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ENJOY THE

breath-taking beauty

& THE

country lifestyle

OF THE BRAZOS RIVER

Secluded in one of the scenic bends of the Brazos River, Laprada Landing offers an escape from the rigors of the city. Located 40 miles west of downtown Houston, Laprada Landing feels worlds away with dense stands of mature trees and sweeping vistas overlooking the Brazos. The unspoiled, natural beauty of the tracts offers a pristine piece of the rural Texas countryside without having to sacrifice the amenities of city living. Laprada Landing, located just south of Fulshear, is easily accessible from Westpark Tollway and FM 1093. Laprada Landing offers tracts ranging from Âą60 - 105 acres, each with its own unhindered view of the Brazos River. With varying tree coverage, each tract has its own features that set it apart from the others with no two being exactly alike. There is ample opportunity to build and create your own sense of place.


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HWY 99

Interstate 10

Westpark Tollway

FM 1093

FM 723

Stratman Rd

Laprada Trace

(Formerly Montgomery Rd)

r ive

sR zo

Bra

359 HWY

Bois D’Arc Ln

Winner Foster Rd

Secluded in one of the scenic bends of the Brazos River, Laprada Landing offers an escape from the rigors of the city. Located 40 miles west of downtown Houston, Laprada Landing feels worlds away with dense stands of mature trees and sweeping vistas overlooking the Brazos.

Beadle Ln

The unspoiled, natural beauty of the tracts offers a pristine F othe r mrural o r e Texas infor m at i o n cwithout o n tachaving t piece of countryside to BILLamenities BLYTHE of at city (713)living. 829-3465 or sacrifice the Laprada Landing, located just south of Fulshear, easily accessible from D. LEIGH MARTIN atis(713) 835-9839 Westpark Tollway and FM 1093.

Martha Turner

Sotheby’s International Realty


Spring is here and we’re already looking forward to a great summer.

LETTER FROM TH E PUBLISH ER

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As always happens, by the time spring arrives with it’s beautiful “California” weather, we can already feel the hint of summer’s heat. Oh well, this is Texas and as everyone knows, we really have just two seasons: summer and winter. The good news about that is we usually see both several times in the same week – in the winter at least. Spring brings some welcome changes, though. This is the time that we prepare for annual summertime events and family pilgrimages. With great expectations, families will plan their vacation adventures to chosen vacation spots or amusement parks dotted across the country. Whether a day trip, a vacation or a rite of passage to Mickey’s paradise, this is surely the season for family time.

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Photo by Jaclyn Ritter

This is also the time of year when many people move from one place to another. For Fulshear, this means that homebuilders are preparing for summer home sales. It’s a wave of growth that will culminate just prior to the start of school. This, too, is an annual event that is easy to anticipate. Get ready to welcome some new neighbors. Regardless of the season, Fulshear Magazine is proud to be a part of the continuing success and growth in our area. Our writers, photographers, editors and contributors have all determined to bring our readers their best perspective of our area’s most interesting aspects. Whether presenting Fulshear’s “Hacksaw Ridge” connection or introducing you to Mike Hopfe, owner of Fulshear’s new “Ace Hardware”, we have some great information for you to read so that you can learn more about the uniqueness of our area. By the way, we hope that you will join with us in thanking our great advertisers. They make Fulshear Magazine possible by paying the bills. So, please express your thanks in the way that they hope you will – do business with them. After all, they support your community just like you do. On behalf of George Lane and the entire Fulshear Magazine family, please accept our appreciation for reading Fulshear Magazine and making it part of your life. We appreciate your continued readership and encouragement.

By the way, we’re already working on our Fall issue. Have a great summer. Daniel McJunkin

PUBLISHER - FULSHEAR MAGAZINE


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On the Cover

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Photo Credit: iStock.com/olgaIT

Letter from the Publisher

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Fostering

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A Second Chance At Life

Heroes in Our Midst

DANIEL M c JUNKIN Publisher

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Fulshear’s Connection to Hacksaw Ridge

Locally Grown, Locally Known

MAGAZINE STAFF

KATIE MECHAM Art Director

JENNI M c JUNKIN

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Media Director

JACLYN RITTER Editor

Beyond Nuts & Bolts

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SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND Associate Editor

What Is Your “Why?”

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DON M c COY

Chamber Consultant

Arts Fulshear Presents

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The Red Barn Music Festival

Fulshear in the Path of Texas History The Eyes Have It A Cowbow Hat, a Photograph, and a Chinese Delegation

PRODUCTION STAFF

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Bookkeeping

44 48

Simonton’s Place on the World Stage

TRACY MILLER Accounting

JOSEPH SONNIER IT Consultant

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

The Boys Behind the Bar-B-Que

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Miss Hughes Goes to Washington

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Futhering Fulshear’s Philanthropic Future

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Laprada Landing

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STACEY GOOTEE JACLYN RITTER MARCIA SIMMONS SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

A New Style of Country Living

Lemon Chicken & Spaghetti Squash

BONNIE M c FERREN

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BROOKE FATIGANTE PHOTOGRAPHY JEFF HEGER RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY JACLYN RITTER

Spring Recipe

Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce Directory

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FULSHEAR MEDIA PARTNERS, LLC GEORGE LANE & DANIEL M c JUNKIN Principals

WWW.FULSHEAR.COM

FULSHEAR MAGAZINE 281-973-0633

4017 Penn Lane, Fulshear, TX 77441

© Copyright 2017 - Fulshear Media Partners, LLC All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.

Photo by Rhonda Renee Photography

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FOSTERING

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A Second Chance

AT LIFE

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY

Local Rescue Group Gives Dogs

A New Life

Through Foster Program

Katie Wing with Daisy

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Saving Our Own “There is something about the city of Fulshear,” smiles Katie. “It is so community oriented. Fulshear rallies around those in need like I have never seen before.” A perfect example of this, is during the floods of 2016. Houston K911, was responsible for pulling twenty dogs from the flood waters. Katie and her team worked tirelessly to rescue these dogs from the water and find fosters willing to take them in on such short notice. A plea went out on Facebook, asking for extra hands, as well as blankets, crates, and dog food. The response was overwhelming. “It was predominately Caroline Trulock with Frieda

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ulshear, like its big brother to the east, Houston, has a serious problem. For whatever reason, our area has become a dumping ground for dogs. With so few of these dogs having been spayed or neutered, this problem will only continue to grow. Katie Wing and Anna Barbosa have worked with rescue groups for several years together prior to starting their own, Houston K911 Rescue, in February of 2015. While Houston has them busy, they are noticing a real need closer to home. To date, Katie and Anna have helped rescue, rehabilitate, and rehome almost 1,000 dogs. “These dogs have no voice and are unable to change their situation,” says Katie. “We want to step in and help.” Through their rescue group, that relies only on fosters and donations, they are doing exactly that.


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the Fulshear and Weston Lakes communities that stood up and helped. These caring neighbors even helped fund the medicals bills of the dogs that needed extra care.”

FOSTERING

Recently, a Houston K911 volunteer, Caroline Trulock, came across a property in Fulshear that had over 15 dogs on sight. Ten of these dogs were young puppies, three were nursing moms, and two were chained to trees, lying in their own feces. They had no clean drinking water and were surrounded by glass and garbage. These dogs had bruises, scrapes, and cuts due to the fact that they could not protect themselves, let alone get away. Once again, thanks to social media, the news spread and the town took action. “People were outraged and wanted to help in any way they could,” Katie adds. One of those who spoke up was Sylvie Andrews of Fulbrook on Fulshear Creek. Sylvie had seen a picture of Winston, one of the dogs chained to a tree on this particular property, scroll across her Facebook page back in November. He was nothing but skin and bones. “When I saw his picture, I had tears in my eyes,” says Sylvie. “He looked like he had lost all hope. I knew I had to do something.” Sylvie and her husband, Greg, who already have three dogs and a cat of their own, contacted the rescue group and filled out an application to foster Winston. Katie approved the application that very night, and Winston was at the Andrews’ home the next day.

Rescue groups like Houston K911, cannot function without the help of people like Greg and Sylvie Andrews. “We currently have 146 dogs in the program, our highest number to date,” says Houston K911 founder, Katie Wing. “It makes me smile knowing that every single one of those dogs is in a loving home, instead of a shelter. None of this is possible without the help of our devoted fosters.” All fosters must fill out an application and allow a home visit. This is to help Katie, her partner Anna, and board member, Michelle Haberland, match the right dog in need, to that specific home and lifestyle. “We work hard to guarantee a smooth transition for both the dog and the foster family,” adds Katie. “It is important that we set these dogs up for success, not failure.” Houston K911 works closely with rescues in Wisconsin and Washington. When a dog is adopted by a family out of state and are waiting to be transported, Katie is in need of a temporary foster. This is perfect for first-time fosters because it gets them exposed, while having an end date in sight. There are absolutely no out of pocket expenses for fosters. Houston K911 provides a list of numerous partnering vets in the area, and all visits, procedures, and medications are fully covered. In fact, the group even provides, a tag, collar, leash, and crate if needed. Unlike some rescues, fosters with Houston K911 are not required to attend any weekend adoption events. Fosters are only responsible for providing a safe and loving home for these dogs in need. “There is nothing like taking a dog that is broken, or injured, or sick, and watching their transition,” says Katie. Once you experience this, you are hooked. Yes, at times it can be challenging, and even emotional, but in the end, everything is overshadowed by the joy of seeing these dogs transform. This is why many first-time fosters continue. Fosters are the heart of the organization.

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“You could tell Winston had never been in a house before,” notes Greg Andrews. “He was afraid, and yet he still knew he was safe. I could see in his eyes that he was thankful to be given a second chance at life.” In just those first two weeks, Winston had gained fifteen pounds! Greg and Sylvie fostered Winston for five weeks, and in that time, they got him through extreme malnutrition and a severe case of mange. They had given him all the love and assistance he needed to be able to find his forever home.

Why Foster?

(Group L to R) Caroline Trulock with Semper Fi, Sylvie Andrews with Winston, Judy Einbinder with Whitney, Ella Clement with Mia and Daisy.


Meet two of Fulshear’s own!

-Winston -

Winston was found chained to a tree on a property in Fulshear. Extremely malnourished and affected by mange, he had given up hope. Thanks to a post of Facebook, first-time fosters, Greg and Sylvie Andrews, took Winston in and gave him the love and attention he needed. Many neighbors visited and greeted him while out on walks. He quickly became a local celebrity. Winston attached himself to a couple down the road. In fact, he would often “walk” himself between the two houses to get double the love and affection. Just a few weeks later, this couple filled out the adoption form for Winston. While Winston had a rough start, within weeks he was happy, healthy, and loved by his forever family. “We got really attached to him over the five weeks we fostered,” says Sylvie. “But lucky for us, we still get to see him often.”

- November 2016 Winston was tied to a tree emaciated in downtown Fulshear.

-Dais y -

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There was a report that a dog had been hit by a car in downtown Fulshear. She was unable to move and was ultimately left for dead. Houston K911 found her and got her the medical attention she needed. This poor girl, now named Daisy, had broken bones all throughout her back and down to her femur, and literally had to be put back together. Thanks to the skilled doctors at Texas A&M, Daisy underwent major orthopedic surgery. The surgery, however, cost roughly $5,000. Fulshear rallied together and raised 90% of the funds needed to cover the procedure. Fulshear resident, Rhonda Kuykendall, fostered Daisy at the beginning, and helped her get through the worst. Daisy continues to improve through water therapy, high doses of affection, belly rubs, and yummy treats. She is thankful to the city of Fulshear for giving her a second chance at life. Daisy now dreams for a family to call her own. Could it be yours?

Cheryl Osborne, his adopter, Winston, and his foster, Sylvie Andrews.

- October 2016 Downtown Fulshear after being hit by a car and left.

- February 2017 after months of recovery, surgery, and therapy.

All You Need Is Love So often, we hear stories from Houston about starving and injured stray dogs in need of help, but thanks to Katie and Houston K911, we can help those in need right here in Fulshear. This is only possible if more Fulshear families take the leap and become fosters. Katie is known for her resilience and ‘one step at a time’ approach to life. While it is easy for some to get angry, angry at the people who put the dogs in these circumstances, angry at the people who do not spay or neuter their pet, and angry at those who turn their backs to the sad images of dogs in need, Katie instead fights back with determination and love. She is the driving force behind this organization that has improved the lives of so many dogs and humans.

Houston K911 Rescue is a non-profit organization with a mission to address the immediate crisis of animal overpopulation in Houston by rescuing street dogs in poor health and in danger. We provide safe haven and rehabilitation. We place them in loving homes to be fostered and adopted. We turn their lives around. We encourage population control and we strive to be agents of change to raise awareness and to improve the protection and treatment of family pets and the homeless animals in our communities.

HoustonK911Rescue.org HoustonK911rescue@gmail.com

Be sure to check them out on Facebook! Donations can be made via paypal & on their website.

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“The reward, and what I have gotten back from helping these dogs, is something I do not get anywhere else. It is the most fulfilling thing I have ever done in my life,” smiles Katie. “There is no greater love than the love of a rescue dog. And, all our fosters know that these dogs have so much love to give. Every time someone fosters, it truly means that another dog is saved! d


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Unlike any other store in Katy, we sell light fixtures, ceiling fans, decorative hardware, accessories and plumbing. Owned and operated by residents of Katy, we have a true passion for what we do and would be honored to assist you with your project. You will be amazed by the transformation that can take place by adding the proper finishing touches to your home...and we’re here to help.


H EROES IN OUR MIDST

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HEROES IN OUR MIDST

Fulshear’s Connection to Hacks aw Ridge WRITTEN BY SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

Photo of Carl Bentley, courtesy of Houston Chronicle June 29, 2009

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here are shadowed pools in most of our lives that are hidden and deep. Some of us may have experiences and memories that are hard to share, and that are often shrouded in the recesses of remembrances left behind. Carl Briscoe Bentley—lifelong resident of Fulshear, Justice of the Peace for Fort Bend County for over 30 years, municipal judge, and mayor—was one of those who

held a deep pool within. Many of those who have lived in or around Fulshear for some time have their “Carl” stories. Some would say they never saw him without his ubiquitous cowboy hat and boots. Some would run into him at the post office or at Dozier’s, where they might learn some new fact about Fulshear that they didn’t know before. Some have pledged their marriage vows before him as Justice of the Peace. Some were fortunate enough to interview him a time or two over the years.


Carl had a lot of stories to tell. Some were colorfully embellished; all provided entertainment. He loved Fulshear, and he loved the history of his town and of his ancestors. However, there was a side to Carl that many in this small town didn’t know very well. Besides his judgeship, his friendship, and his love of Fulshear history, Carl Bentley had another story to tell.

A Forbidding

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Obstacle The Maeda Escarpment is a 400-foot monolith that stretches five miles across the southern width of the island of Okinawa. With a plateau fortified by pillboxes—concrete or rock fortifications with a hole for an enemy soldier to fire a weapon—and caves that housed Japanese machine guns and artillery, the completely vertical and forbidding sheer cliff was almost impenetrable for American troops. The 307th Infantry of the 77th Division was part of Operation Iceberg—the largest amphibious assault in the Pacific War. An invasion larger than D-Day, Operation Iceberg (which was carried out between April and June of ’45) was also one of the bloodiest battles of World War II. Over 14,000 American soldiers died and another 50,000 were injured. Among the dead was America’s beloved war correspondent, Ernie Pyle. The Japanese fared even worse, losing over 75,000 soldiers and 150,000 local citizens who were forced into suicide missions where surrender was not an option.

Photo Courtesy of Terry Benedict

C arl’s Path to War Carl was taking care of his grandmother’s cotton farm when World War II broke out and, therefore, received a military deferment. After witnessing so many other young men going off to fight the Germans and the Japanese, he felt compelled to join the war effort, as well. Colorblindness kept him out of the Air Corps, which was his first choice. Still, he knew foot soldiers were needed, so he joined the infantry.

As noted before, our soldiers also had to fight against a strategy known as Operation Ketsu-Go—the official policy of defending Japan to the death, where all Japanese men, women, and children participated. The American soldiers who fought for our freedom did not receive participation trophies for their efforts. These men fought for their very lives and the lives of the men around them. Carl Bentley was one of those men.

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As a Browning Automatic Rifleman, he served in the 307th Infantry of the 77th Statue of Liberty Division in the Battle of Okinawa. On April 29, 1945, Carl’s battalion entered a fierce and intense seven-day battle when it launched an assault on the Maeda Escarpment—also known as Hacksaw Ridge.

Okinawa was known by American forces as the HellHole of the Pacific. Forced to sleep in mud and cold rains, soldiers had mud caked in their ears, their noses, and their mouths. They wore the same wet socks for days, drying them off as best they could before putting them and their boots back on their feet. Beyond that, bodies and blood were everywhere. Carl’s grandson, Leigh John Bentley, recalls the stories he heard as a child. “The men literally slogged through blood. Granddad dreamed about that, sometimes.”

