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To Life

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FOOD STORIES Farmers, Chefs & Artists SHARE THE TABLE

PLUS:

GREAT FALL ADVENTURES


Together makes us better. And you, too.


The new UAB Multispecialty Clinic at Baptist Medical Center South brings two names you trust together.

Together makes us happier, stronger, better. That’s why Baptist South has opened a brand new clinic that brings the best names in healthcare together. Nurses and staff from Baptist South will join specially trained doctors from UAB to offer advanced care in many specialties. It’s a partnership that’s going to make everyone better, including you. Call today and make an appointment at the new UAB clinic. Let’s get you better, together.

See a UAB doctor in one of these specialties UROLOGY GASTROENTEROLOGY ENDOCRINOLOGY RHEUMATOLOGY More specialties to come

Knowledge that will change your world

334.613.7070 UABmedicine-Baptist.com 2119 East South Blvd, east of the Emergency entrance at Baptist South

MULTISPECIALTY CLINIC BAPTIST MEDICAL CENTER SOUTH


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Suddenly, you’re in a whole different state of the road less traveled. morning commute. island cruise.

Beyond our expansive sugar white beaches, you’ll find quiet back bays, miles of unspoiled nature trails, wildlife preserves, open roads and bikeways waiting to be explored. Come be transformed. GulfShoresOrangeBeach

@alabamabeaches

GulfShores.com 877-259-3946 Kaiser Realty by Wyndham Vacation Rentals Coastal Half Marathon and 5K Run

November 26


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PUBLISHER

You may be putting your swimsuit away, but fun in the Alabama outdoors is just beginning.

JTL Publishing EDITOR

From Red Mountain to Heirloom Harvest, we’re highlighting people and places working to preserve and beautif y our state’s magnificent spaces.

Jenny Enslen Stubbs WEB EDITOR Jennifer Stewart Kornegay ART DIRECTOR

Since its inception in 2012, maga zine has been advocating for a sustainable, whole life that utilizes and respects the place we live and call home. Appreciating all that Alabama has to offer brings us together to break bread and share the flavors that make our little place on the planet so special.

Erika Rowe Tracy DIGITAL MEDIA PRODUCERS Big Dreamz Creative MARKETING

Speaking of breaking bread, learn more about some amazing eats around the state, including the Alabama Sweet Tea Company as well as what’s fast becoming the most must-eat event around: the Oyster Cook-Off and Craft Beer Weekend at the Hangout.

Kelly Haynes PUBLIC RELATIONS Denise Greene

Earthborn Pottery is another example of how Alabama’s renaissance in sustainability and craft is garnering attention from people both in and out of state.

PROOFREADER Georgia Pinkston

Living local inspires us to eat better, be better and become a part of our community. We want to be your resource for all things Alabama.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jennifer Stewart Kornegay Jenny Enslen Stubbs CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

SUPPORT

Big Dreamz Creative Art Meripol Graham Yelton COVER PHOTOGRAPHY Erika Rowe Tracy

lean is published quarterly by JTL Publishing. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part is prohibited without permission from the publisher. lean reserves the right to determine the suitability of all materials submitted for publication and to edit all submitted materials for clarity and space. lean is not responsible for damage, loss or any other injury to unsolicited manuscripts and/or unsolicited artwork. This includes, but is not limited to, drawings, photography, transparencies or any other unsolicited material. lean does not knowingly accept false or misleading advertising or editorial. The publishers do not assume responsibility should such advertising or editorial appear. lean is a news magazine with information on health, fitness, leisure activities and sports. Readers are advised to consult their physicians before participating in any sport or fitness activity or starting any exercise, dietary or nutritional program published in lean. EDITOR IMAGE BY AUBRIE MOATES.


I M AG E BY: G R A H A M Y E LTO N / R I G H T I M AG E BY B I G D R E A M Z C R E AT I V E

Features

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RED MOUNTAIN

EAT AROUND ALABAMA FALL ISSUE 16

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CONTENT 12 WHOLE LIVING

Earthborn Pottery

14 THE DISH

Oyster Extravaganza

18 ON THE MOVE

Fab Facelift: Hotel Finial

GOOD FOOD 32 TO LIFE

Managing Stress with Breast Cancer

34 LEAN LOVES

Products & Gear

48 GO & DO

’s Calendar of Events


FOOD

FROM DOWN THE ROAD BY JENNIFER STEWART KORNEGAY


A NEW NON-PROFIT IS HELPING ALABAMA FARMERS SPREAD THE The emphasis on “eating local” has taken hold in Alabama, and folks are more anxious than ever to buy fresh produce and really get to know who grew their food and how. But for small farmers, the time needed to get their story in front of a wider audience and get their products beyond their immediate area just doesn’t exist. For family run farms, the hours between daylight and dusk are usually spent tending to their crops. Enter Heirloom Harvest, a new non-profit organization founded in April 2016 that is working on creating a more streamlined process for getting locally grown products to chefs. Alabama native and founder Will Dodd came up with the idea while working Washington D.C. on the federal farm bill. “The public policy of agriculture is not really set up to benefit the medium and small farms,” he said.

“These guys are having a hard time getting their product to market and expanding their market. They don’t have the resources,” he said. He moved back to the state and is now in Birmingham. Growing up in rural Alabama with farming grandparents, Dodd has always been interested in agriculture and sympathetic to the challenges facing farmers. A few conversations with friends in the restaurant business led to the formation of Heirloom Harvest. “There’s a lot of talk about sourcing and buying local, but no clear or efficient way to do it,” he said. He left his job with a consulting firm and spent months driving around Alabama and talking to farmers to gauge their needs and interest. The response was overwhelmingly positive. He learned that farmers spend so much time farming, they don’t have the opportunity to

Heirloom Harvest is working on creating a more streamlined process for getting locally grown products to chefs.

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A PUBLICATION OF THE JOY TO LIFE FOUNDATION


THERE IS

"

A LOT OF TALK ABOUT

SOURCING AND BUYING LOCAL, BUT NO CLEAR OR EFFICIENT WAY TO DO IT.

"

meet will dodd Alabama native and founder Will Dodd came up with the idea while working Washington D.C. on the federal farm bill. “The public policy of agriculture is not really set up to benefit the medium and small farms,” he said. “These guys are having a hard time getting their product to market and expanding their market.

