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FIND YOUR PASSION | OCTOBER 9-15, 2003

buzz

z buz Oct. 9-15, 2003

Arts | Entertainment | Community

FREE!

COMMUNIT Y

Grandparents raising grandchildren (page 3) ARTS

Race and art in C-U (page 6)

MUSIC

Top five 7th inning stretch performances (page 13) CALENDAR

Gloria Steinem plus special guests from advertising & academia northwestern university, thorne auditorium, chicago saturday, october 18th 2003, 9am-5pm admission & lunch: $35 888 986 8060 students: $15 special guests include Susan Bordo, Amy Richards, and Jennifer Scanlon Sponsored by the ADVERTISING EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION Symposium Chair: Linda Scott, PhD, University of Illinois.

Roots of Orchis, The Blackouts, Graham Coulton (page 14)

FILM & TV

Scrubs gets the last laugh (page 23)

death cab for cutie’s transatlantic journey to champaign


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WHO NEEDS SHOUT OUTS WHEN WE HAVE DIRTY TALKS | OCTOBER 9-15, 2003 buzz

insidebuzz 4 8 11

COMMUNIT Y

Q & A with local jazz man ARTS

Discovering the Mediterranean MUSIC

Outkast casts off tradition

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CALENDAR

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FILM & TV

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ODDS & END

See all there is to do in C-U Get lost in the Translation Tigers and Rush Limbaugh, oh my

Volume 1, Number 31 COVER DESIGN | Meaghan Dee

BUZZ STAFF Editor-in-chief Tom Rybarczyk Art Director Meaghan Dee Copy Chief Erin Green Arts Katie Richardson Music Brian Mertz Entertainment Jason Cantone Calendar Marissa Monson Assistant Music Editor Jacob Dittmer Calendar Coordinators Lauren Smith, Cassie Conner, Erin Scottberg Photography Christine Litas, Adam Young Copy Editors Elizabeth Zeman Designers Adam Obendorf, Carol Mudra, Jason Cantone Production Manager Theon Smith Editorial Adviser Elliot Kolkovich Sales Manager Lindsey Benton Marketing/Distribution Melissa Schleicher, Willis Welch Publisher Mary Cory All editorial questions or letters to the editor should be sent to buzz@readbuzz.com or 244-9898 or buzz, 1001 S. Wright St., Champaign, Ill., 61820. Buzz magazine is a student-run publication of Illini Media Company and does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. Copyright Illini Media Company 2003

editor’snote

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or the past 95 years, Cubs fans have waited to hear those cherished words “Cubs win, Cubs win the World Series.” And, it looks like that dream may soon come true. The Cubs have always been something special. They represent the lovable losers, the underdog that America has always loved. Maybe that’s why America has embraced these Cubbies. Suddenly fans all over the country have shown their Cub pride, a pride based on the idea of the Cubs. They love the idea of David and Goliath. They love the idea of the loser winning it all. That’s why if the Yankees go to the series, it will seem like the entire country versus New York City. Everybody hates the Yankees and loves the Cubs. America has always loved the underdogs, ever since its inception—when the United States was only colonies looking to free themselves from an overbearing empire. The Cubs are that group of colonies and the overbearing empire is the World Series. Yet, most of these fans do not claim to be lifelong Cubs’ fans. These fans embrace the Cubs because their team is not in the playoffs. Now there are true Cubs fans from sea to shining sea and beyond. The Cubs have fans in Australia, Japan and other distant lands. Some have even traveled to Chicago to see their lovable losers, the team they can never give up on. And the team they never will give up on. The fans that bother thousands of Cubs fans are the ones that claim they have been Cubs fans their whole life and have since begun to party every time the Cubs play. They ask when the Cubs will be playing and then plan parties around their “beloved” Cubs. After the game starts, they get smashed and do not even seem to care what happens to their team. They ask who every player is. They have no idea what a full count is. They do not even know that Sammy Sosa broke the old record set for home runs years ago. “Who is Ron Santo?” they say. All these individuals care about is the party. Why do they have to ruin other Cubs’ fans joy by pretending? If a fan of another team supports the Cubs because of the deep mythological meaning a Cubs victory symbolizes, great. If a true Cubs fan from across the world supports the Cubs, great. But do not be that person who sits at the bar, screaming for the Cubs and Sammy Sosa (the only Cubs player you know). If you want to party and do no work, do not use the Cubs as an excuse. It offends those of us who have waited most of our lives for our team to win it all. GO CUBBIES! –TR

letterstotheeditor

I

t was refreshing to read an article on Burch Village. There are still many questions that linger after reading it. Who else benefits from the rebuilding, which contractors? What are the typical renting options after being forced to leave? The broken down older homes that have been rampantly selling as “investment properties,” or the large apartment complexes like Prairie Greens, Sunny Crest II, which builders receive a tax credit on for 10 years. These two apartment complexes each have surpassed crime rates of public housing—look at the data via the Freedom of Information Act from the local police. The park districts do not provide landscaped green space or trained personnel or activities expressly for the large numbers of working families in these places. The schools are bursting without the builders’ tax dollars to match the increase in student population. Places like Burch Village look unappealing. Why? Because very low-cost basic maintenance has not been done? Has the park district refused to lead volunteers in landscaping projects? Have companies like Lowes refused donation requests for materials for new screens, gutters or paint for front doors? Or has no member of management supported those efforts? The University Orchard Downs where students with families live is virtually the same tiny style of construction, built about the same time with only two laundry stations and has no plans to be torn down. The grounds are picturesque and spare acreage is used for gardens. Is it the difference of education levels, wholesome recreation options or basic caretaking? Or is it that no contractors are lobbying for funds to redo the facilities? -Andrea Antulov Urbana

I

applaud Buzz for taking the time last issue to recognize the movie mirth and mayhem produced by Jason Butler, Mark Peaslee and their colleagues. With Thoraxx II and last year’s Teeth in the Bottle, the man known to many as “JB” has certainly come a long way, baby. However, the accompanying editorial applauding their efforts is mildly degrading and rather ill-informed about film arts and Champaign-Urbana. While the general train of thought encouraging our twin cities to support their artists a lot more then they do is appreciated, please look around you a bit closer for proof that moviemaking does exist, here and now. We have other neighbors taking film activity seriously that deserve our community’s support. These include people like documentary filmmaker Jay Rosenstein, whose new film The Amasong Chorus makes its local

debut on Oct. 8 at Beckman Auditorium, and Mike Trippiedi, who has been making lowbudget black comedies on his own dime for 20 years, such as Dogs in Quicksand and Bucky McSnead. The university’s film club, Illini Film & Video, which was founded by engineering students Andrew McAllister and Mike Stone almost four years ago, has collectively produced dozens of films, with Chris Folkens’ production Triad setting the bar of public recognition with three capacity-crowd screenings at the Armory in May. Your most glaring omission, of course, is the family drama Crab Orchard, a feature-length production produced by local filmmaker Robin Peters through his company Dreamscape Cinema. This film is indeed a professional independent film made with professional talent from Los Angeles, professional crew and equipment from Chicago, and most importantly for pride (if not sales potential), local people, area locations and—get this— central Illinois money. Not that much money, compared to beefy Hollywood productions, but enough to make it happen. Sure, Thoraxx II might only accomplish so much with a “measly $1,000.” But, you know what? At least the Brainsmart brethren hunkered down and did what most people in Champaign-Urbana HAVEN’T done—they made a movie. By the same token, Peters might only be able to accomplish so much with his projected $600,000 budget for Crab Orchard, but you know what? He’s doing what most of us WISH we could do—produce a movie with name talent (Ed Asner, Judge Reinhold) that has a chance of being completed, distributed and seen by people the world over, not just in C-U. So, it leads back to the question—can Champaign-Urbana support its filmmaking artists, let alone the artists of all stripes who learn, teach and attempt to ply their trade here? Does it have to be a foregone conclusion—or rather, a cynical myth spoken by many without much thought behind it—that creative people have to leave this place sooner or later in order for them to be creative AND financially sound? It’s your call as well as mine. -Jason Pankoke Champaign

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buzz OCTOBER 9-15, 2003 | DON’T PLAY WITH TIGERS

AND ANOTHER THING...

Mama told you not to play with tigers, you got what you deserve T

here are some stupid people out there. I’m not talking about the ones who make that Darwin List every year. If you leave your wallet at the scene of a burglary or light a cigarette in a fireworks store, then you know whom I am talking about. I’m talking about the special stupid. I’m talking about doing something so blatantly stupid that folks appear surprised when it doesn’t work out. The first example of this is easy. Siegfried and Roy. Say what you will about two flamboyantly dressed men in their 60s wearing tights on a daily basis. It’s strange maybe, but it happens. It’s not necessarily stupid on it’s face. It becomes stupid, however, when you throw some large wild animals into the mix. Last Friday, Roy was mauled by a tiger during their act in Las Vegas. He ended up with a severe wound to the neck and almost died. He can now move his fingers and toes, so I suppose when he can make a full sweeping motion with his hand he’ll be cleared to return to the stage as that appears to be the only skill he has. The tiger was named “Montecore.” I don’t know what the name means really, but I do know this. You name a dog, or a cat, or maybe even a gerbil. You don’t name anything that could conceivably drag you around by the neck like a pork chop. Hundreds turned out to hold a candlelight vigil for him outside the hospital. I knew a guy in high school who took a lot of speed, drank a lot of beer and drove around all the time. Eventually, he pulled in front of a train and was killed. We were upset and sad, but there was no candlelight vigil. He was doing something dangerous and completely ignorant on a fairly regular basis and if I were to be completely honest about it, he probably deserved what he got. No one acted surprised in the least bit. Out in Vegas though, you got people crying and hugging and saying: “I can’t believe this happened to Roy.” Well, let’s see, he’s screwing with 600 pound tigers that are all drugged up in front of 1,000 intoxicated people every night. Geez, man, I don’t know what happened there either. I can’t believe the tiger didn’t bite his ass a long time ago. I’m not taking the tiger’s side exactly, but that’s what they do, right? They attack other animals to get meat. I haven’t really taken any survival courses or anything, yet I have a pret-

ty good idea that you shouldn’t go around yanking tigers all over a stage. In fact, if you ever see one you should run like hell. The second example is just as stupid, but maybe not as obvious. Rush Limbaugh resigned from his commentator gig at ESPN after some flack over a statement he made, that the media wanted Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb to succeed because he was black. Rush was amazed at the controversy. He claimed the media treated him different because of his status. That might be true at a Klan rally or a Denny’s, but I think you have to figure it’d be noticed on ESPN. Forget that he’s just plain wrong. I mean, McNabb’s a damned good quarterback. Why the hell was he offering his opinion anyway? Because some idiots hired him to do just that. ESPN said they were shocked and concerned about his comments before he resigned. Really, why? You hired a guy who’s apparent goal in life is to say things to piss people off, to speak about something he’s shockingly unqualified to talk about on national TV. Yeah, something like that should have worked out fine. Don’t let the fact that you’re owned by Disney affect your decision. They screw up, too. I mean, you still can’t get Song of the South on video. Rush was on his radio show Friday whining about his right to free speech being violated and crying that you can’t say what you want anymore in this country. See, Rush, that’s not exactly right. You said what you wanted and you had the right to say that. Your problem is that other folks also have the right to free speech and can change the channel if your tired ass shows up on the screen. ESPN doesn’t like such things and exercised their rights to free speech by canning your ass. The system works just fine from what I can tell. Screw with a tiger, hire an idiot. Most people would never do the former and probably will do the later at one time or another. Neither of them usually works out for very long. Do what you have to, go to the hospital or fire the idiot, but don’t pretend you’re surprised. Everyone else saw it coming.

Michael Coulter is a videographer at Parkland College and a bartender. He writes a weekly email column, “This Sporting Life” and has hosted several local comedy shows. He can be reached at coulter@readbuzz.com.

DirtyTalk

you're awesome. Wanna go out some time? -- NDJ Roses are red, violets are blue. Compared to the shoutouts, Sweet Talk is poo. :-(

KMY1002- You have no idea what I want to do with those pig tails. What do I have to do to get that number? - Jon Katie-- your form and composition render you a masterpiece of ass! --Carly Danye- Drop the dwarf and come get yourself an older and much taller man. -Your pool partner Your Miss U of I girlie misses her Miss Polish U of I girlie. Hope your still jumping up and down with that #1 finger at Kams! -your old iD-er! Vitai - Booty Call! Angelique, I'll love you forever and ever, and I'm sorrier than I have ever been. Girls of 408: Why are we always the hottest ladies everywhere we go? Beauty is a curse sometimes. Skaterboy--show me your bling bling and I'll show you mine! You have a small penis- You know who you are. XPM -- I'm probably not your type, but I think

Hanlon- I can’t wait to get my hands on you. Betsy- You’re hot. Chad- I’ll show you some decoration ;-) You fail life. Lauren- Have you gotten a parking violation recently? because you’ve got fine written all over you. Adam- If you put an S in front of your name, it’s like Sadam, but with an emphasis on SA, which is cooler. Let me put the SA to your dam(n). Carol- Your name reversed is Lorac, which sounds like Low Rack, but yours is hot and perky- ironic. Adam- Can I jiggle your apples? SWEET “DIRTY” TALKS ARE FREE. To submit your message go to www.readbuzz.com and click on the Sweet Talk link. Please make your message personal, fun, flirty and entertaining. Leave out last names and phone numbers because we (and probably you!) could get in big fat trouble for printing them. We reserve the right to edit your messages. Sorry, no announcements about events or organizations. (Enter those at cucalendar.com)

WHITE MAN


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DON’T GIVE UP | OCTOBER 9-15, 2003

buzz

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): "I've been practicing radical authenticity lately," my Aries friend Steve told me. "I'm revealing the blunt truth about unmentionable subjects to everyone I know. It's been pretty hellish -- no one likes having the social masks stripped away -- but it's been ultimately rewarding." I thought a minute, then said, "I admire your boldness in naming the currents flowing beneath the surface, but I'm curious as to why you imply they're all negative.To practice radical authenticity, shouldn't you also express the raw truth about what's right, good, and beautiful? Shouldn't you unleash the praise and gratitude that normally go unspoken?" Steve sneered. He thought my version of radical authenticity was wimpy. I hope you don't, Aries. You have an astrological mandate to be honest in both ways.

working behind the scenes, weaving connections that are invisible to us in our normal state of awareness. I predict that you will be awash in synchronicities in the coming week, Leo.You will get concrete proof that everything is far more intertwined that you've ever dared to imagine.

cent of vintage roadsters," says CMG. 2. Shimma. "A shimmer, a shake, a lustrous flake, this pearlized metallic adds a savvy crackle to your communications." 3. Iron Ore-ange: "The influence of copper on orange creates a sophisticated background with primal undertones." 4. Exploring Khaki. "This safari green recalls rain forest moss and buried treasure."

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): If you want to place yourself in alignment with the current cosmic trends, you will seek out more than the usual amount and quality of your favorite physical sensations. My advice is to compose a list of your top five, then write out a proposed plan for getting those needs met and met and met. For instance, if you normally have a massage every once in a while, arrange to have at least two in the coming week, and make sure you enlist the services of the very best masseuse or masseur you know. Use the same approach to sex, food, sleep, aromas, beautiful sights, and any other experience that thrills your body.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): One of my favorite obscure holidays is International Moment of Frustration Scream Day. Observed every October 12, it's meant to release pent-up tension resulting from the gap between what we have and what we think we want. Given the fact that your gap is particularly gaping right now, you Tauruses would especially benefit from throwing yourself into this fierce enjoyment with all your angst unfurled. The holiday's founders, Thomas and Ruth Roy, suggest that everyone should go outside sometime during the day and yell for 30 seconds. I hope the sound of you bellowing Bulls will be heard around the world. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): It looks like you're poised to put the finishing touches on something that will last a very long time -an expression or creation that will be a defining monument to your essential self. If I'm right and you're really ready, let me offer a suggestion. This masterpiece should not only reflect what's excellent and successful about you; it should also acknowledge the role that your failures have played in growing your beauty. CANCER (June 21-July 22): This is one of those rare moments when laziness can be an asset. Fate is conspiring to rejuvenate you, and all you have to do is make sure you don't get in the way. I suggest, therefore, that you follow the advice of the Zen master who said, "Don't just do something, sit there!" I mean it, Cancerian. Empty yourself of ambitions. Burn your to-do list. Tell your monkey mind you're taking a sabbatical from its obsessive leaping and shrieking. Feel absolutely no guilt as you practice the art of making yourself a tabula rasa.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Given how fresh and strong you've been feeling lately, you may not be in the mood to initiate a showdown with The Problem That Refused to Die. Why risk getting demoralized by that boring old energy drain when you're so peppy? I'll tell you why: You now have a new and unprecedented advantage over The Problem That Refused To Die. You may not be able to kill it off completely, but then again you might. And you will at least be able to dramatically limit its power to mess with you.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): "There is only one thing in the world worse than being talked about," wrote Libran Oscar Wilde, "and that is not being talked about." You won't have to worry about the latter problem in the next two weeks. The number of discussions about your character and behavior will probably exceed that of any other 14-day period in the past five years. Fortunately, the astrological indicators suggest that a relatively high percentage of the gossip flying around will be benevolent and even flattering. It will be a good time, therefore, for a marketing campaign or networking blitz.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): "No work is more worthwhile than to be a sign of divine joy and a fountain of divine love." So says mystic and scholar Andrew Harvey, and I fervently agree. Not everyone is cut out for such an exacting career, of course. The pay isn't great, the hours are long, and the heroes who make it their main gig rarely get the appreciation they deserve. It's best to try it out for a while on the side without quitting your day job. Having provided those caveats, Aquarius, I'm pleased to inform you that this is the best time in years for you to work hard at being a sign of divine joy and a fountain of divine love.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You are potentially a genius. Maybe not in the same way that Einstein and Beethoven were, but still: You possess some capacity or set of skills that is exquisitely unique.You are a work of art unlike any other that has ever lived. Furthermore, the precise instructions you need to ripen into that glorious state have always been with you, even from before you were born. In the words of psychologist James Hillman, you have a soul's code.You might also call it the master plan of your heart's deepest desire; the special mission that the Divine Wow sent you here to carry out; the blueprint that contains the secret of how to be perfectly, gracefully, unpredictably yourself. Now here's the really good news, Scorpio: You're at a turning point when you have extraordinary power to tune in to and activate untapped areas of your soul's code.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Your flavor of the week will be ginger peach or vanilla clove or some other blend of piquant spiciness and smooth sweetness. The kitchen accessory that best symbolizes your special skills will be a thick sponge that has an abrasive surface on one side for scrubbing dirty pots. The recurring dream you're most likely to dream for the last time, triumphing forever over the past trauma that originally spawned it, is the nightmare in which you feel like a cornered animal. Your haiku of power will be "melodious struggle where the soul turns crap into fertilizer."

✍ HOMEWORK:

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Every year the Color Marketing Group (CMG) at www.colormarketing.org issues a report that identifies the new colors coming into fashion, as well as their symbolic meaning. From their long list, I have selected the specific hues you should surround yourself with if you'd like to be in harmony with cosmic forces during the rest of 2003. 1. Lemon Meringue. "Silver flirts with gold in this zesty confection reminis-

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): According to author Colin Wilson, synchronicities are meaningful coincidences that are created by the unconscious mind to jar the conscious mind into a keener state of perception. They imbue us with a powerful sense that there are hidden meanings beneath the surface of everyday life; they lead us to suspect that a huge, benevolent intelligence is always

What image best symbolizes the love you want in your life all the time? Put that image in a prominent place in your home. www.freewillastrology.com

Rob Brezsny's Free Will ☎ Astrology beautyandtruth @ f r e e w i l l a s t r o l o g y. c o m 415.459.7209(v)• 415.457.3769 http://www.freewillastrology. com P.O. Box 798 San Anselmo, CA 94979

buzz

Grandparents raising grandchildren in Illinois BY BETH ROGERS | STAFF WRITER

S

lowly, so she would not disturb her sleeping husband, Lynette rolled over, tugging the quilt up to her chin. Bobby, her mind whispered. What am I going to do? How am I going to come up with the money for his next winter coat? I have to remember to buy more diapers. In the cradle he was fast outgrowing at the foot of their bed, Bobby’s breathing was slow and even. The silence closed in around Lynette, and she looked at her husband, David, in the moonlight. Thank God, she thought. Thank God I don’t have to do this alone. Lying awake at night, worrying about money for a bigger baby bed, food and clothes for Bobby has come more and more easily to Lynette Lemke, 56. She is Bobby’s grandmother and she and her husband Dave, 55, are raising the baby, who was only 5 months old when he came to live with them in their double-wide on Independence Street in Urbana. It might not have happened at all. When Lynette realized she was going to have to take Bobby into her home, she was glad to do it. “The thought of what would have happened to him if I hadn’t taken him in scares me,” she

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said. “His father said things like, ‘Well, I guess aside for the program next year in Governor he’ll have to go into foster care.’” Rod Blagojevich’s budget proposal, presented But Lynette had no idea where to start. to the Illinois General Assembly on April 9, it Deciding to apply for legal guardianship of the must serve the needs of over 103,000 grandparbaby, she went to the Urbana Free Library to ents solely responsible for their grandchildren’s look for information. The best the library could needs across Illinois. offer were law books from the 1950s, which “The Department on Aging programs held no answers for her. Scanning the shelves weren’t really designed for this. We have to and desktops for something that might help, a adjust to a different set of legal issues like pamphlet for the Illinois custody and health care for Department on Aging caught grandparents raising grandher eye. children,” said Barb Lynette called the hotline Schwartz, coordinator of number on the back of the the Grandparents Raising pamphlet and got in touch Grandchildren program. with Barb Schwartz, coordi“The most important thing nator of the Grandparents is that grandparents know Lynette Lemke Raising Grandchildren we’re here. We may help Program for the Illinois them apply for the Child Department on Aging. Through the agency, Only Grant and never hear from them Lynette found out that one of more than 80 supagain, but they know we’re here.” port groups for grandparents raising grandchilThe money from the new state budget will dren throughout the state was located in cover maintenance of the current program, but Champaign. no new services, Schwartz said. The money will The Illinois Department on Aging began the allow them to set up conferences around the Grandparents Raising Grandchildren program state to discuss grandparents’ issues, to fund in 1996. Although $139,600 in grants was set support groups, regional quarterly conferences

and an emergency fund. “Sometimes grandparents will call to tell us that their electricity is about to get turned off,” said Schwartz. Most grandparents raising grandchildren have an average family income of $18,000 to $25,000, according to the Illinois Department on Aging. Grandparent caregivers are also 60 percent more likely to live in poverty than grandparents not caring for their grandchildren. Every third Wednesday of the month, Lynette and Dave take Bobby to the Senior Citizens Center to meet with a handful of other grandparents in the same boat. The children play together in the next room while their grandparents sit around worn card tables, drinking coffee and talking about their problems. These grandparents have been hurt, resigned to their broken families and irresponsible children. Some have children in jail, in rehabilitation centers, or those who picked up and left, abandoning their children to fate. “Our kids are adult children who don’t do what they’re supposed to do,” said Lynda Gritten, support group leader. “They guilt trip you and say ‘Oh, it’s not my fault,’ and ask you to constantly pick up the pieces.”