Maeda Escarpment - Photo Courtesy of Terry Benedict


H EROES IN OUR MIDST

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Joining the Bat tle In the battle to take Hacksaw Ridge, the 96th Division had been decimated. War records later revealed that their bodies were stacked upon the ridge like cordwood. The 77th Division was called in to take over the fight. Carl’s battalion battled through mortar and artillery fire and, on April 29, they reached the top of the escarpment and dropped ropes back over the side for other soldiers to climb. Nine times in the next seven days, the men were driven off the escarpment by Japanese artillery. The 77th Division estimated that they killed many Japanese in the battle, but the American’s, too, suffered great losses. May 5 was a particularly fierce battle. The battalion had gone up on the escarpment with 155 men in their company. Thirty-three came back down on their own power. The rest were left to die or to the care of one medic. The Japanese goal in the war was to break the morale of the American soldiers and, to this aim, targeting American medics was one of their favorite tactics. To kill a medic was to demoralize the men, for there would be no one with the medical training to keep them from dying.

Returning to

Hacks aw Ridge There were 15,000 men in the 77th Division, but by the time Carl was interviewed in 2003 there were less than 15 who were still alive and who had shared first-hand experience with Desmond Doss. Before filming his documentary, Terry Benedict made a trip to Fulshear to visit with Carl. He invited him, along with Doss, Jack Glover, and Henry Huneken, (all members of the 77th Statue of Liberty Division) to accompany him on a trip back to Okinawa. There were obstacles, Terry said, as all the men were in their 80s, and one or the other would fall ill, and the trip would have to be postponed. Finally, they made the journey to Japan and, there again at Hacksaw Ridge, Carl’s transparent honesty and raw emotions became a part of Benedict’s film. “I don’t like being here,” Carl said. “I don’t like bringing it back to my memory. I would rather not have come, but…” He paused as the memories almost overwhelmed him…”but I felt I had to.” Terry said that “he needed to do it for Desmond.”

In the battle against the Japanese atop the Maeda Escarpment, and with the air full of grenade fragments The 77th platoon’s medic—a and bullets, Carl Bentley was conscientious objector named severely wounded several Desmond Doss, who carried times, receiving shrapnel in his no weapon, but who climbed face and eyes. He received the rope ladder time after time two purple hearts and a bronze to patch up the wounded, star for injuries sustained there. comfort the dying, and carry However, in a kill or be killed those he could to safety—has kind of war, sometimes it’s those been immortalized in the recent invisible wounds that are the Mel Gibson film, Hacksaw worst and the most lasting. At Ridge. According to filmmaker one point in the documentary Terry Benedict, who wrote and film, Carl recounted to Terry a directed a 2004 documentary devastating moment when he about Doss called The and two others were hiding in Harry S. Truman awarding the Medal of Honor to Conscientious Objector and a cave from the Japanese just Desmond Doss. Photo Courtesy of Terry Benedict. who also served as producer outside. One of the GIs was of Hacksaw Ridge, “the story of a medic is a story of severely wounded and was moaning and groaning. carnage. A medic sees the effects of battle, the after Carl and his buddy debated briefly on whether to kill effects, the parts of a soldier that are left over.” the soldier to put him out of his misery and to keep the Japanese from hearing and killing them all. But, they With hundreds of Japanese rifles firing directly at him, couldn’t do it. In what gave a powerful insight into Doss carried men down that mountain. Carl told Carl’s character, he quietly said to Terry, “I’m ashamed Terry Benedict that it “just looked like Desmond was of even thinking about it.” at peace, walking around.” And, according to Terry, Carl would definitely have known. “Carl was one of two men who were lying in a foxhole watching Doss and who knew exactly what they saw.”

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Honoring a Hero

Doss’s Medal of

Seriously wounded, himself, and with thousands of rounds of bullets aimed directly at him, Desmond Doss continued to treat the soldiers of his platoon and, in a single day, saved the lives of 75 men. “It’s as if God had his hand on [Doss’] shoulder,” Carl said. “It’s the only explanation I can give.”

Honor

Desmond Doss was awarded the Medal of Honor by Harry S. Truman in 1945, after Carl Bentley and three other soldiers who served with him wrote letters and affidavits of recommendation on behalf of Doss. “The odds of getting a medal of honor are slim to none,”


said Terry Benedict. These affidavits have to make it all the way up the chain of command until they reach the President of the United States. And, even though Doss didn’t like to refer to himself as an objector but, rather, a “conscientious cooperator,” there have been only two conscientious objectors who ever received the Medal of Honor.

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Terry said he especially loved Carl and his honesty when he opened up about his experiences on that ridge. “His openness, that’s his legacy. That, and his sacrifice…all their sacrifices. That’s the legacy.” Carl Bentley lived a full and active life here in Fulshear. But, one thing his family and friends can tell you—he never completely left behind the battle of Hacksaw Ridge.

On the

Precipice Before Terry Benedict came to visit Carl and invite the men to Okinawa, he called his father to tell him about the documentary he wanted to make. He told him he would like to take some of those men back to Okinawa and to Hacksaw Ridge. His father questioned the soundness of taking old men back up there, but Terry optimistically, and perhaps naively, responded, “What could happen?” Once there, in Okinawa, he found out. Terry wanted to take each man separately up to the ridge to get his honest response. When it was Carl’s turn to go up, they followed a narrow path up the east side of the escarpment called Needle Rock. Carl, in his everpresent cowboy boots and Stetson hat, followed behind Terry. At one point, Terry looked back and did not see Carl. He put down his camera and went back down the rocks to find him, only to see that Carl had slipped off the precipice and was hanging from a bush. Terry grabbed a scraped and bleeding Carl and pulled him to safety.

Photo Courtesy of the Desmond Doss Council Georgia Cumberland Association of Seventh-day Adventist, Inc

“You okay?” “Of course I’m okay,” Carl said. “I just slipped with these cowboy boots. Now, let’s go.” And, of course, Carl never lost his hat. d

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CREDITS: The Conscientious Objector, A Documentary Film by Terry L. Benedict *All Carl Bentley quotes are from the documentary, The Conscientious Objector Killing The Rising Sun by Bill O’Reilly & Martin Dugard www.history.net Battle of Okinawa: The Bloodiest Battle of the Pacific War (Photo of Carl Bentley) Houston Chronicle, June 29, 2009 (Affidavit written by Carl Bentley) (Document can be found at docsteach.org) PFC Carl B. Bentley’s Affidavit Used in Support of the Desmond Doss Medal of Honor; ca. 1945; Records of U.S. Army Operational, Tactical, and Support Organizations (World War II and Thereafter), Record Group 338. National Archives Identifier: 595195 Carl Bentley as a young soldier. Photo Courtesy of Terry Crockett.


LOCALLY GROWN, LOCALLY KNOWN

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Locally

Grown, Locally KNOWN WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY

Beans, Bees, and Birdhouses, Oh My!

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he Fulshear Farmers Market continues to grow as word spreads of the fresh and local goods that can be found there every week. What sets this market apart from others is the fact that it is so diverse. Shoppers are able to buy fruits, vegetables, eggs, meat, easy prep meals, coffee, flowers, pottery, and more, all in one stop. However, I would argue that, the best part of the Fulshear Farmers Market are the vendors, themselves. These men and women work all week preparing their goods, and they then carve out a better part of their Saturdays to be available for their customers– rain or shine! Each and every one of these vendors has a story. After the warm response from our last issue’s article, we could not wait to share three more inspiring stories with our readers. Rosie’s Honey label was designed as a project by graphic art students at Cinco Ranch High School.


Hunter Hamilton - H U N T E R

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COFFEE ROASTER WITH A DREAM To Hunter Hamilton, coffee is not just a quick pick-me-up one drinks in the morning; it is a ritual. “I love coffee,” smiles Hunter. “It is a therapeutic part of my morning.” While completing his studies in North Carolina, Hunter gravitated toward the coffeehouse scene. He appreciates the relational aspect this beverage provides.

“ I L OV E GETTING TO TALK AND CONNECT WITH PEOPLE, WHOM I W O U L D N O T HAVE CROSSED PATHS WITH, IF IT WEREN’T FOR COFFEE. ” Hunter graduated from college with a twenty-year dream of owning his own coffee house. That dream, however, has morphed over the years, due to the realization that there is just no way to compete with the big coffee chains. Hunter has worked to find his own niche in the coffee industry.

Hunter Beans Roasters produces small batch, hand-crafted, single origin, specialty coffee that is roasted locally. Best of all, it is extremely fresh! As a small batch roaster, Hunter roasts on a 1.5 kilo drum roaster and can roast roughly three pounds of coffee at a time. Each batch takes anywhere from 12 to 15 minutes to roast. Hunter currently sells 10 different origin coffees, including Columbian, Kenyan, and Ethiopian, as well as two blends—The Gatherers Blend and the Big Bear Espresso Roast. By using a pour-over technique, also known as manual brew or slow brew, Hunter is able to avoid all the plastic and distorted tastes and, instead, brew nothing but rich, fresh coffee. Having sold at the Fulshear Farmers Market for a little over a year, Hunter has already established his own following. On any given Saturday, a consistent flow of people can be found approaching his tent. Often, Hunter’s regulars are greeted with their “usual” already brewed and ready to go. “My business allows me to get to know my customers, and they get to know me,” says Hunter. “They know they can always count on me to be at the market every Saturday!” Hunter and Johnna, his wife of 15 years, worked for 12 years as Home Teachers at the Brookwood Community—a nearby educational environment for adults with disabilities. With Johnna now overseeing the residential program at Brookwood, Hunter has become stay-athome dad to their two children, 13-year-old daughter Ellie and 9-year-old son Jack. “My wife and I are truly both chasing dreams at the same time.” Hunter adds, “While we sometimes run in parallels, we are always cheering one another on.”

Conroe resident, Susanne Slade, handcrafts all of Hunter’s custom mugs and pour overs.

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With Hunter Beans Roasters brewing the best coffee in town, it will not be long before Hunter reaches his goal of opening his own coffee shop. More importantly, Hunter and Johnna’s two children have grown up watching their parents chase their dreams and, because of this, they have already begun making dreams of their own.


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Rosie McCusker - R O S I E ’ S

HONEY

LOCAL BEEKEEPER BOTTLES NATURE’S SWEETEST GIFT

How does one get into beekeeping? For Rosie McCusker, it was a no-brainer. Rosie grew up in Scotland, the granddaughter of a farmer and the daughter of a hobby beekeeper. She insists beekeeping is in her blood. While Rosie moved to Fulshear in 2000, it was not until 2008 that her interest in the honey business took shape. Thanks to the help of her mother back in Scotland, a very helpful neighbor, and the Fort Bend Beekeepers Association in Rosenberg, Rosie found that her family’s passion was also her passion. As a full-time marketing and recruiting manager with the University of Houston-Victoria at Katy, Rosie McCusker’s days are jam packed. That being said, we all make time for the things that bring us joy, and Rosie is no exception. With the help of her husband, Tom, Rosie currently manages roughly 15 to 20 hives at a time. Rosie’s Honey could not get more local. Located on Bois D’Arc Lane, about one mile from the Fulshear Farmers Market, sits Tom and Rosie’s 11-acre property. A honey’s specific taste comes from the unique combination of nectar sources that bees gather, from as far as two miles away from their hive. With Rosie’s apiary located on her property, surrounded by her picturesque pecan orchard, stretches of lavender, a variety of established fruit trees, and an abundance of wild flowers, her bees are truly foraging on the best that nature offers. “The bees gather pollen and nectar from all of these sources to make my honey,” she smiles. “That is what makes Rosie’s Honey so special.” Sadly, honeybees can now be found on the endangered species list. “The publicity around bees, and their habitat, is diminishing,” says Rosie.

“ T H E Y ARE SUCH HARDWORKING AND FASCINATING CREAT U R E S, T H AT GIVE SO MUCH. HONEY, AS A BYPRODUCT, IS SIMPLY AMAZIN G. I T I S S TRAIGHT FROM NATURE. YOU CANNOT FIND ANYTHING PURER . ” Rosie’s Honey is raw, unfiltered, unpasteurized, and extracted straight from her bee hives here in Fulshear. Unfiltered honey contains traces of pollen that many believe help build an immunity to seasonal allergies. As many know, allergies are all too common in this part of the country. Adding a little local honey to your morning tea or making it a PB&H instead of PB&J could be just what you need to get a little relief this allergy season. Honey is also a natural anti-inflammatory and, generally, promotes overall healing.

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“I am delighted to be following in my mother’s and grandfather’s footsteps,” adds Rosie. While they may be continents away from one another, they enjoy sharing bee yard stories and swapping secrets. Rosie’s bees are spoiled. They get to feast on Fulshear’s finest plants and flowers. But, there is no denying that three generations of care and love—for bees and their honey—is really what puts Rosie’s Honey so delicious.


Dennis Dietrich

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FINDING PURPOSE AND PASSION AFTER RETIREMENT After years of working, retirement is the time when hobbies and other interests can really take off. In 2007, Dennis Dietrich retired from Texas Instruments, where he had worked for 15 years building “clean rooms.” Now that he had so much free time, Dennis was uncertain how to go about filling his days. “I had to find something to do,” says Dennis. “I couldn’t just sit around all day.” That is when he began tinkering around with scrap pieces of wood.

“ I F O U ND MYSELF BUILDING BIRD HOUSES. I HAVE ALWAYS LOVED B I R D S, S O I T WA S A NATURAL FIT.” WHILE THIS NEW HOBBY STARTED SMALL, I T Q U I C K LY GREW, AND HIS PIECES ONLY GOT BIGGER AND MORE INTRICAT E . In a workshop in Orchard, Texas, Dennis can be found surrounded by birdhouses in various stages of completion. More often than not, he is working behind the saw, carefully carving logs out of cedar. Every piece starts with a sketch and a detailed vision. On average, it takes Dennis three days to complete one birdhouse. His favorite piece to date—a big red barn with 16 compartments for purple martins—took almost an entire week to finish. “You can’t make the same birdhouse every time,” adds Dennis. “You have to have variety.” Over the last few years, Dennis has gotten creative with his birdhouses. He has crafted barns, schools, churches, windmills, and even a castle. Some are on stands, some hang, some are painted, while others are left natural. All of them, however, have been carefully constructed to allow for easy clean out. In fact, Dennis is known to do custom orders. He recalls one time, in particular, when he created an exact replica of a couple’s home.

Dennis is a family man. He and his wife, Mary, have two sons, four grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren. Many of them can be seen helping with setup and teardown at the Fulshear Farmers Market every Saturday morning. “My wife was always there for me,” smiles Dennis. “She was my biggest supporter.” She enjoyed his birdhouses, often reserving her favorites for their own yard. Mary’s love was unwavering, even while Dennis was ill and awaiting two new kidneys. After four-and-a-half years on the transplant list, he finally got the call in 2000. To this day, Dennis is only one in four people in the state of Texas to receive a double kidney transplant.

Dennis’ lifelong love of birds turned into a hobby, that later grew into a passion. As many of his regulars at the Farmers Market know, each piece is unique and has its own story. Many shoppers buy a birdhouse, not only for themselves, but to give as a gift. Dennis’ masterpieces can be found displayed all over the United States of America. d

T H E F U LSHEAR FARMERS’ M ARKET 2 0 3 5 B O I S D ’ A R C L A N E • F U L S H E AR, TX E V E RY S AT U R D AY 9 A M - 1 P M

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Three years ago, it was Dennis’ turn to repay the favor. Up until his wife lost her battle with cancer, he remained by her side. It was then that Dennis’ son built a workshop next to his own, so his father could be close by and continue with his love of building birdhouses. Dennis did exactly that, however, every year since, he has donated several birdhouses to charities in honor of his late wife.


BEYOND NUTS & BOLTS

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BEY ND

NU S &

B L S Local ACE HARDWARE Lives Up to Its Name by Providing Exceptionally Helpful Service

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY

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ce is the place when it comes to quality products and quality customer service. Fulshear resident, Mike Hopfe, is the proud owner of Fulshear Ace Hardware, located on FM359, along the main stretch of town. Since its opening on November 29, 2016, area residents have welcomed this much-needed addition to Fulshear. In a short time, Mike and his wife, Allison, have made Ace Hardware a warm and welcoming place

to shop. Not only has the town embraced the store, but the store has embraced the town, and specifically caters to the needs of the people in it.

DREAMING BIG At an early age, Mike knew he wanted to own his own company. Over the years, he had the opportunity to work for multiple, diverse companies, all laying the groundwork for the day he would be able to open the door of his own. “I grew up on three acres about four miles from here,” says Mike. “My two brothers and I spent most days just exploring the area. We would go down to Buffalo Bayou to fish and explore the woods and adjacent lakes.” While attending Katy High School, Mike was a part of the water polo team and swim team, as well as an active member of Future Farmers of America (FFA). Through FFA, Mike raised steers, chickens, and pigs. “I was also in the calf scramble at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. I caught a calf and was able to raise a Brangus heifer that I ended up showing around the state of Texas. It was a great experience.” Mike had a wholesome and all-American upbringing.


