - www.bbbhou.org

BEST SEPTIC TANK CLEANING & TRANSPORT

(281) 342-5464 - www.cfbca.org

(281) 395-9000 - www.ChampionRestoration.com (281) 644-1407 - www.chase.com

CHERYL STALINSKY (281) 851-1464

CURING CHILDREN’S CANCER FUND (713) 503-6247 - www.cccfund.org (832) 367-4585

(925) 667-7882 www.goosehead.com/dan-looney

CHILD ADVOCATES OF FT. BEND COUNTY

DANIEL R SLAVINSKI, CPA

BIG FROG CUSTOM T-SHIRTS & MORE OF KATY

CHRISTIAN BROTHERS AUTOMOTIVEFULSHEAR

DAVID R. MELANSON

BIG PAULIE’S PIZZERIA

CHRIST CLINIC

(832) 563-2163 - www.bigpauliespizza.com

(281) 574-1455 - www.christclinickaty.org

BILL HEEDE

CHUCK BUCEK, CPA P.C.

(847) 980-7246 - williamheede@aol.com

(832) 471-6144 - www.chuckbucekcpa.com

BINGLE VET KATY

CHUCKWAGON BBQ & BURGERS

(281) 342-9891 www.bestseptictankcleaning.com

(281) 712-4191 - www.bigfrog.com/katy

(713) 468-3688 - www.binglevet.com

BLACKBURN FAMILY ORTHODONTICS (281) 769-3095 - www.blackburnortho.com

BLAIR MORROW (916) 997-1628

BOB LUTTS FULSHEAR/SIMONTON LIBRARY (281) 346-1432 - www.fortbend.lib.tx.us

BOB’S TACO STATION

(281)232-8555 - www.bobstacos.com

BRAZOS BEND GUARDIANSHIP SERVICES (281) 232-7701 www.brazosbendguardianship.org

BRAZOS ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY, PLLC (281) 394-2933 - www.brazosoms.com

BRAZOS MATERIALS, INC.

(713) 552-1333 - www.brazosmaterials.com

BRAZOS RIVER ROTARY CLUB (713) 931-1242

BRIGHTWAY CARPET CLEANING (281) 391-2224 www.brightwaycarpetcleaning.com

BROOKWOOD

(281) 375-2260 www.brookwoodcommunity.org

BROWN & GAY ENGINEERS, INC. (281) 558-8700 - www.browngay.com

BUCKNER HOSPICE HOUSTON (281) 493-6800

C. WOOTEN ADVERTISING & EVENTS

(512) 758-1876 - www.cwootenadvertising.com

CAMMARATA PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY GROUP (832) 913-6353 - www.kids-teeth.com