PINK YOUR

RIDE JOIN OUR FIGHT

y JOYTOLIFE.ORG

on i s si m The grow is to local our d foo y. nom e co


“We have plenty of land, the right climate and good soil, but it is still hard to make good money farming.” “sell” themselves well. “We want to get the harvest from a farmer in Selma and take it outside of his immediate area; we want to get it into a restaurant in Birmingham,” Dodd said. “Our mission is to grow our local food economy and make farming more profitable so more people consider going into farming,” Dodd said. “We have plenty of land, the right climate and good soil, but it is still hard to make good money farming.” To do this, Heirloom Harvest is gearing up to become a wholesale market for farmers’ foods. It will buy from farmers and assume the risk of then selling the products to restaurants. “This helps them solve issues like transportation,” Dodd said. “They don’t have the means to get their products across the state.” It also gives them a more consistent income. He’s also interested in expanding “farm-to-table” access beyond the state’s fine dining establishments. “We want to work with more casual restaurants too,” he said. And restaurants are not Heirloom Harvest’s sole focus. Dodd would also like to help get more farm-fresh foods

into schools and hospitals around the state. He believes that by expanding a local food economy, we can combat many of the socio-economic issues plaguing the state. “Everybody eats, so food is a great common denominator that can solve certain health, education and economic issues for people across a wide spectrum,” he said. And as it grows, Heirloom Harvest also hopes to provide other business services to farmers too, in addition to the overall promotion of the “eat local” concept. “We want to create a narrative that is tied to our state’s agricultural heritage and our food culture,” Dodd said. “We want to inspire people to get back to the tradition of eating this way and to also get interested in growing their own food. When people think about where their food comes from, they tend to buy and eat more intentionally, and that can pay off in a lot of ways.”

MISSION: “Our mission is to grow our local food economy and make farming more profitable so more people consider going into farming,” said Dodd. “We want to get the harvest from a farmer in Selma and take it outside of his immediate area; we want to get it into a restaurant in Birmingham."

The bottom line according to Dodd: “It should not be easier and cheaper to get vegetables from Central America than from our own state.”

SUPPORT HEIRLOOM HARVEST TO HELP ENSURE MORE FRESH, LOCALLY GROWN FOOD ENDS UP ON THE PLATES OF ALABAMIANS.

HEAR CHEF RANDY GRESHAM AND FARMERS ALIKE TELL THEIR LOCAL FOOD STORY AT HEIRLOOMHARVEST.ORG


G WHOLE LIVIN

handmade

EARTHBORN POTTERY LEARN HOW ALABAMA POTTERY ARTIST TENA PAYNE'S WORK CHANGED THE DINNERWARE MARKET IN FINE DINING

“I didn’t climb this mountain by myself.” Payne modestly downplays her success as founder of award-winning Earthborn Pottery by pointing out the support that is behind it.

Although Tena Payne started creating dinnerware pottery long before the sustainability movement, her Alabama-

behold beauty

true, award-winning products

People early in her life and those who came later—her father built her first potters wheel and a school teacher later persuaded her to continue to use it—helped her along on the amazing journey to where Earthborn

continue to please and garner loyalty throughout nationwide fine dining venues because of both its intrinsic beauty and exceptional durability.

To see more Earthborn Pottery pieces as well as an impressive list of its culinary clients, visit earthbornpottery.net.

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Pottery is today. “I didn’t climb this mountain by myself,” Payne is quick to point out. And while she didn’t set out to change the face of pottery, she was always finding a way to do it. “People would ask me why I would continue to create it. I would say, ‘Because I can. I know I can. If I don’t, I’m short-changing myself.’”

BY JENNY ENSLEN STUBBS


A visit to Springhouse at Russell Crossroads is a treat

“IT’S IN YOU. YOU CAN’T NOT CREATE.”

in itself thanks to the culinary delights of James-Beard-Awardnominated Chef Rob McDaniel.

Payne, creator of the evolutionary Earthborn Pottery, believes people can love taking part in more than one interest at a time but admits creating pottery has always been a part of her. “It’s in you. You can’t not create.”

An added bonus to the dining experience— enjoying Earthborn's artful products in action.

“THESE ARE HAND-TOUCHED; ANOTHER HUMAN HAND HAS MADE THEM.” It’s no surprise the passion and love she feels for her craft has translated into relationships spanning cultures and palates through artful, hand-made serving ware. Earthy hues, rustic qualities and a natural elegance make this human-touched pottery what it is. “These are handtouched; another human hand has made them.”

Set the table

“CHEFS LIKE THE IDENTITY THEY CAN PUT ON THEIR FOOD. WHY SHOULD DINNERWARE BE ANY DIFFERENT?” In fact, many chefs, like Chef Alex Eaton of Manship Woodfired Kitchen in Jackson, Miss., are proving such love and loyalty by replacing all their dishes with Earthborn Pottery. “It’s a testament to how well the pieces hold up. The average round and white lasts 60-90 days, while these are lasting years,” explains Payne. “These restaurants aren’t re-ordering as much, and it saves them time.”

I M AG E S BY DA N I E L TAY LO R P H OTO G R A P H Y / C O U R T E S Y O F S P R I N G H O U S E R E S TAU R A N T

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the dish

OY S T ER HANG OUT AT AN

E X T R AVAG A N Z A

Eat your fill of oysters—including Alabama’s lauded farmed varieties—at this year’s Hangout Oyster Cook-Off down at the beach.

RAW OYSTERS, ROASTED OYSTERS, STEWED OYSTERS, GRILLED OYSTERS, OYSTERS TOPPED WITH SAUSAGE, OYSTERS BASTED IN HOT SAUCE, OYSTERS WITH GARLIC:

The long list of bivalve bites up for eating at the annual Hangout Oyster Cook-Off & Craft Beer Weekend in Gulf Shores reads like something out of a Forest Gump fantasy (just sub oysters for that other Southern seafood favorite). The 2016 event will be November 4 and 5. The festival is entering its 9th year and draws thousands eager to eat what the many heavyhitting brewers and chefs involved are dishing out. It kicks off on Friday night with the Craft Beer Festival featuring more than 20 Southern breweries pouring tastes of their foaming favorites and live music. On Saturday, more than 60 chefs, including local stars and James Beard Award winners, make and serve their best interpretations of Gulf oysters, and you get to sample their efforts. Last year a few of the innovative combos included riffs on oysters Rockefeller using kale and a blue cornbread crumble; grilled oysters topped with gumbo or Tasso and corn maque choux; raw oysters with Serrano-honey mignonette or green tea foam and cucumber risotto; and roasted oysters embellished with pickled onions, ginger and mirin.