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International Business from the University of St. Thomas in Houston. Unlike environmental and safety, business and marketing offered an opportunity for more creativity, rather than science. This is what drew Mike to the unexpected career shift.

Originally studying Radio, Television, and Film at Sam Houston State University, Mike quickly realized the long and hard road that the broadcasting industry requires before one could make a stable income. Having always had an interest in the sciences, Mike switched majors and earned a BS in Environmental Science. Shortly after graduation, Mike married his college sweetheart, Allison. Mike worked in the environmental safety field for roughly 10 years, moving in and around the Houston area, while he and Allison raised two kids, Caitlin and Will. During his years with the oil company, Pennzoil, Mike discovered an interest in business and marketing. The company funded Mike’s MBA in

“I love to learn,” adds Mike. “When I look back and think about the various job changes I have made over the years, it was always because I had stopped learning, and I did not feel fulfilled.” In hindsight, Mike knows that it was all a part of the plan. With environmental and safety experience, he learned structure, as well as the acknowledgement and importance of detail. International business allowed him to explore the creative side of his brain, learn how to develop business strategy, manage a group, and see fast results. It is only now that he is ready to tackle his third and, final, career—his lifelong dream of owning his own company.

IT ALL BEGINS WITH AN IDEA While Mike knew he wanted to start a business, he was not sure what it was going to be. “I knew it had to be a product-based business,” he says. “I love selling products that I am excited about.” After he and his wife, Allison, spent months brainstorming, Allison suggested an Ace Hardware. Mike declined, assuming that it, like many other business possibilities they brainstormed,

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Mike fondly remembers what Fulshear was like when he was growing up. Because it was so small, there was not much reason to venture this way. As a teenager, Mike worked as a busboy at Womack’s House, a local restaurant that was located where Jump Start Daycare sits today. “My family would occasionally drive into Fulshear for BBQ and beef jerky over at Dozier’s,” Mike remembers fondly. “Nothing has changed. It looks the same, and the food tastes the exact same – awesome!”


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was a centrally-owned corporate business. After more research, Mike was pleased to learn that Ace Hardware stores are independently owned and, therefore, allow owners more flexibility and customization. In February of 2015, Mike settled on Ace Hardware. “I like the company and what it stands for – helpful customer service, quality brands, and convenient locations.” He adds, “Of course I like hardware, but, most of all, I love working with customers and all that comes with running a business.” Once Mike had settled on the what, it was time to consider the where. “This was the easiest part; there was no question, it had to be in Fulshear.” The Hopfe family moved to Fulshear in 2010, and they already have a pride of being a part of the Fulshear community. “I like the sense of town Fulshear has. The city has its own rich history, water tower, schools, a developing downtown center, organized business community, and an active chamber of commerce. And what about the Christmas lights the city strings up across the road? All of these things contribute to that small-town appeal.” What started as just a dream and an idea quickly manifested into an exciting reality. Located in the heart of downtown Fulshear, Ace Hardware made a splash on its much-anticipated opening day.

WHAT SETS

ACE HARDWARE APART?

With big box hardware stores nearing Fulshear city limits, it is important to note that Fulshear Ace Hardware is in a league of its own. As compared to the larger competitors, Ace Hardware is more conveniently located, easier to navigate, and more unique to the town, itself. Ace is also known for its superior customer service. Most of the employees at Fulshear Ace Hardware live in the Fulshear and Simonton area. Originally a team of eight, they have recently reached 18 employees and are still growing. “We’ve got a really strong team that we are very proud of,” says Mike. “They are all very knowledgeable and can help customers find specific items at the store or online, recommend products, and sometimes even solve your DIY project problems. I genuinely believe people have a need for convenience and helpful service, and that is what we strive to provide each and every time you walk in our door.”

While Mike does not own the building itself, or the property, he is in full control of the company. Because of this, there are so many things Mike and his team have authority to do that the big box competition cannot. There have been numerous times when customers find items in our store that they cannot find elsewhere. In other cases, when customers have asked for the same item that is not carried in the store, Mike simply adds it or orders it for the individual customer. These customers are pleasantly surprised when they see these items on the shelf during their next visit. “We have roughly 17,000 different items in the store, but we have access to over 85,000. If we do not carry it, it is very likely we have access to it and can order it for you, with no shipping cost.”

THIS IS FULSHEAR’S ACE HARDWARE.

This is apparent from the moment you walk in the door. “We have the flexibility of customizing the store around the community and even influencing the architecture of the building,” smiles Mike. Allison Hopfe, who oversees the frequented Main Street Home and Gifts section of the store, lines the shelves with special one-of-a kind items, as well as beautifully crafted seasonal items. “We have equestrian themed items, alligator heads, and items showcasing our Texas pride.” More than that, Mike and Allison are huge supporters of all things local. Near the register customers can find Hunter Beans Roasters coffee, Fulshear Soaps, and Fulshear Honey, which aside from nuts and bolts, is the most frequently purchased item in the store. “My favorite thing about this job is spending time with the customers. I like knowing the people I do business with.” Mike adds, “we already have regulars that we know by name.” He proves that working close to home is a real blessing. Not only is it an easy commute, but he gets to do business with neighbors and friends. “Most of the time, in suburban areas, the community is built around the neighborhood. “Fulshear is a rare exception,” says Mike. “Here, the community is built around the town.” Mike is pleased that the people of Fulshear have welcomed and supported him and his new business. “I am so grateful to be a part of this town, and I fully intend to use my business as an instrument to serve the community in other ways.” d

ACE HARDWARE (281) 533-8571

8411 FM 359 RD • FULSHEAR, TX 77441


What is Your

WH AT IS YOUR “WH Y?”

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“Why?” iron Tribe Fitness helps its members find

t h e b e s t v e r s i o n o f t h e m s e lv e s WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY

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hen looking to get into shape, the important question that you need to ask yourself is why. Why now? Local fitness facility, Iron Tribe Fitness, asks this very question of each of their members. Whether your “why” is to set a good example for your children, to be available to those who count on you, to fit into your old jeans, or lower your cholesterol, Iron Tribe is determined to help you reach your goals. “We are not about who is the fastest, fittest, or strongest,” says Iron Tribe’s Chief Operating Officer, Jeremy Browning. “It is about finding the healthiest version of yourself.”

Jeremy considers himself lucky to have had the opportunity to watch these three men grow from a garage, to what is now one of the top recognized fitness programs in the country - Iron Tribe Fitness. “They truly inspired me,” smiles Jeremy. “They found our space in the health and fitness industry.” In fact, Jeremy was so inspired, he partnered with his friend, Lee Adams, and together are on track to open six franchise locations by 2021.

The Road to the Top

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Iron Tribe is ranked one of the top five workouts in the country. This comes of no surprise to those in the Fulshear and Katy area who have already tried it. Located on Spring Green Blvd., just west of Kroger, Iron Tribe Fitness opened its doors on May 2nd, 2016. Very quickly, this location proved to be the fastest growing site to date. This is largely due to owners Jeremy Browning and Lee Adams. They stand behind the business, and therefore, are excited to share it with others. It was during his time coaching baseball at the University of Montevallo, in Alabama, that Jeremy witnessed something extraordinary. Two gentlemen on the school’s baseball team, Jim Cavale and Matt White, had just partnered with a man by the name of Forrest Walden, who had a new vision for the fitness industry. Tired of big box gyms and repetitive workout videos, Forrest, Jim, and Matt, developed an innovative fitness and nutrition program.

What Sets Iron Tribe Apart? These fast paced, 45-minute, high intensity interval training (HIIT) group classes, allow members to get in a great work out, and get on with their day. “It is the most fun and effective 45 minutes of your day,” chuckles Jeremy. Each class is capped at 20 people, allowing the two functional fitness coaches leading the class to better monitor, educate, and assist each member.


Safety is very important to the staff at Iron Tribe. Every member is required to take a Power Prep 101 class. This six-day class stresses the importance of technique and form. Being educated helps prevent injury. With members ranging in age from 15 to 70 years young, the fitness trainers emphasize modifying certain exercises. Whether you need to modify up or down, it is important to listen to your body and not overdo it. The classes are intended to always be fun, effective, and most importantly, safe.

Iron Tribe Goes Above & Beyond Active member, Captain McCoy, of the Fulshear Police Department, knows firsthand that Iron Tribe is out of the ordinary. “Iron Tribe is not just a place to go and work out, it is full service. They help with technique, nutrition, and combating injury,” says Captain McCoy. “You are not just a number here,” Jeremy adds. “We know your story, your concerns, and your ‘why.’” While they are not licensed nutritionists, the Iron Tribe team educates its members on healthy eating. They emphasize the need for good quality, whole foods in our daily diet. Going above and beyond, the team is known to go grocery shopping with members, helping them make educated decisions when it comes to filling their carts.

helped me modify my workouts to avoid aggravating my prior injuries, while still strengthening my core, and taking pressure off my back. In a few short months, my back pain was gone! It is amazing, they truly want to see you do well.”

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With Iron Tribe, the results are guaranteed. That is, if you are ready to make the changes that are required to get you there. The amazing results are not the only reason people join and stay at Iron Tribe. With a cap at only 300 members at each location, the facility will never get too crowded. This leads to a more intimate, family-like setting. Everyone supports one another on their journey toward their own personal milestones. “The group setting motivates you to keep going back.” Captain McCoy continues, “If I miss class, I know I am going to hear about it. They all hold me accountable. I don’t want to disappoint family.” Family is right. Any spectator that walks into the facility can see just how close the group has become in such a short time. They are reaching their individual goals as a team, a tribe.

Making YOU a Priority While we are all busy, it is important to make your health a priority. “Busy is a mindset,” notes Jeremy. “If you cannot find 45 minutes a day to help you prolong your life, where is your priority?” Jeremy loves seeing his members improving their health, reaching their goals, and finding their confidence. “The greatest gift God gave us is our health.” If you are your best self, you will feel better, and therefore, be a better parent, spouse, employee, and friend. What you do in those 45 minutes affects not only your waistline, but every aspect of your life. Iron Tribe wants you to invest in YOU! d

Through healthy eating and effective exercise, numerous members have seen a drastic improvement in their health. “I have had a bad back for a very long time,” says Captain McCoy. “The Iron Tribe trainers have

(281) 303-5671

9555 Spring Green Blvd., Suite F • Katy TX, 77494

Nationwide, Iron Tribe works for Never Thirst, an international nonprofit Christian organization dedicated to bringing clean and living water to the poor. Annually, Iron Tribes across the nation host a “Workout for Water.” In 2016, our local Iron Tribe raised $14,400 for the cause. This helped provide four clean drinking water wells in four different countries!

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Iron Tribe is all about results. In fact, if you take a peek at their Facebook page you will see them proudly display members’ before and after pictures. However, results are not just your number on a scale. It is how you feel, it is getting to do things you could not before, it is about seeing positive changes in your mind and body.


TH E RED BARN MUSIC FESTIVAL

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s

ent s e r p

The Red Ba rn

M u s i c F e s t i va l

WRITTEN BY MARCIA SIMMONS PHOTOGRAPHY BY BROOKE FATIGANTE PHOTOGRAPHY

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on’t pack up that rodeo wear yet. On Saturday, October 28, join Arts Fulshear at the Red Barn at the Red Potato Market in Simonton for music by Grammy winner Rick Trevino. It promises to be an evening of great Americana music by two of the best entertainers in the business. Trevino began his recording career in 1993 with Columbia Nashville with the release of “Just Enough Rope,” followed by a self-titled album a year later that reached certified gold sales. He charted fourteen singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart, and has recorded seven studio albums, including his most recent release, “Cowboys like Me” from the Long Coyote Gone album. Opening for Trevino is Dean Seltzer, who describes his music as “high energy redneck rock n roll.” Critics praise Seltzer’s original lyrics and “tell it like it is” performance style. Both Seltzer and Trevino are Austin-based.

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Arts Fulshear promises a fun evening with these two talented performers. Look forward to food trucks, and beer and wine in the Barn, and local favorite Anthonie’s Market Grill next door; come early and stay late. Debra Sabrasula, co-owner of the Red Potato Market, says, “Lori [Cuthbertson] and I are thrilled to be able to provide a venue for such a great event, and excited to see someone offering music in the area.” Arts Fulshear credits their growth over the past six years to being blessed with some of the most innovative and creative thinkers in the area as Board members, staff, teaching artists and volunteers. The best part of the variety of events and classes offered by Arts Fulshear, according to staff members, is the opportunity to work with new and talented professionals. Executive Director Marcia Simmons is joined in the effort to put on such a large event by friend Singer/songwriter Dean Seltzer

Singer/songwriter Rick Trevino

Scott Witt of Fulshear House Concerts, who met with Simmons more than a year ago to discuss potential collaborations. Witt introduced Simmons to Fulshear resident Brooke Fatigante, owner of an established photography, entertainment and promotion company. Fatigante, who works with the likes of Merle Haggard, Randy Rogers, Roger Creager and many more, will promote the event and assist in all aspects of marketing, photography and production. The Arts Fulshear Board of Directors, led by Fulshear Run developer Doug Konopka, hopes to expand the festival next year to several venues over a day or weekend. Plans are already in the works for an April concert, and Fatigante and Simmons are brainstorming ways to connect professional musicians with local children through Arts Fulshear’s children’s programming. The “Red Barn Festival” is a fundraiser for Arts Fulshear, a 501c3, whose mission is to create opportunities that enrich the community through equal access to the arts. Arts Fulshear provides education, connections, and exposure through programming and events with the goal of building a permanent visual and performing arts center that will act as the foundation of creative growth in our community. d Tickets are available online through www.artsfulshear.org. General Admission starts at just $25 advanced ticketing, and $35 at the door. Sponsorships and reserved tables and seats are available, as is VIP parking. For more information, go to the website or call 281-533-4109.


FULSH EAR IN TH E PATH

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FULSHEAR IN THE PATH OF

WRITTEN BY SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND

March 1836 A Courier has just left us, after bringing us a dispatch from General Houston. We’re to leave! All the people are to leave! Colonel Travis and the boys at the Alamo have been slaughtered. Every last one of them. President Burnet’s cabinet has gone to Harrisburg. Houston is in retreat toward the Sabine. Santa Anna and his armies are sweepin’ eastward from San Antonio. According to Father, all those Mexicans comin’ this way are virtually unopposed. We gather what few personal things we can grab, but we’re in such a hurry most everything is left behind. We leave at sunset, hauling clothes, bedding, and whatever we can grab to pile on the wagon with our one yoke of oxen. We even leave our dishes unwashed on the table. Mother and I walk, she with the baby in her arms. Brother drives the oxen. Father rides the horse. Little sister is too sick to walk. Everyone we know is headed for the Sabine, and our homes are gonna sit here abandoned. Houses stand open, beds unmade. Pans of milk are molding in the dairies. Household goods are scattered all along the road. But, we know we have to get away from the Mexicans and the Indians. We can’t delay. We join with all the other families and their negroes, camping and sharing what food we have left. We brought some beef with us, but it spoiled, and we threw it away the first day. We have little to eat. One of the boys in our camp killed a turkey, and we ate that.

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The tall grass prairie is a scene of chaos. The skies send sheets of cold, heavy rains upon us. All the rivers and creeks are filled from bank to bank, and it takes us a full day to get the wagons across the Brazos with horses and oxen. We know there are many more rivers still to cross. Roads are muck and sludge, and we stagger waist deep in mud. This morning, two women with five children with bundles of clothing on their heads came up to our campsite. Their husbands were killed in the Alamo and they, too, were trying to go east. Measles, sore eyes, whooping cough, and every other disease that man, woman, or child is heir to breaks out among us. Those who die are buried right where they fall. Even, today, my little sister who was so sick she had to ride in the wagon has died. The promise of our Texian victory has come to an end. We have lost. Our hope is gone.*


For the Texans, the time between the fall of the Alamo on March 6, 1836 and the Battle of San Jacinto on April 21 was one of intimidation and dread; of widespread hunger, sickness, death; and of perceived atrocities inflicted on settlers by a vengeful Mexican army. The Runaway Scrape is barely an afterthought in the pages of Texas history. Memorable quotes from the larger war, like “Remember the Alamo!” or “Come and Take it!” refer to the courageous soldiers who ran headlong into bloody battles….not to the settlers who fled in terror. One might question the flight versus fight response and ask, “Why did all those people run? Why didn’t they fortress up?“

“ Why didn’t they stay to fight? “ The truth is, however, that our forefathers at the Alamo had just been annihilated, and the early colonists who heard about the siege and fall of the fortress did not know how this war would turn out. Frightened for their lives and for the lives of their children, these early Texans chose to run. On March 12 came news of the fallen mission and the death of Colonel William B. Travis and his brave fighters. Upon hearing of the massacre, Sam Houston—who had been elected at the 1833 Convention to serve

as Commander in Chief of the Texan army—chose to retreat toward the Sabine River, which forms a boundary between Texas and Louisiana. This action marked the beginning of a large-scale evacuation of the Texas population, known as the Runaway Scrape. Houston knew that his army was unprepared to face the starkly superior Mexican army; in order to have time to whip his men into fighting shape, he chose a series of strategic retreats to organize and train his troops.