Who has been the biggest musical influence in your life? Wes Montgomery because I listen to him a lot, but Kenny Burrell, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis and Grant Green have also been major influences. My biggest influence was probably my musical mentor, Charles Morris. Morris was a piano player who taught me how to play chords and read music. We nicknamed him “The High Priest.”

What is the best piece of advice you can give to aspiring musicians? You’ve got to practice and get a good teacher if you can find one. They will eliminate many technical problems. Practice consistently.

[

Our kids are adult children who don’t do what they’re supposed to do.

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Q & A

www.tommygs.com

Without Drugs.....

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community

OCTOBER 9-15, 2003

1 Took off at full speed 9 Kind of quartz 14 Like Sherlock

Holmes’s nose

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America” star 17 Anne ___, Helen Keller’s teacher 18 Refuse to compromise 19 Vigor 20 Campbell’s soup selection 21 N.H.L. star Lindros 22 Transplant 24 Holder of recyclables 25 Springfield, e.g. 27 Walkie-talkie answer 28 Beekeeper in a highly rated 1997 film 29 “The Five Red Herrings” author 31 Putdown for a computer whiz 33 “Norma Rae” director 35 One that’s punched out 36 Coaches 40 1984 Cyndi Lauper hit

44 Bath additions 45 Simulated 47 Dutch-speaking

Caribbean isle 48 “It could not slake mine ___, nor ease my heart”: Shak. 49 Painter of haystacks and poplars 51 Fair pace 52 Millennial Church member 55 ___ acid (baking powder ingredient) 57 Performer who’s charged 58 Once-in-a-lifetime 59 Comic strip character surnamed Smith 60 Folded comestible 61 Three-year-olds compete here 62 Blood group? DOWN 1 Some thin slices 2 Tanks 3 Invalidate 4 Cabinet workers? 5 Ken of “thirty-something”

6 Bank deposi-

tor? 7 Momentarily 8 One with the backing of the U.S. Treasury? 9 Paintings on hinged panels 10 “I must’ve forgot …!” 11 Previous 12 Complaisant 13 More flavorful 16 Blitzed 23 Price-setting grp. 26 Port ___ (Isle of Man resort) 28 One working on a plot 30 Robed benchsitter’s place 32 Derisive comeback 34 Tears for Fears, e.g. 36 Cranes 37 Pet carrier feature 38 Resolve 39 Summoned

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Puzzle by Patrick Berry

downloads

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If you could meet any two people, living or dead, who would they be? Jesus Christ and Wes Montgomery. Wes Montgomery is a guitar player from Indianapolis. His style of playing has made a difference in the way the guitar is played.

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What is the most important life lesson you’ve learned so far? Do unto others that you would have them do unto you.

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Where do you see yourself in five years? Probably doing some recording and expanding on where I play. I don’t want to travel very much though.

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How much did you practice the guitar to get to where you are today musically? A lot. Initially, five to seven hours a day.

Stuck up? Powder containers Consequently Baby shower?

or the better part of 30 years, Lemont Parsons has been entertaining the Champaign-Urbana community with his jazz guitar. Parsons, a Danville native, lives in Urbana with his wife, Edna. Along with other local jazz musicians, Parsons has played such venues as the Monday Night Jam Session at Two Main Lounge. Now, the 63-year-old plays at the Senator’s Inn, 1001 N. Dunlap Ave., from 8 to 10 p.m. Thursdays.

If you could play any other instrument besides the guitar, which instrument would it be and why? The piano because it is an instrument that covers everything, the bass and treble clefs. It is probably the mother of all instruments because of its capabilities. Describe your favorite music-related moment. The moment when the band is really gelling and the feeling is good. It gets your adrenaline up. You don’t get that feeling all the time. Maybe only one time a year; it’s something that’s elusive but you try.

When you were 20 years old, did you imagine yourself to be where you are in life now? No, when I was 20 I was just trying to survive, trying to work to make a living. It was the early ‘60s and things were different back then. There was not a lot of opportunity for young black males.

What is the greatest musical performance you have ever seen? Ravi Shanker and Marcus Roberts. Ravi Shanker plays the sitar and Marcus Roberts plays the piano. They are virtuosos. Both shows were seen at the Krannert Center.

Do you have any regrets? Yes, but I don’t dwell on them. One of the main regrets is not getting a college education.

What are your thoughts on talent? Talent is not “you’ve got it or you don’t.” Practicing makes you have it.

What is the best piece of advice you have ever gotten? My grandparents used to say to try to make a difference in a positive way and to make something of yourself. When you play your music, what feelings and messages do you hope to evoke in your listeners? I want people to leave feeling good. I want them to have a good listening experience. Any other comments on music that you would like to convey to readers? People need to get in the habit of supporting live music. Especially jazz, because jazz is a dying art form and it’s America’s music. It’s the most sophisticated form of American music (out of blues, country, etc). I don’t want to take away from the other kinds of music, but that’s the reality. Jazz is on the level of European classical music. I would also like to applaud the Krannert Center in how they are trying to bring jazz to the musical forefront and make people understand that it is a music that needs to be listened to. What is your dream? To play as well as I can.


1009buzz0425

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10/8/03

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community

Lynda saved Lynette the worry of applying for guardianship, having done it with her own grandson. She took copies of the papers she had filed years before over to Lynette’s house in order to show her how it was done. Together, they worked their way through the complicated legal wording and three weeks after she filed, Lynette had a court date and eventually gained custody. After gaining custody of Bobby, Lynette and Dave would confront the hassles of raising their grandson, scouring garage sales for baby blankets, clipping coupons to buy diapers and jars of strained peaches. Every day, Lynette searches through the ads in the newspaper for sales coming up. Maybe there’ll be another sale on diapers. Bobby goes through about 150 dia-

OCTOBER 9-15, 2003

pers a month. Last winter he outgrew two coats. They still need a playpen and cannot afford it. As he grows, Bobby will need more. He’ll need books and binders after enrolling in school. Then there are immunizations and dentist appointments, a bicycle and more clothes, shoes and haircuts and more. “I’m not going to worry about that until I get to it,” said Lynette. “We’ve done pretty well so far. The Lord will provide.” Sometimes Lynette stops to worry about Bobby going to school because the kids are sure to ask why his grandma always picks him up instead of his mom. “I worry that he’ll blame us,” she said. “I don’t want him to think we took him away

from his mom because we wanted him so much. I decided to let him find out the truth about his parents for himself when he’s old enough to understand.” This family is not alone in raising their grandchildren. According to the 2000 Census, more than 4 million children in the United States live in a grandparent-headed household. The number increased by more than 1 million children from 1990. In Champaign County, 951 grandparents listed themselves as solely responsible for the needs of their grandchildren with almost 2,000 grandchildren in the county living with their grandparents. Few who have not raised their grandchildren realize what a physical, emotional and mental strain it is, as a senior citizen, to take on the responsibilities of a parent—and society offers little help. Bobby’s mother, Laura McGath, is bipolar and struggles with an addiction to prescription painkillers and other drugs. Right now, she lives in Oxford House, a drug treatment center in Springfield. She calls her parents sporadically, but only when she needs something. The first thing Lynette did was throw Laura out of her house. In an earlier attempt to get clean, Laura began to attend meetings at Prairie Center Health Systems in Champaign. She attended two or three meetings a day, said Lynette, to stay out of the house with her exhusband, Scott McGath. But Laura dropped out of the program. Lynette let her borrow the car one morning to go to a meeting and babysat Bobby all day. Laura didn’t return after her meeting was over and Scott called, looking for his wife. By the time Laura walked through the front door, as dusk was falling, Lynette was angry.

buzz

“Where have you been?” she asked. At a meeting, Laura said. “Open your purse,” she said. Laura refused. “You took my car and left Bobby here. You’ve been out all day and I want to know what’s in your purse.” When Laura finally opened her handbag and turned it upside down on the kitchen table, what Lynette described as “a whole lot of marijuana” fell out. “That’s it,” Lynette said. “I don’t want to see you again until you’ve straightened yourself out. I think you should go.” After establishing guardianship, Lynette applied for the Child Only Grant, which comes from federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families funding. For a single child, Lynette collects $108 a month. She also gets a medical card that will save them money on medicine and covers their insurance co-payment, as well as dental and eye care, which Dave’s work insurance does not cover. Another program available for grandparents raising grandchildren is KidCare, a state program that offers health care coverage to children if they live in families with incomes up to 185 percent of the poverty level. Lynette and Dave do not qualify for that program. In his recent budget proposal, Governor Blagojevich pledged to increase state health insurance programs for low-income families, including a $4 million increase for KidCare. When Lynette went to apply for her Child Only Grant check from the Department of Human Services, an agency representative asked her: “You don’t really need this, do you? It’s only $108.” Lynette felt ashamed, but she signed up to receive the grant anyway.

buzz

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Above: Lynette feeds Bobby mashed potatoes for lunch. When asked how she felt about the future Lynette said, "We're worried. We don't ever want him to feel unloved by anyone." Left: Bobby stuffs fried chicken into his mouth during lunch. "The other day he was running around with a fly swatter he was dipping in the toilet and patting in his hair...there's never a calm moment around here," said Lynette.

25

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film & tv

TEXAS IS KNOWN FOR MANY THINGS: IDIOTS AND MASSACRES. | OCTOBER 9-15, 2003 buzz

Drive-thru Reviews

MATCHSTICK MEN

AMERICAN SPLENDOR ★★★★

PAUL GIAMATTI AND HARVEY PEKAR Both delightfully intricate and amusingly simple, American Splendor is the opposite of this summer’s bloated adaptation of The Hulk. While Ang Lee attempted to transfer a comic book into real life, Berman and Pulcini render real life into a comic book and stretch it into a commentary on happiness, accomplishment and the disheartened lifestyle of Middle America. (Matt Pais) Now showing at Beverly.

CABIN FEVER

no stars JORDAN LADD AND RIDER STRONG Nothing could have saved Cabin Fever from its own devouring illness. Not only did the number of plot flaws rival the body count, but even the overt sexual content and gore lost their appeal after awhile. (Daniel Nosek) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy.

FREAKY FRIDAY ★★★ JAMIE LEE CURTIS AND LINDSAY LOHAN Freaky Friday’s family-friendly plot still includes a mother and daughter unsympathetic to one another’s problems because each is convinced her own life is more difficult than the other’s. After a mysterious fortune cookie puts a fateful spell on the pair, Anna, the daughter, and Tess, the mom, wake up in each other’s bodies. One of Jamie Lee Curtis’ most successful films in 20 years. (Janelle Greenwood) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

LOST IN TRANSLATION ★★★★ BILL MURRAY AND SCARLETT JOHANSSON Bill Murray finds a relationship with a younger woman in this intelligent film set in Japan and directed by Sofia Coppola. The enigmatic serenity of Lost in Translation confounds and astonishes while it simultaneously embraces and rejects convention. The link between Bob and Charlotte feels a touch familiar but, more importantly, perfectly natural. (Matt Pais) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

THE MAGDALENE SISTERS ★★★ NORA-JANE NOONE This is the true story of women who were sent to a convent/laundry facility to be cleaned of their sins. However, they were also beaten and brutalized along the way. This story powerfully shows women who rose against the Catholic Church in the name of decency. This film won Best Picture at the Venice Film Festival. (Janelle Greenwood) Opening at Boardman’s Art Theatre

★★★

NICOLAS CAGE AND SAM ROCKWELL No, this isn’t a film about pyromaniacs or arsonists invading a town. Instead, matchstick men are con artists, and here the cons go between friends and family members. When Cage’s character finds out he has a daughter, they meet and she wants to join in on the con.The story is fun and entertaining, but the book is much better and doesn’t have the slow, confusing moments that the movie does. (Jason Cantone) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

The Seabiscuit phenomenon was one of the most captivating in United States history and this film does it justice. (Andrew Crewell) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy.

THE SCHOOL OF ROCK ★★★★

Ahhhhhhh!!!!!

JACK BLACK AND JOAN CUSACK Jack Black plays a rock star who bottoms out and becomes a teacher at a prep school. (Matt Mitchell) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

Do you like scary movies?

ONCE UPON A TIME IN MEXICO

SECONDHAND LIONS ★★★★

Exorcist. Omen. Halloween.

JOHNNY DEPP AND ANTONIO BANDERAS Once Upon a Time in Mexico is an action film that is every bit as intense as it is gorgeous. Fans of the trilogy will not be disappointed, and most audiences will be delighted with the fresh style of action as well as the intelligence present in the script. Paying homage to western campiness with memorable characters and a bit of goofball humor, this is the summer blockbuster that moviegoers should have received two months ago.(Aaron Leach) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

ROBERT DUVALL AND MICHAEL CAINE Two old men, who might have been successful bank robbers in the 1920s, take custody of their nephew. Melodramatic story, tears and laughter ensure and manipulate your emotions, but make you love every second. (Jason Cantone) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

★★★★

OPEN RANGE ★★ KEVIN COSTNER AND ROBERT DUVALL Open Range mixes slow-paced historical nostalgia with slower-paced Little House on the Prairie references, pitting free range herders against static, prejudiced ranchers. At times, the film plays a little like Gangs of the Old West and anyone who’s even heard of classic Westerns like Shane or The Searchers can pretty much stay two steps ahead of Open Range at all times. (Matt Pais) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

OUT OF TIME ★★★ DENZEL WASHINGTON AND SANAA LATHAN Denzel Washington, fresh from his Oscar-winning performance in Training Day and his lead role in the crappy John Q., portrays a cop framed for a heinous crime in this film, which uses a little-used genre effectively to provide an interesting and suspenseful thriller. (Andrew Crewell) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: THE CURSE OF THE BLACK PEARL ★★★ JOHNNY DEPP AND GEOFFREY RUSH All eyes are on Depp in his scene-stealing turn as Capt. Jack Sparrow in Pirates of the Caribbean.The characters are not all that developed and sometimes the action scenes are a bit long, but overall the film comes together as a good action flick. (Janelle Greenwood) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

THE RUNDOWN ★★★ THE ROCK AND SEANN WILLIAM SCOTT The Rundown is pure entertainment, plain and simple. It’s hard to lump it into one genre as it reaches into action, adventure and comedy in order to come up with an exhilarating and fun combination that will leave audiences more than satisfied. (Aaron Leach) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

SEABISCUIT ★★★★ TOBEY MAGUIRE, JEFF BRIDGES AND CHRIS COOPER

UNDERWORLD ★★ KATE BECKINSALE AND SCOTT SPEEDMAN Werewolves, vampires and humans, oh my! This Romeo and Juliet tale pits love against an eternal war between vampires and werewolves. Look for great action sequences and a dark tone similar to The Matrix. And then there’s also Kate Beckinsale in all leather to watch for. (Jason Cantone) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy.

OPENING THIS WEEKEND

Submit your list of the Top 10 Horror Films of All-Time to cantone@uiuc.edu by Oct. 22!

SAVOY 16 Route 45 & Burwash Ave. $5.50 Kids all shows

(217)

355-FILM

$5.75 DAILY Matinees til 6pm & Seniors $6.25 Late Shows Fri & Sat $6.25 Students $7.25 Evenings Mon - Thurs No passes DIGITAL STEREO Unlimited Free Drink Refills & .25¢ Corn Refills

BUFFALO SOLDIERS

ED HARRIS AND ANNA PAQUIN This story tells a less than flattering tale of American soldiers in Germany. These soldiers aren’t the heroes idolized after Sept. 11, which made this film delay for 3 years.These soldiers are thieves and criminals. (Jason Cantone) Opening at Beverly

GOOD BOY!

MATTHEW BRODERICK AND BRITTANY MURPHY An alien dog talks to kids. Simply amazing. Watch Matthew Broderick’s career sink even further. (Jason Cantone) Opening at Beverly and Savoy

HOUSE OF THE DEAD

JONATHAN CHERRY AND CLINT HOWARD A group of ecstacy-loving kids sail out to an island by Seattle and find zombies. Or is it just a drug-induced parable to get kids off drugs? Nope, it’s probably zombies. (Jason Cantone) Opening at Beverly and Savoy

INTOLERABLE CRUELTY

GEORGE CLOONEY AND CATHERINE ZETA-JONES Miles Massey (Clooney), the nimblest divorce attorney in L.A., is out to trap the gold-digging wife (Zeta-Jones) of a client. But beautiful people can't help falling in love, no matter which side of the table they’re on. It’s the Coen Brothers, so it’s probably not the crap it sounds like. (Jason Cantone) Opening at Beverly and Savoy

KILL BILL: VOLUME ONE

UMA THURMAN AND DAVID CARRADINE Quentin Tarantino has been considered cool ever since his first films hit America. In this film (split into two parts because of all of the action scenes), he tries to reinvent himself while proving he’s still the King of Cool. (Jason Cantone) Opening at Beverly and Savoy

Stadium Seating Gives YOU An Unobstructed View All Rocking Chairs

SHOWTIMES 10/10 - 10/16

INTOLERABLE CRULETY (PG-13) DIGITAL/STADIUM SEATING 12:45, 2:50, 4:55, 7:00, 9:05 FRI/SAT LS 11:10 KILL BILL, VOLUME 1 (R) DIGITAL 2 PRINTS/ 2 SCREENS 12:20, 1:05, 2:35, 3:20, 4:50, 5:35, 7:05, 7:50, 9:20, 10:00 FRI/SAT LS 11:35, 12:10 GOOD DOG! (PG) 2 PRINTS/ 2 SCREENS DIGITAL 12:40, 2:40, 4:40, 6:40, 9:00 FRI/SAT LS 11:00 DIGITAL/STADIUM SEATING (SAT/SUN 11:20) 1:20, 3:20, 5:25, 7:20, 9:20 FRI/SAT LS 11:20 THE HOUSE OF THE DEAD (R) DIGITAL/STADIUM SEATING 1:30, 3:25, 5:20, 7:15, 9:10 FRI/SAT LS 11:25 SCHOOL OF ROCK (PG-13) 2 PRINTS/ 2 SCREENS 12:15, 12:55, 2:25, 3:00, 4:35, 5:15, 6:45, 7:30, 8:55, 9:35 FRI/SAT LS 11:05, 11:45 OUT OF TIME (PG-13) 2 PRINTS/ 2 SCREENS 12:30, 1:00, 2:40, 3:10, 4:50, 5:20, 7:00, 7:30, 9:10, 9:40 FRI/SAT LS 11:20, 11:50 THIRTEEN (R) 9:15PM THE RUNDOWN (PG-13) DIGITAL/STADIUM SEATING 12:50, 2:55, 5:00, 7:05, 9:10 FRI/SAT LS 11:15 UNDER THE TUSCAN SUN (PG-13) 11:50, 2:10, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10 FRI/SAT LS 11:25 LOST IN TRANSLATION (R) DIGITAL/STADIUM SEATING 12:55, 3:05, 5:15, 7:25, 9:35 FRI/SAT LS 11:50 UNDERWORLD (R) DIGITAL/STADIUM SEATING 12:30, 5:10, 9:45FRI/SAT LS 11:55 SECONDHAND LIONS (PG) DIGITAL 12:25, 2:35, 4:45, 6:55, 9:05 FRI/SAT LS 11:15 COLD CREEK MANOR (R)12:00, 5:00, 9:40 FRI/SAT LS 12:00 MATCHSTICK MEN (PG-13) 2:40, 7:20

ONCE UPON A TIME IN MEXICO (R) DIGITAL/STADIUM SEATING

buzz

community

OCTOBER 9-15, 2003

“I felt like some kind of deadbeat,” she said. “I pay my taxes. I’ve never asked for government help before and now that I need it, I’m not going to go without it.” In contrast, unlicensed foster care families are eligible to receive $292 for one child each month, according to the Department of Child and Family Services. Many grandparents facing money problems, like the Lemkes, turn to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families for help. Unfortunately, there may not be enough room for them all in the national budget. According to the Children’s Defense Fund, the Bush Administration’s proposal does not add additional money to the TANF block grant. Inflation was not taken into account for the five-year plan. The money these families will receive will go less and less far as costs increase; the block grant is expected to lose 29 percent of its current value over the next five years. In 2000, states spent $2 billion more than the annual block grant by dipping into previous years’ funds. Since existing welfare reform laws expired at the end of last year, President George Bush has placed more demands on families to qualify for the grant. According to White House press releases, the president’s plan requires welfare recipients to work 40 hours per week—either at a job, in school or in other training programs “designed to help them achieve independence.” This a one-third increase from the current 30 hour requirement of most families, and a 50

percent increase from 20 hours for single parents with young children. Spokespersons for President Bush did not return daily phone calls over a period of two weeks. Lynette feels comfortable at the support group headed by Gritten, who has raised her grandson since he was 3 years old. There, they discuss where to find used clothing, how to apply for financial aid, and laugh and cry together over shared problems. “When we raised our kids, we had a whole network of friends with kids,” said Lynette. “Now, our friends’ kids are grown and off with their own families. There isn’t anybody for Bobby to play with, and I worry that he won’t learn to be social with other kids if he’s always around us old people. Parents have to do more than feed, clean and keep them warm. Someday they’ll have to go out there and be a whole person.” Lynette credits Lynda and the support group with getting her started. When she first tried to apply for guardianship of Bobby, lawyers wanted $1,000 just for a consultation, something the family couldn’t afford. Instead, she filed the necessary papers at the County Clerk’s office and applied for guardianship without a lawyer. The court appointed a lawyer to act in Bobby’s best interest. Because of Lynda’s help, the entire process cost only $180. Lynette is grateful for small blessings. She does the best she can; her faith in God comforts her. Twelve years ago, she was rushed to the

hospital when her colon burst. While doctors investigated the problem, they discovered huge tumors on her uterus and informed Lynette that unless the tumors were benign, there was a good chance she would not survive. “I went under the knife for my colon knowing I could die,” she said. “And I got right with that. I know I won’t live to raise Bobby fully, but there will be someone to take care of him.” The tumors were benign and the colon repair went better than doctors expected.