CAMP BOW WOW KATY, TX

(281) 849-3647 - www.campbowwow.com/katy

CAMP GLADIATOR

(832) 746-7470 - www.campgladiator.com

CANE ISLAND

(281) 725-6555 - www.caneisland.com

CARDUNIS BAKERY AND CATERING (281) 795-3785 - www.cardunis.com

CARECOM PHARMACY & COMPOUNDING

(832) 437-3397 - www.carecompharmacy.com

(281) 533-9325 - www.cafb.org

(832) 648-1443 - www.cbac.com/fulshear

(281) 394-7784 www.chuckwagonbbqburgers.com

CIGAR ENVI

(832) 449-8712 - www.Cigarenvi.com

CINCO TIRE & AUTO

(281) 392-4900 - www.cincotireandauto.com

CINCOAUTO2

(281) 394-9170 - www.cincoauto.com

CIVILCORP, LLC

(832) 252-8100 - www.civilcorp.us

CLARITY EYE CARE

(832) 913-1092 - www.clarityeyecare.org

CLEAN SWEEP PROPERTY SERVICES (281) 533-6000 - www.arayaclean.com

CLEAR CHOICE OFFICE SOLUTIONS

(888) 788-4268 - sales@clearchoiceos.com

CLOUD 9 COMPUTING

(713) 345-0144 - www.cloud9c.com

COBB, FENDLEY & ASSOCIATES (713) 462-3242 - cobbfendley.com

COLE INSURANCE GROUP (713) 910-2886 www.allstate.com/timothycole

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

(346) 368-2528 - www.communityimpact.com

COMMUTA PLUS SERVICES LLC

(832) 562-0786 - www.Commutaplus.com

CONSTABLE PRECINCT 3 WAYNE THOMPSON (281) 238-1430

CONTROL-IT SMART HOME AUTOMATION (713) 966-9306 - www.controlitav.com

CONVENE IT USA LLC

(713) 865-1621 - www.conveneitusa.com

CORNER HOUSE SHOP GIFTS & DECO (713) 899-8979

COSTELLO, INC

(713)-783-7788 - www.costelloinc.com

COUNTY JUDGE BOB HEBERT (281) 341-1454

DAVIS-GREENLAWN FUNERAL CHAPELS - MISSION PARK (281) 341-8800

DLS FLEET SERVICES LLC

(832) 222-2056 - www.dlsfleetservices.com

DOZIER’S GROCERY & MARKET*

(281) 346-1411 - www.doziersbbq.com

DR. DAVID BRIGHT ORTHODONTICS (281) 599-1155 - www.brightbraces.com

DREAM LANDSCAPE*

(281) 744-2669 www.dreamlandscapedesign.com

ECN ENTERPRISES

(832) 405-3184 - www.demandgenpros.com

ECO2 OFFICE

(832) 437-3204 - www.eco2officekaty.com

EDWARD BATINGA, CPA P.C.

(281) 222-3307 - www.batingacpa.com

EDWARD JONES*

(281) 242-3307 - www.edwardjones.com

EFTEX BUSINESS SERVICES, LLC* (832) 315-1165 - www.eftexllc.com

ELECTRIC & GAS SAVINGS, LLC

(713) 636-2672 - www.electricsavings.net

ELIZABETH PRATT, PLLC LAW FIRM (281 394-4681 www.elizabethpratt-legal.com

ELKO CONSULTING, LP DBA IMPROVE IT! CONSULTING & TRAINING*

(281) 799-0930 - www.improveitsolutions.com

EMBROIDME FULSHEAR

(281) 232-7577 www.embroidme-fulshear.com

EMPLOYERS ONE SOURCE GROUP (281) 492-9292 - www.eosg.com

ENCHANTMENT KIDS FINE ARTS LEARNING CENTER (281) 394-5090 - www.Enchantmentkids.com

ENCORE PRINTSTORE

(281) 398-7444 - www.encoreprintstore.com

ER KATY*

(281) 395-9900 - www.erkaty.com

EXCEL CENTER BEHAVIORAL OF WEST OAKS HOSPITAL (281) 647-0020 - www.westoakshospital.com