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A dispatch from General Houston advised settlers to immediately leave their homes in search of safety. Frantic colonists from all over Texas began to leave everything they owned behind and flee from impending danger. As soldiers made the journey east, many burned their own homes to prevent anything falling into the Mexicans’ hands. Some families gave up the flight and cowered with their children in the bottomland canebrakes along the Brazos River. A prolonged drought had plagued the Texas settlers in 1835, but now the rains came in torrential downpours. Because of cold, rain, hunger, and disease, many refugees sickened and died. The rivers caused particular danger. One woman and her two children rode a horse that bolted at a swollen creek and plummeted into the raging water. Horrified refugees on the opposite bank could only watch as horse, mother, and children were swept under the swift current.

- The Alamo -

Photo Credit: iStock.com/ Dean_Fikar

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The Runaway Scrape


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- Families traveling to find safety A soldier later recalled the conditions he witnessed: “Delicate women trudged…from day to day until their shoes were literally worn out, then continued the journey with bare feet, lacerated and bleeding at almost every step. Their clothes were scant, and with no means of shelter from frequent drenching rains and bitter winds, they traveled on through the long days in wet and bedraggled apparel. The wet earth and angry sky offered no relief.”

FULSHEAR in the Path

While maps show a variety of routes taken by the advancing Mexican army, we can be fairly certain that the Fulshear area was on the route of both the Mexicans and the Texan soldiers. At Fort Bend, Wyly Martin attempted to prevent the Mexican army from crossing the Brazos River. When Martin and the Texans learned that 1,500 Mexican soldiers had crossed nearby at Thompson’s Ferry, they, too, had to retreat.

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Randolph Foster was one of the Old 300 settlers whose plantation was in the John Foster grant that lay between what is now FM 359 and FM 723 just south of Fulshear. He was a member of Martin’s Company and, from William Harris Wharton’s account, we ascertain that the Company “camped on the night of the 11th at Churchill Fulshear’s.” Churchill Fulshear’s plantation lay on the north side of the Brazos River in what is now Fulshear township. Rose Dilue Harris recalled her own family’s horrors during the Runaway Scrape, which were later published in the Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association. In her memoir, she mentions Churchill Fulshear: “Mr. Roark said uncle had been sent two days before the battle with Messrs. Church Fulcher, and Wash Secrest to watch General Cos.” Mrs. Harris’ uncle James Wells made a narrow escape from being captured by the Mexicans. “When he and Messrs. Secrest and Fulcher were run into the bottom, his horse ran against a tree and fell down, and uncle was badly

hurt.” (The narrative of Robert Hancock Hunter also mentions encounters with Fulshear and Wells during the Runaway Scrape.) Family history of the late Carl Bentley, long-time judge and resident of Fulshear (see article on page 18 of this issue), revealed that Sam Houston had asked Randolph Foster to escort settlers to the east. “Just show them the river,” was the way Carl liked to say it. The Bentley family also have on record that, under Sam Houston’s orders, Randolph Foster helped Deaf Smith—a hero of the Texas Revolution—to destroy Vince’s Bridge near Harrisburg. This kept the Mexican army from actually retreating when Sam Houston made his final military offensive into the Mexican camp. Records vary among historians and descendants, but Randolph Foster apparently took steps to secure his family in a safe place while he served in Martin’s Company. His wife, Lucy, also apparently fed many refugees, gave them blankets, and helped them to salvage whatever they could. We also know from the obituary of Lucretia Collatinus Foster Maye’s (“Mama Crece”)—Randolph’s daughter and one of Fulshear’s oldest and most beloved residents—that “when a little over two months of age, [she] had to retreat with her parents from the Brazos before the mighty Mexican army until the battle of San Jacinto rid Texas forever of these invaders and despots.”

From Victims to

VICTORS Sam Houston’s retreat toward the Sabine and away from the Mexican army earned him a great deal of scorn from the Texas rebels. However, on April 21 at San Jacinto, General Houston—with the famous cry of “Remember the Alamo!”—led his 783 troops in a stunning victory over the entire Mexican force.


With that victory, the Runaway Scrape was over.

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Rose Dilue Harris wrote about it this way: “When the rider got near enough for us to understand what he said, it was ‘Turn back! The Texans have whipped the Mexican army and the Mexicans are prisoners. No danger! No danger! Turn back.’” Almost as soon as it began, the Runaway Scrape became a footnote in Texas history: “The Texans had, in a single day, transformed themselves from victims to victors… Almost before the episode was over, it was relegated to the fine print of history.” (Texas Monthly, 1989). d

CREDITS: *Dramatization by author of various personal diaries and journals of participants in the Runaway Scrape. Noah Smithwick, an early pioneer to Texas and a contributor of Memoirs to the Texas Historical Commission. Steve Goodson tamu.edu. Mrs. Dilue Rose Harris. Her recollections were published in the Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association. History of Fort Bend County. Clarence R. Wharton . “A Hard Lot”: Texas Women in the Runaway Scrape East Texas Historical Journal. Vol 29. Issue 1. Stephen L. Hardin.

The Handbook of Texas Online. TSHA. Archaeological Report No. 13 (1998). 41 WH 91, Wharton County. A campsite of the Retreating Mexican Army April 1836. March 13: This Day in History. The History Channel. Gordon Leigh Briscoe’s records of Randolph Foster & Lucy Ruffin Hunter—from The Old Foster Community Museum. Lucretia Collatinus Foster, obit. Carl Briscoe Bentley, descendant of Randolph Foster. From his reminiscences & family historical records. Wagon Wheel Photo Credit: iStock.com/ paronsuren

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The Narrative of Robert Hancock Hunter.


THE EYES

HAVE IT

TH E EYES H AVE IT

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WRITTEN BY STACEY GOOTEE

Most of “our generation” that has no need for corrective lenses sees the world of print in this way. As we age our visual acuity decreases. Aging is just something we can’t escape; we wrinkle, get grey hair, aches and pains and for some of us our vision declines.

I

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

was born with great vision. It was 20/20 my whole life - that is, until I began reaching a “certain age.” Then, I had to extend my arm a bit to read things or increase the font size on texts and my Kindle books. Finally, when my arm could no longer reach the go-go gadget range, I had to give in and get reading glasses from the local pharmacy. At first, I only needed them to read books for extended periods. Now, I can’t even grocery shop or work on the computer without putting on my readers. I’m noticing the older I get, the worse my vision becomes.

staying at the forefront of this rapidly developing field of medicine.

The doctors at Whitsett Vision Group work tirelessly to help patients in my situation overcome this visual challenge as well as many others. Jeffrey C. Whitsett, MD founded the practice that bears his name over twenty years ago. Since its inception, the Whitsett Vision Group has become recognized as a world-class surgery center and clinical research center for new devices, procedures and medicines. The practice’s scope reflects Dr. Whitsett’s own clinical and research DR. JEFFREY WHITSE TT interests: custom cataract That’s the bad news. The good news is that vision surgery, multifocal and accommodating lens implants, correction for my generation is one of the fastestLASIK and other vision correction procedures, as well as developing fields of medicine. As the millions of Baby the treatment and management of glaucoma. Almost Boomers in this country have advanced, first into the from the beginning, Dr. Whitsett began partnering with “reading glasses stage,” then into cataract age, they manufacturers and regulatory groups to participate in have demanded better solutions for their age-related clinical trials of revolutionary new technologies, many of vision loss. What’s more, the expansion of home which went on to become industry standards. computers, smart phones, and tablets into every facet of our lives means far more demands are placed on our close-up vision than people of our parents’ generation. When reading glasses are no longer just for reading the morning paper, but for the dozens of times a person checks email or text messages in a day, those glasses become more of an annoyance.

Dr. Whitsett has surrounded himself with a team of doctors with a similar PASSION for patient care and new technology.

The past two decades have seen a revolution in surgical vision correction. New devices and procedures are appearing on the market, all with the same goals: safety, improved vision, and reduced (or no) dependence on corrective lenses, for the 45-65 age group. For that reason, patients in this age group are well-advised to seek out a vision care provider that is committed to

Among them is Dr. Jesse McKey, who shares Dr. Whitsett’s vision for improving patient care through clinical trials, innovations and looking toward the future. Dr. McKey’s research interests include next-generation diagnostic tools such as iTrace® and the ORA System®. iTrace is a revolutionary diagnostic tool that was developed by


Tracey Technologies, a Houston-based company. It is utilized by surgeons to assist in mapping the eye before cataract and other lens surgeries. iTrace gives the surgeons more accurate data about the patient’s eye structures than previously available, allowing for more customization and more successful outcomes.

DR. JESSE M C KEY

JEFFREY C. WHITSETT, M.D. - CYBELE C. WOON, M.D. DAVE C. FU, O.D. - JESSE B. MC KEY, M.D.

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Dr. Whitsett has seen some incredible changes in this field of medicine in the decades that he has been in practice. When asked about the technology available today, and how it differs from what was available when he first performed cataract surgery, his answer was simple: “A major difference is in the lens implants that are available. Up until the early 2000s, the only choice was a single-focus lens implant. What that meant was that many patients could achieve good distance vision after cataract surgery, but would always be dependent on reading glasses for near vision. (If the patient had astigmatism, they would likely need bifocal glasses.) These days, we have toric lens implants for correcting astigmatism, and multifocal and accommodating implants for near vision, meaning that many patients can obtain great vision in the distance as well as close-up, without being dependent on glasses or contacts.” The lens implants are just one of the technologies that Dr. Whitsett and his team have been able to help bring to this country through clinical trials. He explained a bit about the process, “We were fortunate to be part of the FDA clinical trial for a new implantable lens known as Tecnis Symfony®. Symfony is an improvement over the multifocal lenses that were previously available. Multifocal lenses can offer good near, middle, and distance vision for many patients, but they had a few drawbacks. Some patients complained of glare from light sources. Others mentioned that they had good vision at very close range, very long range, and certain middle ranges, but would have blurry vision ‘in between’ those focal points.” Dr. Whitsett further explains the new lens. “Symfony is known as an Extended Range of Focus lens, and is the first of its type to be available in this country. It can provide the same sharp near, middle, and far vision of a multifocal lens, while reducing the intermediate blurriness and glare. Symfony received FDA approval last summer, and we were actually honored to be chosen as the first center in the Houston area to implant this new lens after final FDA approval.”

WHITSETT VISION GROUP OFFICE IN KATY

WWW.WHITSETTVISION.COM (713) 365-9099 KATY | 23510 Kingsland Blvd. Suite 200, KATY SPRING BRANCH | 1237 CAMPBELL ROAD, HOUSTON

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As innovators and leaders in vision correction surgery, the doctors at Whitsett Vision Group are focused on their patients’ needs and plan to continue seeking best treatment options for their patients through this ever-changing field. d


Jim Fatheree C A N D I D AT E F O R F U L S H E A R City Council Member at Large

• May 6, 2017 •

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seemingly short thirty years ago, the VIA and Cinco Ranches, just west of Highway 6 and the Addicks Reservoir, consisted of prairies and streams and were run primarily as cattle and farming operations. Two developers with financing from local investors and lenders purchased the property with the intention of creating the master planned communities of Cinco Ranch and Grand Lakes. I was fortunate enough to have participated in these projects especially in the negotiations of the master drainage agreement which resulted in a comprehensive coordinated plan. Existing only at that point in the imagination of the developers was the Grand Parkway, Cinco Ranch Boulevard, and the extensions to Fry and Peek Road. Fortunately, I have seen those ideas come to fruition. This experience emphasized to me that drainage and mobility are two issues that require perpetual planning and thought by city officials in coordination with developers and other local government agencies. Now, imagine replicating similar or greater population growth as that of Grand Lakes and Cinco Ranch within Fulshear and its surrounding extra territorial jurisdiction (ETJ). The growth will happen. There is demand for property in our area because of its prime location, quality school districts, and exceptional demographics. However, location has no benefit if there is poor and inadequate drainage. Location has no benefit without sufficient and efficient mobility. Our citizens need to be able to travel to work and schools safely in a reasonably timely manner and be confident their property is safe from flooding. I believe health, safety, drainage, and mobility are the main responsibilities of local government and its representatives. My ancestor Thomas Rice came to Fort Bend County in August of 1836. He brought his family here to seek fresh opportunities and to escape the heavy hand of local government he had experienced in New England. He later lost his life in the Dawson Massacre at Salado Creek in September 1842 defending the rights he had sought in coming to the Republic of Texas. To continue his legacy as your representative in our local government, I plan to focus on health, safety, drainage, and mobility and not on arbitrary and unnecessarily costly ordinances that stymie growth and infringe on property rights and natural liberty. City government should help, not hinder its citizens. Fulshear’s growth is taking place at a rapid pace. It is our responsibility to ensure the growth is positive; creating value for homeowners and property owners while simultaneously maintaining the integrity of Fulshear’s historic past. As a candidate for Fulshear City Council Member at large I intend to make a positive contribution to Fulshear’s growth by applying my forty-nine years’ experience in real estate finance, development and title abstract to the reality of the inevitable growth of our city.

Your support and vote will be very much appreciated. Thank you,

Jim Fatheree For Information Regarding Jim’s Civic Activities & Qualifications, Please Visit

W W W. FAT H E R E E . I N F O Pol. Ad. Pd. For By James L. Fatheree Jr, Treasurer


A COWBOY H AT

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A COWBOY HAT, A PHOTOGRAPH,

AND A CHINESE DELEGATION S I M O N TO N ’ S P L AC E O N T H E WO R L D S TAG E

WRITTEN BY SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND

T

he town of Simonton, Texas, located a mere four miles west of Fulshear, has long been known as just a wide spot in the juncture between Farm to Market (FM) 1093 and FM1489. Settled by one of Austin’s Old 300 colonists, the land around the town consists of fertile ground cradled by the Brazos River, where rich, loamy soil nurtured sugar cane, cotton, and red potatoes. The area is also the epicenter of major commercial and residential development in the near future.

This extraordinary moment in history happened at the Round-Up Rodeo in Simonton, a popular venue for cowboys, rodeo aficionados, and country music fans. Owned and operated by Luke Van Dries, the Round-Up Rodeo was the place to be on weekend nights. While A.E. “Snake” Bailey originally built the Round-Up in 1962, Luke bought the building and the business in 1972 from Jimmy Wade and Willie Carl. Popular with conventioneers from Houston, the venue boasted top-ranked entertainers like Johnny Cash, Charlie Pride, and Reba McEntire; top rodeo talent from around the country; and celebrities of all nationalities.

The Round-Up was also a place that locals loved to call their own. The spot was synonymous with good times.

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However, something symbolic and of historic significance happened one wintry night in 1979 that elevated Simonton’s status and thrust the town directly onto the world stage. On that cold February night, U.S. Secret Service members and journalists from around the world, converged on the small country town for a Friday night rodeo, and a single iconic photograph of a diminutive man in a cowboy hat. This photograph helped change the course of geopolitical history.

Guts & Glory

Vice Premier Deng Xiaoping with his 10-gallon Stetson hat


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Bullrider Paul Cook Simonton 1981

Van Dries put in a steakhouse that was open Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays. After 10 pm, the joint became a bar. On the east side of the building sat the Barbeque Hut. Local musicians, like Clel Connor and the Al Sulak Band, were regular entertainers there. Even Luke’s daughter, Kitty Van Dries, would sometimes play her guitar and sing.

Round-Up boasted quite a few “firsts.” The first Saturday of the month was when the big stars like George Strait, Tanya Tucker, Ray Price, and Clint Black came out to play. President Carter’s daughter, Amy, came to the Round-Up one night and joined in a calf scramble. Because Luke Van Dries loved to watch people having a good time and also liked an occasional good prank, he hired some streakers to run through the arena the night Ray Price sang and, to top that, the first gay rodeo in Texas was held at Simonton’s Round-Up in 1984.

The Best First The best “first” for the Roundup Rodeo, however, took place at the height of the Cold War, when the United

States saw the Soviet Union as its biggest threat and sought to ally itself with communist China as a balance to Soviet power. In 1972, President Richard Nixon and his Secretary of State, Henry Kissinger, traveled to Beijing to establish diplomatic ties between the two countries. Both countries signed the “Shanghai Communiqué,” but, alas, relations remained strained.

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According to Kitty, who is a lifelong resident in our area, the convention rodeo was, actually, where the money was. Gray Line Tours would bus the conventioneers out from Houston to Simonton where they could buy Stetson hats, ride around the arena in a Wells Fargo Stagecoach, eat steak or barbeque, watch cowboys kick up a lot of dust, and dance the late night away.