5

Now, the doctors have told her that if they operate on the tumor crouched in the nerves of her right hip, there’s a 90 percent chance that she won’t be able to walk out of the hospital. Instead, she chooses to live with the pain until the tumor takes away her ability to walk for good. In the meantime, Lynette does the best she can to raise Bobby, giving him a stable, loving home. “It always comes back to Bobby,” Lynette said. “Whatever I do, it’s for him now.” buzz

Above: Bobby holds his Elmo as he gets ready to take his afternoon nap. Since gaining custody of Bobby, the biggest thing Lynette misses is her independence. "We hardly go out anywhere during the week anymore," she said.

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Boardman’s

Art Theatre 126 W. Church St. Champaign, IL

Winner Best Picture Venice Film Festival! R, runs 119 minutes, flat, presenented in HPS-4000/DD. Daily at 7:00PM, Matinees on Sat/Sun at 2:00PM

7 British Independent Film Nominations, including Best Picture! R, runs 107 minutes, flat, presented in HPS-4000/DD. Daily at 4:30PM & 9:30PM

Listen to WPGU FM107.1 to win movie tickets, and more! eTickets/reserved seats: www.BoardmansArtTheatre.com

BOARDMAN’S THEATRES www.BoardmansTheatres.com 1-800-BEST PLACE (800-237-8752) 217/355-0068 eTickets/reserved seats: www.BoardmansArtTheatre.com

Left: Lynette Lemke, 56, kisses her 18month-old grandson Bobby Lemke. Lynette and her husband Dave have been raising Bobby since last October. "We had no choice. He needed us, turns out we needed him more than we thought," said Lynette.


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arts

WHAT IS FUNNY? REALLY? | OCTOBER 9-15, 2003

buzz

buzz OCTOBER 9-15, 2003

rt audiences and historians spend their lives trying to reconstruct the worlds in which art pieces were created. Over time, this cultural process has given birth to a self-conscious art world, to a limited extent. Some artists and historians have begun to look at art as not only a source of sensory and emotional pleasure, but also as a product that represents the social sphere in which it was produced. The upcoming symposium at the Levis Faculty Center, “After Whiteness: Race and the Visual Arts,” will serve as a forum for artists, historians and art critics who have begun exploring unconscious social biases and privileges they believe have unfairly shaded the art world. “Whiteness consists of the presumptive, often unconscious power brought about by being classified as white in social and cultural settings,” said Suk Ja Kang Engles, a University of Illinois graduate student in fine and applied arts and co-organizer (along with Tim Engles) of the symposium. “Social relations, media portrayals and life chances remain set up for white people to function as the idealized, ‘normal citizens.’ Therefore, for people of color, it becomes a constant struggle to be like whites in some ways, especially like middle-class whites, if they want to be treated like dignified human beings.” Kang Engles, along with other panelists at Saturday’s symposium, believes that as a result of these ongoing social realities, it remains difficult for minorities to justify their art to consumers and critics in an art world

bookreview

Said the Shotgun to the Head ★★★★

Saul Williams

BY NIC WEBER | STAFF WRITER

A

t a time when Mars, god of war, is closest to our planet, comes a call for peace. We have long forgotten that we personified nature as a woman, and her creator a man. What if we don’t believe in a god that is defined by man’s word? Do we simply disregard God? There has been a movement of our young minds to do so because we don’t believe in a religion. Who among us has not known God

BY JASON CANTONE AND JENNIFER KEAST | ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR AND STAFF WRITER

dominated by “whiteness.” “Although I, for instance, have exhibited and sold abstract paintings, I am continually asked to explain them in terms of my Asian femininity, while race and gender are largely considered insignificant aspects of artistic production by white men,” Kang Engles said. One of the most challenging concepts for white audiences and artists, according to Kang Engles, is the fact that although whites don’t usually realize it, they are just as racialized as the groups they have deemed “minorities.” “If the art that I make that addresses whiteness works for white viewers, it helps them see something they hadn’t seen before about the racialized side of themselves, and/or about the racially whitened norm that they take part in,” said Kang Engles. Much like the practice of art history, cultural whiteness has solidified over a long period of time. David Roediger, a University history professor, approaches whiteness from a historical standpoint. “The system of white privilege focuses the attention of those categorized as white on the narrow privileges they gain as a result of something as literally superficial Workers set up for “After Whiteness: Race and Visual Arts,” which is free and open to the public. as their skins. It leaves no room for imagining that new worlds are possible, either in search for safety in art can lead artists into a “After Whiteness: Race and the Visual Arts” art or everyday life,” Roediger said. Roediger believes that whiteness in the art career of appeasing or pandering to white Levis Faculty Center, 4th Floor world is quite similar to racism in every- audiences without challenging the concept Saturday, Oct. 11, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Free and open to the public of whiteness. day life. “Artists play a key role in exposing the con- Keynote speech: “Now What? Awakening from “Whiteness is a failure of—and even an assault on—the imagination. (Whiteness) nections of whiteness to misery—not only the the Dream of Whiteness” by artist/philosophy coerces its bearers, as James Baldwin once miseries racism inflicts on people of color but professor Adrian Piper in the Knight wrote, into choosing the illusion of safety over those it fastens on the whole society,” Auditorium, Spurlock Museum at 3:30 p.m. creative life and spirit,” said Roediger. The Roediger said. buzz intimately? Has not known the passion behind a sober embrace that leaves us speechless, leaves us grasping for breath and understanding? We personify nature and believe deeply in her preservation but lack the comprehension of her creation. If we equate God and love, why can we not equate our divinity toward God and sex? More simply, though, who has not been so branded by a kiss that they were not forever changed? Saul Williams boldly pens the epic poem Said the Shotgun to the Head at a time when our attention span dictates three-minute radio songs and 90-minute movies. Our ability to focus is so pertinent in all that we consume. Our literature, our conversation, our relationships: They all revolve around our ability, or lack thereof, to hold interest. But what happens when we are so ravished by an event that our attention span is shaken and we become different in that moment,

forever changed? Williams is writing a poem to our generation. Years from now we will look back on our time in the early 21st century and say, here is what we truly believed in and were looking for. Ten pseudo-chapters break down, with uncontrollable alliteration, what we have feared for a long time: the ability to recognize a woman as our savior. Through the chaos of our consumption we find order. This is not a poem directed at the “slacker generation,” as we have from time to time been labeled. It is instead a complicated piece that will contribute to the intellectual evolution of the sons and daughters of a sexual revolution. Our parents fought against, or bought into a society that they believed would somehow be better for us. This poem is the manifestation of that hope and the dream of past generations. continued on page 7

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PHOTO | MATT COHN

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Make ‘em laugh: NBC tries to get funny

After Whiteness BY MATT COHN | STAFF WRITER

film & tv

| FRIENDS WILL DIE BUT SCRUBS WILL NEVER LEAVE YOU.

nce every few years, a great comedy comes along and grabs hold of the American public. Sometimes the show blasts out of the starting gates and quickly pulls viewers in with its uproarious scenarios and high quality writing, directing or acting. Other times, the show needs to be nurtured and becomes a sensation in its own right only after the audience has realized that when they went to bed laughing that night, it wasn’t just a fluke. However, the popularity of the sitcom is slowly deteriorating, forcing reviewers and network executives alike to ask the simple question: Is it worth spending millions of dollars on a comedy when a cheaper, low-budget reality show can guarantee good ratings some comedies could never dream of? Look at the Nielsen ratings of which comedies perform the best. Friends, Will & Grace and recent Emmy winner Everybody Loves Raymond are at the top of the heap, building on their already strong fan bases to stay on their thrones as ratings kings and also Emmy Awards regulars, as all three were nominated for Best Comedy last month. The old mainstays are keeping their reign while newer shows are often canceled before they’re given a chance. So, how do little shows become big hits? The following three shows build on one these two concepts: well-known stars or well-watched time slots. Maybe these shows (or the two intelligent ones) can help ebb the death of the television sitcom and remind viewers there is more to television than eating slimy bugs.

HAPPY FAMILY

★★★★

Few shows will ever live up to the King and Queen of NBC comedy: Friends and Will & Grace. but the new comedy Happy Family has the potential to reach those ranks. The show stars five-time Emmy award-winner John Larroquette as Peter and Emmy award-winner Christine Barnaski as Annie. They play parents whose children are all in their 20s and finally getting out of the house. This means they will be able to be just a couple again. Except not really. First, there is Tim (Tyler Fracavilla of Boston Public), their 20-year-old junior college graduate. Except he didn’t graduate. But he didn’t bother telling anyone this. He instead went out and bought a graduation gown. When his parents find out that he didn’t actually graduate, they decide he needs to learn responsibility and tell him to move out. So he does; he moves in next door with Mrs. Harris, his mom’s tennis partner—and his (until then) secret girlfriend. Todd (Jeff Davis) is the eldest and Annie and Peter’s favorite. He’s engaged to one wonderful woman. And dating another. Upon discovering this, Annie asks Todd what about his fiancee, to which he replies: “I love her, she is my fiancee, she is totally in the mix.” Sara (Melanie Paxson) is the overachieving career success who is in the middle of a mid-life crisis. She can’t get a date to save her life and her social life consists of wearing a cocktail dress to play Scrabble with her parents on a Friday night. With all this hilarious drama laid out in the pilot episode, it looks as if Happy Family will continue to deliver laughs throughout the season. The show is

highly entertaining and smartly written with witty punch lines and wonderful acting, particularly by Larroquette and Barnaski. Larroquette is hilarious to watch, especially when he takes the blame for everything that has gone wrong with his children, exclaiming, “I was too focused on keeping them off drugs!” Happy Family explores the trials and tribulations of having older children and shows that no matter where they are living, parents are always dealing with all the trouble their kids get into. If you are looking for an entertaining and funny show to add to the mix of Friends and Will & Grace, check out Happy Family—it’s a comedy worth watching. (Jennifer Keast)

WHOOPI

Every year a whole group of new comedies hits prime time—most of which fail faster than we even have time to try to enjoy them. NBC’s new celebrity comedy Whoopi is destined to be one of those shows. Whoopi Goldberg is an ex-diva named Mavis Rae who runs the Lamont Hotel she bought with her money as a one-hit wonder in New York City. She is assisted by the goofy Nasim (Omid Djalili), her Peruvian (not Arab!) friend. Add to the mix Mavis’ brother Courtney (Wren T. Brown) who moves into the hotel with her to start a law practice, along with his girlfriend Rita (Elizabeth Regen) who is white, but talks “black,” and you’ve got the main cast. So what happens in this show? Unfortunately for viewers, not a whole lot. Whoopi—er, Mavis just runs around her hotel talking trash about people. By the end of each episode, each viewer is sure to be cringing at her overexaggerated and squawky slang voice. Whoopi attempts to get at the issues of diversity and America’s recent fear of Middle Eastern people by poking fun at it. Instead of being funny, this is pulled off as inappropriate and almost rude. Some of Mavis’ comments to Nasim (who is constantly referred to as “Arab”) include “all you people look alike to me,” “you people scare me” and “I see three or four of you on an airplane—I take off.” The show is trying to make light of some serious issues, but it seems these are the kinds of issues that should just be left alone. The Arab issue comes up again later when Mavis is returning an unwanted TV to a store in the show’s first episode. When the clerk refuses the return, she lies to the clerk and says that Nasim is her boss and to take it up with him. As she is explaining why Nasim would want to return a nonrefundable TV, she refers to him saying: “you know how these Arabs are.” By the time of this fourth or fifth Arab comment, it is not only not funny, but it is enough to make one want to turn the show off. For a show produced by the producers of That 70’s Show and 3rd Rock From the Sun, two

NBC ENTERTAINMENT

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WHOOPI | WHOOPI GOLDBERG highly successful comedies, one would expect more out of Whoopi. One can only wonder if the reason why the show is so unappealing has to do with Whoopi Goldberg’s presence, as it seems she’s only doing this to get back into the limelight she’s lost. It is hard not to think that with a show named Whoopi when that isn’t even her character’s name! (Jennifer Keast)

SCRUBS ★★★★ When NBC threatened to pull Scrubs off of its lineup after two hilarious seasons, a fan-based writing campaign immediately started and put the show back into its Thursday time slot. But even wedged between Friends and Will & Grace, many Americans are missing the funniest show on network television. Scrubs focuses on the lives of medical residents and the doctors that make their lives a living hell. Although the show centers on residents J.D. (Zach Braff), Elliot (Sarah Chalke) and Turk (Donald Faison), the show’s true brilliance comes through supporting character Dr. Cox (John C. McGinley). Dr. Cox spews sarcasm more than any character on television and has no problem calling each male resident a girl’s name, demanding that they call him The Big Cheese or trying to beat Dr. Kelso at Pac-Man, although Kelso has allowed people to die just so he could get a better score. In one episode, Dr. Cox defines his character’s impressive dichotomy. After inviting guys at the hospital to watch a wrestling match and eat pizza, no one shows up except for J.D., the resident he enjoys ridiculing so much. But instead of showing his sadness witnessed by the TV audience, he mocks J.D., saying, “Would you stay ... and watch the game with me? Maybe have a slice of pizza? I can braid your hair,” forcing J.D. to leave. Scrubs is truly a rare event: a sitcom so fresh and funny that it’ll leave you rolling on the floor, but filled with important messages such as how to deal with loss: loss of a loved one, loss of a relationship or loss of sanity when entering a new environment or fighting against adversity. Within a minute, an episode can make you laugh, cry and laugh again. Now starting its third season, Scrubs is not something to miss. (Jason Cantone)


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SPONGEBOB SQUAREPANTS IS OUR GOD. | OCTOBER 9-15, 2003

moviereview

THIRTEEN ★★★ MIRAMAX FILMS

BY JANELLE GREENWOOD | STAFF WRITER

THE DANCER UPSTAIRS | JOHN MALKOVICH

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THE DANCER UPSTAIRS

★★

BY RACHEL TOLER | STAFF WRITER

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egrettably, actor John Malkovich’s directorial debut is not about dancing. The Dancer Upstairs tells the story of Agustin Rejas, a police detective trying to unmask the guerrilla terrorists who have been wreaking havoc in Latin America. In the process, Agustin falls in love with his daughter’s ballet teacher. These two different plot lines could potentially lead to an interesting and original film—unfortunately, the screenplay tackles only one at a given time. Javier Bardem makes Agustin’s jaded character accessible to the audience despite his subdued tone of voice and no-nonsense manner. Laura Morante also delivers a strong performance as Yolanda, the beautiful and secretive ballet teacher. Morante demonstrates her range as an actress in this demanding role, and becomes the center of the film despite the screenplay’s battling plot lines. Even with her impressive performance, though, the film’s constant shift in focus becomes a distraction instead of an intricacy and the main cause of the movie’s downfall. The screenplay’s failure to unite these plot lines is most apparent at the end of the film. The lackluster, drawn-out conclusion attempts to reconstruct the gaps left between the two plot lines, but the attempt comes too late. Fortunately, Malkovich’s impressive direction saves this film from complete failure. In The Dancer Upstairs, Malkovich channels his background in theater to create the artful and provocative scenes that highlight the most dramatic parts of the film. His alternate use of bright colors and shadow suggest the film’s struggle between good and evil forces. Malkovich’s film noir approach also defines the struggles between good and evil characters in a way that the screenplay fails to do. Malkovich’s wise directorial decisions unite the poorly structured screenplay, perhaps suggesting that power lies not in words (as the terrorists in the film might suggest), but—as the dancer proves—in the beauty and grace of the artistic spirit.

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n an exercise to show parents the truth of today’s youth comes a disturbing look into their lives in Thirteen. Thirteen follows the squeaky-clean teen Tracy (Evan Rachel Wood), fresh from the dramatic series Once and Again, who longs to fit in with the popular and fast-paced Evie (Nicki Reed). Evie epitomizes the ideal L.A. teenager by representing everything that magazines and television highlight as important to these girls. Tracy, in an attempt to ditch her goody-goody image, steals a wallet on Melrose Avenue, eventually proving her worth to Evie’s gang. From that point, despite knowing better, Tracy attempts to shed her innocence through every new experience Evie puts her in. At first glance, the film looks like it’s simply going to showcase midriffs and tongue piercings in order to shock parents, but it does move into serious issues. Despite wanting to appear older, both Tracy’s and Evie’s youth comes through in the film’s beautiful cinematography and script, which highlight their youth effortlessly. When the girls come home after dropping acid in a sprinkler

dvdreview

SPONGEBOB SQUAREPANTS TIDE AND SEEK ★★

BY THOMAS ABBATACOLA | STAFF WRITER

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hy has SpongeBob SquarePants become so popular that he has his own DVDs, video games and upcoming film? The answer can be found by watching a few episodes of the Nickelodeon show. This animated series is so entertaining that families gladly watch alongside children, but its odd humor has also attracted a college-aged following. While SpongeBob SquarePants is still very much aimed at kids, interest among other age groups triggered the release of several DVD collections of episodes. However, SpongeBob SquarePants: Tide and Seek is not the best way for children or adults to enjoy the adventures of their favorite sponge. This cartoon is adored by all ages because of the original characters and their environment. SpongeBob, voiced by Tom Kenny, is an optimistic and cheerful sponge living under the sea. His voice, facial expressions and outfit make him a likeable character even though he often

park, Evie begins to sing, “the itsy bitsy spider dropped acid in the park,” showing a bizarre, yet poignant look at her own attempt to mask her innocence through a false maturity by using drugs. The cinematography really draws on the experience, like eavesdropping into the unseen world that teens today are apparently keeping from the rest of us. Co-written by one of the film’s stars, Reed, Thirteen hits on the feelings surrounding selfesteem and the need to fit in through making Tracy’s character steal, experience awkward sexual encounters and experiment with drugs. Just as many teens try out new personas, Tracy’s life becomes dissected, but the film goes beyond a superficial shell to reveal a disturbed youth who cuts herself repeatedly in the bathroom to deal with her stress. We clearly see Tracy’s physical transformation through her disappearing clothes; however, it’s her shift from a considerate young girl to a self-centered teen that really showcases Tracy’s insecurities. Thirteen could have taken the after-school special route and used cheesy cliches, especially given that a 13-year-old girl helped write the script, but it doesn’t. Instead, the film is brave and rewards the viewer with a breakout performance that showcases Wood’s ability to draw empathy and distaste in the same action. The unobtrusive cinematography brings the viewer right into the fast world that these girls see in the Los Angeles lifestyle. In another glimpse of the 13-year-old girl, both girls try to outdo each acts like a “square.” The slow witted Patrick, a sea star, deserves the most credit for laughs, as he and SpongeBob team up in most episodes. In two episodes on this DVD, adults might catch references to Abbot and Costello Meet Frankenstein and The Marx Brothers’ Duck Soup. The show takes place in a strange underwater world filled with seaweed and bubbles, which looks great on DVD. SpongeBob, who lives in a pineapple and works at a fast food restaurant called The Krusty Krab, walks and talks freely with the other sea creatures. The squirrel, however, lives in a bubble and must travel in scuba gear. The unusual environment separates SpongeBob SquarePants from other cartoons, but still allows for normal storylines. Kids accept the show because it is bright and optimistic but does not get preachy with morals. There is great energy and you can tell kids feel it when they shout along with the theme song, “Who lives in a pineapple under the sea? SPONGEBOB SQUAREPANTS!” It is hard to find more excitement than this in most Saturday morning style cartoons. SpongeBob is a simple form of silliness but parents shouldn’t expect any smart humor. It succeeds in making the viewer feel like a child. But despite the fun and games, the DVD can often disappoint the show’s biggest fans. Tide and Seek is a collection of 10 old episodes and a few special features. These randomly selected episodes have no relation to each other. Fans may be disappointed to spend money on these DVD collections if Nickelodeon releases the full seasons later. Another disappointing part of Tide and Seek is

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other while making out with two boys. It draws on the awkwardness of the situation; Tracy pays more attention to Evie in order to mimic her behavior and “one up” her, rather than realizing the weight of the situation. Holly Hunter’s performance as Melanie, Tracy’s mother, appears endearing and honest, and it should earn her a nod for best supporting actress in the Oscar run in February. Her feelings come through as lost and truly frightened of her daughter’s capabilities when trying to confront and comfort Tracy. More importantly, however, Hunter’s performance mirrors the same confused feelings of her daughter. Thirteen really reflects society’s desire to move forward, even at the cost of its youth, and the result is an overbearing world of chaos that today’s teens are thrown into too early in life.