FAMILY HOPE

CRUISE PLANNERS/WATERCREST TRAVEL

FARMERS INSURANCE GROUP TIM O’BRIEN INSURANCE AGENCY

(832) 772-6866 shbdevelopment.com/properties/cross-ridge-fulshear

CRUISE PLANNERS - GENE CHIN

(713) 207-1111 - www.CenterpointEnergy.com

(281) 249-7705 - www.dwhomes.com

CROSS RIDGE OFFICE CONDOS

CENTER COURT PIZZA & BREW CENTERPOINT ENERGY

DAVID WEEKLEY HOMES

EXPRESS ITALIA

(281) 733-1304 - www.craft-ecreations.com

(281) 533-4101 www.watercrestcruisetravel.com

(281) 665-3152 - www.centercourtpizza.com

(979) 541-9297 - drmelanson@yahoo.com

CRAFT-E CREATIONS

(409) 673-9802 - www.caring4katy.org

CARING4KATY

(281) 342-2674

(832) 377-6220 www.mycruisecoordinator.com

CULLIGAN OF HOUSTON

(713) 293-6400 - www.houstonculligan.com

(281) 533-0099

(832) 492-5136 - FamilyHopeFulshear.org

(281) 375-5928 www.farmersagent.com/tobrien

FIRST CHOICE EMERGENCY ROOM (972) 899-6662 - www.fcer.com

WW W.F ULSHEA R .COM

(281) 668-3217 - www.bbt.com

77


BRONZE, COPPER, NONPROFIT M E M B E R S + R E S I D E N T I A L PA R T N E R S

CH A M B ER DIRECTORY

78

* CHARTER MEMBERS

FIRST CHOICE EMERGENCY ROOM KATY CINCO RANCH

FULSHEAR OUTREACH & DEVELOPMENT

www.fcer.com/locations/houston-map/ katy-cinco-ranch/

FULSHEAR POLICE DEPARTMENT

(832) 913-8220

FAIRMONT CUSTOM HOMES (713) 539-0048 www.fairmontcustomhomes.com

FASTSIGNS KATY

(281) 346-2202 www.fulshearpolice.com

FULSHEAR POLICE FOUNDATION (713) 502-9877

FULSHEAR PRESSURE WASHING

(281) 599-1111 - www.fastsigns.com/515

(832) 581-5812 www.fulshearpressurewashing.com

FIF ENGINEERING LLC

FULSHEAR PROFESSIONALS

(346) 800-4343 - www.fifengineering.com

FIRST CUP CAFE

(281) 989-1171 - www.yourfirstcupcafe.com

FIRST FULSHEAR UMC*

(281) 346-1416 - www.firstfulshear.org

info@fulshearprofessionals.com

FULSHEAR READY MIX CONCRETE

(281) 533-0300 - www.fulshearreadymix.com

FULSHEAR REAL ESTATE PARTNERS L.P. (713) 302-0555

(281) 493-3880 - www.heritagetexas.com

HLG WEALTH MANAGEMENT (713) 337-2241

HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE

(281) 882-9453 - www.homeinstead.com/252

HOMEWOOD SUITES BY HILTON KATY

(281) 391-5500 - www.homewoodkaty.com

HOPE FOR THREE*

(800) 317-0787 - www.hopeforthree.org

HOUSER ROOFING

(979) 472-9176 - www.houserroofingtx.com

HOUSTON CHRONICLE

(713) 362-5163 - www.houstonchronicle.com

HOUSTON FINANCIAL CENTER

FIRST LINE DEFENDERS

FULSHEAR SAFE AND LOCK

(832) 841-6733 - www.fulshearlocksmith.com

(713) 302-6744 www.houstonfinancialcenter.com

FIT SENSE, LLC

FULSHEAR SIMONTON FIRE DEPARTMENT

HOUSTON PEDIATRIC DENTAL SPECIALISTS, PC

FLINT PHOTOGRAPHY

FULSHEAR STAR

HR IN ALIGNMENT, LLC

FONTANILLA ACCOUNTING SOLUTIONS

FULSHEAR TREE SERVICES

HUNT LAW FIRM, PLLC

(281) 712-1047 www.katy.bookkeepingexpress.com

FULSHEAR.COM

INDEPENDENCE TITLE COMPANY

FOREVER FULSHEAR*

GALLERY FURNITURE

(832) 776-1145 http://www.firstlinedefenders.com (832) 600-4474 - www.fitsense-llc.com (281) 899-0818 - www.Flint-Photography.com

(713) 703-4129

FORT BEND CARES FOUNDATION

(832) 819-2005 - www.FortBendCares.org

FORT BEND COUNTY FAIR ASSOCIATION

(281) 346-2800 - www.fsfd.org

(281) 665-9678 - www.fulshearstar.com (713) 302-0555 - www.fulsheartreeservices.com (832) 377-6574 - www.fulshear.com (281) 687-1263 - www.galleryfurniture.com

GEOVEND INTERNATIONAL LLC

(281) 513-4681 - www.geovendinternational.com

GGG SUSTAINABILITY SOLUTIONS

(972) 415-3017 - www.greengrovegroup.com

(281) 342-6171 www.FortBendCountyFair.com

GLADIATOR EXCELLENCE

FORT BEND COUNTY MUSEUM ASSOCIATION

GLAMOUR GYPSIES

(281) 342-1256 www.fortbendmuseum.org/georgeranch.org

FORT BEND COUNTY REPUBLICAN PARTY www.fbcgop.org

FORT BEND RAINBOW ROOM (832) 451-5867 - www.fbrr.org

FORT BEND COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE (281) 341-4664 - www.fbcsheriff.org

FORT BEND SENIORS MEALS ON WHEELS (281) 633-7049 - www.fortbendseniors.org

FRECKLES STATIONARY & GIFTS

(281)536-4900 - www.frecklescentral.com

(713) 659-9747 - www.GladiatorExcellence.com (713) 376-0114 www.glamourgypsies.com

GLASS EXPRESSIONS (713) 702-2292

GLENN SMITH EXECUTIVE COACHING

(281) 346-8326 - www.smilesgonewild.net (281) 889-9075 - www.hrinalignment.com (832) 315-5494 - www.familylawyerkaty.com

(281) 533-9922 www.independencetitle.com

INSPERITY

(281) 312-2065 - www.insperity.com

IRON TRIBE FITNESS - CINCO RANCH (281) 303-5671 www.cinco-ranch.irontribefitness.com