A COWBOY H AT

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All of that changed on that frosty, wintry night in 1979. The most powerful figure in the People’s Republic of China from the late 1970s until his death in 1997, Vice Premier Deng Xiaoping, spent nine days in America, visiting the National Gallery in Washington DC, the headquarters of Coca-Cola in Atlanta, the Boeing corporation in Seattle, the Johnson Space Center in Houston, and even a John Denver concert. The significant facet of the communist leader’s trip, however, was the premier’s own request for a “provincial” experience in Texas. That seminal event was held at Simonton’s Round-Up Rodeo. With heavy security provided by the Secret Service, 400-500 telephone lines installed, and media crews from around the world in attendance, the rodeo that night was announced in both English and Chinese and was beamed, via satellite, to China. Between beer and barbeque, and surrounded by 1500 guests, Luke’s youngest daughter Kelly galloped up to the front row seat on horseback, offered the diminutive Chinese leader (Deng Xiaoping stood less than 5 feet tall) a 10-gallon Stetson hat, and the cameras began to whirr. Kitty describes the night as one where Deng and his entourage sat around eating jalapeños, drinking beer, and wearing their cowboy hats backwards. Al Sulak’s “Sounds of Country” played and Kitty, whose horse had earlier taken a bad fall, had been invited to sit next to

the Chinese leader. But, it was the photograph of Deng in the 10-gallon hat, which appeared the next day in newspapers across America, that became a symbol of his American visit. As Ezra F. Vogel, a biographer of Deng, put it, the photograph “signaled to the U.S. public that he was not only good-humored, but, after all, less like one of ‘those Communists’ and more like ‘us.’”

An Historic & Pivotal Moment According to Orville Schell—writer and academic who is well known for the 10 books he has written about China— this moment in Simonton, Texas was the pivotal moment when Chinese-American relations finally normalized. As cheers rang through the crowd, James Schlesinger, Secretary of Defense under Ronald Reagan and Gerald Ford, was quoted that night as saying,

“Here we are in the heart of Texas with a group of people who are vehemently anti-Communist, strong conservative, and what happens? They have fallen in love with the Communist dictator of a billion people.”

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

Danny Triplett running from bull Red Angel - Simonton 1980


More than just a publicity stunt, Deng really did endear himself to the people of Texas. Kitty Van Dries still remembers that the Chinese leader sent his own doctor to check her out after she was thrown by her horse. He even sent the Van Dries family a needlepoint of the wall of China and invited them all to visit his country. Deng Xiaoping, himself, claimed the trip to the states a triumph and that “the honeymoon will continue.”

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Of course, history has a way of dousing the flames of a dictator’s popularity. The massacre by the Chinese Peoples Liberation Army of hundreds to possibly thousands of student protestors in Tiananmen Square ten years later significantly cooled relations once again between China and the West and proved that Deng Xiaoping’s Leninist form of oneparty government was incompatible with American values. Still, for a brief and historic moment in time, the world’s eyes were focused on that wide spot in a Texas roadway, where a Communist leader donned a 10-gallon Stetson at the Simonton Round-Up Rodeo. d

The Round-Up Rodeo continued in operation until 1997, when the building was bought and restored by Benchmark Wireline.

Vice Premier Deng Xiaoping enjoying the crowd and his new hat.

CREDITS: “How a 10-gallon hat helped heal relations between China & America.” Washington Post. Adam Taylor. September 25, 2015. “Simonton’s Place in History, Revisited.” Houston Press. December 23, 2008. “China Strikes Back.” The New York Review of Books. Oct. 23, 2014. “Mr. Deng Goes to Washington”— a 2015 Chinese historical documentary film written and directed by Fu Hongxing, starring Deng Xiaoping, Jimmy Carter, Henry Kissinger, Zbigniew Brzezinski, Rina Sa, and Chan Tin-suen. The film picks up the story of Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping’s nine-day official visit to the US in 1979. The film was released on 15 May 2015 to commemorate the 35th anniversary of China and the United States established diplomatic relations.

LINKS: Mr. Deng Goes to Texas https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNKhvixdV4o Mr. Deng Goes to Washington https://sinosphere.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/05/18/ xiaoping-film-mr-deng-goes-to-washington/?_r=0

Vice Premier Deng Xiaoping on the cover of Time Magazine

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“Mr. Deng Goes to Texas.” ABC Anchor, Frank Reynolds. February 2, 1979.


Dana

Hollingsworth EXPERIENCED • HONEST • COMMUNICATOR CANDIDATE FOR DISTRICT 1 - FULSHEAR CITY COUNCIL

Let’s Get Real Fulshear

I believe it is time our City Council candidates took a stance on key issues and put a stop to the usual “political rhetoric”. We can all agree that the City needs to improve intra-council relations and cooperate to accomplish positive results for all citizens.

What separates me from my opposing candidate? I am not afraid to stand up and fight for my neighbors’, or my concerns. I am concerned that the proposed Tree Ordinance will carry with it, yet another financial burden for taxpayers. Should we feel compelled to place tree protection above our property values and bank accounts? Requiring an arborist to perform a tree assessment prior to the installation of any structure does infringe upon our property rights. The citizens of Fulshear have voiced their opposition, yet a select few City leaders have squandered tens of thousands of taxpayer dollars promoting their personal agendas. The beautiful tree lines in Fulshear are one of the reasons we chose to live in this community. Preservation without burdening property owners is a more logical solution. I am concerned about the lack of fiscal responsibility by the City. I vehemently oppose raising taxes. The City’s budget needs tightening and excessive spending needs to be eliminated. There is an alternative financing option for the Heritage Parkway through Fort Bend County. There is no need for the proposed sale of Certificates of Obligation, or the additional 8 cent tax that it will incur. Your City Council is being asked to expeditiously vote to authorize the debt sale at the April meeting, prior to the May 6th election. I am concerned that the work of the Planning and Zoning Commission is going unchecked. During the March City Council meeting, lengthy deliberation ensued to issue a Special Use Permit to Thrive Church. It was clear that P&Z did not perform adequate due diligence. Nonetheless, the Special Use Permit was passed by Council with a habitual 3-2 vote, even after it was publicly revealed that three separate entities would be operating inside the building. We deserve professionals who take their Commission appointments seriously; citizens who work for the good of the City. I am concerned that our City has not adopted an Ethics Policy for elected officials. There are conflicts of interest in numerous City transactions. One such example is the 2016 purchase of a $1,200,000+ tract of unusable park land. Why the rush to spend park funds? According to sources the owner, a high profile political contributor, purchased the land 17 months prior to the sale for $615,000. I am concerned that the City has forced us as taxpayers to fund over $300,000 in litigation fees to fight ourselves. Had the City met and negotiated with the Municipal Utility Districts, or MUDs, over Agreements that were executed in 2007, the lawsuit against the MUDs could have been avoided. The Cities of Sugar Land, Houston, Katy, and The Woodlands Township, to name a few, have all negotiated common sense Agreements with in-city MUDs, and in turn, successful, quality developments that added property value and subsequently lowered taxes were the result. I am concerned that the residents off of Bois D’Arc have not received adequate answers and solutions to their flooding problems. Following the Memorial Day flood of 2016, the President of the United States declared Fort Bend County eligible for federal aid. Resources for flood mitigation were available from FEMA, after the declaration. Did your elected officials pursue those resources? Are any of the elected officials versed in FEMA claim processing, as I am? I am concerned that District 1 did not have a clear and unyielding voice to advocate for solutions. As my campaign forges ahead, I hear the frustration and helplessness of the citizens of Fulshear. They are the reason I chose to be an advocate for District 1. It is time Fulshear restored its reputation and veered off this self-destructive path. Despite what your position on various issues may be, rest assured that I will always fight for what is right. Without compromising my integrity or reputation. I am an independent thinker, fully vested in our charming community. I implore you to research the candidates and vote your conscience on May 6th. You deserve a strong voice of reason to represent you.

I am asking for your vote of confidence, on May 6th.

DanaForCityCouncil.com Pol. Ad. Pd. For By Dana Hollingsworth


TH E BOYS BEH IND TH E BAR-B-QUE

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The Boys

- Behind the -

Bar-B-Que

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

WRITTEN BY SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY


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Everybody knows Dozier’s. Bicyclists ride out from Houston to enjoy chopped beef sandwiches at picnic tables under the trees. People drive out specifically for the ribs and links. The place may not be a Texas landmark, but it is certainly a Fulshear institution. Locals can purchase thick ribeyes and whole chickens. Last minute grocery items can be found on the market shelves. When brothers Scott and Smedley Evans wanted to purchase Dozier’s back in 1985, they inquired about a loan from their bank in Columbus. “Dozier’s Bar-B-Que?” the bank officers questioned with legitimate skepticism. “What and where is that?” When a long-time board member of the bank overheard and exclaimed, “Dozier’s! That place is an institution!” the Evans boys got the money, bought the business, and the rest is history.

give change. There were only cigar boxes—one to make change, one to hold checks, and one to pay the vendors. A cash register, to the Evans boys, was a top priority.

Cash Drawer Before The Cash Register

Presidential Bacon, Oilmen, & Celebs Weekends were the busiest times, the Evans say. On Saturdays, people lined up to buy barbeque. Scott would usually take one weekend off, and Smedley would take off the next. Monday—their much needed day of rest—was the day Dozier’s was closed.

What the Evans boys knew of barbequing, they learned from their grandfather and from eating at Jerry Mikeska’s BBQ in Columbus, Texas where they grew up. When they bought the market and smokehouse in Fulshear from Ed Dozier in 1985, they had no experience for running a business like this. Ed had owned and successfully run the place since 1957, and had established its reputation. “Maybe it was better that we were ignorant,” Scott says. While they did attend a few A&M classes in sausage-making, they adamantly believe that there is “nothing like hands-on experience.” Plus, they both say that they had never been afraid to jump into something new. Jump in they did. When they first took over the business, long-time customers who liked the way things had always been, would say, “Now, don’t clean it up too much.” However, there were updates that simply had to be made. Sawdust used to cover the floor of the kitchen to catch the grease, so the first step was to clean and update the equipment and the flooring. There were no cash registers to take money and

One weekend back in the late ’80s, Smedley was running the shop. There was no backup cashier, the barbeque line was long, and the phone wouldn’t stop ringing. Smedley wasn’t even sure if he’d get a bathroom break. “It was one of the busiest days I remember,” he says. Around lunchtime, with phones still ringing off the hook, Smedley picked up the call of all calls—on the other end of the line just happened to be the head cook at the White House. He informed Smedley that President George H. Bush was going to be in Houston on Monday and wanted to buy Dozier’s smoked bacon. “That’s our day off,” Smedley told the man. “We’re closed on Mondays.” He kept working the register and taking care of his customers, but he remembers a long moment of silence on the other end of the line before the man finally spoke. “Is there not something you can do to accommodate the President of the United States?” Well, let’s put it this way— Scott and Smedley came in on Monday—their day off—to

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The Evans Boys At The Helm


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fill the order. They packed four whole slabs of bacon into 36”—long boxes, stacked a foot and a half high. A ’69 Chevy pickup with a camper pulled up and Bush’s aide, a little man with an official pin on his lapel, jumped out and carried the boxes of bacon off to Air Force One. They sold bacon many times to the President, but after that first time, they would just package it up and send it to the White House via UPS. So, was the experience of selling bacon to the President of the United States the pinnacle in marketing for the Evans boys? “I thought we’d never be able to top that,” says Smedley. However, there were other extraordinary sales, and Dozier’s reputation had spread far beyond Fulshear, Texas. About 15 years ago, the head chef at Google in Mountain View, California called to order 300 pounds of Dozier’s jerky for their corporate kitchen. The Stardust Resort and Casino in Las Vegas planned to hold a Texas Barbeque and wanted 300 pounds of whole briskets shipped to them—hot, mind you. Scott and Smedley packaged them up in igloo containers and shipped them by Emory Air Freight. The briskets arrived in Vegas nice and hot. In their early years as owners, the Evans did quite a bit of catering, including for a horse sale in Madisonville for 10,000 people. John Connally, Dale Robertson, and celebrities of all stripes flew in by helicopter. During the three-day event at which many food vendors participated, the party ran out of chili. With entrepreneurial spirit, Scott took off for a store, bought boxes of canned chili, came back to the event and heated it up. He proudly states, “People raved about that chili.” Oil executives craving Dozier’s barbeque would often fly into Fulshear from Houston by helicopter, landing in the vacant lot across the street. Those oilmen and women also came by the carload. Dozier’s, it seems, has always had quite a reputation. Celebrities? Well, aside from the leader of the free world and corporate executives, Dozier’s has had visits from quite a few celebrities over the years—from sports figures like Bum Phillips and his Oilers, Mary Lou Retton, Hakeem Olajawon, and Clyde Drexler, to actors such as Farah Fawcett, Ben Johnson, James Drury, and even Roy Rogers and Dale Evans.

The Cut is Everything

These Guys Know How To Cook!

Not Just Barbeque The formula for their business works pretty well. Their employees and cooks are incredibly loyal, and many have been with them for several generations. Scott usually takes care of the market’s bookkeeping, but both Smedley and Scott can cook and cut meat. “We can do it all,” they like to say. Dozier’s sells 2,500 pounds of brisket every week. Their sauce is custom-blended and made in-house, but you might not want to wager any bets on getting the recipe out of anyone connected with the place. Secrets that tasty are meant to be held close. Dozier’s also still carries a few grocery items. It wasn’t all that long ago that Dozier’s was the only place around to buy everyday items without a long drive into Houston. Deer season starts in October and ends in February. During those five months, the Evans process 2,000 deer, making 100,000 pounds of link sausage, alone. Working six days a week and extremely long hours, they admit that “everybody here is chugging pretty hard during that time.” Dozier’s has a website, but the primary form of advertising is by word of mouth. “We’ve been blessed,” Scott says. Much work and time have gone into making Dozier’s a success, but as Scott and Smedley say, “It was all worth it.” They know that success is all about courtesy to customers and consistent quality of food. The writer of this article can attest to the fact that everybody knows Dozier’s. Even if they aren’t from Fulshear, they seem to know about the barbeque. On a trip in the mid ’90s to Sicily, Italy, I was visiting one of the many Greek amphitheaters remaining on the island. There was only one other American couple there that day. When they asked where we were from, we replied that we lived in “a tiny town in Texas called Fulshear.”

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

“Oh,” they exclaimed, “Dozier’s!” Yep. That’s just the way it is—

Everybody knows Dozier’s. d DOZIER’S GROCERY & MARKET, INC. Thank You From The Prez

Sausage A’ Waiting The Grill &, Oh Yeah, The Sauce

8222 FM 359 • Fulshear, Texas 77441 (281) 346-1411 • doziersbbq.com


UP

Miss Hughes

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WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER

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ast spring we featured Fulshear resident, Sarah Hughes. Since childhood, Sarah has battled Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, a lifethreatening disease. In 2014, as a last resort, she began receiving high-dose adult stem cells, processed and cryogenically banked through Houston-based Celltex Therapeutics, with therapy taking place at a private hospital in Cancun. The results have been outstanding. And while she is very much enjoying her new life, she is determined to fight for others who could benefit from this type of therapy. We are excited to catch up with Sarah again, one year later.

Sarah on the way to the Capitol Building to hear the president’s speech

On Tuesday, February 28th, President Trump gave an address to a joint session of Congress, and Sarah was in the audience as Congressman Pete Olson’s guest. “Sarah Hughes was an important inspiration for me as we worked to pass the 21st Century Cures Act last year,” Rep. Olson said. “Congress passed that bill, which was signed into law. It will go a long way to help folks like Sarah, impacted by rare diseases, find a cure. It was an honor to invite her as my guest at the president’s speech.” For Sarah, it was an opportunity of a lifetime. “It was such an honor and privilege to have been Representative Pete Olson’s guest to the presidents first address to a joint session of Congress,” says Sarah. “To be able to experience the event in person, not through my television, was surreal. I got to meet so many important people, people that have the power to make great change. My goal is to raise awareness and urge Congress, and our new president, to make life saving treatments available in the United States.” While Sarah thoroughly enjoyed the meet and greets, interviews, and that evening’s speech, it was the private tour of the capital building, led by Congressman Olson that was the highlight of the trip. “Not everyone can say they got a personal tour by their Representative,” adds Sarah. “It was a memorable experience, for sure.”

United States Rep. Olson and Sarah together in D.C.