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GET CRACKIN'

RAW HOT ROASTED STEWED GRILLED

The 2016 event will be NOVEMBER 4 AND 5. The festival is entering its 9th year and draws thousands eager to eat what the many heavy-hitting brewers and chefs involved are dishing out.

FIND DETAILS ON THIS YEAR’S PARTICIPATING CHEFS, BREWERIES AND MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT AND GET YOUR TICKETS AT HANGOUTCOOKOFF.COM.

BY JENNIFER STEWART KORNEGAY


IM AGES COURTESY OF HANGOUT OYS TER COOK- OFF

FRIDAY KICK OFF NIGHT. Craft Beer Festival featuring more than 20 Southern breweries pouring tastes of their foaming favorites and live music. SATURDAY THE MAIN EVENT. Sample the efforts and innovative combos of more than 60 chefs, including local stars and James Beard Award winners, as they make and serve their best interpretations of Gulf oysters.

STEP RIGHT UP. At the North American Oyster Showcase and Oyster Bar, which features oysters from seven distinct regions of the continent, you can eat even more oysters. A panel of oyster experts chooses the country’s “Best Oyster,” but you can discover the differences and find the variety that wins your love by tasting them “in the nude” and on the half shell. Sampling the many and varied ways chefs prepare oysters is definitely the highlight of the event, but the all-thingsoyster weekend has other facets too. Learn from nationally recognized chefs performing demos and workshops throughout the weekend. Cheer on contestants during the Bloody Mary Invitational. And don’t miss your chance to take part in the oyster-shucking contest. It’s all set against the backdrop of Gulf Shores’ white sands and turquoise water, making for a fabulous fall weekend full of good food and plenty of fun.

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IF OUR “BUBBA” REFERENCE IN THE OPENING GOT YOU THINKING ABOUT SHRIMP, you can eat your fill of these crescent-shaped crustaceans at the annual National Shrimp Festival, also in Gulf Shores, this year on OCTOBER 13-16. Watch our cool video highlighting the event at READLEAN.ORG.


HAVE OYSTERS, WILL TRAVEL. If you’re in lower and coastal Alabama and you think oysters would be a great addition to your next party or event (and you’re right, they would), why not set up an oyster bar? Don’t have the resources or know-how to do it? No problem. Contact The Wandering Oyster. This unique catering company specializes in providing premium oysters on the half shell and brings several varieties of handcrafted oysters from the East Coast, West Coast and, of course, the Gulf Coast, along with some shuckers ready to pop them open and serve them up fresh to your hungry guests. The Wandering Oyster gives folks the chance to savor them all and serves them oysters ice cold and arranged by variety, so guests can see and taste the differences. The Wandering Oyster is currently focusing mainly on its own backyard, which stretches along the coast from Biloxi, Miss., across Alabama’s Gulf areas to Pensacola Beach, Fla. But its motto is “Have shucking knife, will travel” so you never know where the group might show up. Learn more at thewanderingoyster.com.

HE ONCE MADE INSTANT PUDDING ALL BY HIMSELF, HID HALF OF IT IN A LAUNDRY HAMPER AND THEN PROCLAIMED HIMSELF “A BIG BOY.” C H I L D R E N A M A Z E U S E V E R Y D AY and at Children’s of Alabama we want to see every child grow up and live to their fullest potential. That’s why we recruit, train and retain the most inquiring minds, the most skilled hands and the most compassionate hearts in pediatric medicine. 1600 7TH AVENUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM, AL 35233 (205) 638-9100 ChildrensAL.org

LeanMagazine_COA_HeadlineAd.indd 1

1/18/16 11:10 AM


ON THE MOVE THE QUEEN ANNE-VICTORIAN STUNNER THAT’S LONG TOPPED A SMALL HILL ON

Anniston’s tree-lined Quintard Avenue HAS ALWAYS BEEN A BEAUTY, BUT SHE WAS BEGINNING TO LOSE HER LUSTER.

Fab Facelift Check into the Hotel Finial

and check out its continuing legacy of welcoming elegance. 18

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BY JENNIFER STEWART KORNEGAY / PHOTOGRAPHY BY ART MERIPOL


all great ladies age;

some do it more gracefully than others. The Queen Anne-Victorian stunner that’s long topped a small hill on Anniston’s treelined Quintard Avenue has always been a beauty, but she was beginning to lose her luster. Now, thanks to a major renovation and restoration effort, the 1888 house is once again beaming, and she’s welcoming guests to come on over and see her shiny new look and asking them to call her by a new name: Hotel Finial. In her previous incarnation, she was The Victoria Hotel. After years of decline, in both business and in the property’s upkeep, the hotel closed several years ago. The house was then in the city’s hands, but it couldn’t afford to maintain it. In 2015, Anniston city officials made an offer: They’d hand over the house and grounds to anyone who would commit to spending at least $1.5 million to fix and preserve it. Nobody even put in a bid. So the city turned to State Senator Del Marsh and his wife Ginger, an Anniston native. “The city asked us if we’d take this on, and at first, we said no. But I really didn’t want to watch it fall into further disrepair,” Ginger said. “I grew up here, and it has always been such a special place to me and to our city.” It’s one of the last historic homes left in the area. “We felt like the community wanted the house to stay here and be returned to its former glory,” Ginger said. After nine months of work, and more than $2 million spent, Hotel Finial opened on March 21, and the property now has 61 rooms, including five sophisticated suites— several named after the home’s original owners—in the main house. The other rooms are in an addition off the back of the house. The original carriage house is now a rustic bar and also houses the front desk for check in. The appeal of Hotel Finial can be found in its mix of old and new, a style Marsh calls “past forward.” She and

Peek inside at hotelfinial.com

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THE ORIGINAL

carriage house IS NOW A RUSTIC BAR AND ALSO HOUSES THE FRONT DESK.

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interior designer Patsy McKinney went to great lengths to retain the home’s historical architectural elements and fixtures while giving the color palette, finishes and furnishings a refresh with contemporary hues, modern shapes and even a few “funky” touches. “We took great care to make it fresh and comfy while keeping the house’s heritage intact too. All of the floors, moldings and stained glass are original,” Marsh said. Cool washes of blue and gray and pops of clean bright white are warmed up by rich wood. The Kirby Room, one of the in-house suites, is unabashedly modern, with shining chrome and sleek lines, while the Wilson Room is soft and plush with gold accents swimming in a sea of calming spa blue.