ITALIAN MAID CAFE

(281) 341-1587 - www.italianmaidcafe.com

JACQUELYN NICOLE PHOTOGRAPHY (281) 794-7385 - www.jacquelynnicole.com

JDC FIRETHORNE

(281) 395-1440 - www.firethorne.info

JLA REALTY-JOE GORCZYCA (281) 814-8934

JOE JOE BEAR FOUNDATION

(281) 841-6680 - www.glennsmithcoaching.com

(281) 398-4522 - www.joejoebear.org

GNA INSPECTIONS, PLLC

JORDURK SOLUTIONS, LLC

(832) 567-3293 - GNAInspections.com

(888) 452-6461 - www.jordurk.com

GOLDEN EAGLE TAEKWONDO

JOYCE LONG WELLNESS INSTITUTE

GRATITUDE SOLUTIONS

JUDGE CHAD BRIDGES CAMPAIGN 240TH DISTRICT COURT

(832) 953-4853 www.goldeneagletaekwondo.com

(281) 772-3971

GREENWAVE DRY CLEANERS

(281) 344-0095 - www.joycelong.biz

(832) 867-0471 - www.judgechadbridges.com

JUDGE MAGGIE JARAMILLO 400TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

FRONT ROW SIGNS

(832) 222-9385 - www.frontrowsigns.net

(346) 707-8168 www.greenwavedrycleaners.net

FRONTIER TITLE COMPANY

HALO PROFESSIONALS

(281) 391-9181 - www.frontiertitletexas.com

(281) 860-2535 - www.haloalarmshouston.com

FULSHEAR - SIMONTON LIONS CLUB

HANA GARDEN CHINESE RESTAURANT

JUICE PLUS

(832) 437-7852 - www.hanagarden.us

(713) 703-1554 www.carmenizzo.origamiowl.com

FULSHEAR ACE HARDWARE

HANSON AGGREGATES

KASABE DESIGNS INC.

FULSHEAR ATHLETIC BOOSTER CLUB

HEALTHY TEETH PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY

KATHIE LAUHOFF KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER

(281) 346-4156 www.fulshearsimontonlionsclub.org (970) 214-7876

F UL SHEA R M A GA ZI NE

(832) 492-5136 - www.FulshearOutreach.org

HERITAGE TEXAS PROPERTIES

(832) 541-1768 - www.fulshearathletics.com

FULSHEAR CITY GRILL*

(281) 346-8196 - www.yongsasianfusion.com

FULSHEAR FAMILY MEDICINE*

(281) 346-0018 - www.fulshearfamilymed.com

FULSHEAR FLORAL DESIGN

(281) 346-1136 - www.lehighhanson.com

(713) 234-1002 www.healthyteethpediatricdentist.com

HEARTLAND PAYMENT SYSTEMS (713) 302-1852 www.Heartlandpaymentsystems.com

HEARTS AT HOME SENIOR CARE

(281) 533-9468 - www.fulshearfloraldesign.com

(713) 515-2567 www.heartsathomeseniorcare.com

FULSHEAR FOOT AND ANKLE

HEMI HIDEOUT

(281) 391-1212 - Fulshearfootandankle.com

FULSHEAR INSURANCE GROUP, INC.