Sarah’s story is stretching far beyond Fulshear’s city limits. It is a story of struggle, strength, and survival. Sarah is hopeful that great change is on the horizon and that others, like herself, will have the opportunity to experience another chance at life. d

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Former Texas Governor and incoming Energy Secretary Rick Perry visits with Sarah at the joint session


Furthering Fulshear’s

Philanthropic Future WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER

Photo By Rhonda Renee Photography

Cross Creek Ranch Resident Creates & Grows Programs to Better Serve Those in Need

F

rom the outside, it may look like Tiffany Guarisco grew up a classically trained, southern debutant. It seems that way, because she did. However, it is not what you see, but what you don’t see that speaks of a persons’ true identity. Despite the nice home, private school education, and adventurous vacations, Tiffany and her family were extremely giving of both their time and money. Few knew they volunteered with local foster children, United Way, Habitat for Humanity, the food pantry, or various church mission projects, but that is exactly how they wanted it. After college graduation, Tiffany pursued a career in corporate America, but found her true passion rooted in the love of philanthropy. Over the last two and a half years, she has established or expanded at least 15 charity and outreach programs in and around Fulshear. Tiffany is the epitome of a go-getter. Along with her excellent education, she possesses determination, passion, and enthusiasm to do good. Fulshear is in excellent hands.

Instilling GOOD Life Lessons

Tiffany was not your average kid. Downtime, though it was rare, was spent listening to the news and reading Reader’s Digest. While she was a part of just about every

Tiffany Guarisco as a child with her parents.

high school club offered, she was also heavily involved with student government on a local and national level. Tiffany won numerous awards for bills that she wrote through Youth Legislature. She could also be seen running between houses in her neighborhood or chatting on the phone, trying to sell newspaper subscriptions in the hope of winning the local newspaper competition held for kids to increase the number of reader subscriptions. Having won three years in a row at the ages of 9, 10, and 11, Tiffany earned the top prize each year, which accumulated to more than $15,000. While her dad invested most of her earnings, Tiffany also donated some of her money to local charities. Unlike many youth, Tiffany


Some of Tiffany’s fondest memories were working the food bank alongside her mom as early as the age of three. While her mother reached out to those in need within the community, she also opened her home, as well. “Our dinner table was always open to anyone who needed a good meal, especially during the holidays.” Tiffany appreciates having experienced this sort of open-door policy her mother established and is proud to say her house is run the same way.

was not forced to do volunteer work with local organizations. She actively sought out philanthropic opportunities on her own. She loved helping people, especially children, a space she is still passionate about today. “I didn’t have much downtime as a kid,” says Tiffany. “But I liked it that way.” The desire to work hard and give back to those in need was a foundation laid early by her parents. “I had an idyllic childhood,” remembers Tiffany. Her father worked 35 years for Kraft Foods. He also owned Shipley Donut stores, on the side, for fun. Tiffany’s mother was a preschool teacher. This career path allowed her to maintain the same schedule as her daughters. Hard work and a commitment to excellence was a daily expectation in the Thomas household.

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Passing on

THE LESSONS

Tiffany tackled corporate America immediately after college graduation. Tiffany & Joe Guiarisco, and Having been offered a job in the highly their son Mathis. competitive pharmaceutical and medical sales industry a few months before graduating However, it was the PRECIOUS TIME spent from Mississippi State University, she felt there was driving alone with her father that made the real no option but to pursue this unexpected open door. “I’ve spent more than a decade following my passion impact. The STORIES HE SHARED, WISDOM HE IMPARTED, and the time spent LISTENING to Paul for people, science, and medicine,” Tiffany says. “I love the competitiveness of the industry, and I love a Harvey on the radio together were PRICELESS. good challenge.” During this period, Tiffany climbed the corporate ladder, traveled the world making “My father made sure that I understood how privileged connections, and made a name for herself in the industry. we were and that not everyone was as fortunate. This A short time after being transferred to Houston, she met was important to him.” Tiffany adds, “We traveled a lot Houston firefighter, Senior Captain Joe Guarisco. “We growing up. Because of this, I really began to understand are polar opposites. I am a workaholic who never slows how our life in Madison, Mississippi was not the normal down to actually catch my breath. My husband, on the status quo.” It was not just her father’s words that made other hand, is laid back and thrives on steady, organized a lasting impression, but his actions. structure.” Joe and Tiffany have been married for almost seven years and have a four-year-old son, Mathis. Photo By Rhonda Renee Photography

Tiffany & her parents Bob & Fran Thomas.

“To this day, I remember walking the streets of Ecuador with my father. He spotted a woman with no shoes on her feet. The temperature and thus the pavement was scorching hot. It really had to hurt. Without hesitation, my father guided this elderly lady into a shoe store and bought her a pair of shoes to protect her feet.” This random act of kindness was not out of the ordinary. Tiffany remembers many instances her father performed these kind gestures, noting it was never on display for other people to see. “My mom is also very philanthropic and a force to be reckoned with when leading a project,” notes Tiffany.

“I am never going to be the best wife or mother, because there is always going to be someone who does it a little different or better. My goal in life is to create a wellrounded child who has a passion for exploring life, a love of the Lord, and compassion for others. Especially living in the area that we live, where there is so much privilege, I want my son to see that there is another side of life. Not all children will have the opportunities or privileges he has access to as a child. Just like my parents did for me, I don’t want Mathis to only hear about others in need. I want him to actually see people in need and the way they live. By nurturing his mind and heart, my goal is to help him develop the compassion and skill set to help others.”

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After Mathis was born, Tiffany had an epiphany. While she loved her career and the opportunity to chase the American dream, her heart and passion were entrenched elsewhere. With the backing of her husband, Tiffany scaled back her work commitments to focus on being a mom to Mathis and to being Fulshear’s own philanthropic kick starter. “I couldn’t do what I do each and every day if it weren’t for my husband,” says Tiffany. “My husband works for two fire departments, so that I can put the hours into First United Methodist Church, Fulshear, and the surrounding communities. He is my biggest supporter.”


HOW CAN YOU HELP? Friends of Fulshear

FOOD PANTRY West Brazos Elementary

ORCHARD SNACK PROGRAM FULSHEAR FAIRY

GODMOTHER

PROJECT

Tiffany created the Friends of Fulshear Food Pantry. Beginning in 2014, every Wednesday, from 10am-Noon, Fulshear United Methodist Church welcomes hundreds of families from the Fulshear, Simonton, and Orchard area. Families in need are able to pick out eight pounds of food per week, free of charge.

HOW CAN YOU HELP?

- Volunteer to sort, stock, and run the food pantry - Donate money to help keep the pantry stocked - Donate non-perishable goods * Money and non-perishable food items may be dropped off at Fulshear United Methodist Church *Tiffany is able to offer a tax receipt on all donated items and financial contributions

Roughly 85% of West Brazos Elementary students are on free or reduced lunch. Due to financial constraints, these children eat breakfast and lunch provided by the school. Preschoolers, kindergarteners, and first graders have the earliest lunch period, sometimes as early at 10:30am. While they are allotted a time during the afternoon to have a snack, many of these kids do not have one, as their families simply do not have the means to provide them. Some of these children do not eat a consistent dinner at home and, therefore, return to school starving the next morning. Teachers noticed a lack of concentration in the afternoons, and as a result, declining test scores. Tiffany and her team began the Orchard Snack Program that provides healthy snacks for these three grade levels at West Brazos Elementary, every day for the entire school year.

HOW CAN YOU HELP?

- Donate your time to help purchase, sort, and organize snacks - Donate money to help purchase snacks * Money and non-perishable snacks may be dropped off at Fulshear United Methodist Church *Tiffany is able to offer a tax receipt on all donated snacks and financial contributions

This newly established project allows community members the opportunity to nominate or recognize the efforts of their friends and neighbors who go above and beyond normal standards to help others. The project recognizes and rewards Fulshear residents through small random acts of kindness. Tiffany and her team have established various “Fulshear Fairy Godmother” participants to help in recognizing people in the community whom are selflessly doing good for others. To nominate or recognize a friend, neighbor, or Fulshear church member, please email FulshearPhilanthropy@ gmail.com Please provide the name of the person, a description of their kind act, and their physical address. Tiffany is working with local companies to put together nice gifts and “happy baskets” as a small way to say thank you to the good Samaritans of Fulshear. Freckles Stationary and Gifts is the initial partner for this project. They are donating gift items and coupons for their store. Be on the lookout for more information about this exciting project!

TIFFANY GUARISCO • (912) 398-8946 6423 Creekside Park Drive • Fulshear, TX 77441 • GuariscoFamily@gmail.com • FulshearPhilanthropy@gmail.com

FULSHEAR UNITED METHODIST CHURCH (281) 346-1416 • 8201 Harris Street • Fulshear, TX 77441


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Tiffany recalls one of her proudest days as a mother thus far, when four-year-old Mathis asked what they were going to do for the day. Tiffany told him they were going to be spending the day feeding hungry people. He quickly replied, “We help people, Mama. That is what we are supposed to do.”

Building Blocks to a

BETTER FULSHEAR Tiffany does nothing half way. She does everything to the very best of her ability. In 2016 alone, Tiffany organized a variety of mission and outreach projects that reached 2,000 local families and over 100 families globally.

Christmas Box Project

Fulshear is a very affluent city. However, there are still areas that beckon for attention, and there are people who need a hand up. There are families that do not have consistent meals or appropriate school clothing for their children. There are parents who simply want to see the faces of their children light up with simple gifts under the Christmas tree.

During the 2016 floods, her team assembled and delivered meals and flood buckets for hundreds of displaced families. They also collected over 1,000 Christmas decorations, which were donated to the flood victims. Knowing that many local families lost everything

Holiday Market for Huggins

during the floods, it was important that the flood victims could still find cheer during the holiday season. Through her “Thanksgiving Project,” Tiffany and her volunteers provided meat for 234 families in the Fulshear, Simonton, Orchard, Brookshire, and Katy areas. The “Christmas Box Project” collected 6,000 non-perishable food items, fresh fruit, and vegetables. Volunteers packed 300 boxes of food for 150 local families. During the Christmas Box Project, a warehouse was donated to establish a base for families in need. Those families were able to shop, free of charge, for baby items, Christmas decorations, new toys for their children, and donated household items and furniture. “Merry and Bright” is one of Tiffany’s favorite ideas because it allows Fulshear residents to give back to people who work hard in the community every single day. Through this effort, every Fulshear police officer, firefighter, and city employee selects their favorite dessert. The desserts are created or purchased and then delivered to each employee by our Fulshear residents. The intent is for the Fulshear employee to share the dessert with their family over the holidays. “It is important to show our appreciation to those that devote their lives to our community and families. I can’t think of a better way for a variety of Fulshear families to show their gratitude than by delivering a favorite dessert!” says Tiffany.


Tiffany’s evolving team, whom she affectionately refers to as her “sidekicks,” allows her to delegate various aspects of projects once she has them established. Aware that she has difficulty saying “no,” Tiffany hopes to continue to grow more individuals who have a passion for helping others into leaders within the community. This opportunity will allow her to further the ability to change lives by giving those in need a hand up versus a hand out. Her dream is to continue to establish new projects to benefit Fulshear and create goals that make a realistic difference in the lives of others. “There are so many people that need help,” says Tiffany.

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Grateful families receive food from the Thanksgiving Project.

In December of 2016, Tiffany organized the first annual Holiday Market for Huggins at Huggins Elementary School. Fulshear Police officer, Jennifer Edmonds, lit the spark with an idea she had about the importance of kindness, generosity, and thinking about others during the holiday season. Tiffany got the ball rolling and brought the project to fruition. Through generous donations from local families and businesses, all 894 students were able to hand pick a gift for a special someone in their life and have it gift wrapped by a volunteer. The Weston Lakes Ladies Association was kind enough to give Tiffany a grant that made it possible to purchase gift-wrap materials. “While we say that Christmas is not about receiving, but about giving, many children do not grasp the actual concept behind the idea. Through this outreach program, Fulshear children run home excited for their mom, dad, aunt, uncle, or grandparent to open something they chose just for them – paving the way toward an understanding of the true reason for the season.”

Tiffany says during our interview.

“I am just doing what I feel is right and needed in our community.”

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

“I have so many ideas that initially seem a little outlandish or crazy. None of these concepts would become reality without the support of our community, churches, and my volunteers. We have a loving, caring, and compassionate community. I am so thankful to live in a small town that places an emphasis on the importance of serving others.”

Judy Meloy, Tiffany Guarisco, and Barbara Echols.

“If I can DELEGATE tasks or projects from the sidelines that will make a difference, I can FOCUS on the next opportunity to CHANGE LIVES.”

Empty Nesters of Cross Creek Ranch who package all snacks for Orchard. The group is led under the direction of Nancy Waller.

Help comes in all forms. It can be as simple as picking up groceries, sorting cans, or filling snack bags for students. “If people are willing to take the initial step, I can help them find the area wherein their passion lies,” states Tiffany. “Once they find their niche, I know the opportunity to serve others will be incredibly rewarding.” Tiffany is quick to point out that the emphasis is not on the amount of money or time individuals are able to donate. She truly is grateful for each and every person who is willing and able to serve others, no matter what or how much they are able to give. “Every contribution of time, energy, or finances, whether big or small, makes a difference,” says Tiffany. Tiffany’s parents opened her young eyes to the world, far beyond her immediate surroundings. Through their commitment to serving others, they showed her the importance of giving back. Thanks to her solid upbringing and the unwavering love and support of her husband Joe, Tiffany is able to do what she loves and devote time to developing the passions that lie in other people. Tiffany feels it is important to pay it forward when someone does something nice for you, without expecting anything in return. She is proud to be a part of the city of Fulshear. “There are so many people in this city who help others, on so many different levels, and yet they do not broadcast it. Thank you to each and every one of you. I am so appreciative for your willingness to give of yourself to make a difference in the lives of other people. You never know how a random act of kindness can completely change the life of another person.” d


LAPRADA LANDING

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A NEW STYLE OF COUNTRY LIVING F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

W

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF HEGER

hat was it about the city of Fulshear that drew you in? For many, it was Fulshear’s small town feel and undeniable charm. It is here where families can acquire sizable property and experience a bit of the country, all while being a short drive away from the city and its multitude of amenities. As Houston continues to push westward and Fulshear grows, open acreage become harder to come by. Nestled along a bend in the Brazos River, Laprada Landing offers that much needed escape from busy city life. This Highland Resources property, located just three miles southeast of Fulshear, is unlike anything else. With 720 acres divided into just nine tracts, buyers will

have the unique opportunity to let their imaginations run wild. The vast views of wildlife, flowers and mature trees draped in delicate Spanish moss overlooking the river, paint a picture of nature at its finest. Whether it be intended as the family ranch, or a second home away from downtown, Laprada Landing is what everyone is talking about.

LAND RICH IN HISTORY

Laprada is no ordinary piece of land, it is part of Texas’ rich history. Its unique narrative begins in 1824 when David Randon and Isaac Pennington acquired land from Stephen F. Austin, joining the prominent group of


69

“THE MORE TRANQUIL A MAN BECOMES, THE GREATER IS HIS SUCCESS, HIS INFLUENCE,

HIS POWER FOR GOOD. CALMNESS OF MIND IS ONE OF THE BEAUTIFUL JEWELS OF WISDOM.”

While they could easily sell to a residential developer who would likely strip away the property of its charm, displacing the wildlife and thinning out the trees, Highland has chosen to divide the acreage into nine tracts, ranging from 60 to 105 acres. “We have owned this property for over thirty years, so we have had a long time to think about its future,” says Charles Wolcott, President and CEO. “It was never in the cards to do a development property, it is just too pretty.” In fact,

they have incorporated protective covenants within the deed to ensure that the location remains secluded and not built up like the tightly packed communities nearby. For example, only one residence is allowed per 60 acres and every home site must be set back off the road a minimum of 300 feet. Highland is so proud of the property’s legacy, that they have taken it a step further and applied through the Fort Bend Historical Commission for a historical marker. They are pleased to say that just recently they have been accepted. The marker will be called the Randon and Pennington Grant of 1824. Charles is pleased knowing that it is no longer hearsay, it is proven historic record. “We hope that by acquiring this historical marker people see the deep history tied to the property and that they are not just buying a piece of ranch land, but a piece of Texas history.”

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Texas’ first settlers – the Old Three Hundred. Randon and his wife Nancy McNeel ran a successful plantation on the property until 1859 when they sold the land. After being passed through a few more hands over the years, Highland acquired the 2,000 acres in the late 1970’s. After thirty years of cattle ranching operations, the decision was made to market the southernmost 720 acres.

JAMES ALLEN


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NATURE AT ITS FINEST

LAPRADA LANDING

“We are excited to be involved with this property,” shares Gloria Catalani, operations manager at Highland. “I even find myself escaping the city and relaxing amongst the vast wilderness just to get away from the day to day strife.” This comes as no surprise because the aura of Laprada Landing is truly magical. There the air smells sweeter, the grass is greener and the stars seem to shine brighter. Situated on newly named Laprada Trace, a county road that dead-ends within Laprada Landing, buyers can rest assured that there will be no through traffic. Majestic pecans, live oaks and water oaks cover the property. In the spring, the area is draped in color thanks to the beautiful Texas wildflowers. “The river is the large selling point – the gem,” says Charles. There are no land locked tracts. All nine front a large stretch of the Brazos and have buildable home sites. The land is perpetually preserved and protected from dense development as portions of this property are within floodway and floodplain delineations that were finalized by FEMA in 2014. Highland was looking for a name as unique as the property itself – something evocative of the feel of the land. Laprada is a play on words of the Spanish word la pradera, meaning meadow. The name has since been trademarked as to remain unique to the property.