Originally THE VICTORIA HOTEL, THE 1888 HOUSE IS ONCE AGAIN BEAMING, AND SHE’S

welcoming guests TO COME ON OVER AND SEE HER SHINY NEW LOOK.

The rooms in the addition were completely redone as well, and the same attention to detail is evident in each. “We used vintage heart pine from an old mill in Sylacauga to create the beds,” Ginger said. These guestrooms also cater to the many who visit Anniston to take advantage of the Chief Ladiga Bike Trail; several of them boast bike racks, and more will be added in the future. Fuel up with the included full breakfast—offerings like fluffy scrambled eggs, Conecuh sausage, waffles, home fries and a selection of just-squeezed juices and coffee prepared by the onsite chef—and then set out to explore all the Anniston area offers. WHEN YOU ARE READY FOR SOME TIME IN NATURE'S BEAUTY:

Pedal on . . . READ MORE ABOUT ANNISTON'S CHIEF LADIGA BIKE TRAIL ON THE NEXT PAGE.

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A PUBLICATION OF THE JOY TO LIFE FOUNDATION


a ticket to

RIDE Grab your gear. Hit the trail.

From beginners to experts, bikers venture to Anniston to traverse the Chief Ladiga Bike Trail that travels through some of North Alabama’s most scenic splendor.

The rail lines that crisscross our country were once bustling and busy with train traffic. In the last few decades though, many have fallen out of use, yet the tracks, and the nice cuts they make through the countryside, still remain. A program called Rails to Trails is taking advantage of these areas, transforming them into trails for walking and biking. MAKING A MARK Chief Ladiga Trail is Alabama's first extended rails-to-trails project.

FIT FOR FUN The 33-mile trail has only a slight grade (the 3 to 4 percent used on rail lines), so the path stays fairly flat with a few gentle hills, the entire way. This combined with its paved surface, makes it an easy ride devoid of car traffic for all cycling levels.

THE LONG HAUL The Trail’s far eastern end connects to Georgia’s Silver Comet Trail. All together, the two trails encompass 100 miles, making them the longest paved trail in the country.

SUPPORT

One such path is the 33-mile Chief Ladiga Trail, located in Cleburne and Calhoun counties and running through Piedmont, Jacksonville, Weaver and Anniston. Its paved surface offers an easy ride devoid of car traffic for all cycling levels, and in some places, the surrounding scenery, including wetlands, streams, forests, farmlands and a horizon filled with rolling hills and mountains, is simply stunning. You’ll pedal through Jacksonville State’s Campus, over Terrapin Creek and through portions of the beautiful Talladega National Forest. There’s even a little “bamboo forest” south of Jacksonville whose shade is quite enticing. It all began in 1990 when the Calhoun County Commission and City of Piedmont purchased 22 miles of the rail line corridor. The awarding of several grants allowed the city, and then adjacent cities, to buy more land and pave the trail. Chief Ladiga Trail is the state’s first extended rails-to-trails project, and it is named for a Creek Indian leader. On any given weekend, you’ll find serious cyclers riding right past kids with training wheels and folks out walking their dog. Most riders pick a comfortable pace and stop often to


Discover unseen parts of our state.

snap photos along the way or for a quick bite at one of the picnic tables scattered along the route. Biking the Chief Ladiga Trail is a great way to explore previously unseen (unless you’re a train engineer) parts of our state, and with only a slight grade (the 3 to 4 percent used on rail lines), the path stays fairly flat, with a few gentle hills, the entire way. The Trail’s far eastern end also connects to Georgia’s Silver Comet Trail, and if you’re looking for a really long ride, all together, the two trails encompass 100 miles, making them the longest paved trail in the country. Find trail maps and more info at chiefladigatrail.com. READ ABOUT SOME OF THE COUNTRY'S MOST UNIQUE RAIL-TRAIL DESTINATIONS, WHICH PROMISE ADVENTURE, CULTURAL EXPLORATION AND (MOST OF ALL) LOTS OF FUN.

railstotrails.org


ON THE MOVE

Finding green space in an urban environment is never an easy feat. But Red Mountain Park in Birmingham is “upcycling” at its best. Once the site of ore mines, the park now takes what used to be and has transformed it into a practical, usable space that still pays homage to the hardworking people who once mined it for their livelihood.

RED MOUNTAIN PARK

BI R M I NGH A M'S

MAKING THE CUT

COMMON GROUND BY JENNY ENSLEN STUBBS // PHOTOGRAPHY BY BIG DREAMZ CREATIVE

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A PUBLICATION OF THE JOY TO LIFE FOUNDATION


EXPLORE / redmountainpark.org

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Today, Red Mountain Park’s massive size includes 1,500 acres of land filled with red earth hidden underneath a sprawling green space of hills, valleys and breathtaking views. The Past Remains

Red Mountain was once the site of America’s most productive iron ore mines. Remnants of the city’s industrialized past still sit memorialized through gigantic factories, railroad ties and other spaces that were pivotal in building the city that stands today. But Red Mountain’s history was somehow lost in the shift and almost forgotten until a new project emerged. The Red Mountain Park project awoke a sleeping giant, and through the cooperation of volunteers, organizations, philanthropists and recreational enthusiasts alike, this once-vibrant treasure is again beginning to realize its potential, although its newfound function is quite a turn from what it once was. In 1962, the last mines closed, in large part because a more cost-efficient, higher grade of ore was found in Venezuela. Hundreds of miners and their families lived in and around the mountain (two of which are the Wenonah and Ishkooda communities), where many of the same families remain. In many ways, this devastated the communities. But now, changes are happening. In 2007, through efforts of both the Freshwater Land Trust and committees of interested individuals, U.S. Steel made one of the largest corporate land donations in the nation’s history, which included selling more than 1,200 acres at an incredibly discounted price to the Red

Mountain Park and Recreational Area Commission. This made possible today’s vision of Red Mountain Park to take place and, in result, make Birmingham one of the “greenest” cities in America.

Past and Present Meet Future

Where the Birmingham Mineral Railroad once sat, railheads are being transformed into pedestrian byways. Red Mountain Park is proud of the “community buy-in” taking place, wherein volunteers come and play a role in prepping and pre-construction, giving them a sense of ownership in the park. Katie Bradford, director of communication and marketing at the park, explained the excitement of the ongoing projects because the organization was “running a park while we’re building a park.” In fact, she hopes the adjoining communities will benefit from the park and says Red Mountain Park is working with the city to build an alternate route that directly feeds into the historic Wenonah and Ishkooda communities.