Said the Shotgun to the Head is now available at local bookstores. Retail price runs at $11.95.

comingthismonth BY JEFF NELSON | CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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SPONGEBOB SQUAREPANTS | SPONGEBOB a lack of extras. Those interested in animation may enjoy a storyboard for one episode but most fans could probably care less. The socalled “Behind the Scenes” feature is only a minute long. Two episodes have commentary by creator Stephen Hillenburg and Kenny. Such a fast paced, energetic cartoon deserves the same kind of attitude from commentators. But these two mumble through both episodes lifelessly sounding like Jay and Silent Bob. While the older audience may find the monotone commentary hilarious, most kids will be bored. There is nothing great about the SpongeBob SquarePants: Tide and Seek DVD that would make kids beg for it. Big fans may want to add it to their collection of SpongeBob merchandise, but most should be cautious if full seasons are ever released. With a movie on the way, the fad of SpongeBob does not seem to be ending soon and this DVD is just another way of cashing in.

C

Our narrator is a babbling prophet who spouts his fear of a nation being dictated by a burning bush. He aspires to be someone among us who is content. Though the poetry of our generation has been filled with angst, there is a sense of longing in all that we write, along with a plea behind the complaints that says, “I do love, I just don’t understand how it can survive.” Saul Williams is a man who can do no more than breathe, which in itself is inspiration, portraying the type of voice we represent as the youth of a world, not a nation. We are confused, we are scared and we are anxious. We turn to goods instead of gods and seek enlightenment in three-minute intervals. This is not our failure but our programming. So what happens when we call God a woman? When we buck the trend of spending our money and begin to spin our minds? We find that contention that we long for, and this epic poem is the transcription of a generation who seeks as though they have been followed, not blindly led.

s the fall arts season gears up, that big building that occupies an entire block of the east University of Illinois campus, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, is one place to look for a variety of offerings in the performing arts. October and November are Krannert’s peak months, and this autumn there is something for everyone. For those who follow the University’s various symphonic and chamber music outlets, the Illini Symphony will perform Sunday at 3 p.m. Also next week, faculty members Serban Lupu and Ian Hobson will perform violin and piano music Oct. 14. The month finishes with offerings from the University’s Wind Symphony/ Symphonic Band on Oct. 17 and its Chamber Singers on Oct. 25. Cellist Maya Beiser will perform some contemporary compositions in the Tryon Festival Theatre on Oct. 17, while across the lobby in Foellinger, the Champaign-Urbana Symphony Orchestra will perform youthful works of great composers such as Bizet’s “Symphony

This statue sits in front of the University’s main library. It was created by former University Art Instructor Lorado Taft as part of his “Fountain of Creation” series.

No. 1.” The month draws to a close with a visit from the extraordinary National Dance Company of Siberia on Oct. 23 and violinist Joan Kwoun on Oct. 26. Vocal music fans can enjoy the Oct. 19 tribute to former faculty member William Warfield and a visit from soprano Denise Graves on Oct. 16. Also, look forward to a double treat from Bulgaria on Oct. 21; Opera Verdi Europe will perform Mozart’s 40th symphony and the ultimate vocal work, Mozart’s “Requiem.” If you expect theater at the Krannert Center, this month will not disappoint. In what has already been declared a Sondheim year, the University of Illinois Department of Theatre will open his brilliantly musical bittersweet fairy tale montage, Into the Woods, on Oct. 24. It will run weekends until Nov. 2. If Barbara Cook’s Mostly Sondheim concert on Sept. 16 didn’t hint of great Sondheim events around the corner, please note that the University’s Opera will present Sweeney Todd beginning Feb. 20. Finally, if you like your plays without music, Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde will run in rotation with the comedy Anton in Show Business from Oct. 28 to Nov. 16 at the Studio Theatre. Just in case nothing here really grabs you and your entertainment is gut level, try The Drummers of West Africa on Oct. 15. This great group from Senegal may be the one that does take hold. FYI: This year, most evening Krannert events start at 7:30 p.m. and a few start at 7 p.m.

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ARTIST’S CORNER

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THIRTEEN | HOLLY HUNTER

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OCTOBER 9-15, 2003 | WHAT KIND OF BEE GIVES MILK? A BOO-BEE!

ZAR Absolute is a spoken word artist who lives in Urbana and is a student at the University of Illinois. He is the emcee in a hip-hop band called Animate Objects, which won this year’s Battle of the Bands. His producer is PROTOTYPE from the Bankiet Sound System. He sees spoken word as contributing to hip hop and that, as a medium, hip hop is “expanding, not dying. Instead of being one thing it is evolving into a genre that incorporates more and more aspects.”

Concrete Gemini

What inspires you? My love for the craft and my desire to do something therapeutic for myself and for others inspires me. I am studying psychiatry and I strive to enrich people through the enrichment of myself.

Have patience, because once our consciousness is awakened I guarantee that we can make it I can’t take it I made a living out of channeling my hatred To conquer anything that I’m faced with I ain’t complacent; I’ll destroy anything that you’ve created To get my people emancipated

What themes are present in your work? Eclecticism is present along with different art forms that preceded hip hop. For example, bebop, jazz and swing. What environment do you best work in? I work well in a place where I could be intimately connected with the audience. This way I can educate while performing. Where can you find the best conversation in town? The best conversations are found anywhere following a U-C Hip-Hop function. You get to open up and talk to each other as individuals.

I spent too many cold winters with a frozen heart in the Chi So now I watch my own back like a Gemini Hard knocks aficionado, who wears a blank face like Movado But found hiding from his own emotions is Bravado Things get hard to swallow, and inside you feel hollow Looking for some guide to follow

We need freedom, need to know doubts and regrets are our demons That’s why I can’t sleep, but I’m still dreaming Ain’t no reason, for my people to sit around weeping Stand strong and follow what you believe in Hope it’s your heart Mine is embedded in art, to the point that I don’t think I can tell them apart Whether a gift or a curse To uplift or to hurt I try to see both sides through the eyes of my verse

PHOTO | ADAM YOUNG

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PHOTO | KATIE RICHARDSON

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FOUR FUNNY SENTENCES WALK INTO A BAR, ONLY ONE COMES OUT. HERE IT IS | OCTOBER 9-15, 2003 buzz

The spirit of Mediterranean Pathos: The early works of Pierre Daura P

ierre Daura was a Catalonian-American artist who lived from 1896 to 1976, and during his life created many pieces of art. A number of his earlier works are currently on display at the Krannert Art Museum and will remain so until Nov. 2. The exhibit includes charcoal nude drawings, engravings, a still life painting, a self-portrait and others. All of the artwork in the exhibit was received as a gift from Martha Daura, Pierre’s daughter. The museum was given 12 paintings and 56 works on paper, said Roxanne Stanulis, curator of collections at the Krannert Art Museum. “This gift is unique because of the number of works and the quality of those works,� she said. “The work in the exhibit highlights parts of our permanent collection.� In 1914, Daura moved from Spain to Paris to continue his work as an artist. A few years later, Daura returned to Menorca to serve in the military. On display at the museum are charcoal nude sketchings from this period in his life. “We worked together and went through the larger body of work to choose the pieces for the exhibit,� said Jordana Mendelson, guest curator for the exhibit and assistant professor of art and design at the University of Illinois. “The work is pretty (much) arranged in a

chronological framework and there are a variety of different works.� Daura met in 1927 his wife, Louise, who, after graduating from Bryn Mawr College, went to Paris to travel. A year later they married and traveled together throughout Spain. Another piece on display is an engraving of his hometown, Ascu. His skillful technique of wood and bronze engraving is visible in this piece. Also featured are books from the University library that supplement the art and history of Daura. “His work has the greatest impact on learning communities in places like university art museums,� Mendelson said. “We try to tie the works in with things we have here in order to give a sense of the way his work resonated among critics.� Daura’s work tended to display a tension between figuration and abstraction. This is apparent in many of his still lifes during the 1920s and 1930s. One such painting can be seen at the Krannert exhibit. “Martha has donated work to various places where Pierre Daura lived and worked. These were carefully thought out choices,� Mendelson said. “(Martha) was here for the fundraising gala benefit in September just recently,� Stanulis said. “She is very interested in having her father’s work on exhibit where it can be studied and appreciated.�

Virginia and St. Cirq. Today, the house that Daura owned in St. Cirq has been given to the government to serve as an artists’ colony. “We hope to bring recognition to this important artist who probably hasn’t received enough attention and to get his work better known,� said Stanulis. buzz

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An engraving from Civilisation by Pierre Daura

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LOST IN TRANSLATION BY MATT PAIS | LEAD REVIEWER

0$5&+,1* ,//,1,

Come visit our free this weekend!

Daura’s work, during his lifetime, was displayed in many different places. He made pieces that reflected the places he had seen during his travels. Daura helped organize a number of events, including a group called Agrupaciu d’Artistes Catalans (Group of Catalan Artists) and Cerle et CarrĂŠ (Circle and Square) which emphasized the strategic creation of art, as opposed to surrealism. “There is a precociousness to his production,â€? Mendelson said. In 1930, Pierre and Louise moved to St. CirqLapopie, France. In their first year there, their daughter Martha was born. Then from 1934 to 1935, they went to Louise’s hometown in Virginia. From this experience Daura created a series of American landscapes. At age 41, Daura served in the Spanish Civil War on the Republican side. After returning from the war upon a result of being wounded, Daura created a series of engravings called Civilisation, 1937-1939, showing the shocking experiences he observed and sketched. Both Pierre and Louise wrote letters during this time, which were afterwards published; Daura wrote to Louise and Louise wrote to her family in Virginia. While living in Virginia, World War II broke out, and Daura and his family stayed in Virginia. They became naturalized citizens and Daura became a college art teacher. Beginning in 1947, Daura alternated living between

moviereview

PHOTO | SUZANNE SITRICK

BY SUZANNE SITRICK | STAFF WRITER

ill Murray has a great face for movies. Thin and droopy, proud and weary, Murray’s mug has developed lines that perpetually crawl down his face and neck and pull down the corners of his mouth. The actor’s befuddled maturity has ripened with age, shining most recently in Wes Anderson’s Rushmore and The Royal Tennenbaums. His rough, ragged face sags with outstanding, temperate sadness throughout the stunningly nuanced Lost in Translation, a moving, enigmatic dissection of the human condition. And as former movie star Bob Harris (Murray) struggles to understand a Japanese commercial director’s request to imitate the members of the “Lot Pock� (a garbled “Rat Pack�), Murray settles into one of the most triumphant comedic and dramatic performances of his career. At 53, he still has the same knack for physical

moviereview

OUT OF TIME ★★★ BY ANDREW CREWELL | STAFF WRITER

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101 E. University • FREE PARKING IN REAR • Mon-Fri: 10-9 Sat: 10-8 Sun: 12-6 • 351-5974

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21

film & tv

OCTOBER 9-15, 2003| BILL MURRAY’S FINEST WORK

ut of Time is a refreshing film that revisits a genre seldom used and reunites a successful actor-director combination. Film noir is rarely employed in current filmmaking, but director Carl Franklin rejoins with Academy Award winning actor Denzel Washington (Training Day) for a repeat of the 1995 detective thriller Devil in a Blue Dress. In this 2003 reunion, Denzel stars as Matt Lee Whitlock, a small-town police chief in Florida. Whitlock, who has been down on his luck with his estranged wife played by Eva Mendez (2 Fast 2 Furious), finds himself in the throes of an affair with an old flame. Just as his life couldn’t seem any more mixed up, Whitlock makes an enormous half-million dollar drug bust and sees his life turn upside down as he starts to get into trouble. It’s at this point that Whitlock realizes he is being used by con artists trying to get through him to the drug money he has access to. Looking for an answer, he decides to run away from his troubles with his cancer-ridden high school sweetheart, and nurse her back to health with the drug money. Unfortunately, by this time, Whitlock is in over his head, has

comedy, but with a more adult sense of awshucks hopelessness. Murray provides virtually every one of the many laugh-out-loud moments in Lost in Translation, which balance its varying tones with competent, gentle grace. Hilarious and heartbreaking, the film is driven by Murray’s worn-in performance, which is as mesmerizing as it is memorable. All alone in the glowing neon city of Tokyo, Bob is far from the fame he knew in the 1970s. His hair has thinned, and his sense of Hollywood hegemony has dwindled into a languid passivity that falls a few steps short of alcoholism. But Bob, endorsing Japanese liquor, isn’t the only lost soul in the city: he meets Charlotte (Scarlett Johansson), a moody Yale graduate staying in the same hotel while her husband (Giovanni Ribisi) photographs celebrities. The two lonely hearts gradually bond, and their calm flirtation forms an entrancing, whirlwind romance of platonic infatuation. Lost in Translation is noticeably different in content but markedly similar in mood as writer/director Sofia Coppola’s debut, the wonderfully ambiguous The Virgin Suicides. While Coppola’s first film addressed sexual repression and miscommunication through the eyes of small-town teenagers, her poignant follow-up spins an entirely new incarnation of wandering alienation. Again employing an atmospheric, dream-pop soundscape, Coppola creates lush, liquid sequences of tremendous humor and heart. been framed for murder, and everyone he knew has suddenly abandoned him. As he sits down to think through the problem, the DEA shows up wanting the cash, and his wife shows up as a homicide detective brought in to solve the very murder Whitlock had been framed for. The entire film turns out to be Denzel racing against time, police and the criminals he’s tracking as he tries to stay one step ahead of everyone. The film is very enticing to watch, and the understated action builds suspense as the audience finds themselves enthralled by the story and rooting for Denzel. Denzel, a pillar of support for the black acting community after winning the Oscar, varies a lot in the film, leading some scenes to be more believable than others. However, his presence and ability to assert himself allow him to be truly amazing. The rest of the cast is relatively unknown but very supportive of Denzel. This is especially seen in John Billingsley as Chae, who always turns up at just the right time to save his buddy and provide a chuckle. All in all, this could be Carl Franklin’s best work. His scenes string together in an extremely fluid motion that makes Out of Time inherently easy and thrilling to watch. The tension never dies and builds to the end and a fan-favorite conclusion. The plot may not be the most exciting in the history of suspense films, but the diligent work of cast and crew bring it together in fine fashion. The overall feel of the movie resembles Touch of Evil, an Orson Welles film noir from

And once again, Coppola’s work may not sink in until an hour, a day or a week after the credits roll. On the surface, there may not appear to be anything especially noteworthy to the story of two Americans, lost in a city where the only thing that makes any sense is each other. But Coppola cares not for the standard love affair; Bob and Charlotte are not horny philanderers looking for a good time to quell their pain. Instead, thousands of miles from home and separated by years of experience, they find freedom in their undefined relationship. The enigmatic serenity of Lost in Translation confounds and astonishes while it simultaneously embraces and rejects convention. The link between Bob and Charlotte feels a touch familiar but, more importantly, perfectly natural. The simple, step-by-step evolution of their friendship has an idealistic purity not found in most cinematic representations of the older man, younger woman relationship. Age has nothing to do with their connection; these are two people who, not in mind and body, but in spirit, truly understand each other. After only two features, Coppola has proven herself a master of constructing films that are much more than the sum of their parts. Emotionally rich and psychologically complex, her work is a feast for the senses; these are movies meant to be felt rather than seen. This time, she strips celebrities of their pretense and young adults of their naivetÊ. Bob and Charlotte are human in the purest sense of

FOCUS FEATURES

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10/8/03

LOST IN TRANSLATION | BILL MURRAY the word, and their need to establish themselves in a large, faceless city is completely reciprocal and sincere. Coppola has a unique ability to evoke gradually a great deal of meaning that doesn’t present itself until the last possible moment. While The Virgin Suicides magnified the fascination and confusion that exists between the sexes with startling density, her latest work embodies the importance of a familiar face in a country full of strangers. But throughout the subtle, stupendous Lost in Translation, Bob and Charlotte discover in each other not just a friendly face but an ally in the universal game of lost and found.

C-UViews THE SCHOOL OF ROCK ★★★ WIll Osler Champaign MGM FILMS

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OUT OF TIME | DENZEL WASHINGTON the 1950s where Charlton Heston and Welles star opposite each other and create the same sort of inter-police office strain, a film still receiving accolades to this day. Out of Time is a film that has the scope to revitalize a genre in dire straits, and adds one more notch to the already stunning career of possibly the most popular actor in America. For an actionpacked two hours before Thursday night’s big frat park concert, get to the theater and take in Out of Time.

SCREEN REVIEW GUIDE

★★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★ no stars

Flawless Good Mediocre Bad Unwatchable

"It's off the meat racks."

★★★★ Jason Townsend Urbana

"Jack Black rocks!"

UNDER THE TUSCAN SUN ★★★ Carla Brown Champaign

"It had beautiful cinematography from Tuscany.�


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10/8/03

3:25 PM

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calendar

Life Map Workshop – A life map is a collection of visual images, a method of connecting with your intuition, a tool for visualizing your dreams or goals. Come explore life mapping--approaches, uses, and the opportunity to create your own life map. 9:15am-1:00pm on Saturday, November 1 at McKinley Foundation, C. To register or for information, contact Jo Pauly, MSW, Whole Life Coach at (217) 337-7823 or jopauly@prairienet.org

THEATER LISTINGS Elysium on the Prairie, Live Action Roleplaying – Vampires stalk the city streets and struggle for dominance in a world of gothic horror. Create your own character and mingle with dozens of players who portray their own undead alter egos. Each session is another chapter in an ongoing story of triumph, tragedy and betrayal. Friday, “Vampire: The Masquerade” For more information visit: http://ww2.uiuc.edu/ro/elysium/intro.html. Check site for location, 7pm. Parkland Theatre presents “The Laramie Project” – Written by Moises Kaufman and the members of the Tectonic Theatre Project, this drama looks at the events surrounding the 1998 death of gay student Matthew Shepard in Laramie,Wyoming as told through the voices of the townspeople. The director, Randi Jennifer Collins Hard, has cast over 70 community members to bring the town of Laramie to life. Performances are Oct 1, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11 at 8pm and Oct 12 at 3pm. A post-performance talk with the director and actors will be held on Fri, Oct 3 after the show. General admission tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for students (over 12) and seniors, and $5 for youths 12 and under. Special priced nights are opening night, Wed, Oct 1 when all tickets are $2.99 and Thu, Oct 9 when all tickets are half their regular price. Call (217) 351-2528 for tickets and information.