(281) 533-9067 - www.fulshearinsurance.com

(281) 347-HEMI - www.HemiHideout.com

HENDRIX INSURANCE

(832) 437-5528 - www.yourLTCexpert.com

(281) 660-4363 - www.judgemaggiejaramillo.com

JULIE K GRAY, CPA (281) 712-5013

(281) 712-2659 - www.kasabedesigns.com

(713) 562-8502 - www.kathielauhoff.com

KATY CHRISTIAN MAGAZINE (281) 777-9790 www.katychristianmagazine.com

KATY FAMILY YMCA

(281) 392-5055 - www.ymcahouston.org/katy

KATY LIFESTYLE CHIROPRACTIC (281) 347-444 - www.katychiro.com

KATY MAGAZINE, LLC

(281) 579-9840 - www.katymagazine.com


BRONZE, COPPER, NONPROFIT M E M B E R S + R E S I D E N T I A L PA R T N E R S

* CHARTER MEMBERS

KATY MEDIA ROOMS, LLC

MEDINA ORTHODONTICS

KATY PLANTATIONS HANDCRAFTED SHUTTERS

MEMAMA’S COOKIES N’ MORE

(281)-402-1280 - www.katyplantations.com

(713) 503-8310 www.memamascookiesnmore.com

PAYCHEX*

KATY TREADMILL REPAIRS

MEMBERS CHOICE CREDIT UNION

(832) 731-6785 - www.katytreadmillrepairs.com

(281) 398-9900 - www.mccu.com

PERCHERON TITLE AGENCY, LLC

KATY YARD GREETINGS

MICHAEL T. MCCANN FOUNDATION, INC - BIKE FOR MIKE

(713) 898-4358 - www.katyyardgreetings.com

KELLY FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC (281)346-8397

KENT HARRIS

(832) 578-1967 - kentjharris@gmail.com

KIDDIE ACADEMY OF RICHMOND TEXAS (832) 633-0093 www.kiddieacademy.com/richmond

(281) 394-9300 - www.medianbraces.com

camccann@me.com

MICHELLE BRAUD (225) 806-4344

MINDFUL ART*

(713) 303-4381 - www.mindful-art.com

MINT PRINT HOUSE (832) 712-0244

KINGDOM & WHEELS

MOMS CLUB FULSHEAR/SIMONTON

(832) 437-7039 - www.kingdomandwheels.com

(203) 650-6263 - www.mindful-art.com

KJT CONSULTING LLC

MOSQUITO DEFENSE SOLUTIONS

(281) 705-6895 - kjthomason@mail.com

(281) 889-8499 - www.Mosquito-Defense.com

KRENEK LAW OFFICES

MOSSWOOD PROPERTIES, LLC.*

(281) 578-7711 ww.tkthompson@kreneklaw.com

(281) 346-8032

L&N BLINDS AND SHUTTERS

(832) 277-5610 - www.n2pub.com

(832) 427-7971 - www.lnblindsandshutters.com

LAMAR CISD

(832) 223-0330 - www.lcisd.org

LANIER PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES PLLC (713) 504-3755 - www.drstaceylanier.com

LATHROP DENTAL CENTER*

(832) 437-3849 - www.lathropdentalcenter.com

LAUGHING DOG GLASSWORKS (281) 346-0099

LAVO NATURAL NAILS

(281) 346-8636 - www.lavonails.com

LAZIT INDUSTRIES (281) 334-9969

LEGACY AT FALCON POINT

(281)394-0628 - www.legacyatfalconpoint.com

LEGALSHIELD

(281) 750-5317 - www.legalshieldassociate.com

LEGALSHIELD / IDSHIELD

(281) 986-7023 - www.msmithcorp.com

LEONETTI GRAPHICS INC.

(281) 499-4959 - www.leonettigraphics.com

LIBERTY STAR MORTGAGE - a branch of

N2 PUBLISHING - WEST SIDE STORIES

(281) 392-3034 - www.newellsdesigns.com

NO LABEL BREWING CO.

(281) 693-7545 - www.nolabelbrew.com

NORTH AMERICAN TITLE KATY (832) 524-5832

NORTH FORT BEND WATER AUTHORITY (713)-488-8253 - nfbwa.com

NOVABAY PHARMACEUTICALS (832) 244-5678 - www.NovaBay.com

NOW CFO

(713) 823- 2134 - www.nowcfo.com

OAK PARK RESORT LIFESTYLE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

(281) 574-3800 - www.officemakers.com

LOUETTA AUTOMOTIVE

OLD FOSTER COMMUNITY MUSEUM

(209) 484-9583 - www.marykay.com/ldyer1616

MAS SOLUTIONS LLC

(281) 494-4874 - www.masquality.com

MATHNASIUM OF FULSHEAR

(832) 437-5033 - www.mathnasium.com/fulshear

MCFRUGALS DRY CLEAN DEPOT (832) 589-2885 - www.mcfrugalsdc.com

PIVOTAL STEEL BUILDINGS & ROOFING (888) 75-STEEL - www.pivotalconstruction.net

POLISHED NAILS STUDIO

(281) 665-8716 - www.polishednailsstudio.com

PRAUPER

(346) 226-5335 - www.prauper.com

PRESTIGE PROPERTIES TEXAS (281) 238-0800

PREVALENT HEALTH

(713) 554-6100 - www.prevalenthealth.com

R&M LOGISTICS, LLC

OFFICEMAKERS

MARY KAY - LINDA DYER

(281) 347-8900 - www.ptcare.net

NEWELL’S DESIGNS NEWELL CHEATHEAM

(832) 844-2025 - www.lonestartransitions.com

(805) 558-0533 - www.marykay.com/cfairbanks

PHYSICAL THERAPY CARE & AQUATIC REHAB OF FORT BEND

R.G. MILLER ENGINEERS

(281) 547-8200 - www.nbdgraphics.net

LONE STAR TRANSITIONS

MARY KAY

(281) 202-5988 - www.photoboothonwheels.com

NBD GRAPHICS INC.