Where it is Today

When you have 1,500 acres to work on (and 10,000 visitors a month), things can get expensive, and revenue is always needed at the park. The organization does not charge for entry into the park but, instead, has fantastic outlets for adventure that charge a nominal fee. Fifteen miles of trails encompass these fun stops, including two amazing city overlooks and three tree houses.

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A PUBLICATION OF THE JOY TO LIFE FOUNDATION


It’s the largest dog park in Alabama. A park just for your pooch! This sixacre park even has spaces dedicated to small dogs, large dogs and dogs with special needs. Need we say more?

WOULD YOU LOOK AT THAT

In 2007, U.S. Steel made one of the largest corporate land donations in the nation’s history, which included selling more than 1,200 acres at an incredibly discounted price to the Red Mountain Park and Recreational Area Commission.

If you’ve driven around the city much, chances are you’ve seen some billboards pointing you to the avant-garde artwork found in the form of Schaeffer Spectacles— giant eyeglasses made with industrial pieces from the area.

A REAL HONOR The park is full of Eagle Scout projects that are a sight to see.

OUR FAVORITE? THE ENO STATION!

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KEEPING THE STORY ALIVE Underground work in the mines was a serious, dangerous and sometimes deadly job where the men had no other option but to look out for one another. (In fact, the current Mayor Bell’s grandfather died while working in the mines.) One of the living miners points out, “Underground, we were all just red.”

Because of its storied past, what is known as the Red Mountain Park Oral History Project is taking place. This project continues to be documented and its product is found by listening to the TravelStorysGPS app as well as on Red Mountain Park’s YouTube channel.

VISIT READLEAN.ORG

SUPPORT

REMY’S DOG PARK

Friends of Red Mountain Park consists of people who support the park by various pledges each year and, in return, enjoy park perks. Red Mountain Park actually has no debt and relies on no governmental funding. It’s a community-driven park that supports just that: the community.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE PROGRAM, VISIT REDMOUNTAINPARK.ORG.

HELPING HANDS A community “buyin” is taking place, wherein volunteers come and play a role in prepping and preconstruction, giving them a sense of ownership in the park.


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IZ P

GET YOUR THRILL ON

Zip lines for the adventure-seekers.

VULCAN MATERIAL ZIP TRIP

This trip takes you on seven zip lines, a sky bridge and a “Tarzan” swing.

HUGH KAUL BEANSTALK FOREST

This challenge presents 20 treetop rope (and cable) obstacles.

MEGA ZIP

AT THE KAUL ADVENTURE TOWER

The folks at the park claim this to be the “most daring zip line around,” because its 1,000-foot-long length reaches speeds of 30 mph. This is definitely a course for the more advanced adventurist.

KAUL ADVENTURE TOWER

Both traditional rock climbing and “leaf” climbing can be found at this one-of-a-kind tower. In fact, there’s not another one like it in the world. There are six layers of climbing and rappelling, and the tower comes to be 80 feet tall with a 100-foot-long zip line.

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PICK A CHILL RED MOUNTAIN ADVENTURE SCHAEFFER SEG TOUR

This tour allows for a 90-minute exploration of the park’s historic trails and mining sites in an all-terrain Segway.

RILEY’S ROOST TREEHOUSE

This treehouse overlook allows for wheelchair access. Interested parties need to call ahead to reserve the “nomad.”


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love yourself

YOU

October is breast cancer awareness month, and for more than 15 years, the Joy to Life Foundation has worked to provide mammograms to underinsured women throughout the state of Alabama. Founder Joy Blondheim explains, " These are women with jobs, families, trying the best they can to care for themselves and the people they love. They make difficult choices. Joy to Life is easing minds by providing screenings and, more importantly, we are saving lives."

TAKING CARE OF

M A N AGING S TRES S W ITH BRE AS T CA NCER

Life can be difficult enough without having to deal with the strenuous effects of breast cancer. So it's no surprise stress, anxiety and depression oftentimes follow the devastating diagnosis. Whether it's wading through treatment options, dealing with the side effects of those decisions, social concerns, financial concerns or threat of relapse, “the ways in which people cope with these stressors, and their resources of emotional support, can have profound effects on their quality of life and potentially on the progression of their disease,” says Stanford University School of Medicine's David Spiegel, M.D. The good news? Dr. Spiegel also points out that due to better screening and treatments, over half of all breast cancer patients will not die of their illness. Yet it’s about a whole lot more than numbers and statistics. Understandably, the symptoms of cancer and its treatment can leave patients with feelings of hopelessness, fatigue, sleep disturbance and loss of appetite, leading one to believe the depression may not be as severe as it actually is.

FORWARD MOTION The stress that accompanies breast cancer can complicate the course of the disease. Taking it head-on and learning to understand and deal with the stress can help combat the cancer.

But the Stanford Center on Health and Stress has been hard at work determining how much of a role stress plays in the survival of those stricken with cancer.

the good news:

In fact, they’ve come up with an acronym to sum up stress management for breast cancer patients. F-A-C-E-S. FACES.

DUE TO BETTER SCREENING AND TREATMENTS, OVER HALF OF ALL BREAST CANCER PATIENTS WILL NOT DIE OF THEIR ILLNESS.

BY JENNY ENSLEN STUBBS


S TA NF OR D UNI V ER SI T Y ’ S CEN T ER ON S T R E S S A ND HE A LT H IS DIS C OV ER ING NE W WAY S T O UNDE R S TA ND T HE S T R E S S OR S OF BR E A S T C A NCER A ND T HE WAY S T O DIF F USE T HEM DUR ING A ND A F T E R T R E AT ME N T.

 ACING RATHER THAN FLEEING. F It’s important to deal with the stress as it comes, as opposed to letting it compound.

ALTERING PERCEPTION. In other words, mind over matter. When a cancer patient has pain coupled with anxiety, the pain can actually become worse.

But by using mind-calming techniques such as selfhypnosis, treatment of the pain and anxiety becomes much more manageable.

. COPING ACTIVELY. Dr. Spiegel points to the serenity prayer which reads, “Lord, give me the courage to change what I can change, the grace to accept what I can’t, and the wisdom to know one from the other.”

He suggests the key is to find the aspect of a particular stressor that can be controlled and control it. Deciding what the next step will be helps to control the stress, which will allow one to feel less helpless.