AUDITIONS Calling All Models Including Males – Oct. 11 – Model auditions for the 22nd Annual B.A.T.S. fashion Show – FAR 13:30pm

ENVIRONMENT 6th Annual Salt Fork River Clean-up – Come out to the Salt Fork River and help clean up a local treasure. Meet at the Preserve, 2573 South Homer Lake Road, at 8:30 am. Enjoy refreshments, free t-shirts, and a prize raffle complements of C-U businesses – Salt Fork River Forest Preserve, October 4-30, 8:30am-1pm

WORKSHOPS Artist’s Way Group – A 12-week adventure in recovering and celebrating our creative spirit. Wednesdays, Sept 17Dec 17 (no session Nov 26) from 5:45-7:15pm at McKinley Foundation (free parking). To register or for more information, contact Jo Pauly, MSW, Whole Life Coach at (217) 3377823 or jopauly@prairienet.org. Walking In This World Group – The new sequel to the Artist's Way with 12 new weeks of strategies and techniques for expressing our creative spirit. Wednesdays, Sept 17-Dec 17 (no session Nov 26) from 7:30-9:00pm at McKinley Foundation (free parking). To register or for Great Grain Breads – October 18 – Learn to fit whole grains into your diet by creating healthy, simple whole grain breads. The feature recipe can be altered to create many different types of bread from the same basic recipe. The class meets Saturday, October 18 from 10-11:30 a.m. at the Mettler Center, 2906 Crossing Court in Champaign. The registration fee is $20. Registration deadline is October 10. For more information call 217/403-4590. Ballroom I: An Introduction to the World of Ballroom Dancing – October 20 - November 24 – Learn the basic steps of waltz and swing in a fun, easygoing environment. No experience and no partner are necessary. The class meets Mondays from 6:45-8 p.m. at the Refinery, 502 S. Kenwood St., Champaign. The registration fee is $49. Registration deadline is October 13. For more information call 217-403-4590. Salsa and Nightclub Two-Step – October 20 - November 24 – This is a beginning class for club-style partner dancing. Participants will learn salsa and nightclub two-step. No experience and no partner are necessary. The class meets Mondays from 8:15-9:30pm at the Refinery, 502 S. Kenwood St., Champaign. The registration fee is $49.

WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com | OCTOBER 19-15, 2003

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TMJ Discomfort: What Can You Do? – October 22 – Learn about the anatomy and function of the jaw and how to keep it functioning optimally. The class will also address the role muscle tension can play in joint dysfunction and how to relieve this tension. Douglas Nelson and the staff of Body Work Associates will teach the class. The class meets Wednesday, October 22 from 7-9pm in room M130 at the Parkland College campus. The registration fee is $16. Registration deadline is October 15. For more information call 217-403-4590.

Topdog/Underdog ★★

Suzan-Lori Parks

BY SYD SLOBODNIK | CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Faux Finshing Workshop - Marble – October 16 – Faux Finish Painting Workshops. $20 for one evening session. Tools and supplies provided. Register online at www.boyerdrawing.com or call. – Boyer Drawing & Painting Lincoln Square Mall, 7-9pm

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ho can figure the rationale behind the politics of a Pulitzer Prize committee? Since 1918, this committee, endowed by former NY World publisher, Joseph Pulitzer, in a bequest to Columbia University, has awarded nearly annual prizes for excellence in journalism and letters, drama being one category. With much anticipation, Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre Company, at 1650 N. Halsted St., has staged the Midwest premiere of the 2002 Pulitzer Prize winner for drama, Suzan-Lori Parks’ Topdog/Underdog. This present run is planned until Nov. 2. Though this production features some of the Steppenwolf’s usual fine acting caliber—K. Todd Freeman and David Rainey—the impact of Parks’ themes and messages is underwhelming. Also, theater-goers should not have to consult Cliff Notes interpretations before attending this production. The contemporary, two-person drama details several days in the lives of a pair of inner city African-American brothers, Lincoln and Booth, who seem to suffer from two of the

Faux Finshing Workshop - Faux Wood – October 23 – Faux Finish Painting Workshops. Oct. 23 - Faux Wood; Oct. 30 - Stone and Brick. 7-9pm. Tools and supplies provided. Register online at www.boyerdrawing.com or call – Boyer Drawing & Painting - Lincoln Square Mall, 7-9pm New Catalog Basics – October 17 – At this small-group beginners' class, we'll demonstrate the basics of the new catalog, then answer questions while you try it yourself. Please register by calling – Champaign Public Library, Information Desk, 9:30-10:30am

SOCIAL ISSUES "Silent Witness Project" – October 15-17 – This project consists of lifesize cutouts that have a story of a real-life domestic violence situation attached. (The project will not be shown on the 16th.) – Champaign-Urbana Public Health District

arts

OCTOBER 9-15, 2003 | YOU DON’T MAKE FRIENDS BY MAKING FUN, AND YOU DON’T WIN FRIENDS WITH SALAD.

playreview

Registration deadline is October 13. For more information call 217-403-4590.

Anti-Columbus Day Rally featuring Charlene Teeters – October 10 – The Progressive Resource/Action Cooperative will be holding its annual anti-Columbus day event. This event will make the connections between the legacy of Christopher Columbus and the presence of the mascot "Chief Illiniwek" at the U of I. There will be a picket and speakers from 11:30am-2pm on the UI Quad in front of the Henry Administration building. The keynote speaker will be Charlene Teeters, founder of the anti-"Chief" movement

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most common types of social deficits. Both have had minimal success connecting with women in their lives, and both are marginally employed. The elder brother, a 30-something recent divorcee, dresses as his namesake and plays the Great Emancipator in an arcade where the Lincoln assassination is repeatedly re-enacted daily for audiences’ amusements. The slightly younger brother, Booth, opens the play practicing his elaborate lyrical street hustle of Three-Card Monte. Booth lives in a rundown flat with a single cot and a recliner chair. Even though Lincoln pays to stay there while he’s in transition, he comments critically, “You live in the Third World, fool.” As Booth, K. Todd Freeman, a regular member of the Steppenwolf ensemble, brings life and dimension to this rather cliched and unlikable pistol-packing thug. Freeman’s realistic staccato delivery of his lines and natural outbursts are the highlight of his skilled performance. Early in the play Booth refers to how their father named them, saying, “It was his idea of a joke.” This line telegraphs several key events in the play. The rest of this plotless drama seems more like a series of long monologues of past memories, love relationships gone wrong and pipe dreams of either attaining greater easy wealth, or vulgar opportunities with sexy girlfriends or one-night stands who will heal their chronic sufferings. So what makes this play a supposed modern Cain and Abel parable or an insightful,

Rookie Cookies – Hands-on cooking class for elementary

cutting edge analysis of modern brotherhood, worthy of the Pulitzer honor? As a character study of two seemingly social losers, it’s only director Amy Morton’s skilled direction of Freeman and Rainey that squeeze what little life and emotional intensity can be pulled out of these loosely drawn characters. At one point in the play, there appears to be an attempt of social criticism of a sort of bizarre reversal of the minstrel show character humiliation. The character Lincoln

Su Oct 12

Habitat For Humanity – October 10 – Sign up today for Habitat for Humanity's at the University of Illinois co-ed volleyball tournament. The tournament will take place on Saturday, participants will receive a free t-shirt at the event and refreshments will be served. The registration fee is $13 per individual, or $72 per team of six players. Those interested may register by downloading a registration form at http://habitat.union.uiuc.edu, and mailing it to 266 Illini Union, 1401 W. Green St., Urbana IL 61801

appears in white face, with complete fake beard and black coat and stovepipe hat. But unlike Spike Lee’s underrated satire of minstrel show characters in Bamboozled, Parks’ satire is only fleeting cynicism without elaboration on racist employment practices, discrimination and exploitation. This depressing tale of these conventional inner city brother ends so abruptly it leaves even the most patient theater-goer perplexed and dissatisfied. Don’t be fooled by this play’s Pulitzer honors! buzz

K. Todd Freeman (Booth) and David Rainey (Lincoln) in Topdog/Underdog.

this week

National Coming Out Day Rally – October 10 – A rally in support of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered persons. There will be live performances and guest speakers – North End of Quad, noon-1pm

UI Philharmonia 3pm, $2-$5 Jazz Vespers 5:30pm, University Place Christian Church, free Sponsors:

@

krannert center

We Oct 15

Th Oct 16

Drummers of West Africa 7pm, $15-$28 Sponsors: Jean Huddleston and Paul and Kelly Foster

Wine Tasting 5pm, free

KIDS & FAMILIES Tu Oct 14

Girls, Girls, Girls! – October 10 – Games, crafts, and reading time for girls in kindergarten to fifth grade – Douglas Branch Library, 4-5pm

It's Storytime! – October 11 – Join us at Pages for this free children's storytelling event, each and every week! Our booksellers are excellent readers, and we choose two new (or classic) storybooks to read each week. Drop in and join the fun! This event is recommended for children ages 1 to 8. Cookies served – Pages For All Ages, 11:30am TotNotes – Come to one of our favorite activities: TotNotes-Pages For All Ages' music appreciation class for babies! Pages is very happy to welcome instructor Lisa Cerezo into our store for a free class in music appreciation that's just right for infants and toddlers – Pages For All Ages, 10am

Denyce Graves, mezzo-soprano 7:30pm, $25-$42 Sponsors: Mary and George Perlstein Dolores and Roger Yarbrough Anonymous

Sherban Lupu, violin and Ian Hobson, piano 7:30pm, $2-$5

First Step Fitness – October 9 – Learn about health and join in fun group exercise activities. Class meets Fridays through October 17. (ages 4-5) – Phillips Recreation Center, 3:30-4:20pm ABC 123 – October 9 – Preschoolers will learn creatively thought, games and crafts – Phillips Recreation Center, 1111:45am

EAT IN TAKE OUT l

l

Jazz Vespers 5:30pm, University Place Christian Church, free

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Some Krannert Center programs are supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Illinois Arts Council, and patron and corporate contributions.

Season Sponsors Coporate Season Underwriters

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Patron Season Sponsors

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The Jazz Threads project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts Challenge America—Access to the Arts Program.

KrannertCenter.com 217/333-6280 or 800/KCPATIX 217/333-9714 (TTY) 217/244-SHOW (Fax) 217/244-0549 (Groups) kran-tix@uiuc.edu Ticket Office Open 10am to 6pm daily; on days of performances open 10am through intermission.


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music

“HEY YA” IS HIP-HOP. DEAL WITH IT. | OCTOBER 9-15, 2003

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A transatlantic journey to Champaign

Gallery Virtu Cooperative – Original fine art and crafts from member artists including jewelry, pottery, paintings, collages, hats, handbags and other textiles, sculptures and journals. The Gallery also offers workshops; a new schedule of classes is on the web site.220 W Washington St, Monticello.(217) 762-7790. Thu 12-4pm, Fri 12-8pm, Sat 10am-6pm.www.galleryvirtu.org Glass FX – New and Antique Stained Glass Windows, Lamps, and unique glass gifts.Gallery is free and open to the public. Interested in learning the art of Stained Glass? Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced Stained Glass Classes offered.202 S First St, Champaign.Mon-Thu 10am-5:30pm, Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 9am-4pm.(217) 359-0048.www.glassfx.com.

The travels and trials of Death Cab for Cutie’s Ben Gibbard

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his has been a busy year for Ben Gibbard. “I’ve been moving all year. There have been three to four weeks since January that I have been home,” Gibbard said. Most musicians consider it a full year if they are able to record and release one critically praised album as well as to perform to sold out crowds across the nation. Gibbard was able to do that earlier in 2003 with his side project, The Postal Service, when he co-wrote and recorded Give Up and toured as lead singer and guitarist. But it seems that doing that once just isn’t enough for Gibbard. He is now starting the process all over again and leaving home with his full-time band, Death Cab For Cutie. This Seattle quartet released their fourth fulllength album, Transatlanticism, this past Tuesday and is on the road for another national headlining tour. That tour will bring Death Cab’s emotional and introspective rock sound to The Highdive on Sunday. Weaving their way across the nation in a van is nothing new for Death Cab for Cutie, who have, since forming in 1997, reached the upperechelon of the indie-rock world. “Touring is the closest thing you can get to 1950s beat culture,” Gibbard said. “You roll into town in your vans, play songs for your friends, party with your friends afterward and then get back on the road to see more friends. There is no better motivation for creative expression than getting to share it with friends on tour.” Gibbard is quick to point out, in a slightly joking manner, that the repetition of touring can get a little old. “We’ve stopped at the same Thriftway store in Texas every single tour for the past four years,” Gibbard said with a laugh. Traveling down the same old roads year after year is a small drawback to touring. Transatlanticism deals with a bigger one. “You reach a point being in a band, with so much go, go, go and getting on tour, that you start to notice that personal relationships— romantic, friendships, family—they start to suffer,” Gibbard said. “It’s a weird relationship for a band where our friends are sending us off and at times we want to get the fuck away, but those relationships suffer. So the theme of distance is prevalent on the album.” Gibbard doesn’t go into specifics of these relationships, but songs on the album like “Transatlanticism,” “Title and Registration” and “A Lack of Color” all have the musical and lyrical dark clouds of relationships falling apart. In “Title and Registration” Gibbard sings, “But there’s no blame for how our love did slowly fade / And now that it’s gone, it’s like it wasn’t

Presently, Gibbard is focusing on Death Cab there at all / And here I rest: where disappoint- writing so much music that when we finished the D-plan tour (a co-headlining tour Death for Cutie and finding joy in organizing his vinyl ment and regret collide, lying awake at night.” “I will pick up a guitar or sit down at the Cab did with Washington, D.C., group collection, which has grown over the year. “I enjoy putting on a record and being compiano and that’s what comes out,” Gibbard Dismemberment Plan in 2002), that I needed mitted to listening to an album all the way,” said, explaining the songwriting process. “This that break.” The songwriting process worked by Gibbard said. is what I was feeling on this album, and I don’t That vinyl isn’t necessarily the standard indie Tamborello writing beats and sending them to think it will be there on the next one.” In fact, the trademark introspective lyrics Gibbard on a zip disk through the mail (hence fare. Brian Eno’s Ambient 2 was playing on Gibbard’s record player before embarking on might be altogether absent on the next Death the name Postal Service). “I would get a little package in the mail and tour, along with “the B-52’s first two or three Cab release. “The next album is going to be less personal. it would be like getting a new treat every albums.” “I’m really enjoying music that is fun,” I’m drained emotionally,” Gibbard said. “It will week,” Gibbard said. Gibbard would then record vocals and guitar Gibbard said. “I just saw this Seattle band called probably (be) more fictional.” the United States of Electronic that is very cool While Transatlanticism might have been lyri- parts and send them back to Tamborello. “It was great because someone else did the and has this fun Daft Punk vibe to them. I’m cally draining for Gibbard, it seems to have brought the band closer together, even with the hard part. Jimmy wrote the songs.” Gibbard enjoying music like that that is emotional.” Finding more bands like that might be tough said. “I would just step back and clean up.” addition of a new member. Gibbard said that he personally has taken for Gibbard and the rest of Death Cab as they Early demos submitted by Gibbard to the rest of the band weren’t met with as much enthusi- away a few new insights from his Postal Service complete their seven-week tour. After that, and the Postal Service dates, Gibbard said Death asm as prior Death Cab recording sessions. So experience. “I’ve learned to use technology in new ways Cab is looking for a “really good supporting the band, at a laid-back pace, took a year and a and also to look at music in a more linear fash- slot” with a well-established band. half to deconstruct and rebuild the songs. “In a perfect world, we’d open for one of the Guitarist and keyboard player Chris Walla ion. It’s helped me think about taking tracks produced the album. Bassist Nick Harmer and onto a computer and working with loops,” bands on a very short list we have,” Gibbard said, unwilling to deliver any further details. new drummer Jason McGerr also joined in with Gibbard said. Due to his Death Cab commitments and “Just think of the four or five biggest rock bands crafting the tracks. “I think this record is more akin to We Have Tamborello’s schedule with Dntel and remix in the world that are well-respected and you’ll The Facts and We’re Voting Yes. We have a good work, there are no definite plans for a follow-up know who is on that list.” For Gibbard and Death Cab for Cutie, 2004 is balance in the band and I think we’ve managed Postal Service album. “We’ll meet up when the smoke clears,” shaping up to be another busy year. buzz to take the pluses out of catalog and put them Gibbard said. on this album,” Gibbard said. But before all of the smoke clears, Gibbard Another difference between this album and prior Death Cab releases is that the band did not said he will reunite with Tamborello for several Death Cab for Cutie is playing this Sunday at The perform the tracks for live audiences before West and East Coast Postal Service shows in Highdive with The Long Winters. Tickets are $12 and January and possibly a show in Chicago. recording. doors open at 9:30 p.m. “We used to tour and play tracks into the ground and I think that was stifling creatively,” Gibbard said. “We were able to break down the tracks and do a lot more collaboratively. It proved to be much more rewarding.” Gibbard wasn’t only collaborating more this year with his Death Cab mates, but also with Jimmy Tamborello of Dntel. The two came together to create a project called the Postal Service. Their album, Give Up, which was released on Sub Pop records, started out with praise from small publications and eventually built up enough steam that they received an interview and a profile on MTV. “When it started it seemed like a good break,” Gibbard said. “I had been Death Cab for Cutie are Jason McGerr, Nick Harmer, Ben Gibbard and Chris Walla.

Griggs Street Potters – Handmade functional and decorative pottery.305 W Grigg St, Urbana.(217) 344-8546.Mon-Fri 11am-4pm, or call for appointment. The High Cross Studio Gallery – Works by Sandra Ahtens on display.Artist studio space available.1101 N High Cross Rd., Urbana.Tue 7-9pm,Thu 3-5pm, Fri 3-5pm and by chance or appointment.spiritofsandra@hotmail.com Hill Street Gallery Inc. – Oil and watercolor paintings, hand painted T-shirts, handmade jewelry.703 W Hill, Champaign. (217) 359-0675.Sat 12-5pm or by appointment during the week. International Galleries – Works from local artists.Lincoln Square Mall.(217) 328-2254.Mon-Fri 10am-8pm, Sat 10am6pm, Sun 12-5pm. Larry Kanfer Gallery – University of Illinois images by photographic artist Larry Kanfer.Unique diploma frames and other UI gifts.Sepia Champaign-Urbana Collection also on display. Available now: 2004 Prairiescapes and University of Illinois calendars.2503 S Neil, Champaign.(217) 398-2000.Free and Open to the Public.Mon-Sat 10am-5:30pm.www.kanfer.com LaPayne Photography – Specializes in panoramic photography up to 6 feet long of different subjects including sporting events, city skylines, national parks and University of Illinois scenes. Las Vegas Strip photo show coming soon.816 Dennison Dr., Champaign.(217) 356-8994.Mon-Fri 9am-4pm and by appointment. Old Vic Art Gallery – Fine and Original Art.11 E University, Champaign.(217) 355-8338.Mon-Thu 11am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-4:30pm. Springer Cultural Center – Cultural, recreational and educational programs for all ages as well as workshops, lectures, exhibits and performances.Offers classes in dance, music, theater, visual arts, health/wellness and for preschool children.301 N Randolph Street, Champaign.398-2376.Mon-Thu 8am-9pm, Fri 8am-5:30pm, Sat 9am-5pm, Sun 12pm-5pm.www.champaignparkdistrict.com Steeple Gallery – Works from Gary Ingersoll, including many Allerton Park photos on display.Also showing vintage botanical and bird prints, antiques, framed limited edition prints.102 E Lafayette St, Monticello.762-2924.Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat 10am-4pm.www.steeplegallery.com Verdant News and Coffee & Verde Gallery – Magazines, newspapers, coffee, beverages and fine pastries along with the Verde Fine Art Gallery. 17 E Taylor St, Champaign.366-3204. Cafe hours: Mon-Sat 7am-10 pm; Gallery Hours:Tue-Sat 10am10pm.www.verdant-systems.com/Verde.htm UIUC Japan House -- Public Tours: Every Thursday, 1-4pm,Third Sat of each month, 1-5pm or by appointment.2000 S Lincoln Ave, Urbana.(217) 244-9934.email japanhouse@uiuc.edu. Ziemer Gallery – Original paintings and limited edition prints by Larry Ziemer.Pottery, weavings, wood turning and glass works by other artists.Gallery visitors are welcome to sit, relax, listen to the music and just enjoy being surrounded by art. 210 W Washington, Monticello.Tue 10am-8pm,Wed-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 10am-4pm.www.ziemergallery.com

ART OPENINGS PHOTO | COURTESY OF TAG TEAM MEDIA

BY BRIAN MERTZ | MUSIC EDITOR

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OCTOBER 9-15, 2003 | WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com

“Colors of Islam” – In conjunction with Islam Awareness Week, the Muslim Students Association is cosponsoring an art show at the Illini Union Art Gallery until Nov 3.1401 W Green, Urbana.Open Every day 7am-10pm.