PRIME LOCATION

“We want to be different than anything else in the area, but still blend in,” notes Gloria. “We are working to create understated country elegance in a unique and secluded location.” Located right around the corner from the highly sought after Fulshear area, and only 40 miles west of Houston, there will be no sacrifice of the desirable amenities city living brings. Residents will be minutes from local stores and restaurants. This kind of property is hard to find. Laprada Landing is a place you can go to escape, to breathe, to be closer with nature – and call home. A place with as rich a history as this is meant to be preserved and enjoyed. It is now time for a new generation to be part of that legacy. d

Energy Corridor

10

8

ay Westpark Tollw

99

Fulshear

Sugar Land

59

Houston

For more information about LAPRADA LANDING contact

BILL BLYTHE at (713) 829-3465 or D. LEIGH MARTIN at (713) 835-9839 with MARTHA TURNER SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

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90

The Galleria

610

Bra z

r ve Ri os

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

Katy


INGREDIENTS

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1 spaghetti squash Olive oil Sea salt, to taste Black pepper, to taste 2 chicken breasts, cut into 1-2 inch pieces 1 yellow onion, diced 4 cloves garlic, minced 3 cups cherry tomatoes, halved ½ teaspoon sea salt ¼ teaspoon black pepper ½ lemon, juiced 1 cup chicken broth 8 ounces baby spinach

PREPARATION 1.Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

LEMON CHICKEN & SPAGHETTI SQUASH WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER

2.Use a fork and make a line of holes lengthwise across the top of the spaghetti squash. 3.Keeping holes facing up, microwave spaghetti squash on high for 5 minutes. 4.Cut squash in half along the holes. Remove seeds with a spoon. Drizzle squash with olive oil, and season with salt and pepper. 5.Place squash upside down on baking tray and bake for 40 minutes. Let cool.

A

6.Using a skillet, cook the chicken breast pieces on medium-high heat with a little olive oil for 6-8 minutes, or until the chicken is golden brown and cooked through. Remove chicken from the pan and set aside.

I gave it a whirl and it was a hit! My kids knew something was different with the dish, but that did not keep them from clearing their plates. They ate a whole serving of vegetables without throwing a fit at the table.

7.In that same skillet, sauté the onion for a few minutes. Add garlic and cook for an additional minute. Add tomatoes and cook for a couple more minutes.

ll my recipes thus far have been things I am familiar with—recipes that I have enjoyed through my childhood and favorites in my family. This time I went out of my comfort zone. I found this recipe for lemon chicken and spaghetti squash on Goodful’s YouTube page and was intrigued. Having never worked with spaghetti squash before, I was a little hesitant. Would it really resemble pasta? Would my kids eat it?

The mixture of lemon and tomato makes for a light, refreshing, and spring-worthy dish. I chose to serve mine with a sprinkle of fresh grated parmesan and a side of warm crusty bread. Since making this the first time, I have cooked with spaghetti squash on numerous occasions. Meatballs and marinara over baked spaghetti squash is a great light, yet fulfilling, substitute to spaghetti and meatballs. Add stir fry veggies and your favorite Asian flavors and you have another great variation to the dish. This recipe is a wonderful foundation that can easily morph into other mouthwatering meals. When planning your dinners for the week, add this one – you won’t be sorry! d

8.When onions are translucent, add lemon juice and chicken broth. Cook until the liquid partially reduces, roughly 20 minutes. Add chicken and cook for 2 more minutes. Then add spinach and cook for 2 minutes. 9.Using a fork, shred the inside of the squash. 10.Pour sauce over the squash and serve.


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(281) 391-2224 - www.brightwaycarpetcleaning.com

CONSTABLE WAYNE THOMPSON

(281) 829-9314 - www.first-texas.com

24 HOUR FITNESS

BROOKWOOD

(281) 375-2260 - www.brookwoodcommunity.org

CONTROL-IT SMART HOME AUTOMATION

(469) 693-2893 - www.24hourfitness.com

4A PRINTS

BROWN & GAY ENGINEERS, INC.

(281) 558-8700 - www.browngay.com

CONVENE IT USA LLC

(713) 489-9723 - www.4APrints.com

8 BROTHERS BARBEQUE

CAMMARATA PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY GROUP (832) 913-6353 - www.kids-teeth.com

COSTELLO, INC

(979) 488-1127 - www.facebook.com/8brothersbbq/

9ROUND

CAMP BOW WOW KATY, TX

(281) 849-3647 - www.campbowwow.com/katy

COUNTY JUDGE BOB HEBERT

(281) 394-9719 - www.9round.com/fitness/Katy-TX-x2392

A MIGHTY FORTRESS LUTHERAN CHURCH

CAMP GLADIATOR

(832) 746-7470 - www.campgladiator.com

CRAFT-E CREATIONS

(281) 533-4121

ACT OF LIFE

CANE ISLAND

(281) 725-6555 - www.caneisland.com

CROSS RIDGE OFFICE CONDOS

(713) 991-5433 - www.actoflife.org

ACTIONCOACH OF TEXAS

CARDUNIS BAKERY AND CATERING

(832) 344-2036 - www.newfirst.com

PRO IMAGE* - (713) 806-3016 www.proimagepromotional.com

RANDLE LAW OFFICE LTD., L.L.P.* (281) 657-2000 - www.jgradyrandlepc.com

REPUBLIC SERVICES (713) 726-7510 - www.republicservices.com

SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH (713) 465-3408 - www.second.org

SEVERN TRENT SERVICES (281) 646-2364 - www.stservices.com

TAYLOR MORRISON (281) 780-4652 - www.taylormorrison.com

WAGGIN’ TAILS PET RANCH* (281) 533-0500 - www.waggintailspetranch.com

WINGNUT AERIAL VIDEO SYSTEMS W.A.V.S (417) 861-7113 - www.wingnutaerialvideo.com

BRONZE

(832) 871-7217 - www.actioncoach.com/kevinalft

(281) 342-9891 - www.bestseptictankcleaning.com (281) 712-4191 - www.bigfrog.com/katy

(847) 980-7246 - williamheede@aol.com (713) 468-3688 - www.binglevet.com (281) 769-3095 - www.blackburnortho.com (916) 997-1628

(281) 346-1432 - www.fortbend.lib.tx.us

(281) 394-2933 - www.brazosoms.com

(713) 552-1333 - www.brazosmaterials.com (713) 931-1242

(281) 795-3785 - www.cardunis.com

CINCO TIRE & AUTO CINCOAUTO2

CIVILCORP, LLC

CLARITY EYE CARE

CLEAN SWEEP PROPERTY SERVICES CLEAR CHOICE OFFICE SOLUTIONS CLOUD 9 COMPUTING

(713) 910-2886 - www.allstate.com/timothycole (832) 562-0786 - www.Commutaplus.com (713) 469-2028

www.votewaynethompson.com

(713) 966-9306 - www.controlitav.com

(713) 865-1621 - www.conveneitusa.com (713)-783-7788 - www.costelloinc.com (281) 341-1454

(281) 733-1304 - www.craft-ecreations.com (832) 772-6866 - shbdevelopment.com/properties/ cross-ridge-fulshear

CROSSFIT FULSHEAR

(832) 773-8558 - crossfit-fulshear.com


(281) 533-4101 - www.watercrestcruisetravel.com

CRUISE PLANNERS - GENE CHIN

(832) 377-6220 - www.mycruisecoordinator.com

CULLIGAN OF HOUSTON

(713) 293-6400 - www.houstonculligan.com

CURING CHILDREN’S CANCER FUND (713) 503-6247 - www.cccfund.org

DAN LOONEY DBA GOOSEHEAD INSURANCE (925) 667-7882 - www.goosehead.com/dan-looney

DANIEL R SLAVINSKI, CPA (281) 342-2674

DAVID R. MELANSON

(979) 541-9297 - drmelanson@yahoo.com

DAVID WEEKLEY HOMES

(281) 249-7705 - www.dwhomes.com

DEKKER’S MESQUITE GRILL

(281) 533-0909 - dekkersmesquitegrill.net

DOZIER’S GROCERY & MARKET*

(281) 346-1411 - www.doziersbbq.com

DREAM LANDSCAPE* - (281) 744-2669 www.dreamlandscapedesign.com

ECN ENTERPRISES

(832) 405-3184 - www.demandgenpros.com

ECO2 OFFICE

(832) 437-3204 - www.eco2officekaty.com

EDWARD BATINGA, CPA P.C.

(281) 222-3307 - www.batingacpa.com

EDWARD JONES*

(281) 242-3307 - www.edwardjones.com

EFTEX BUSINESS SERVICES, LLC* (832) 315-1165 - www.eftexllc.com

ELITE DISCOUNT APP (845) 893-5436

ELIZABETH PRATT, PLLC LAW FIRM

(281 394-4681 - www.elizabethpratt-legal.com

FRONTIER TITLE COMPANY

(281) 391-9181 - www.frontiertitletexas.com

FULSHEAR - SIMONTON LIONS CLUB

(281) 346-4156 - www.fulshearsimontonlionsclub.org

FULSHEAR ACE HARDWARE (970) 214-7876

FULSHEAR CITY GRILL*

(281) 346-8196 - www.yongsasianfusion.com

FULSHEAR FAMILY MEDICINE*

(281) 346-0018 - www.fulshearfamilymed.com

FULSHEAR FLORAL DESIGN - (281) 533-9468 www.fulshearfloraldesign.com

FULSHEAR FOOT AND ANKLE

(281) 391-1212 - Fulshearfootandankle.com

FULSHEAR GRAPHICS*

JACQUELYN NICOLE PHOTOGRAPHY

(281) 794-7385 - www.jacquelynnicole.com

JDC FIRETHORNE

(281) 395-1440 - www.firethorne.info

JLA REALTY-JOE GORCZYCA (281) 814-8934

JOE JOE BEAR FOUNDATION

(281) 398-4522 - www.joejoebear.org

JORDURK SOLUTIONS, LLC

(888) 452-6461 - www.jordurk.com

JOYCE LONG WELLNESS INSTITUTE (281) 344-0095 - www.joycelong.biz

JUDGE CHAD BRIDGES CAMPAIGN 240TH DISTRICT COURT

(832) 867-0471 - www.judgechadbridges.com

FULSHEAR OUTREACH & DEVELOPMENT

JUDGE MAGGIE JARAMILLO 400TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

FULSHEAR POLICE DEPARTMENT

JULIE K GRAY, CPA

FULSHEAR POLICE FOUNDATION

JUICE PLUS

FULSHEAR PRESSURE WASHING

KATHIE LAUHOFF KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER

FULSHEAR PROFESSIONALS

KATY FAMILY YMCA

FULSHEAR READY MIX CONCRETE

KATY MAGAZINE, LLC

FULSHEAR REAL ESTATE PARTNERS L.P.

KATY MEDIA ROOMS, LLC

FULSHEAR SIMONTON FIRE DEPARTMENT

KATY PLANTATIONS HANDCRAFTED SHUTTERS

FULSHEAR STAR

KATY TREADMILL REPAIRS

FULSHEAR TREE SERVICES

KATY YARD GREETINGS

(832) 244-2411 - www.fulshear.graphics (832) 492-5136 - www.FulshearOutreach.org (281) 346-2202 www.fulshearpolice.com (713) 502-9877

(832) 581-5812 - www.fulshearpressurewashing.com info@fulshearprofessionals.com (281) 533-0300 - www.fulshearreadymix.com (713) 302-0555

(281) 346-2800 - www.fsfd.org

(281) 665-9678 - www.fulshearstar.com (713) 302-0555 - www.fulsheartreeservices.com

(281) 660-4363 - www.judgemaggiejaramillo.com (281) 712-5013

(713) 703-1554 - /www.carmenizzo.origamiowl.com (713) 562-8502 - www.kathielauhoff.com

(281) 392-5055 - www.ymcahouston.org/katy (281) 579-9840 - www.katymagazine.com (281) 780-9383 - www.katymediarooms.com (281)-402-1280 - www.katyplantations.com

(832) 731-6785 - www.katytreadmillrepairs.com (713) 898-4358 - www.katyyardgreetings.com

ELKO CONSULTING, LP DBA IMPROVE IT! CONSULTING FULSHEAR.COM (832) 377-6574 - www.fulshear.com & TRAINING* (281) 799-0930 - www.improveitsolutions.com GALLERY FURNITURE (281) 687-1263 - www.galleryfurniture.com EMBROIDME FULSHEAR (281) 232-7577 www.embroidme-fulshear.com GEOVEND INTERNATIONAL LLC (281) 513-4681 - www.geovendinternational.com EMPLOYERS ONE SOURCE GROUP (281) 492-9292 - www.eosg.com GGG SUSTAINABILITY SOLUTIONS (972) 415-3017 - www.greengrovegroup.com ENCHANTMENT KIDS FINE ARTS LEARNING CENTER (281) 394-5090 - www.Enchantmentkids.com GLADIATOR EXCELLENCE (713) 659-9747 - www.GladiatorExcellence.com ER KATY* (281) 395-9900 - www.erkaty.com GLASS EXPRESSIONS EXCEL CENTER BEHAVIORAL OF WEST OAKS HOSPITAL (713) 702-2292 (281) 647-0020 - www.westoakshospital.com GLENN SMITH EXECUTIVE COACHING (281) 841-6680 - www.glennsmithcoaching.com FAMILY HOPE (832) 492-5136 - FamilyHopeFulshear.org GNA INSPECTIONS, PLLC (832) 567-3293 - GNAInspections.com FARMERS INSURANCE GROUP TIM O’BRIEN INSURANCE AGENCY GOLDEN EAGLE TAEKWONDO

KELLY FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC

FIRST CHOICE EMERGENCY ROOM

HALO PROFESSIONALS

LAUGHING DOG GLASSWORKS

HANA GARDEN CHINESE RESTAURANT

LAVO NATURAL NAILS

HANSON AGGREGATES

LAZIT INDUSTRIES

HEARTLAND PAYMENT SYSTEMS

LEGACY AT FALCON POINT

HEMI HIDEOUT

LEGALSHIELD

HENDRIX INSURANCE

LEONETTI GRAPHICS INC.

HERITAGE TEXAS PROPERTIES

LIBERTY STAR MORTGAGE a branch of SecurityNational MC NMLS 3116*

(281) 375-5928 - www.farmersagent.com/tobrien (972) 899-6662 - www.fcer.com

FIRST CHOICE EMERGENCY ROOM KATY CINCO RANCH - (832) 913-8220 www.fcer.com/locations/houston-map/ katy-cinco-ranch/

FAIRMONT CUSTOM HOMES

(713) 539-0048 - www.fairmontcustomhomes.com

FASTSIGNS KATY

(281) 599-1111 - www.fastsigns.com/515

FIRST CUP CAFE

(281) 989-1171 - www.yourfirstcupcafe.com

FIRST FULSHEAR UMC*

(281) 346-1416 - www.firstfulshear.org

FIRST LINE DEFENDERS

(832) 776-1145 - http://www.firstlinedefenders.com

FIT SENSE, LLC

(832) 600-4474 - www.fitsense-llc.com

FLINT PHOTOGRAPHY

(281) 899-0818 - www.Flint-Photography.com

FONTANILLA ACCOUNTING SOLUTIONS

(281) 712-1047 - www.katy.bookkeepingexpress.com

FOREVER FULSHEAR* (713) 703-4129

FORT BEND CARES FOUNDATION

(832) 819-2005 - www.FortBendCares.org

FORT BEND COUNTY FAIR ASSOCIATION

(281) 342-6171 - www.FortBendCountyFair.com

FORT BEND COUNTY MUSEUM ASSOCIATION

(832) 953-4853 - www.goldeneagletaekwondo.com (281) 860-2535 - www.haloalarmshouston.com (832) 437-7852 - www.hanagarden.us

(281) 346-1136 - www.lehighhanson.com (713) 302-1852 - www.Heartlandpaymentsystems.com (281) 347-HEMI - www.HemiHideout.com (832) 437-5528 - www.yourLTCexpert.com (281) 493-3880 - www.heritagetexas.com

HLG WEALTH MANAGEMENT (713) 337-2241

HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE

(281) 882-9453 - www.homeinstead.com/252

HOMEWOOD SUITES BY HILTON - KATY

(281) 391-5500 - www.homewoodkaty.com

HOPE FOR THREE*

(800) 317-0787 - www.hopeforthree.org

HOUSER ROOFING

(979) 472-9176 - www.houserroofingtx.com

HOUSTON CHRONICLE

(713) 362-5163 - www.houstonchronicle.com

HOUSTON FINANCIAL CENTER

(713) 302-6744 - www.houstonfinancialcenter.com

(281) 342-1256 - www.fortbendmuseum.org/georgeranch.org HOUSTON PEDIATRIC DENTAL SPECIALISTS, PC (281) 346-8326 - www.smilesgonewild.net