EXPRESSING EMOTIONS. To put it simply, emotions should act as a help and not a hindrance. “We have our emotion system to get our attention,” says Dr. Spiegel. “So if something is making you fearful, angry or sad, the thing to do is use that emotion as a useful alarm system.”

Sharing your feelings and expressing your emotions lead to more efficient processing of the emotions being felt.

SOCIAL SUPPORT. Giving and receiving help as a cancer patient and/or survivor becomes much easier through the help of strong social support networks. Thankfully, breast cancer is not nearly as stigmatized as it used to be, but communication with family and friends continues to be crucial.


Gear PRODUCTS &

GET AN EYEFUL OF THESE PRODUCTS AND PLACES WE LOVE.

TEA TIPS

HOW SWEET IT IS Sweet tea. As the region’s go-to form of refreshment, it’s become synonymous with the South. It’s easy to drink: Cold and crisp, it goes with anything and always hits the right spot. It’s easy to make: Mix tea and sugar and pour over ice. It’s simple. So how could an entire business be centered on such a well-known, can-find-it-anywhere staple? The answer is just as simple: As any tea devotee will tell you, the nuances of tea are many and varied. The pedigree of the drink’s principal ingredient, the tea leaf, matters. It’s a fact the guys behind the Alabama Sweet Tea Company know and respect. Montgomerians Wes Willis and Golson Foshee founded their company in early 2016. They use a custom blend of wholeleaf black teas mixed especially for The Alabama Sweet Tea Company. “Lots of tea companies use tea ‘dust.’ It’s what falls off the leaves,” Wes said. “It’s cheap, but really bitter. The whole leaf is the best part, and that’s what we use.” Then they put a few spins on it. There’s the Southern: traditional sweet using natural cane sugar; the Yankee: unsweet; and the Mason-Dixon: half and half. They also make the Yellowhammer, which adds fresh-squeezed lemonade. None of The Alabama Sweet Tea Company’s products contain preservatives or anything artificial. “It’s funny since the name says

Order yourself some Alabama Sweet Tea Company tea at alabamasweettea.com and follow company founder Wes Willis’ tips for brewing it better.

RIGHT ON Grab a great tea tee too.

Sweet Tea, but the tea is actually really good without any sugar or anything added to it,” Golson said. Wes had the initial idea, and it stemmed from his love of sweet tea. While traveling the country with his band, Rush of Fools, he realized how much he missed his favorite drink when he ended up in towns that didn’t have it. He decided to create a company that would not only create a great tea, but share it across the state, the South and beyond. He partnered with Montgomery real estate developer, Golson Foshee, and The Alabama Sweet Tea Company was born. They’re currently selling mason jars full of their tea at local farmers markets and driving around the state in a funky vintage truck to take their tea to the masses at music and food festivals. Their tea is also available for order online, so folks can brew it at home.

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Don’t let it steep too long. “About five minutes is best,” Wes said.

Let it cool before pouring it over ice.

Taste it before sweetening the deal. “Our tea is not too fruity and not too bitter. You may find it doesn’t need a thing.”


-IT IS ALL GOOD Golson and Wes know that sweet tea is a positive symbol that conjures happy thoughts, and they’re using that to be a part of the positive change in their hometown of Montgomery. “We wanted to create something that people wanted but that they could also be proud of,” Wes said.

COMING SOON The Alabama Sweet Tea Company’s first brick and mortar store will be in downtown Montgomery, part of the capital city’s new Market District in the heart of the city’s center that should be up and going by summer 2017.

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A path T O T A K E

PUMPKIN PICKIN’ Whether you carve them into spooky jack-o-lanterns or leave them un-cut to include in your autumn décor, pumpkins of all shapes, sizes and colors are some of our favorite signs of fall. Turn your annual pumpkin procurement into an event with a trip to one of Alabama’s many pick-your-own pumpkin patches. Many of these family owned farms offer hayrides to their fields, where you can pluck the plump pumpkin of your choice straight from the vine. Some also have corn mazes, face painting and other kids’ activities. DOWN ON THE FARM, Rainsville downonthefarminal.com

HEART & HOME Artist Jordan Hughes, the founder of Birminghambased Stately Made, celebrates the art, food and music of her sweet home Alabama through SM’s Southernthemed, hand-lettered and drawn prints and greeting cards. The whimsical designs feature traditional Southern phrases and bits of Alabama culture with a strong focus on food. Many feature words or images fashioned into the shape of our state. Find Stately Made products online and at select stores across the Southeast. statelymade.com

SAY HELLO!

TATE FARMS, Meridianville tatefarmsal.com

Catch Lucy and other friendly, Southern makers at Birmingham's Pepperplace Market on Saturdays through December.

APLIN FARMS, Geneva alpinfarms.com PARADISE PUMPKIN PATCH, Eufaula paradisepumpkinpatch.com BARBER BERRY FARMS, Millbrook barberberryfarm.com PUMPKIN PATCH EXPRESS AT THE HEART OF DIXIE RAILROAD MUSEUM, Calera hodrrm.org

TREAT YOURSELF & SOMEONE ELSE Add some sparkle to your fall fashions with one of Lucy Farmer’s necklaces. The Birminghambased jewelry designer’s company, Lucy’s Inspired, recently launched its "Inspired to Give" line. Each Inspired to Give purchase includes two necklaces — two glimmering prisms paired with dainty, vintagelook keys on a rustic leather cord. There’s one for you, and one for someone special in your life. lucysinspired.com

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ealth

toyour

I M AG E BY: JAC K J E F F R I E S

HAPPY h

iversa

FLOUR POWER Alabama’s To Your Health Sprouted Flour Co. turns 10 this year, and it all started in a home kitchen in little Fitzpatrick, in rural Central Alabama. Founder Pegg y Sutton wanted to improve her health by eating better, by eating foods closer to their natural state. She discovered the nutritional power of sprouting grains and then grinding them into flour, and in the last decade has grown her company from producing just a few pounds of sprouted flours and sprouted grains a week to more than 100,000 and has attracted the business of national brands like Kashi, which uses TYH products in some of its offerings. TYH now produces sprouted f lours and other sprouted grain products made using all organic, non-GMO whole grains and legumes including red and white wheat, spelt, kamut, rye, black beans, corn, brown rice, amaranth and more. And it’s still going and growing in Fitzpatrick, where it all started. healthyflour.com

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a m a b a Al EATING AROUND

IDE FIELD GU A ut u m n i n A l a b a m a i s t h e p e r f e c t t i m e t o e x plo r e o u r s m a l l t o w n s , b ig c it ie s a n d e v e r y wh e r e i n b e t w e e n w it h a d ay t r ip o r a f u l l w e e k e n d e s c ap e . W h e t h e r it ’s f a l l c olo r s , c ol le g e f o o tb a l l o r j u s t a v i s it w it h f a m i ly t h at c a l l s y o u t o t h e r o a d , y o u ’r e g o i n g t o h av e t o e at . H e r e a r e a f e w o f o u r f av o r it e pl a c e s a l l a r o u n d t h e s t at e t o d o j u s t t h at .