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“First Annual Midwest Sequential Art Exhibition” – The Middle Room Gallery hosts an exhibition of comic and sequential art talent from the Midwest.Ranging in visual and narrative style from political to fantasy, from Japanese Manga to the familiar super-heroic conventions, this show will help shine a light on one of the most misunderstood and overlooked art forms today. Artists include Pam Bliss,Tim Broderick, Jacen Burrows, Darrin Drda, Brion Foulke, Hope Larson, Layla Lawler, Dirk Tiede, Dann Tincher, Charlie "Spike" Trotman.On View at the Middle Room Gallery through Oct 31. Opening reception Oct 11 7-9pm.218 W Main St, Urbana. http://www.gallery.ucimc.org/

ART-ON VIEW NOW “Whistler and Japonisme: Selections from the Permanent Collection” – Marking the 100th anniversary of James McNeill Whistler’s death, this exhibition highlights his works on paper and examines the influence that Japanese woodcuts had on his artistic technique. On display at the Krannert Art Museum through March 28, 2004.500 E Peabody, Urbana.Tue, Thu-Sat 9am-5pm,Wed 9am-8pm, Sun 2-5pm.(217) 333-1860. Suggested Donation: $3 "Remnants of Ritual: Selections from the Gelbard Collection of African Art" – The magnificent African art collection of David and Clifford Gelbard focuses on the cultural significance and aesthetic beauty of masks and sculptures - many of which were created for ceremonial and ritual purposes.This exhibition includes a wide array of objects and celebrates the durable, expressive essence of festivals, rites and coming-ofage ceremonies.On display at the Krannert Art Museum through Oct 26.500 E Peabody, Urbana.Tue,Thu-Sat 9am5pm,Wed 9am-8pm, Sun 2-5pm.(217) 333-1860.Suggested Donation: $3 "Visualizing the Blues: Images of the American South,18621999" – Every picture tells a story and this exhibition of more than 100 photographs of the Mississippi Delta region portrays a profoundly vivid narrative of life in the American South. These photographs, taken from the Civil War era through 1999, show the rhythms of life from this almost mythic region and powerfully document the sources of inspiration for the lyrics and melodies of blues musicians.Among the photographers represented are Margaret Bourke-White, Alfred Eisenstaedt,Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Gordon Parks, Andres Serrano and many others.On display at Krannert Art Museum through Nov 2.500 E Peabody, Urbana.Tue,Thu-Sat 9am-5pm,Wed 9am-8pm, Sun 2-5pm.(217) 333-1860. Suggested Donation: $3 Featured Works XIII: "The Spirit of Mediterranean Pathos: The Early Work of Pierre Daura" - Pierre Daura (1896-1976) was a member of significant modern art movements in the early 20th century.This exhibition highlights a recent gift of works by Daura and explores the forms and colors of his paintings and drawings from about 1910 to the late 1930s.On display at Krannert Art Museum through Nov 2.500 E Peabody, Urbana.Tue,Thu-Sat.9am-5pm,Wed 9am-8pm, Sun 2-5pm.(217) 333-1860.Suggested Donation: $3 “Separate and Unequal: Segregation and Three Generations of Black Response,1870-1950.” – This exhibit highlights the Plessy v.Ferguson Supreme Court decision of 1896, which legally sanctioned racial segregation in the United States until 1954 when the Supreme Court overturned Plessy in the landmark Brown v.Board of Education case.Materials from the Library's collections and archives highlight the historical period between these two landmark civil rights cases.Sponsored by the Office of the Chancellor, the Brown v.Board of Education Commemorative Committee and the University of Illinois Library.On view at the University of Illinois Main Library, first floor hallway, during library hours.1408 W Gregory Drive, Urbana.Hours vary.333-2290.http://www.oc.uiuc.edu/brown

SENIORS Intermediate Computers – Nov 6-20 (Register by Oct 30) – What happens to computer files after they are deleted? This course is for those who want to learn more about how their computer operates. Learn to locate lost files, create address labels, insert clip art and make columns.The class meets Thursdays from 1-3pm at the Parkland College Bauman Center, 2104 W Park Ct, in Champaign.The course fee is $41.The registration deadline is Oct 30. Call (217) 403-4590 for more information

MIND BODY & SPIRIT

Come out Sunday Night Sunday Zen Meditation Meeting – Prairie Zen Center, 515 S Prospect, Champaign, NW corner Prospect & Green, enter thru door from parking area. Introduction to Zen Sitting, 10 AM; Full Schedule: Service at 9 followed by sitting, Dharma Talk at 11 followed by tea until about 12 noon. Can arrive at any of above times, open to all, no experience needed, no cost. For info call 355-8835 or www.prairiezen.org

“Through Larry Kanfer’s Lens: From Prariescapes to Cityscapes”– The latest exhibit of photographic artwork by critically acclaimed fine-art photographic artist, Larry Kanfer, features "visually stunning Prairiescapes up to 8 feet wide. Contemplate the vast grandeur of America's heartland, with its rich traditions and seasonal cycles of the prairie, juxtaposed against images of Midwest cityscapes, highlighting intimate architectural details. On display at the Lark Kanfer Gallery through Oct 24.2503 S Neil, Champaign.(217) 398-2000.Free and Open to the Public.Mon-Sat 10am-5:30pm. www.kanfer.com

Prairie Sangha for Mindfullness Meditation – Monday evenings from 7:30-9pm and monthly retreats on Sunday. Theravadan (Vipassana) and Tibetan (Vjrayana & Dzogchen) meditation practice. Meets in Urbana. More information call or email Tom at 356-7413 or shayir@soltec.net. www.prairiesangha.org

BENEFITS

Formerly-Fat Persons’ Support Group – Free social meeting every Saturday at 2pm at Aroma Cafe, 118 N Neil St, C. For more information contact Jessica Watson at 353-4934.

Hip-Hop Benefit Show – local hip hop performers will gather to support our local chapters of NORML (National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws) and SSDP (Students for Sensible Drug Policy). DJs include Joe Castro, Derek Wahl, Al-literation, Independent Descendents, and Katastrophe – University YMCA, 8pm

Clear Sky Zen Group – Meets on Thursday evenings in the Geneva Room of the McKinley Foundation. Newcomers to meditation and people of all traditions and faiths are welcome – McKinley Foundation, 809 S Fifth St, 6:25-9pm

Reel to Reel and the Wheels of Steel Movies with Spinnerty and Bozak spinning in the background. Still time for Oktoberfest Beers. Main Market

3:25 PM

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10/8/03

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University

105 N. Market St. Downtown Champaign 355.1236


10/8/03

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WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com | OCTOBER 19-15, 2003

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LIVE JAZZ at

627 E. GREEN 344-0710

/ o w ard b i ij ck Kw y De $ nn 5 Da TONIGHT AT 9:30

Working together matters.

Have you ever noticed how much more you can accomplish when you work together? At United Way of Champaign County, we bring together community partners to focus on what matters most... results. By giving to United Way, you’re helping not just one group, but our entire community. When you add your investment, to the investments of your family and friends, imagine the positive impact you can make on the people of Champaign County. That, after all, is what matters. www.uwayhelps.org

Verde/Verdant 17 E Taylor St, Champaign, 366.3204 Virginia Theatre 203 W Park Ave, Champaign, 356.9053 White Horse Inn 112 1/2 E Green, Champaign, 352.5945 Zorba’s 627 E Green, Champaign

CHICAGOVENUES House of Blues 329 N Dearborn, Chicago, 312.923.2000 The Bottom Lounge 3206 N Wilton, Chicago Congress Theatre 2135 N Milwaukee, 312.923.2000 Vic Theatre 3145 N Sheffield, Chicago, 773.472.0449 Metro 3730 N Clark St, Chicago, 773.549.0203 Elbo Room 2871 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago Park West 322 W Armitage, Chicago, 773.929.1322 Riviera Theatre 4746 N Racine at Lawerence, Chicago Allstate Arena 6920 N Mannheim Rd, Rosemont, 847.635.6601 Arie Crown Theatre 2300 S Lake Shore Dr, Chicago, 312.791.6000 UIC Pavilion 1150 W Harrison, Chicago, 312.413.5700 Schubas 3159 N Southport, Chicago, 773.525.2508 Martyrs 3855 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago, 773.288.4545 Aragon 1106 W Lawerence, Chicago, 773.561.9500 Abbey Pub 3420 W Grace, Chicago, 773.478.4408 Fireside Bowl 2646 W Fullerton Ave, Chicago, 773.486.2700 Schubert Theatre 22 W Monroe, Chicago, 312.977.1700

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Art Classes at High Cross Studio – All classes are held at High Cross Studio in Urbana.1101 N High Cross Road.E-mail or call for reservations and details.(217) 367-6345 or spiritofsandra@hotmail.com.. “Portrait Paintings with Oils” – This course will provide instruction in painting portraits from photographs.Paint a portrait of your loved one or yourself.Mon-Fri daytime class and weekend workshop offered. "Collage for the Soul" – Students will learn a variety of collage techniques, including photo and photocopy transfer, papermaking and manipulation, and frontage, while exploring a particular subject, such as a place, a memory, an experience or a relationship.No art-making experience necessary. "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" – For adults who have always wanted to learn to draw, but felt as if they lacked talent or confidence. Other Classes:“Making Monoprints,”“Art With Intention” (Open Studio).For information on these visit http://www.spiritofsandra.com and click on "classes," then e-mail or call for reservations. "Quilting From the Heartland of Illinois" – Featuring: Illini Country Stitchers Boutique - handmade items by our members, Kid's Corner - fun activities for the kids, 2003 Raffle quilt, Door Prizes, Quilt Registration for the Illinois Quilt Research Project, Bake sale —homemade goodies! Story Book Challenge—guild members were challenged to make a childsized quilt based on a storybook.Quilts and books will be donated to the Crisis Nursery in Champaign.Story Quilts.Over 200 items: quilts, wallhangings, antique quilts, wearables. Sweet Treats from the Pincushion Boutique in Davis, CA – Oct. 25, 26, National Guard Armory, 600 E University, Urbana, 10am-4pm

ART EXHIBITS & GALLERIES

ART LISTINGS Workshop – Register now to join artist-instructor Sandra Ahten for "Drawing More," a one-day workshop held on Oct 25 to inspire you to dust off your sketch pad.Call (217) 367-6345 or email spiritofsandra@hotmail.com to register. High Cross Studio.1101 N High Cross Road.

Broken Oak Gallery – Local and national artists.Original art including photography, watercolors, pottery, oil paintings, colored pencil, woodturning and more.Refreshments served by the garden all day Saturday.1865 N 1225 E Rd,White Heath. (217) 762-4907.Thu-Sat 10am-4pm.

Call for Entries – "Affixed" A show of collage or assemblage work: Artists are invited to submit three pieces of work for consideration for show at High Cross Studio.Consideration fee is $15 for one to three pieces of artwork.It is NOT a necessary requirement that the work be for sale.Commission on work that is for sale is 25 percent.Price of the art work, as set by the artist, should include this commission.For details please write to spiritofsandra@hotmail.com or call Sandra Ahten at (217) 367-6345

Cinema Galley – Local and regional artists including many University of Illinois and Parkland College faculty members. 120 W Main, Urbana.(217) 367-3711.Tue-Sat 10am-4pm.Sun 1-5pm.

Creation Art Studio Art Classes for Children and Adults – All classes offer technical instruction and the exploration of materials through expressive, spontaneous art and experimentation.Independent studies of personal interests and ideas, dreams, etc.are expressed and developed through collage and assemblage art and through drawing, painting, sculpture and ceramics.Children meet Mon-Thu from 3:30-5pm, and Sat 11am-12:30pm.Adolescents meet Fri 4-5:30pm.Adults meet Thu at 10am and Sat between 1:30-5:30pm for two or more hours.Create designs, a still life, portraits, landscapes and more.Open to beginners and advanced students.Adult Open Studio meets Tue 7-9pm.Drop-ins welcome.Come with a friend.Call to make special arrangements for a group.CPDU's offered.For information, contact Jeannine Bestoso at 3446955.Creation Art Studio is located at 1102 E Washington, Urbana.www.creationartstudios.com Join Artists and Workshops at Gallery Virtu – Gallery Virtu, an artist-owned cooperative, now invite applications from area artists.The Gallery also offers workshops for adults, teens and children in knitting, embroidery, photography, jewelry making, printmaking, papermaking, bookbinding and ribbon flowers. Gallery Virtu offers original works by the members including: jewelry, pottery, collages, sculptures, journals, hats, handbags and other textiles.For more information please call 762-7790,

Cafe Kopi – Work from local artists on display.109 N Walnut, Champaign.(217) 359-4266.Mon-Thu 7am-11pm, Fri-Sat 7am12pm, Sun 11am-8pm. Creation Art Studios – Hosts a continuous and evolving display of works by students and associates of the studio.Landscapes, florals, animal life and expressive art in various mediums by Jeannine Bestoso are also currently on display.For information, contact Jeannine Bestoso.1102 E Washington St, Urbana. (217) 344-6955.Tue-Sat 1-5:30pm; and scheduled studio sessions.www.creationartstudios.com Country in the City – Antiques, Architectural, Gardening, Home Accessories.Custom designing available.1104 E Washington St, Urbana.(217) 367-2367.Thu-Sat 10am-5pm. Framer's Market -- Frame Designers since 1981.Current featured artists: Charlotte Brady - Botanical Watercolors, Barry Brehm - Landscape Photography, Larry Hamlin - Aquatint Etchings, Patrick Harness - Vibrant Oils and Pastels, Hua Nian Abstract Watercolors & Pastels, David Smith - Original Acrylic Landscapes, Cindy Smith - Stone & Wood Sculpture, Bill Stevens - Humorous Recycled Metal Sculptures, Steve Stoerger - Steel & Glass Sculpture, Bonnie Switzer - Abstract Acrylic Paintings.807 W Springfield Ave, Champaign.(217) 351-7020.Tue-Fri 9:30am-5:30pm, Sat 10am-4pm. Furniture Lounge – Local artist Dean Schwenk along with many other local and fine artwork/pottery. Also specializing in mid-century modern furniture from the 1920s-1980s, retro, Danish modern, lighting, vintage stereo equipment and vinyl records. 9 E University, Champaign.(217) 352-5150.Sun-Mon 12-4:30pm,Wed-Sat 11am-5:30pm.

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OCTOBER 9-15, 2003 | JACK WHITE’S MOUSTACHE IS HOT!

visit our web site at www.galleryvirtu.org, e-mail workshops@galleryvirtu.org or visit the gallery.Regular hours: Thu 12-4pm, Fri 12-8pm, Sat 10am-6pm.220 W Washington Street in Monticello.

Boneyard Pottery – Ceramic Art by Michael Schwegmann and more.403 Water St, Champaign.(217) 355-5610.Tue-Sat 11am-5pm.

Portraits – Award winning portrait artist Sandra Ahten is currently accepting commissions for portraits for holiday giving. Portraits are priced at an affordable range and professional exchange or barter may be accepted.For examples of work and a quote, contact Sandra Ahten at (217) 367-6345 or spiritofsandra@hotmail.com

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CDReviews

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OUTKAST Speakerboxxx / The Love Below Arista Records

★★★ BY BRIAN MERTZ A wise man once said that Outkast was the Radiohead of the hip-hop world.That seems just about right. Both bands push the limits of their genres but at the same time find widespread acceptance and admiration from pop culture and the critics. Outkast’s fifth album, Speakerboxxx / The Love Below, sees Andre 3000 and Big Boi still pushing up against the boundaries of hip hop, but this time they’re doing it separately. Speakerboxxx / The Love Below is more than a double-disc album; it is two separate solo albums. Speakerboxxx features tracks with Big Boi and The Love Below is Dre’s chance to shine. In the hands of many other rap duos or collectives, this formula might spell certain disaster. There are no such catastrophes on either disc, but there is something missing from this new Outkast adventure. Both discs feature the space-funk, rock and dirty south infused hip-hop beats for Dre and Big Boi to unleash their expert flows over. Big Boi’s disc is a little more smooth and a little funkier than Dre’s eclectic efforts. At the heart of all of their tracks, though, is an admirable balance between innovation and club-friendliness. The music may on first listen cause people to pause, but by the second listen, heads will be bobbing. Speakerboxx has gems like “The Rooster” and the first single “The Way You Move.” Also of note is Big Boi’s take on current events called “War.” He rhymes in his cascading style, “I refuse to sit in the backseat and get handled / Like I do nothing all day but sit around and watch the Cartoon Channel / I’ll rap about the presidential election and the scandal that followed / And we all watched the nation as it swallowed and chalked it up / Basically, America, you got fucked—the media shucked and jived, now we stuck.” Dre’s disc is more of a rollicking collection of tunes that feature guests as varied as Kelis, Bentley Farnsworth, Killer Mike, Norah Jones and actress Rosario Dawson. The Love Below draws out elements from lounge jazz on “Love Hater,” ‘80s electro noises on “Pink & Blue,” good ol’ rock ‘n’ roll on Dre’s first single “Hey Ya” and even a stellar sample of Coltrane on an untitled track. No matter what he is drawing from, Andre manages to put the Outkast sound on everything he does. Couple that with his enormous gift for rhyming, and it is clear that Outkast has another winner here. But after getting through over two hours of material from Andre 3000 and Big Boi, an empty feeling remains. That empty feeling comes from not getting to hear the interplay and trading of verses between these two gifted emcees. If it were possible to squeeze these two discs together and truly bring Outkast together, this might be an instant classic. As it stands now, Speakerboxx / The Love Below is just a good hiphop album from start to finish, and that is something to celebrate.

THE DEREK TRUCKS BAND Soul Serenade Columbia

★★★★ BY MIKE CARBERRY “I should like to say that the true harmony of music comes from the harmony of the soul ... and when it comes from there it must appeal to all souls.”*The music Derek Trucks lays out in this album does not fall short of this description, truly a Soul Serenade. The disc has only seven tracks, but it’s over 40 minutes

long and without a disappointing note. The inherent talent displayed on each track makes it hard to choose a favorite and the cohesive strength of the album as a whole will make you want to listen to it over and over again. There are only lyrics on one tune, “Drown in My Own Tears,” sung by Greg Allman. The rest of the CD has no need for words whatsoever. With the immaculate rhythm and tone Trucks achieves with his six-string, he speaks louder than words. The album opens with the relaxed melodic sounds of his “Soul Serenade.” But the energy builds until it bursts into a bouncing rendition of Bob Marley’s “Rasta Man Chant.” The bass and percussion add a bluesy, gospel-like element and they even jam into “Amazing Grace”briefly in one chorus.The blending of such essential genres such as reggae, jazz, blues, gospel and even Oriental folk music is what makes the album so powerful and gives it soul. Greg Allman defines blues on the third track,“Drown in My Own Tears.” The passion behind Allman’s wailing voice along with Truck’s sweltering solos will leave no doubt in your mind as to what the blues really are after this song is done. Then comes the pearl of the album, the classic song,“Afro Blue,” written by the recently deceased Mongo Santamaria but preformed by such greats as John Coltrane. The song begins with only a flute and then is joined in harmonies with Trucks’ guitar, building into a celebratory ballad. The intensity of the playing on this track makes it hard not to be moved, both physically and spiritually. Drummer Yonriko Scott shows off his jazz chops on “Elvin,” a song obviously dedicated to the quintessential jazz drummer Elvin Jones. This song really demonstrates Scott’s delicate touch and solid groove. His playing, combined with the guitar and piano, creates an improvisational sound delivered with an incredibly tight technique. From there the album moves onto the traditional, yet jazzed up, “Oriental Folk Song” and then closes with an original, “Sierra Leone.” On this track Trucks plays the sarod, an Indian string instrument which creates a mellow, meditative sound that brings the album to a harmonious close, just as it began. The variety and attention with which Trucks chose his tracks and arranged this album seems almost as if he is giving a music history lesson, but he gives much more than that. It’s a spiritual journey and a Soul Serenade.“It would be no exaggeration if I said that music alone can be the means by which the souls of races, nations and families, which are today so apart, may one day be united … Music is not expressed through language, but through beauty of rhythm and tone which reach far beyond language.”* The Derek Trucks Band has given us just that. *Citations from liner notes of Soul Serenade, which originally appeared in The Mysticism of Sound And Music by Hazrat Inayat Khan

RUFUS WAINWRIGHT Want One Dreamworks

★★★ BY JACOB DITTMER Rufus Wainwright is one of those recent artists who has elicited so much praise that often his reputation precedes his accomplishments. Wainwright likely gathers much of his acclaim from his unique songwriting talents coupled with his chamber pop sounds, which achieve operatic grandeur at times and bare-bones troubadour at others. On his third major release, Want One, Wainwright takes on more heavily produced sound than on his previous efforts. Being the son of folk musicians Louden Wainwright III and Katie McGarrigle gave Wainwright a preordained proclivity in the musical arts and by 13 he was touring with his mother. He received much acclaim in his youth in Canada (where he resided with his mother) and even won the “Most Promising Young Artist” at the Juno awards (Canada’s Grammys). America’s Dreamworks label recognized Wainwright’s talents and put out his self-titled debut album in 1998. Often drawing comparison to the singing style of Jeff Buckley, this second generation singer/songwriter has carved out a name for himself without living in the shadows of his much-accomplished parents. Want One is said to be an album that details the things that Wainwright wants from life. Wainwright wants what almost everyone wants, happiness and true love. Make no mistake, he goes down a much-traveled path in songwriting, but ultimately does not lose the listener in a sea of sentimentality and weepiness of lost love. There are other themes interwoven throughout the album with Wainwright often citing the “vicious world” in which we live.Wainwright hopes that through all the complication of living and fervor of modern times those he loves will come to him, for it is the only answer he sees for true happiness. The opening track sets the stage for what this album is all about. He sings,“Oh what a world my parents gave me. Always traveling but not in love. / Still I think I’m doing fine. Wouldn’t it be a lovely headline:‘Life is beautiful’on the New York Times.”