(713) 953-5131 - www.ljaengineering.com

(281) 533-9952 www.martinmortgageonline.com

PHOTO BOOTH ON WHEELS

PROSPERITY BANK

(281) 392-2990 - houstonwest.naturalawn.com

(281) 239-9801 - www.ocusoft.com

MARTIN MORTGAGE *

(281) 346-4535

NATURALAWN OF AMERICA*

OCUSOFT

(281) 769-1452 - www.rosenbergmaidsimple.com

PET SUPPLIES PLUS

(832) 286-6371 www.prospectmortgage.com/NNavarroSung

LJA ENGINEERING, INC.*

MAID SIMPLE

(832) 300-6500 - www.percherontitleagency.com

(713) 503-5171 - www.nancykingrealty.com

(281) 558-0004 - www.libertystarmortgage.com

(713) 714-7357 - www.madamdj.com

(832) 914-3721 - www.paychex.com

PROSPECT MORTGAGE

(281) 398-1500 www.OakPark-Retirement.com

MADAM DJ

(281) 793-5779 - www.paularucky.com

NANCY GARCIA KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER REALTY*

SecurityNational MC NMLS 3116*

(281) 304-2517 - www.louettaauto.com

PAULA RUCKY PROPERTIES REMAX GRAND

(281) 239-2178 www.fostercommunitymuseum.org

OLD REPUBLIC NATIONAL TITLE

(281) 265-9500 www.oldrepublictitle.com/houstonnational

OLSON FOR CONGRESS COMMITTEE (281) 980-0750 - www.olsonforcongress.com

ONE SPORTS NATIONS

(832) 974-0068 www.onesportsnation.com/katy

(281) 574-8674 - www.ProsperityBankUSA.com (713) 461-9600 - www.rgmiller.com (281) 346-1142 - www.rgmiller.com

RACHEL THE REALTOR

(832) 857-4550 - www.RachelTheRealtor.org

RAMEY REALTY

(713) 503-6247 - www.mgramey1@gmail.com

RAYMOND L. WIGGINS, D.D.S., M.D. TEXAS ORAL AND FACIAL SURGERY (281) 395-1200 - www.txofs.com

RE/MAX GRAND III (832) 913-8400

RE/MAX REALTY WEST*

(281) 346-0222 - www.movewest.net

RED POTATO MARKET

(281) 533-9863 - www.redpotatomarket.com

REGAL GRAND PARKWAY

(281) 239-4205 - www.regmovies.com

REINING STRENGTH THERAPEUTIC HORSEMANSHIP (832) 451-6874 - www.reiningstrength.org

REMEDY ROOFING, INC.

(281) 391-8555 - www.remedyroofing.com

REPRESENTATIVE JOHN ZERWAS M.D. (281) 342-6969 - www.JohnZerwas.com

REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB OF KATY

(713) 824-6136 www.republicanwomensclubofkaty.com

REPUBLIC SERVICES

(713) 726-7510 - www.republicservices.com

OWEN AND SHERRI BEMENT

RICHMOND STATE SUPPORTED LIVING CENTER

(281) 346-0299

(281) 344-4335 - www.govsc.org

PARKWAY FELLOWSHIP

RICK HENDERSON - REMAX GRAND

(832) 222-8282 - Parkwayfellowship.com

(281) 994-5717 - www.pickrick.com

PATHPOINTS TO WELLNESS HEALING ARTS & RETREAT CENTER*

RIGHTWAY DENTAL

(832) 461-6936 www.pathpointstowellness.com

PAUL LYTLE INSURANCE AGENCY (832) 266-0153 agents.allstate.com/paul-lytle-fulshear-tx.html