B Y J E N N I F E R KOR N E G AY

Enjoy

E AT I N G LOCAL


Early B I R D GETS THE GOODNESS

we have doughnuts

BHAM

The name of this new spot in downtown Birmingham should really be “We DON’T Have Doughnuts,” since they sell their small-batch, scratch-made-daily fried dough delights from 7 a.m. until 1 p.m. or sold out, and “sold out” is usually pretty early. If you want to fuel up for a busy day with some of WHD’s creative flavors (which are made with local ingredients and change with the seasons) like lavender lemon, buttermilk, brown butter and double blackberry, you’ll need to get on it first thing in the morning! Or think ahead! You can pre-order for pickup a day ahead. You can also find their doughnuts at several coffee shops in the Ham, including Revelator Coffee Company, Satellite Coffee Bar and Seeds Coffee.

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W E H AV E D OUG H N U T S .COM

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BR E A K FA ST

in the morning A LITTLE SECRET

ort ant

the biscuit king

AF E W M O R E FA

mp i 's t I : S VE

FHPE

At this out-of-the-way spot on a county road in Fairhope, you can have a bite of biscuit royalty by ordering the joint’s famed “ugly biscuit.” While the lumpy, odd-shaped, never-really-round mounds won’t win any biscuit beauty pageants, they could easily take the crown in a taste contest. They’re dense yet fluffy, buttery but not greasy, and they’ve got a surprise inside. Depending on which variety you choose, you’ll find eggs, cheese, bacon, sausage, jalapenos or some combination of them all stuffed inside each hand-fashioned puffball of dough. O L D S C H O O L P H O N E : 2 5 1- 92 8 -2 4 2 4

TUSC

T H E WAY S I D E R

BHAM

B IG B A D B R E A K FA S T

MO N T

SHASHY 'S

OBCH

DUC K ' S DI N E R

FLCE

ODETTE

LKMT

S P R I N G H OU S E

OBCH

FISHER'S

WEEKENDERS

SUPPORT

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MO N T

On a grassy patch in downtown Montgomery, a silver Airstream trailer is the site of some of the capital city’s tastiest lunch grub. On A Roll food truck feeds scores of hungry diners each weekday, offering up innovative takes on midday meal staples like Yaki pulled pork with wasabi potato salad, green curry chicken salad, Cajun chicken pasta, chipotle chicken tacos and an amazing rendition of pimento cheese. It’s all courtesy of cute couple Davena and Nick Jernigan; Davena’s doing the cooking, and Nick is ringing up sales and welcoming diners. Don’t forget to order an ice-cold glass of sweettart mixed berry lemonade to wash all that goodness down.

Burger BASH WINNER ' 16

FAC E B O O K .COM /O N A RO L L MG M

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I M AG E BY: B I G D R E A M Z C R E AT I V E

LU NCH is time to break

on a roll

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I M AG E BY: TO D D D O U G L A S

TA K E I T H O M E

kbc butcher Block

DTHN

Dothan native Chef Kelsey Barnard Clark brought her serious cooking skills home after attending the Culinary Institute of America and spending time in some of New York City’s hottest kitchens. She combined her experience with a love for her community and the result is her business KBC, which includes a market, a catering company and two eateries, KBC Butcher Block and KBC Downtown. Hit either one around lunch time to grab fresh salads filled with Wiregrass produce like the KBC Chop Chop—free-range, hormone-free chicken breast, chickpeas, cucumbers, tomatoes, feta, red wine vinaigrette on local lettuce—or sandwiches stuffed with premium meats and cheeses like the Three Little Pigs—roasted pork, black forest ham, bacon, smoked gouda, siracha aioli and fried onions on a toasted sweet bun. Give the brisket sammy some thought before you make a decision. Piled high with brisket smoked in house for eight hours, vinegar slaw and homemade barbecue sauce, it’s one of KBC’s best sellers. E AT K B C .COM

DI N N E R

a fine finish Line nick's orig inal filet house

TUSC

This one-room, cinder block building is known to most as Nick’s in the Sticks, a humble-looking spot that’s been serving good steaks at great prices for more than 75 years. It doesn’t look like much; its bare-bones décor scheme inside and out definitely earns it the title “dive.” But the crowds that pack this place don’t care about looks. They care about the juicy, lightly seasoned, bacon-wrapped filet (that for just under $10 is arguably the best dinner deal around for miles), the fat, flavorful cheeseburger and the Nicodemus, an adult punch-like concoction that is sweet and stout. O L D S C H O O L P H O N E : 205 -7 5 8 - 9 3 16

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In the heart of downtown, Central is housed in an 1890s-era grocery warehouse and wows guests with a large dining room and soaring ceilings lit by the flickering flames of oversized gas lanterns that bounce shadows off of massive mirrors and onto rough brick walls and exposed wood beams overhead. This warm, traditional look is given a punch of pizzazz with the action of an open kitchen, contemporary light fixtures and a vibrant, almost boisterous, atmosphere. The food focus is on fresh, regional ingredients like produce, meats and Gulf seafood used to put exciting spins on Southern classics. Try the Gulf Pot Pie or the 1895 Pork ‘n Beans, and don’t forget a side of Betty Lou’s Cornbread, named after Chef Brandon Burleson’s greatgrandmother and made using her recipe. C E N T R A L 1 2 9 CO O S A .COM

A VISIT H OM E

I M AG E S BY: B I G D R E A M Z C R E AT I V E

central

MO N T


IN THE KITCHEN

wit h C h e f

W H AT ’ S YO U R F O O D PHILOSOPHY?

We chatted with Central’s Executive Chef Brandon Burleson to learn a bit about his background and his food philosophy. The Georgiana, Ala., native began his cooking journey at Auburn University and further honed his skills as the Executive Sous Chef at the Perdido Beach Resort. He stepped up to the helm at Central in March 2016.