MUSIC REVIEW GUIDE

Flawless Good Mediocre Bad Un-listenable

★★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★ no stars

CHARTS PARASOL RECORDS TOP 10 SELLERS 1. Death Cab For Cutie - Transatlanticism (Barsuk Records) 2. The Ladybug Transistor - The Ladybug Transistor (Merge Records) 3. Belle And Sebastian - Dear Catastrophe Waitress (Rough Trade Records) 4. Various - Lost in Translation - Original Soundtrack (Emperor Norton Records) 5. Various - Stop Me If You Think You’ve Heard This One Before: Rough Trade 25th Anniversary (Rough Trade Records) 6. Kingsbury Manx - Aztec Discipline (Overcoat Records) 7. Stereolab - Instant 0 In The Universe (Elektra Records) 8. Isobel Campbell - Amorino (Instinct Records) 9. The Wrens - Meadowlands (Absolutely Kosher Records) 10. Handsome Family - Singing Bones (Carrot Top Records)

NEW RELEASES Clay Aiken - Measure of a Man The Cansecos - The Cansecos Decibully - City of Festivals Feable Weiner - Dear Hot Chick Edie Brickell - Volcano Hybrid - Morning Sci-Fi Jagged Edge - Hard Kill Hannah - For Never and Ever Meshell Ndegéocello - Comfort Woman Shonen Knife - Heavy Songs Travis - 12 Memories Barbra Streisand - The Movie Album Mariah Carey - Remix Album David Benoit - Right Here, Right Now Bottle Rockets - Blue Sky Children on the Corner - Rebirth John McLaughlin - Thieves and Poets Rod Price - West Four Jonny Lang - Long Time Coming The Frisk - Audio Ransom Note Joshua Collins - Project 3 Jimmy Buffett - Live in Las Vegas 9.20.03 and Live in San Diego, CA 9.23.03

These lyrics will surely strike a chord with many of the clouded optimists in our world. The one area this album fails on is its overproduced sound. Wainwright’s earlier works received so much praise for their simplified sound, which often featured Wainwright’s trembling vocals and pleasant piano playing. On this album, Wainwright employs a full orchestra for some songs with all the lavishness of Puccini opera. A simple comparison is that Wainwright employs production methods similar to pop icon Elton John. Certain times it is done nicely while others it detracts from the message of the song and its often personal nature. Wainwright is said to be releasing a follow-up work entitled Want Two later this year, which will likely entail other themes of what he wants from life. Perhaps the songs that are weakest on this album could have been replaced by the strengths of Want Two and Wainwright could have released one solid album instead of what will likely be two mediocre ones.


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HOW DARE YOU COVER RAMBLE ON | OCTOBER 9-15, 2003

buzz

Cubbies playoff wins keep fans dancing in Champaign BY SETH FEIN

MENDOZA MUSIC LINE STAFF WRITER

L

ord Have Mercy....

It would be safe to say at this point that no matter what, I can look back at this season and really feel like the Cubbies turned a corner. It seems apparent that this is not a joke, and more over, that the Central Division was not only the toughest in the National League, but potentially, in the entire country. This weekend was like a roller coaster in the sixth grade: every second felt as if I was going to puke and just the same, I was looking forward to every twist and turn. As I sat on my couch (drinking tea instead of Old Style like a responsible man with a cold) watching game 5, I became so fed up with the FOX announcers that I decided to turn off the volume on the tube and turn on the turntable instead. I needed something to keep my spirits up. I needed something to make me want to dance. I went with one of my newest favorites, Sacramento band, !!!.

Now, I know what you’re probably thinking. “!!!? What the fuck is that?” I thought the same thing too when I first saw their name popping up on the radar in the indie mags and Web sites. I never really gave them a chance until Record Service employee, music lover extraordinaire and former drummer for the Beauty Shop, Joe Martin, spun the CD when he was co-hosting with me this summer at The Iron Post. Their single “Me and Giuliani Down by the Schoolyard” is potentially my favorite song of the year. The music is unstoppable. It just flows so well. And the best part? It’s all done with live musical instruments. Live drummer. Live bassist and so much live percussion that it’s almost impossible to keep track of all the elements at the same time. The name !!! is about as pretentious as it gets. It is actually pronounced “chk, chk, chk,” which to me, is possibly the best name for a band that I have heard in while. Their sound can’t really be described easily. It’s not emo and it’s not classic “indie”. It’s not mainstream and it’s not hip-hop. What it is though, is very dance-able. Now, I am not a dancer per se. Not really anyway. You can generally only find me dancing in two situations: absolutely obliterated on

Jagermeister or totally and completely in love. While both of those scenarios are few and far between for me, this band, as of late, has made me put on my dancing shoes in the friendly confines of my own house and more recently, in the booth at Barfly on Mondays. It feels strange, dancing by yourself. I feel like Elizabeth Shue in the beginning of Adventures in Babysitting, but, for one reason or the next, I never really seem to care. For some people, dancing occurs naturally. I have friends who go out literally just to “dance.” Whether they are in Chicago or merely going to C-Street, that is their goal for the night. For others, like myself, dancing seems irregular and awkward and generally speaking, we need some sort of prop to make ourselves feel like acceptable dancers. (I once used a toothbrush on the dance floor on tour in Austin—needless to say, I went home by myself.) There’s something I’ve learned in the last couple weeks though, and that’s that dancing is a basic human right that doesn’t need justification as much as it just implies it

[

on it’s own. I am dancing for the Cubbies this month, dammit! I am dancing because I feel something tangible in the air and it makes me want to dance. I guess dancing is something I have needed to start doing more for a while. I turn 24 in a few weeks and I don’t want to let my impending midtwenties bitterness get the best of me. With the onset of a newfound love for !!! and the Cubbies one step away from the Series, you very well just might find me dancing in the streets, shirt off and floppy hair blowing in the wind in a matter of weeks. And if that’s the case, you may not see me for a while because I’ll have probably danced my ass to Addison and Clark for what might be the onset of the apocalypse. I can’t wait... buzz Seth Fein is from Urbana. He is a member of Orphans and he spins indie rock at Barfly every Monday night under the moniker 2ON2OUT. He is, in fact, an umpire for men’s softball as well. He can be reached at sethfein@readbuzz.com.

I sat on my couch (drinking tea instead of Old Style like a responsible man with a cold).

[

buzz

OCTOBER 9-15, 2003 | WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com

MUSIC PERFORMANCES Sherban Lupu, violin; Ian Hobson, piano – This all-Bartók program features the composer's first two Violin Sonatas, two sets of Hungarian Dances, and a set of Romanian Dances – Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center, 7:30pm

WednesdayOct15 LIVE MUSIC Open Mic Night – Espresso Royale Caffe, 7:30pm, free Relient K, Anberlin, Don't Look Down – Virginia Theatre, 7:30pm, $16 Open Mic Night hosted by Brandon T. Washington – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $2 Kilborn Alley – blues – Tommy G’s, 9pm, free

DJ Big Sexy Funk with J-Phlip and DJ Bozak – Barfly, 9pm, free The Bridge: A night of old school hip-hop – The Canopy Club, 10pm, $3 DJ Joel Spencer – Mike ‘n Molly’s, 10pm Live DJ – C-Street, 9pm, no cover D-lo & Spinnerty – The Highdive, 10pm DJ Odyssey – Joe’s Brewery, 10pm, free

MUSIC PERFORMANCES Drummers of West Africa – The master drummer of Dakar, Doudou N'Diaye Rose, returns with his family orchestra, again proclaiming a message of peace as they present the rhythms of their Wolof culture used for healing and communication, speaking a universal language through their call-and-response chants and the vibrancy of their sabar "talking" drums – Tryon Festival Theatre, Krannert Center, 7pm, $15-28

WORDS Spoken Wordfest – LaRaviere is a featured artist and will host the upcoming event. Special musical guest Chambana, a local jazz band, will kick the night off with a performance. Chambana will also accompany poets – Cafe Verde, 7:30pm, free

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10/9 Mana @ Allstate Arena 10/9 Graham Colton @ Schubas 10/9 Neko Case @ Field Museum, 6pm 10/10 Death Cab For Cutie, The Long Winters @ Metro 10/10 Keller Williams @ Riviera 10/11 Death Cab For Cutie, Pinebender @ Metro 10/11 Smokey Robinson @ House of Blues 10/11 Abba Mania @ Rialto Square Theatre 10/11 Kid Koala @ Abbey Pub 10/11 Howie Day @ The Vic Theatre 10/12 Howie Day @ The Vic Theatre 10/12 All-American Rejects @ Riviera Theatre, 6pm 10/12 Cher @ Allstate Arena 10/13 Simply Red @ House of Blues

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10/22 Thin Lizzy @ Double Door 10/23 Think LIzzy @ Double Door 10/23 Broadcast, Iron and WIne @ Abbey Club 10/23 India Arie @ The Vic 10/24 Guster @ Aragon 10/24 Cowboy Mouth, Cracker @ House of Blues 10/24 Aesop Rock @ Metro 10/24 Gov’t Mule, Chris Robinson @ The Vic 10/25 The Walkmen @ Double Door 10/25 Cameron McGill @ Schubas 10/25 Clem Snide @ Logan Square Auditorium 10/25 Particle @ Metro 10/25 Reo Speedwagon @ Star Plaza 10/26 Echo and the Bunnymen @ Metro 10/28 Spiritualized @ The Vic 10/28 Travis @ Riviera 10/29 Fuel @ House of Blues 10/29 American Analog Set @ Abbey Club, 18 & over 10/29 Lyle Lovett @ Chicago Theatre 10/29 Echo & The Bunnymen @ Metro 10/30 Alkaline Trio @ Aragon Ballroom

10/30 Belle & Sebastian @ Congress Theatre 10/30 Mojave 3 @ Abbey Pub 10/31 Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe @ House of Blues 10/31 North Mississippi Allstars, Grandaddy @ Congress Theater

NOVEMBER 11/1 Black Keys @ Abbey Club 11/1 Mya @ House of Blues 11/1 Emmylou Harris @ Symphony Center 11/1 Dirtbombs @ Double Door 11/2 Rza, Ghostface Killah @ House of Blues 11/6 Less That Jake @ Riviera Theater 11/6 Maroon5 @ House of Blues 11/6 The Rapture @ Metro 11/6 Xiu Xiu @ Fireside Bowl 11/7 Big Bad Voodoo Daddy @ House of Blues 11/7 Ween @ The Vic 11/7 David Mead @ Schubas 11/7 Flickerstick @ Metro 11/8 King Crimson @ Park West 11/8 Ween @ The Vic 11/8 Twilight Singers @ Double Door 11/8 Godsmack @ Aragon 11/7 Dropkick Murphys @ Congress Theater 11/9 King Crimson @ Park West 11/12 Badly Drawn Boy @ Park West 11/13 Mike Doughty’s Band @ Double Door 11/15 The Shins @ House of Blues 11/19 Fountains of Wayne @ The Vic 11/21 Anti-Flag, Rise Against @ Metro 11/22 Guided By Voices @ Abbey Pub 11/22 Tom Jones @ House of Blues 11/22 Alabama @ Allstate Arena 11/23 Guided By Voices @ Abbey Pub 11/23 Tom Jones @ House of Blues 11/24 Symphony X @ Metro 11/25 Jaguars @ House of Blues 11/29 Rocket from the Tombs @ Abbey Pu

C-UVENUES

10/14 Alice Cooper @ House of Blues 1014 Mars Volta @ Riviera 10/16 Electric Six, Junior Senior @ Double Door 10/16 Rufio @ Metro, all ages 10/16 Enon @ Abbey Pub 10/16 Randy Newman @ Park West 10/17 Soulive, Me’Shell Ndegeocello @ House of Blues 10/17 Young People @ Schubas 10/17 Luncida Williams, Jayhawks @ Riviera 10/18 DJ Justin Long @ Metro Smart Bar 10/18 The Strokes @ UIC Pavilion 10/19 Longwave/Calla @ Double Door 10/21 The Eagles @ Allstate Arena 10/21 Shelby Lynne @ Abbey Pub 10/22 DADA @ Park West

Assembly Hall First & Florida, Champaign, 333.5000 American Legion Post 24 705 W Bloomington Rd, Champaign, 356.5144 American Legion Post 71 107 N Broadway, Urbana, 367.3121 Barfly 120 N Neil, Champaign,352.9756 Barnes and Noble 51 E Marketview, Champaign, 355.2045 Boltini Lounge 211 N Neil, Champaign, 378.8001 Borders Books & Music 802 W Town Ctr, Champaign, 351.9011 The Brass Rail 15 E University, Champaign, 352.7512 Canopy Club (The Garden Grill) 708 S Goodwin, Urbana, 367.3140

C.O. Daniels 608 E Daniel, Champaign, 337.7411 Cosmopolitan Club 307 E John, Champaign, 367.3079 Courtyard Cafe Illini Union, 1401 W Green, Urbana, 333.4666 Cowboy Monkey 6 Taylor St, Champaign, 398.2688 Clybourne 706 S Sixth, Champaign, 383.1008 Curtis Orchard 3902 S Duncan Rd, Champaign, 359.5565 D.R. Diggers 604 S Country Fair Dr, Champaign, 356.0888 Embassy Tavern & Grill 114 S Race, Urbana, 384.9526 Esquire Lounge 106 N Walnut, Champaign, 398.5858 Fallon’s Ice House 703 N Prospect, Champaign, 398.5760 Fat City Saloon 505 S Chestnut, Champaign, 356.7100 The Great Impasta 114 W Church, Champaign, 359.7377 G.T.’s Western Bowl Francis Dr, Champaign, 359.1678 The Highdive 51 Main, Champaign, 359.4444 Huber’s 1312 W Church, Champaign, 352.0606 Illinois Disciples Foundation 610 E Springfield, Champaign, 352.8721 Independent Media Center 218 W Main St, Urbana, 344.8820 The Iron Post 120 S Race, Urbana, 337.7678 Joe’s Brewery 706 S Fifth, Champaign, 384.1790 Kam’s 618 E Daniel, Champaign, 328.1605 Krannert Art Museum 500 E Peabody, Champaign, 333.1861 Krannert Center for Performing Arts 500 S Goodwin, Urbana, Tickets: 333.6280, 800/KCPATIX La Casa Cultural Latina 1203 W Nevada, Urbana, 333.4950 Lava 1906 W Bradley, Champaign, 352.8714 Legends Bar & Grill 522 E Green, Champaign, 355.7674 Les’s Lounge 403 N Coler, Urbana, 328.4000 Lincoln Castle 209 S Broadway, Urbana, 344.7720 Malibu Bay Lounge North Route 45, Urbana, 328.7415 Mike & Molly’s 105 N Market, Champaign, 355.1236 Mulligan’s 604 N Cunningham, Urbana, 367.5888 Murphy’s 604 E Green, Champaign, 352.7275 Neil Street Pub 1505 N Neil, Champaign, 359.1601 Boardman’s Art Theater 126 W Church, Champaign, 351.0068 The Office 214 W Main, Urbana, 344.7608 Parkland College 2400 W Bradley, Champaign, 351.2528 Phoenix 215 S Neil, Champaign, 355.7866 Pia’s of Rantoul Route 136 E, Rantoul, 893.8244 Pink House Routes 49 & 150, Ogden, 582.9997 The Rainbow Coffeehouse 1203 W Green, Urbana, 766.9500 Red Herring/Channing-Murray Foundation 1209 W Oregon, Urbana, 344.1176 Rose Bowl Tavern 106 N Race, Urbana, 367.7031 Springer Cultural Center 301 N Randolph, Champaign, 355.1406 Spurlock Museum 600 S Gregory, Urbana, 333.2360 Strawberry Fields Cafe 306 W Springfield, Urbana, 328.1655 Ten Thousand Villages 105 N Walnut, Champaign, 352.8938 TK Wendl’s 1901 S Highcross Rd, Urbana, 255.5328 Tommy G’s 123 S. Mattis Ave., Country Fair Shopping Center, 359.2177 Tonic 619 S Wright, Champaign, 356.6768 Two Main 2 Main, Champaign, 359.3148 University YMCA 1001 S Wright, Champaign, 344.0721

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WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com | OCTOBER 19-15, 2003 buzz

KARAOKE “G” Force Karaoke and DJ – Lincoln Castle Lodge, 9pm1am Karaoke – Pink House, 9pm

COMEDY Bruce Veach – Courtyard Cafe, Illini Union, 9pm-11pm, $2

DJ Hipster Sophisto – Barfly, 9pm, free DJ Tim Williams – The Highdive, 10:30pm, $5 Saturday Night at Wendl’s with DJ Brad – TK Wendl’s, 9pm-1am “G” Force DJ Chris – White Horse Inn, 9pm-1am DJ Tim Williams – The Highdive, 10pm, $5 Noisboy – Mike `n Molly’s, 10pm, $1

ON STAGE

Parkland Theatre presents “The Laramie Project” – Written by Moises Kaufman and the members of the Tectonic Theatre Project, this drama looks at the events surrounding the 1998 death of gay student Matthew Shepard in Laramie, Wyo., as told through the voices of the townspeople – Parkland Theatre, 8pm

SaturdayOct11 Allison Moorer – Saturday @ The Highdive, 7:30pm, $12

ThursdayOct9 LIVE MUSIC U of I #2 Big Band – Iron Post, 7pm, TBA Noisy Gators – Aroma, 8pm, free Kwyjibo with Danny Deckard – Zorba's, 9:30pm, $5 Johnny Socko, The Pimps, The Pitch – The Canopy Club, 10pm, $5 The Diplomats of Solid Sound, Link Quartet – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $5 Gleen Wilson and the Jazzmanics – Iron Post, 10pm, TBA Gabe Rosen – Embassy Tavern, 8pm, free

LIVE MUSIC Allison Moorer w/ Mark Huff – The Highdive, 7:30pm, $12 Hank Berumen – Borders, 8pm, free Traidisuiun: Spiral Seisiun, SCC Slow Session Ceili Band – Smith Memorial Hall, 8pm, $5 56 Hope Road, Doxy – Iron Post, 9pm, TBA The Buick All-Stars – Embassy Tavern, 9:30pm, free X-Krush – The Canopy Club, 10pm, $5 Cowslingers, Tripdaddy's – Cowboy Monkey, TBA, $6 Trouble IS – The Factory, 128 N Walnut, Danville, 9:30pm1:30am DTS – rock – Tommy G’s, 10pm-2am, cover

“G” Force Karaoke & DJ – Lincoln Castle, 9pm-1am

MUSIC PERFORMANCES

ON STAGE Annual Stepshow – sponsored by Sigma Gamma Sorority Inc. – Foellinger Great Hall, 8am-9pm

LECTURES Now What? Awakening from the Dream of Whiteness – Knight Auditorium, Spurlock Museum, 3:30pm

ON STAGE

Parkland Theatre presents “The Laramie Project” – Written by Moises Kaufman and the members of the Tectonic Theatre Project, this drama looks at the events surrounding the 1998 death of gay student Matthew Shepard in Laramie, Wyo., as told through the voices of the townspeople – Parkland Theatre, 8pm

MARKETS Market at the Square – produce, crafts, entertainment – SE Lot Lincoln Square Mall, 7am-noon

Matt the Electrician – Iron Post, 9pm, TBA Death Cab for Cutie, The Long Winters – The Highdive, 9:30pm, $12 The Blues Jam hosted by Kilborn Alley – The Canopy Club, 10pm, $2

KARAOKE “G” Force Karaoke – Pia’s in Rantoul, 9pm-1am Karaoke – Jillian’s, 9pm, no cover

DJ Fresh Face Guest DJ – Barfly, 9pm, free DJ Spinnerty w/ educational films – Mike ‘n Molly’s, 10pm Live DJ – C-Street, 9pm-1am, cover

LECTURES Panel discussion: War Crimes, Restitution, Reconciliation – Law School Auditorium, 8pm The Mausoleum of Georgi Dimitrov as a Site of Memory – 101 International Studies

Drummers of West Africa – Krannert Center, Wednesday

Bari Koral – nominated as the 2002-03 favorite female music performer by CampusAward.com – Courtyard Cafe, Illini Union, 8pm, $3

LIVE MUSIC

DJ J-Phlip – Barfly, 9pm, free Live DJ – C-Street, 9pm, free Live DJ – Ruby’s, 9pm-1am, free DJ Orby – Joe’s Brewery, 9pm-1am, free

MondayOct13 LIVE MUSIC Bill Passalaqua, Greg Klyma, Green Mountain Grass – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $5 The Roots of Orchis, Melodic Scribes – The Highdive, 10pm, TBA Finga’ Lickin’ – The Office, 10pm, free

DJ Spectrum – Barfly, 9pm, free

KARAOKE “G” Force Karaoke & DJ – Kam’s, 10pm-1am

COMEDY de Bono Improv Comedy – Courtyard Cafe, Illini Union, 9pm, free

“G” Force Karaoke and DJ – TK Wendl’s, 9pm-1am

MUSIC PERFORMANCES Jazz Vespers – a worship service honoring and celebrating music and spirit – University Place Christian Church, 403 S Wright St, 5:30pm, free UI Phil Harmonica – The winner of the John D. and Fern Hodge Armstrong Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Performance is featured in Pierne's Concertstuck for Harp and Orchestra, Op. 39. Also hear Howard Hanson's "Romantic" Symphony (No. 2) and the Overture and Allegro by Couperin as arranged by Milhaud – Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center, 3pm, $5

Run Like A Girl – 192 Lincoln Hall, 5:30pm

FridayOct10 LIVE MUSIC Kevin Hart Quartet – Iron Post, 5pm, TBA Pocket Big Band – The Highdive, 5:30pm, $3 Turtle and Friends – Borders, 8pm, free Innocent Words Presents: Triple Whip, Viza-Noir, Nolan, Solips – Iron Post, 9pm, TBA Jazz Mandolin Project RESCHEDULED for Jan. 16, tickets will be honored – The Canopy Club, 10pm, $10 Seeking Syd, Zea Mays – The Canopy Club, 10pm Maurice and the Mindset – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $3 The Blackouts, Greatest Hits, Luke Walker – Mike 'n Molly's, 10pm, $3 Happy Hour with The Prairie Dogs – bluegrass – Tommy G’s, 5-7pm, free Blues Deacons – Tommy G’s, 10pm-2am, cover

Illini Symphony – Foellinger Great Hall, 3pm Marching Illini In Concert – The Marching Illini perform their classic Illini anthems and highlights from their football half-time presentations in an intimate theatrical setting – Assembly Hall, 3pm WILL-FM Second Sunday Concert – Yang Ying, Chinese Erhu Master – Krannert Art Museum, 2pm

ON STAGE

Parkland Theatre presents “The Laramie Project” – Written by Moises Kaufman and the members of the Tectonic Theatre Project, this drama looks at the events surrounding the 1998 death of gay student Matthew Shepard in Laramie, Wyo., as told through the voices of the townspeople – Parkland Theatre, 3pm

DJ

Maurice and The Mindset – Friday @ Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $3

We wouldn’t even be having this discussion if it wasn’t for the Cubs’ legendary broadcaster. Whether it was the swooping reach of his microphone to pick up the crowd’s cheers or his pleas of “Let’s get some runs,” Harry’s style of performing set the standard for singing during the seventh-inning stretch. While it would have been truly special to have Harry along for the ride for this playoff run, his spirit lives on in every performance of “Take Me Out to the Ballgame.”