FORT BEND COUNTY REPUBLICAN PARTY www.fbcgop.org

FORT BEND RAINBOW ROOM (832) 451-5867 - www.fbrr.org

FORT BEND COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE (281) 341-4664 - www.fbcsheriff.org

FORT BEND SENIORS MEALS ON WHEELS (281) 633-7049 - www.fortbendseniors.org

FRECKLES STATIONARY & GIFTS

(281)536-4900 - www.frecklescentral.com

FRONT ROW SIGNS

(832) 222-9385 - www.frontrowsigns.net

HR IN ALIGNMENT, LLC

(281) 889-9075 - www.hrinalignment.com

HUNT LAW FIRM, PLLC

(832) 315-5494 - www.familylawyerkaty.com

INSPERITY

(281) 312-2065 - www.insperity.com

IRON TRIBE FITNESS - CINCO RANCH

(281) 303-5671 - www.cinco-ranch.irontribefitness.com

ITALIAN MAID CAFE

(281) 341-1587 - www.italianmaidcafe.com

(281)346-8397

KENT HARRIS

(832) 578-1967 - kentjharris@gmail.com

KIDDIE ACADEMY OF RICHMOND TEXAS

(832) 633-0093 - www.kiddieacademy.com/richmond

KINGDOM & WHEELS

(832) 437-7039 - www.kingdomandwheels.com

KJT CONSULTING LLC

(281) 705-6895 - kjthomason@mail.com

KRENEK LAW OFFICES

(281) 578-7711 - www.tkthompson@kreneklaw.com

LAMAR CISD

(832) 223-0330 - www.lcisd.org

LANIER PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES PLLC (713) 504-3755 - www.drstaceylanier.com

LATHROP DENTAL CENTER*

(832) 437-3849 - www.lathropdentalcenter.com (281) 346-0099

(281) 346-8636 - www.lavonails.com (281) 334-9969

(281)394-0628 - www.legacyatfalconpoint.com (281) 750-5317 - www.legalshieldassociate.com (281) 499-4959 - www.leonettigraphics.com

(281) 558-0004 - www.libertystarmortgage.com

LJA ENGINEERING, INC.*

(713) 953-5131 - www.ljaengineering.com

LONE STAR TRANSITIONS

(832) 844-2025 - www.lonestartransitions.com

LOUETTA AUTOMOTIVE

(281) 304-2517 - www.louettaauto.com

MADAM DJ

(713) 714-7357 - www.madamdj.com

MAID SIMPLE

(281) 769-1452 - www.rosenbergmaidsimple.com

MARTIN MORTGAGE *

(281) 533-9952 - www.martinmortgageonline.com

MARY KAY

(805) 558-0533 - www.marykay.com/cfairbanks

MARY KAY - LINDA DYER

(209) 484-9583 - www.marykay.com/ldyer1616

MAS SOLUTIONS LLC

(281) 494-4874 - www.masquality.com

MATHNASIUM OF FULSHEAR

(832) 437-5033 - www.mathnasium.com/fulshear

MCFRUGALS DRY CLEAN DEPOT

(832) 589-2885 - www.mcfrugalsdc.com

MD ANDERSON

(832) 334-3738 - www.mdanderson.org

MEDINA ORTHODONTICS

(281) 394-9300 - www.medianbraces.com

MMEMBER EMBER D IRECTORY DIRECTORY

CRUISE PLANNERS/WATERCREST TRAVEL


MEMAMA’S COOKIES N’ MORE

REPRESENTATIVE JOHN ZERWAS M.D.

THE AD SHEET

MEMBERS CHOICE CREDIT UNION

REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB OF KATY

THE ALTERNATIVE BOARD - HOUSTON SW

MICHAEL T. McCANN FOUNDATION, INC BIKE FOR MIKE - camccann@me.com MINDFUL ART*

RHONDA POHLMAN KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY

THE BUNKER ICEHOUSE*

RICHMOND STATE SUPPORTED LIVING CENTER

THE GLASER GROUP MCDONALD’S

MOMS CLUB FULSHEAR/SIMONTON

RICK HENDERSON - REMAX GRAND

THE GROWLER SPOT

MOSQUITO DEFENSE SOLUTIONS

RIGHTWAY DENTAL

THE GYM STATION WEST CINCO*

MOSSWOOD PROPERTIES, LLC.*

RIVER BEND BAPTIST CHURCH

THE KATY PLUMBING COMPANY

N2 PUBLISHING - WEST SIDE STORIES

RMC SOLAR SCREENS BLINDS AND SHUTTERS

THE KELLY CLINIC

NANCY GARCIA - KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER REALTY*

SAENZ OF THE TIME

THE LACY TUMBLEWEED GENERAL STORE

NATURALAWN OF AMERICA*

SAFARI TEXAS

NBD GRAPHICS INC.

SAMPICA’S ANTIQUES, GIFTS & MORE

THE ORCHARD - ASSISTED LIVING & MEMORY CARE - (281) 371-3000 - www.theorchardkaty.com THE OUGHTNESS GROUP

NO LABEL BREWING CO.

SANDEFUR CPA, P.C.*

THE POPCORN SHOP

NORTH FORT BEND WATER AUTHORITY

SANTIKOS PALLADIUM AVX

THE SALONS OF FULSHEAR / THE LYME LEOPARD

NOVABAY PHARMACEUTICALS

SAPORE RISTORANTE ITALIANO

THE SPORTS MARKETING COMPANY

NOW CFO

SAPPHIRE CUSTOM HOMES

THE SUMMIT FITNESS STUDIO

OAK PARK RESORT LIFESTYLE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY - (281) 398-1500

SCHOBEL IRRIGATION & LANDSCAPE SERVICES, INC. - (832) 250-5807 SENATOR LOIS KOLKHORST

THE UPS STORE 6650

SEND OUT CARDS

THRIVE CHURCH*

OLD FOSTER COMMUNITY MUSEUM

SERVPRO OF WEST FORT BEND COUNTY* - (281) 342-5326

TODAY’S VISION KATY

OLD REPUBLIC NATIONAL TITLE

SHERWOOD FARMS

OLSON FOR CONGRESS COMMITTEE

SIGNARAMA-KATYFULSHEAR

OWEN AND SHERRI BEMENT

SIT STAY OBEY ACADEMY

(281) 770-3250 - www.sitstayobeyacademy.com

TRACY BOGIEL BETTER HOMES & GARDENS GARY GREENE*

PARKWAY FELLOWSHIP

SJR FAMILY PARTNERSHIP, LTD* - (281) 468-3588 SPECIAL PALS

(281) 646-1136 - www.ilovefulsheartx.com

TRACY GREMILLION - KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER

SPORTS CHIROPRACTIC PERFORMANCE - SCP

TRICIA TURNER PROPERTIES

SQUIRREL HOLDINGS LLC*

TURNER DURAN ARCHITECTS, LP

STANCIL PROPERTY TAX LLC

TWO MEN AND A TRUCK WEST HOUSTON

(713) 503-8310 - www.memamascookiesnmore.com

MEMBER DIRECTORY

(281) 398-9900 - www.mccu.com

(713) 303-4381 - www.mindful-art.com (203) 650-6263 - www.mindful-art.com

(281) 889-8499 - www.Mosquito-Defense.com (281) 346-8032

(832) 277-5610 - www.n2pub.com

(713) 503-5171 - www.nancykingrealty.com

(281) 392-2990 - houstonwest.naturalawn.com (281) 547-8200 - www.nbdgraphics.net (281) 693-7545 - www.nolabelbrew.com (713)-488-8253 - nfbwa.com

(832) 244-5678 - www.NovaBay.com (713) 823- 2134 - www.nowcfo.com

www.OakPark-Retirement.com

OCUSOFT

(281) 239-9801 - www.ocusoft.com

OFFICEMAKERS

(281) 574-3800 - www.officemakers.com (281) 239-2178 - www.fostercommunitymuseum.org (281) 265-9500 - www.oldrepublictitle.com/houstonnational (281) 980-0750 - www.olsonforcongress.com (281) 346-0299

(832) 222-8282 - Parkwayfellowship.com

PATHPOINTS TO WELLNESS HEALING ARTS & RETREAT CENTER* - (832) 461-6936 www.pathpointstowellness.com

PAUL LYTLE INSURANCE AGENCY

(832) 266-0153 - agents.allstate.com/paul-lytle-fulshear-tx.html

PAULA RUCKY PROPERTIES - REMAX GRAND (281) 793-5779 - www.paularucky.com

PAYCHEX*

(832) 914-3721 - www.paychex.com

PERCHERON TITLE AGENCY, LLC

(832) 300-6500 - www.percherontitleagency.com

PET SUPPLIES PLUS - (281) 346-4535 PHOTO BOOTH ON WHEELS

(281) 202-5988 - www.photoboothonwheels.com

PHYSICAL THERAPY CARE & AQUATIC REHAB OF FORT BEND (281) 347-8900 - www.ptcare.net

PIVOTAL STEEL BUILDINGS & ROOFING

(888) 75-STEEL - www.pivotalconstruction.net

POLISHED NAILS STUDIO

(281) 665-8716 - www.polishednailsstudio.com

PRESTIGE PROPERTIES TEXAS (281) 238-0800

PREVALENT HEALTH

(713) 554-6100 - www.prevalenthealth.com

PROSPECT MORTGAGE - (832) 286-6371

www.prospectmortgage.com/NNavarroSung

PROSPERITY BANK

(281) 574-8674 - www.ProsperityBankUSA.com

R.G. MILLER ENGINEERS

(713) 461-9600 - www.rgmiller.com

R&M LOGISTICS, LLC

(281) 346-1142 - www.rgmiller.com

RACHEL THE REALTOR

(832) 857-4550 - www.RachelTheRealtor.org

RAMEY REALTY

(713) 503-6247 - www.mgramey1@gmail.com

RAYMOND L. WIGGINS, D.D.S., M.D. TEXAS ORAL AND FACIAL SURGERY (281) 395-1200 - www.txofs.com

RE/MAX GRAND III (832) 913-8400

RE/MAX REALTY WEST*

(281) 346-0222 - www.movewest.net

RED POTATO MARKET

(281) 533-9863 - www.redpotatomarket.com

REINING STRENGTH THERAPEUTIC HORSEMANSHIP (832) 451-6874 - www.reiningstrength.org

REMEDY ROOFING, INC.

(281) 391-8555 - www.remedyroofing.com

(281) 342-6969 - www.JohnZerwas.com

(713) 824-6136 - www.republicanwomensclubofkaty.com (713) 294-9691 - www.seetimsell.com (281) 344-4335 - www.govsc.org

(281) 994-5717 - www.pickrick.com

(281) 232-1801 - www.rightwaydental.com (281) 346-2279- www.riverbendbc.org (281) 660-7769 - www.rmcsolarscreens.com

(713) 876-5680 - www.reverbnation.com/saenzofthetime (281) 277-7888 - www.safaritexasballroom.com (713) 899-8979 - sampicas.agm@gmail.com (281) 533-0911 - www.sandefurcpa.com (281) 239-4205 - www.santikos.com (281) 394-5999 - www.saporestaurant.com (832) 437-5325 - www.sapphirecustomhomes.net

(979) 251-7888

(281) 772-3971 - www.sendoutcards.com

www.servproofwestfortbendcounty.com (713) 578-0449

(713) 471-5398 - www.signarama-katyfulshear.com

(281) 579-7387 - www.specialpalsshelter.org (832) 222-9727 - www.scpfit.com (713) 302-6873 (281) 341-5454

STATE FARM INSURANCE - JEFF GILBERT*

(713) 409-0420 - theadsheet@gmail.com (832) 840-8481 - www.tabhoustonsw.com (281) 923-8833

(254) 833-1488 - www.theglasergroup.net (832) 600-5856 - www.thegrowlerspot.com (281) 394-7844 - www.gymstation.com (281) 646-1700 - www. katyplumbers.com (281) 828-0675 - www.kellyclinic.net (281) 232-6033

(281) 769-2846 - oughtness.net

(832) 437-7016 - www.thepopcornshops.com (281) 533-9332

(832) 945-2220 - www.thesportsmarketingcompany.com (832) 978-3809 - www.thesummitfulshear.com (281) 396-4645 - www.katy-tx-6650.theupsstorelocal.com

THE WELLPET CENTER VETERINARY HOSPITAL (281) 394-2355 - www.thewellpetcenter.com (979) 884-7483 - thrivechurch.cc (281) 828-2020 - www.todaysvision.com/location/katy

TOPMARK REALTY

(281) 698-7787 - topmarkrealty.com

TOUCHSTONE CRYSTAL BY SWAROVSKI (469) 826-3564 www.touchstonecrystal.com/triciawright

(281) 723-9890 - www.isellkatytx.net

(832)-563-0916 - www.har.com/TriciaG (281) 497-1040 - www.turnerduran.com (281) 712-4000 - www.twomenandatruckwesthouston. com

(281) 347-6200 - www.yourareaneighbor.com

UNITED HEALTHCARE

STATE FARM INSURANCE - TODD SHIPP*

UPCLOSE MAGAZINE LLC

(713) 464-4255 - www.toddshipp.com

(281) 413-6614 - www.prsinsurancesolutions.com (281)-235-0600 - UpCloseMagazine.com

STERLING OAKS REHABILITATION

USANA HEALTH SCIENCES - (281) 610-3767

STEVE FUQUA HOMES

VAN HOLTEN LAW FIRM*

(281) 980-1010 - www.stevefuquahomes.com

(713) 865-0229 - www.vanholtenlaw.com

STEWART TITLE COMPANY*

VICTOR’S MEXICAN GRILLE* - (281) 533-0040

(281) 346-1333 - www.stewart.com/houston

www.victorsmexicanrestaurant.com

STIEBER INSURANCE GROUP LLC*

VINES OF WINE - WINESHOP AT HOME

(281) 347-8200 - www.sterlingoaksrehab.com

(281) 341-7141 - www.stieberinsurance.com

SUGAR CREEK MONTESSORI SCHOOL - FULSHEAR (281) 693-7267 - www.sugarcreekmontessori.com

www.usana.com/webhosting/cherrylsenergythrough

(602) 300-2888 - www.wineshopathome.com/ sschlangen

W.A. “ANDY” MEYERS

SUGAR LAND SKEETERS

(281) 238-1400 - www.andy.meyers@fortbendcountytx.gov

SUNRISE OF CINCO RANCH - (281) 240-0500

(713) 935-3720 - www.wallisbank.com

(281) 240-4487 - www.sugarlandskeeters.com

WALLIS STATE BANK

www.sunriseseniorliving.com/communities/sunrise-of-cincoranch/overview.aspx

WATERCREST AT KATY

SUNSET GLASS TINTING

WAUSON | PROBUS

(281) 494-7161 - www.sunsetglasstinting.com

(281) 242-0303 - www.texbusinesslaw.com

SUNSET POOLS, INC.

WESTHEIMER LAKES DENTAL

(281) 693-4896 - www.sunsetpoolsinc.com

(281) 394-7581 - www.westheimerlakesdental.com

SWEET TOOTH SHOPPE INC.*

WESTSIDE GRILL AND FIREPLACE, INC.

(281) 533-0477 - www.sweettoothshoppe.com

(281) 392-5535 - www.westsidegrillandfireplace.com

TANCHES GLOBAL MANAGEMENT INC.

WHITE OAKS ON THE BAYOU

(281) 903-7103 x 102 - www.tanches.com

(832) 862-3037 - www.whiteoaksevents.com

TEMPERATUREPRO OF FORT BEND

WORDSERVE CHURCH

(281) 616-5999 - www.temperatureprofortbend.com

(281) 455-5258 - www.wordserve.org

TERRA POINT REALTY, LLC

WORKFORCE RESOURCES/FAMILY HERITAGE

(281) 346-2112 - www.terrapointrealty.com

(713) 392-7128 - www.workforcelife.com

TEXANA CENTER*

WORLD-WIDE TELECOM

(281) 239-1427 - www.texanacenter.com

(281) 346-6200 - www.world-widetelecom.com

TEXAS COUNTRY PROPERTIES*

YEN TEPPANYAKI & SUSHI STEAK HOUSE

(281) 346-1136

(281) 665-3917 - yenhibachi.com

TEXAS ORTHODONTIC SPECIALISTS

YP-DIGITAL MARKETING SOLUTIONS

(281) 346-8326 - www.texasorthodonticspecialists.com

TEXAS PREMIER SPORTING ARMS

(979) 627-7827 - www.texaspremiersportingarms.com

TEXAS PRIDE DISPOSAL

(281) 342-8178 - www.texaspridedisposal.com

(832) 972-8000 - www.watercrestkaty.com

(832) 633-6990 - www.marketingsolutions.yp.com


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Fulshear Magazine - Vol 03 No 01  

Fulshear Magazine - Vol 03 No 01