B B : I don’t want to just create memories; I want to revive memories. That’s why my food is kinda playful. I like evoking people’s childhood memories. When I think of good food, I think of church homecoming meals, the big potluck events where there’d be 38 different types of deviled eggs. I like to do new takes on old dishes. W H AT ’ S YO U R FAVO R I T E T H I N G T O E AT ? B B : I’m all about comfort. I love white bread with mustard and Conecuh sausage.

W H AT WA S T H E F I R S T T H I N G YO U CO O K E D ?

W H AT ’ S YO U R FAVO R I T E

B B : My first time really making

T H I N G T O CO O K ?

anything other than scrambled eggs was after being a smart aleck to my mom. I said something about her dinner, and she told me if I thought I could do better, I could make dinner the next night, so I did. I made baked beans and Boston butt. The family loved it, and I enjoyed making it.

B B : Anything on the grill. Any

W H AT D O YO U L OV E A B O U T CO O K I N G ? B B : The rush. I grew up playing all kinds of sports, and there is a similar adrenalin rush in the middle of dinner service, the fast pace, etc. But I also love the instant gratification I get when I look out into the dining area and see the satisfied looks on people’s faces because of something I made and they ate.

meat, especially seafood. And my favorite ingredient to cook with is tomatoes, which is weird, because I actually don’t like eating them myself. I don’t like the juice.

Browse through stories of culinary delight from all over the state to find your next meal stop,

W H Y S H O U L D F O L K S CO M E E AT W I T H YO U AT C E N T R A L?

regardless of the hour. Check out “The Dish”

B B : My menu has an all-Alabama

focus. I’ve traveled a lot, and so I take some non-traditional ingredients and work them in, and you’ll see some Latin and Mediterranean influences, but it’s still predominantly Southern.

MARSH

portion of our website for a full menu of archives.

WWW

readlean.org


LUAU P INK EVENT THE GULF COAST FITNESS FUNDRAISER SUPPORTING THE JOY TO LIFE FOUNDATION

OCTOBER 22, 2016 DOORS OPEN AT 10:30AM TICKETS $10

@ BODENHAMER

CENTER

GULF SHORES, AL

Pink Power!

COME SUPPORT THE CURE FOR BREAST CANCER

FACE PAINTING CHAIR MASSAGES PHOTO BOOTH AND MORE!

HOST & INSTRUCTOR // Sherie Coyne 251-377-1050

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SILENT AUCTION // 10 AM

BODENHAMER CENTER // 251-968-1420 // 310 WEST 19TH AVENUE GULF SHORES, AL 46

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NATIONAL BREAST CANCER AWARENESS CAMPAIGN

Pinking of You Show someone affected by breast cancer you are “Pinking” of them. Make a powerful breast cancer support video and invite friends and family to join in. Simply download VideoFizz on your mobile device from the App Store or Google Play and select “Pinking of You” to make your FREE video and share socially!

In benefit of

AMERICAN BREAST CANCER FOUNDATION

Powered by

Record Videos

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A FINE AFFAIR

FAIRHOPE

October 15 Polo at the Point The Polo at the Point charity event provides world class polo and boasts a beautiful tented luncheon and sophisticated silent auction to raise money for multiple charities, including Mitchell Cancer Institute, and has been around for a quarter century. Each year, Polo at the Point proves to be a festival filled with charity and fruitful fellowship (and hats fit for the Kentucky Derby)!

poloatthepoint.com

A BREAST CANCER EVENT

So it’s no surprise the organization is excited to promote an event that currently helps one of its longtime partners, the USA Mitchell Cancer Institute. Polo at the Point is now partnering with MCI to break ground on a new cancer center building in Fairhope to serve Baldwin County residents. Joy to Life is proud to be a big part of serving the people of south Alabama!

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PERRY CORRELL / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Many people across the state know and recognize the Joy to Life Foundation and its “pink plates.” But the organization does much more than proudly touts pink. It provides mammograms to underserved women in every county in Alabama, and in the last few years has donated nearly $900,000 to the fight against breast and cervical cancer for women and men throughout the state. Joy to Life has donated more than $115,000 to the Mobile Bay community in the last three years alone.


2016

CHECK OU T T HE SE SE A SON A L E V EN T S T HROUGHOU T A L A B A M A T O M A K E T HIS YOUR BE S T AU T UMN E V ER !

SEPT/OCT/NOV A LITT LE MOR E

lov e in northeast Alabama mountains at this eye-catching festival.

BIRMINGHAM

September 25 Breaking Bread

SUPP ORT BREA ST HEALTH AWA RENE SS

NORTHPORT

birminghamoriginals.org

October 15-16

“The Local Flavor Festival of 2016” is what they call it. It’s Birmingham’s premier food and wine festival and brings foodies and families alike for a day of culinary delights, live music and other activities.

Kentuck Art Festival kentuck.org If the event has been around for fourand-a-half decades, you know it’s worth the trip! This two-day festival boasts connecting the community to the artist. And with hundreds of artists there to present—including blacksmiths, basket weavers, potters, sculpters, quilters, jewelers and glass blowers—it adds an ambiance to the night of food, music and story-telling that just can’t be beat.

GULF SHORES

October 13-16 National Shrimp Festival myshrimpfest.com Shrimp creole, shrimp gumbo, shrimp salad, shrimp and potatoes—you know you are gonna eat some good shrimp at this annual festival! Take it on down to the Gulf to enjoy this festival of feasts.

support breast cancer awareness month MONTGOMERY TICKLED PINK WOMEN'S EXPO SEPTEMBER 30 Come celebrate life, beauty, fashion and fitness at this exhibition. Enjoy a concert by local favorite and American Idol finalist Jesse Meuse. Proceeds from ticket sales will benefit the Joy to Life Foundation.

HEFLIN

alabamanews.net

Pinhoti 100

PINK PRIDE!

November 5-6

MENTONE

pinhotitrailseries.com

October 15-16

Part of the Pinhoti Trail Series, this challenging 100-mile point-to-point trail running race is full of creek crossings, rocky ridges and magnificent views, including the highest peak in Alabama.

Mentone Colorfest discoverlookoutmountain.com There will be s’mores, storytelling and sing-a-longs with a backdrop of the magical

Visit readlean.org to find more ways to support Joy to Life during breast cancer awareness month, including the Sista Strut 3K taking

place on October 8 at the Alabama Shakespeare Festival.

SUPPORT

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LEAN Magazine-Fall 2016  

Alabama's Good Food Stories, Farmers, Chefs & Artists Share The Table, Great Fall Adventures

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