(281) 232-1801 - www.rightwaydental.com

RIO BRAVE MESQUITE GRILL

(281) 533-0909 - dekkers@mskcompanies.com

WW W.F ULSHEA R .COM

(281) 780-9383 - www.katymediarooms.com

79


BRONZE, COPPER, NONPROFIT M E M B E R S + R E S I D E N T I A L PA R T N E R S

CH A M B ER DIRECTORY

80

* CHARTER MEMBERS

RIVER BEND BAPTIST CHURCH (281) 346-2279- www.riverbendbc.org

RMC SOLAR SCREENS BLINDS AND SHUTTERS (281) 660-7769 - www.rmcsolarscreens.com

RONALD DUNCAN (765) 208-1075

SAENZ OF THE TIME

(713) 876-5680 - www.reverbnation.com/saenzofthetime

SAFARI TEXAS

(281) 277-7888 - www.safaritexasballroom.com

SANDEFUR CPA, P.C.*

(281) 533-0911 - www.sandefurcpa.com

SAPORE RISTORANTE ITALIANO

(281) 394-5999 - www.saporestaurant.com

SAPPHIRE CUSTOM HOMES

TODAY’S VISION KATY

TERRA POINT REALTY, LLC

TOPMARK REALTY

TERRY COZART, PIANO

TOUCHSTONE CRYSTAL BY SWAROVSKI

(281) 616-5999 www.temperatureprofortbend.com

(281) 346-2112 - www.terrapointrealty.com

(713) 882-8558 - www.fulshearpianolessons.com

TEXANA CENTER*

(281) 828-2020 www.todaysvision.com/location/katy (281) 698-7787 - topmarkrealty.com (469) 826-3564 www.touchstonecrystal.com/triciawright

TEXAS BORDERS BAR & GRILL

TRACY BOGIEL BETTER HOMES & GARDENS - GARY GREENE*

TEXAS COUNTRY PROPERTIES*

TRACY GREMILLION KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER

(281) 346-1136

(281) 723-9890 - www.isellkatytx.net

TEXAS ORTHODONTIC SPECIALISTS

TRICIA TURNER PROPERTIES

(281) 239-1427 - www.texanacenter.com

(281) 394-2100 www.texasbordersbarandgrill.com

(281) 646-1136 - www.ilovefulsheartx.com

(281) 346-8326 www.texasorthodonticspecialists.com

(832)-563-0916 - www.har.com/TriciaG

SCHOBEL IRRIGATION & LANDSCAPE SERVICES, INC.

TEXAS PREMIER SPORTING ARMS

(281) 497-1040 - www.turnerduran.com

(832) 250-5807

(979) 627-7827 www.texaspremiersportingarms.com

SENATOR LOIS KOLKHORST

TEXAS PRIDE DISPOSAL

(979) 251-7888

(281) 342-8178 - www.texaspridedisposal.com

(281) 712-4000 www.twomenandatruckwesthouston.com

SERVPRO OF WEST FORT BEND COUNTY* - (281) 342-5326

THE AD SHEET

UNITED HEALTHCARE

UPCLOSE MAGAZINE LLC

SHERWOOD FARMS

THE ALTERNATIVE BOARD HOUSTON SW

(713) 578-0449

(832) 840-8481 - www.tabhoustonsw.com

SIGNARAMA-KATYFULSHEAR

THE BUNKER ICEHOUSE*

(713) 471-5398 - www.signarama-katyfulshear.com

(281) 923-8833

(281) 610-3767 www.usana.com/webhosting/cherrylsenergythrough

SIT STAY OBEY ACADEMY

THE DELANEY AT PARKWAY LAKES

VAN HOLTEN LAW FIRM*

(832) 437-5325 - www.sapphirecustomhomes.net

www.servproofwestfortbendcounty.com

(281) 770-3250 - www.sitstayobeyacademy.com

SJR FAMILY PARTNERSHIP, LTD* (281) 468-3588

SPECIAL PALS

(281) 579-7387 - www.specialpalsshelter.org

SPORTS CHIROPRACTIC PERFORMANCE - SCP (832) 222-9727 - www.scpfit.com

SQUIRREL HOLDINGS LLC* (713) 302-6873

STANCIL PROPERTY TAX LLC (281) 341-5454

STATE FARM INSURANCE - JEFF GILBERT* (281) 347-6200 - www.yourareaneighbor.com

STANFORD CONSTRUCTION SERVICES LLC (281) 726-2833 - www.stanfordcontracting.com

STATE FARM INSURANCE - TODD SHIPP* (713) 464-4255 - www.toddshipp.com

STERLING OAKS REHABILITATION

(281) 347-8200 - www.sterlingoaksrehab.com

STEVE FUQUA HOMES

(281) 980-1010 - www.stevefuquahomes.com

STEWART TITLE COMPANY*

(281) 346-1333 - www.stewart.com/houston

STIEBER INSURANCE GROUP LLC*

(281) 341-7141 - www.stieberinsurance.com

STROS INC.

(832) 757-8213

(713) 409-0420 - theadsheet@gmail.com

TURNER DURAN ARCHITECTS, LP TWO MEN AND A TRUCK WEST HOUSTON

(281) 413-6614 - www.prsinsurancesolutions.com (281)-235-0600 - UpCloseMagazine.com

USANA HEALTH SCIENCES

(832) 945-1899 www.thedelaneyatparkwaylakes.com

(713) 865-0229 - www.vanholtenlaw.com

THE GLASER GROUP MCDONALD’S

(281) 533-0040 www.victorsmexicanrestaurant.com

(254) 833-1488 - www.theglasergroup.net

THE GROWLER SPOT

(832) 600-5856 - www.thegrowlerspot.com

THE GYM STATION WEST CINCO* (281) 394-7844 - www.gymstation.com

THE KATY PLUMBING COMPANY

VICTOR’S MEXICAN GRILLE* VINES OF WINE - WINESHOP AT HOME

(602) 300-2888 www.wineshopathome.com/sschlangen

W.A. “ANDY” MEYERS

(281) 646-1700 - www. katyplumbers.com

(281) 238-1400 www.andy.meyers@fortbendcountytx.gov

THE KELLY CLINIC

WADLER PERCHES HUNDL KERLICK

THE LACY TUMBLEWEED GENERAL STORE

WALLIS STATE BANK

THE ORCHARD - ASSISTED LIVING & MEMORY CARE

WAUSON | PROBUS

(281) 828-0675 - www.kellyclinic.net (281) 232-6033

(281) 371-3000 - www.theorchardkaty.com

THE OUGHTNESS GROUP

(281) 391-4132 - www.wphk-law.com (713) 935-3720 - www.wallisbank.com

(281) 242-0303 - www.texbusinesslaw.com

WESTHEIMER LAKES DENTAL

(281) 769-2846 - oughtness.net

(281) 394-7581 www.westheimerlakesdental.com

THE POPCORN SHOP

WESTPARK CHURCH OF CHRIST

(832) 437-7016 - www.thepopcornshops.com

(281) 712-1492 - www.westparkcoc.org

THE SALONS OF FULSHEAR / THE LYME LEOPARD

WESTSIDE GRILL AND FIREPLACE, INC.

(281) 533-9332

THE SPORTS MARKETING COMPANY (832) 945-2220 www.thesportsmarketingcompany.com

THE STRETCH FACTOR

(281) 394-2831 - www.thestretchfactor.com

(281) 392-5535 www.westsidegrillandfireplace.com

WHITE OAKS ON THE BAYOU

(832) 862-3037 - www.whiteoaksevents.com

WORDSERVE CHURCH

(281) 455-5258 - www.wordserve.org

THE SUMMIT FITNESS STUDIO

WORKFORCE RESOURCES/ FAMILY HERITAGE

(832) 978-3809 - www.thesummitfulshear.com

(713) 392-7128 - www.workforcelife.com

THE TUTORING CENTER

WORLD-WIDE TELECOM

(281) 240-0500 www.sunriseseniorliving.com/communities/sunrise-of-cincoranch/overview.aspx

THE UPS STORE 6650

YEN TEPPANYAKI & SUSHI STEAK HOUSE

SUNSET GLASS TINTING

THE WELLPET CENTER VETERINARY HOSPITAL

SUGAR CREEK MONTESSORI SCHOOL FULSHEAR (281) 693-7267 - www.sugarcreekmontessori.com

F UL SHEA R M A GA ZI NE

TEMPERATUREPRO OF FORT BEND

SUGAR LAND SKEETERS

(281) 240-4487 - www.sugarlandskeeters.com

SUNRISE OF CINCO RANCH

(281) 494-7161 - www.sunsetglasstinting.com

SUNSET POOLS, INC.

(281) 693-4896 - www.sunsetpoolsinc.com

SWEET TOOTH SHOPPE INC.*

(281) 533-0477 - www.sweettoothshoppe.com

(832) 606-0013 www.fulshear.tutoringcenter.com (281) 396-4645 www.katy-tx-6650.theupsstorelocal.com

(281) 394-2355 - www.thewellpetcenter.com

THRIVE CHURCH*

(979) 884-7483 - thrivechurch.cc

TODAY’S HEARING, INC.

(281) 578-7500 - www.tohear.com

(281) 346-6200 - www.world-widetelecom.com

(281) 665-3917 - yenhibachi.com

YP-DIGITAL MARKETING SOLUTIONS

(832) 633-6990 - www.marketingsolutions.yp.com


Comprehensive orthopedic care is within reach. At Memorial Hermann, we are leading the way in orthopedics. From evaluation to orthopedic surgery to post-injury rehab, our comprehensive treatment approach puts patients first. The fact is, if you want expertise in orthopedics – you want the specialists at Memorial Hermann Katy Hospital.

Learn more at memorialhermann.org

Fulshear Magazine - Vol 04 No 01  

www.Fulshear.com

Fulshear Magazine - Vol 04 No 01  

www.Fulshear.com