2. Mike Ditka

“singing” would be giving Ditka way too much credit. He has since given several better performances and his title of worst performance was replaced by Ozzy. But Ditka’s first rendition will still be the guest spot Chicago fans talk about for years.

performance was replayed on television broadcasts across the nation. It might have been tough to bear at first, but the look of anger and shock on Kerry Wood’s face made it worth watching the replays.

3. John Cusack

No one can expect the Cubs to get a genuine Cubs fan to sing every time out. But when those fans who grew up with the Cubs make it into the booth, it truly is something special. John Cusack offered up one of those special performances. A Cubs fan for over 37 years, Cusack grew up in Evanston watching the northsiders through the good times and the more frequent bad times. His singing might not have been angelic, but it was certainly full of passion. And how could we have a Top Five list without Rob Gordon?

4. Ozzy Osbourne

The idea of having guest singers to perform “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” seemed a little stupid at first. None of the performers seemed to do anything special with the song after Harry’s passing. Then came “Da Coach.” Running late to the booth, Ditka rushed and grabbed the mic. Out of breath he sped through a version of the song in his gruff voice. Calling it

You’d think that the rock star on the list would have the best singing performance. Think again. Not even donning a Cubs jersey could save this abysmal singing performance. If Ozzy got one line out of “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” right it might be a minor miracle. His wife Sharon’s attempts to help out were to no avail. This horrible

5. Steve McMichael

Former Chicago Bear and part-time wrestler Steve McMichael’s actual performance wasn’t anything out of the ordinary. What made it special was what happened before and after the singing. McMichael, drinking perhaps a few too many Old Styles, witnessed, along with the rest of the Wrigley faithful, a terrible call by umpire Angel Hernandez. Before breaking into his loud version of “Take Me Out to the Ballgame,” McMichael leaned over and said,“I’m going to have to have a talk with that umpire down there.” After singing, midway through his interview in the bottom of the seventh inning, Wrigley Field security removed McMichael from the stadium. It wasn’t pretty, but it was an unforgettable and fun time.

Honorable Mentions: Ryne Sandberg, Bill Murray, Ron Santo & Pat Hughes, Vince Vaughn, Jack Black, Eddie Vedder

Next week: Top Five Autumn Albums. e-mail us at music@readbuzz.com

MUSIC PERFORMANCES Community Drum Circle – Ten Thousand Villages, 7-9pm

LECTURES Now is the Time for Forgiveness – by Myrtle Smith, C.S., inspirational Christian speaker and healer, Irish storyteller of Belfast, Northern Ireland. Smyth overcame an abusive home and has lived in the midst of terrorism for many years. She speaks with authority on the topic of forgiveness. 7:30pm, Hawthorne Suites Hotel Ballroom,101 Trade Center Dr, C. After Identity Politics: Race, Disability, and the New Genomics – Levis Faculty Center, 3rd Flr, 919 W Illinois St, U, 4pm

KARAOKE

FILM

DJ Tim Williams – The Highdive, 10:30, $5 DJ Bozak – Barfly, 9pm, free “G” Force DJ Chad – TK Wendl’s, 9pm-1am DJ Tim Williams – The Highdive, 10pm, $5 DJ Mertz – Joe’s Brewery, 9pm-1am

1. Harry Caray

SundayOct12

DJ

“Take Me Out to the Ballgame” performances

The Cubs are in the National League Championship Series. In honor of that feat and their upcoming World Series run, we present our favorite 7th inning stretch performances.

KARAOKE

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DJ

LECTURES Voices of Authority for Conscience – Latzer Hall, University YMCA, noon

buzz

TuesdayOct14 LIVE MUSIC Verde Hootenanny – bluegrass jam – Verdant News & Coffee, 7pm, free My Private Nation Tour: Train, Vertical Horizon – Assembly Hall, 7:30pm, $29.50 Graham Colton, Roscoe Plush – Canopy Club, 9pm, $10 Adam Wolfe and Kate Schrock – Iron Post, 10pm, TBA Will Rogers Acoustic Night – Tommy G’s, 9pm, free

DJ DJ Bozak – Boltini Lounge, 10pm, free DJ D-Lo and Spinnerty – Barfly, 9pm, free Rock ‘N Roll DJing with Drew Patterson – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, free NOX: DJ Zozo, DJ Kannibal – The Highdive, 10pm, $2 DJ Hoff – Mike ‘n Molly’s, 10pm Live DJ – C-Street, 9pm, no cover

KARAOKE “G” Force Karaoke and DJ – TK Wendl’s, 9pm-1am

COMEDY Spicy Clamato Improv Comedy – Courtyard Cafe, Illini Union, 9pm, free

SoundBlotter All the best that music has to offer this week

SHOW RESCHEDULING Jazz Mandolin Project reschedules Friday, October 10, The Canopy Club, 10 p.m. The Jazz Mandolin Project was supposed to come to town on Friday along with Phish’s John Fishman. But John Fishman’s second child was born a little later than expected. Instead of getting on the road, the band is going to delay the start of its tour. The Canopy Club show has been rescheduled to Friday, Jan. 16 at the Canopy Club. Tickets for the Oct. 10 show will still be honored at the re-scheduled show in January. If you are unable to attend the show in January, a full refund for the tickets will be available at the point of purchase.

ENDLESS “FAREWELL” TOUR Cher Sunday & Monday, October 12 & 13, Allstate Arena, 7:30 p.m. ($37.50 - $79.50) Remember last October when Cher played at Assembly Hall as part of her “farewell” tour? Maybe you paid a whole lot of money to wave goodbye to this aging diva who is struggling to remain relevant in the pop culture world. Or maybe you missed your chance to sing along with the vocoder garbled “Believe.” Whatever reason you want to come up with, this Sunday and Monday you have two more opportunities to waste $80 to see Cher’s farewell tour. Perhaps the idea of “farewell” was never explained to Cher as this tour has been going for over a year. Or maybe, as a Chicago rock legend once said, she’s “retired like Hulk Hogan.”

HOUSE / TECHNO / ELECTRONIC Beth Gibbons & Rustin Mann Wednesday, October 15, The Metro, 8:00 p.m. ($20) In a few short years, Bristol band Portishead released two of the most important trip-hop albums in the young history of the genre. Since then Portishead’s camp has been claiming that band members Beth Gibbons and Geoff Barrow are working on a new album for the past five years. You can believe that at your own idealistic peril. But if you want a dose of reality, get in your car and head to Chicago to catch Beth Gibbons performing tracks off of her acoustic solo release. The show should showcase her haunting and sultry vocals and her gift for songwriting. And maybe if you’re lucky (or you shout requests loud enough), you might get to hear an old Portishead classic.

CHER

HIP-HOP D-Lo and Spinnerty Wednesday, October 15, The Highdive, no charge D-Lo and Spinnerty do not seem to stop working. Any particular week will reveal either D-Lo, Spinnerty

or both spinning at various venues throughout Champaign-Urbana.Their mix CD, Play it on the Porch, is one of the best things you could listen to this year. It never fails when you pop this excellent collection of Hip-Hop and Rap that someone will ask “what is this?” More heads bob to this compilation than the President’s cabinet affirming W’s latest statements. DLo and Spinnerty’s abilities to blend quality tracks without the listener even noticing is unmatched. People will say,“I know this record, but that’s not how it supposed to sound.” These two DJs are capable of creating the perfect groove for a nice night out with your friends.

INDEPENDENT ROCK / PUNK / EMO Johnny Socko, The Pimps, The Pitch Thursday, October 9, The Canopy Club, 10 p.m. ($5) Johnny Socko has played over 1,000 shows in their own tour bus and they are going to add another to that long list tonight at The Canopy Club tonight. If you missed their intense, crazy and hilarious stage show the last time they came through town, then shame on you.Their music has little touches of punk, ska and rock along with the Socko style of humor. If that isn’t incentive enough, the dance contest they hold at every show always has fabulous prizes. Opening will be The Pimps and local fountains of live energy, The Pitch. Death Cab for Cutie, The Long Winters Sunday, October 12, The Highdive, 9:30 p.m. ($12) The Highdive has played host to some stellar indie rock shows recently, including Jets to Brazil, Mates of State and Rainer Maria. This Sunday Seattle emo rockers Death Cab for Cutie play The Highdive. They have a new album called Transatlanticism, but they’ll still be playing their classic introspective tracks from their three previous albums. For more information about Death Cab for Cutie,read our story on page 10.


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buzzpicks

Hey Mercedes at Record Service

C

hampaign natives Hey Mercedes blend a combination of the sounds of emo heroes Braid and Sheilbound. Don’t expect the typical emo sound that has become a recent staple of mainstream rock; Hey Mercedes offer something unique. Standing with the likes of Modest Mouse, At The Drive-In and American Football, Hey Mercedes have a long list of accomplishments that continue to grow with their new release on Vagrant Records, Loses Control. A sophomore effort, Loses Control was written in a secluded cabin in Michigan and later recorded at Slade and Kolderie’s Studio in Camberidge, Mass. The result: an impressive inyour-face rock album from Hey Mercedes, taking them to a new level. Hey Mercedes play at Record Service, Friday at 4pm, all ages, free.

Roots of Orchis

Graham Colton at The Canopy

R

Its Miller Time at Lava!

R

oots of Orchis have been crafting their progressive sound for nearly seven years. With a mix of influences from jazz to dub to early post-rock, Roots of Orchis have released three full-length albums on Slowdance Records that provide an intense mix of electronic beats and innovative use of instruments, building a strong bridge between instrumental hip hop and avant rock. Without vocals, Roots of Orchis broke into the CMJ Top 200 and stop at The Highdive during their nationwide tour in support of Some Things Plural.

oots/rock 20-somethings Graham Colton found success accidentally, but one listening to the singer/songwriter’s acoustic sound would never guess it. The acoustic five-piece plays at The Canopy Club Tuesday at 9pm, $10.

The Blackouts

T

he intense guitars make up only a small portion of The Blackouts amazing live shows. With intricate baselines and powerful drumming, local rock staples The Blackouts take garage rock to a different level. The Blackouts’ powerful vocals and fine musicianship continue to make waves outside the C-U music scene and on the nationwide scope. Greatest Hits and Luke Walker open at Mike n’ Molly’s at 10pm, $3. Leave the kiddies at home, this show is 21+. For extra photos, check out readbuzz.com

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buzzpicks

Hey Mercedes at Record Service

C

hampaign natives Hey Mercedes blend a combination of the sounds of emo heroes Braid and Sheilbound. Don’t expect the typical emo sound that has become a recent staple of mainstream rock; Hey Mercedes offer something unique. Standing with the likes of Modest Mouse, At The Drive-In and American Football, Hey Mercedes have a long list of accomplishments that continue to grow with their new release on Vagrant Records, Loses Control. A sophomore effort, Loses Control was written in a secluded cabin in Michigan and later recorded at Slade and Kolderie’s Studio in Camberidge, Mass. The result: an impressive inyour-face rock album from Hey Mercedes, taking them to a new level. Hey Mercedes play at Record Service, Friday at 4pm, all ages, free.

Roots of Orchis

Graham Colton at The Canopy

R

Its Miller Time at Lava!

R

oots of Orchis have been crafting their progressive sound for nearly seven years. With a mix of influences from jazz to dub to early post-rock, Roots of Orchis have released three full-length albums on Slowdance Records that provide an intense mix of electronic beats and innovative use of instruments, building a strong bridge between instrumental hip hop and avant rock. Without vocals, Roots of Orchis broke into the CMJ Top 200 and stop at The Highdive during their nationwide tour in support of Some Things Plural.

oots/rock 20-somethings Graham Colton found success accidentally, but one listening to the singer/songwriter’s acoustic sound would never guess it. The acoustic five-piece plays at The Canopy Club Tuesday at 9pm, $10.

The Blackouts

T

he intense guitars make up only a small portion of The Blackouts amazing live shows. With intricate baselines and powerful drumming, local rock staples The Blackouts take garage rock to a different level. The Blackouts’ powerful vocals and fine musicianship continue to make waves outside the C-U music scene and on the nationwide scope. Greatest Hits and Luke Walker open at Mike n’ Molly’s at 10pm, $3. Leave the kiddies at home, this show is 21+. For extra photos, check out readbuzz.com

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WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com | OCTOBER 19-15, 2003 buzz

KARAOKE “G” Force Karaoke and DJ – Lincoln Castle Lodge, 9pm1am Karaoke – Pink House, 9pm

COMEDY Bruce Veach – Courtyard Cafe, Illini Union, 9pm-11pm, $2

DJ Hipster Sophisto – Barfly, 9pm, free DJ Tim Williams – The Highdive, 10:30pm, $5 Saturday Night at Wendl’s with DJ Brad – TK Wendl’s, 9pm-1am “G” Force DJ Chris – White Horse Inn, 9pm-1am DJ Tim Williams – The Highdive, 10pm, $5 Noisboy – Mike `n Molly’s, 10pm, $1

ON STAGE

Parkland Theatre presents “The Laramie Project” – Written by Moises Kaufman and the members of the Tectonic Theatre Project, this drama looks at the events surrounding the 1998 death of gay student Matthew Shepard in Laramie, Wyo., as told through the voices of the townspeople – Parkland Theatre, 8pm

SaturdayOct11 Allison Moorer – Saturday @ The Highdive, 7:30pm, $12

ThursdayOct9 LIVE MUSIC U of I #2 Big Band – Iron Post, 7pm, TBA Noisy Gators – Aroma, 8pm, free Kwyjibo with Danny Deckard – Zorba's, 9:30pm, $5 Johnny Socko, The Pimps, The Pitch – The Canopy Club, 10pm, $5 The Diplomats of Solid Sound, Link Quartet – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $5 Gleen Wilson and the Jazzmanics – Iron Post, 10pm, TBA Gabe Rosen – Embassy Tavern, 8pm, free

LIVE MUSIC Allison Moorer w/ Mark Huff – The Highdive, 7:30pm, $12 Hank Berumen – Borders, 8pm, free Traidisuiun: Spiral Seisiun, SCC Slow Session Ceili Band – Smith Memorial Hall, 8pm, $5 56 Hope Road, Doxy – Iron Post, 9pm, TBA The Buick All-Stars – Embassy Tavern, 9:30pm, free X-Krush – The Canopy Club, 10pm, $5 Cowslingers, Tripdaddy's – Cowboy Monkey, TBA, $6 Trouble IS – The Factory, 128 N Walnut, Danville, 9:30pm1:30am DTS – rock – Tommy G’s, 10pm-2am, cover

“G” Force Karaoke & DJ – Lincoln Castle, 9pm-1am

MUSIC PERFORMANCES

ON STAGE Annual Stepshow – sponsored by Sigma Gamma Sorority Inc. – Foellinger Great Hall, 8am-9pm

LECTURES Now What? Awakening from the Dream of Whiteness – Knight Auditorium, Spurlock Museum, 3:30pm

ON STAGE

Parkland Theatre presents “The Laramie Project” – Written by Moises Kaufman and the members of the Tectonic Theatre Project, this drama looks at the events surrounding the 1998 death of gay student Matthew Shepard in Laramie, Wyo., as told through the voices of the townspeople – Parkland Theatre, 8pm

MARKETS Market at the Square – produce, crafts, entertainment – SE Lot Lincoln Square Mall, 7am-noon

Matt the Electrician – Iron Post, 9pm, TBA Death Cab for Cutie, The Long Winters – The Highdive, 9:30pm, $12 The Blues Jam hosted by Kilborn Alley – The Canopy Club, 10pm, $2

KARAOKE “G” Force Karaoke – Pia’s in Rantoul, 9pm-1am Karaoke – Jillian’s, 9pm, no cover

DJ Fresh Face Guest DJ – Barfly, 9pm, free DJ Spinnerty w/ educational films – Mike ‘n Molly’s, 10pm Live DJ – C-Street, 9pm-1am, cover

LECTURES Panel discussion: War Crimes, Restitution, Reconciliation – Law School Auditorium, 8pm The Mausoleum of Georgi Dimitrov as a Site of Memory – 101 International Studies

Drummers of West Africa – Krannert Center, Wednesday

Bari Koral – nominated as the 2002-03 favorite female music performer by CampusAward.com – Courtyard Cafe, Illini Union, 8pm, $3

LIVE MUSIC

DJ J-Phlip – Barfly, 9pm, free Live DJ – C-Street, 9pm, free Live DJ – Ruby’s, 9pm-1am, free DJ Orby – Joe’s Brewery, 9pm-1am, free

MondayOct13 LIVE MUSIC Bill Passalaqua, Greg Klyma, Green Mountain Grass – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $5 The Roots of Orchis, Melodic Scribes – The Highdive, 10pm, TBA Finga’ Lickin’ – The Office, 10pm, free

DJ Spectrum – Barfly, 9pm, free

KARAOKE “G” Force Karaoke & DJ – Kam’s, 10pm-1am

COMEDY de Bono Improv Comedy – Courtyard Cafe, Illini Union, 9pm, free

“G” Force Karaoke and DJ – TK Wendl’s, 9pm-1am

MUSIC PERFORMANCES Jazz Vespers – a worship service honoring and celebrating music and spirit – University Place Christian Church, 403 S Wright St, 5:30pm, free UI Phil Harmonica – The winner of the John D. and Fern Hodge Armstrong Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Performance is featured in Pierne's Concertstuck for Harp and Orchestra, Op. 39. Also hear Howard Hanson's "Romantic" Symphony (No. 2) and the Overture and Allegro by Couperin as arranged by Milhaud – Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center, 3pm, $5

Run Like A Girl – 192 Lincoln Hall, 5:30pm

FridayOct10 LIVE MUSIC Kevin Hart Quartet – Iron Post, 5pm, TBA Pocket Big Band – The Highdive, 5:30pm, $3 Turtle and Friends – Borders, 8pm, free Innocent Words Presents: Triple Whip, Viza-Noir, Nolan, Solips – Iron Post, 9pm, TBA Jazz Mandolin Project RESCHEDULED for Jan. 16, tickets will be honored – The Canopy Club, 10pm, $10 Seeking Syd, Zea Mays – The Canopy Club, 10pm Maurice and the Mindset – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $3 The Blackouts, Greatest Hits, Luke Walker – Mike 'n Molly's, 10pm, $3 Happy Hour with The Prairie Dogs – bluegrass – Tommy G’s, 5-7pm, free Blues Deacons – Tommy G’s, 10pm-2am, cover

Illini Symphony – Foellinger Great Hall, 3pm Marching Illini In Concert – The Marching Illini perform their classic Illini anthems and highlights from their football half-time presentations in an intimate theatrical setting – Assembly Hall, 3pm WILL-FM Second Sunday Concert – Yang Ying, Chinese Erhu Master – Krannert Art Museum, 2pm

ON STAGE

Parkland Theatre presents “The Laramie Project” – Written by Moises Kaufman and the members of the Tectonic Theatre Project, this drama looks at the events surrounding the 1998 death of gay student Matthew Shepard in Laramie, Wyo., as told through the voices of the townspeople – Parkland Theatre, 3pm

DJ

Maurice and The Mindset – Friday @ Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $3

We wouldn’t even be having this discussion if it wasn’t for the Cubs’ legendary broadcaster. Whether it was the swooping reach of his microphone to pick up the crowd’s cheers or his pleas of “Let’s get some runs,” Harry’s style of performing set the standard for singing during the seventh-inning stretch. While it would have been truly special to have Harry along for the ride for this playoff run, his spirit lives on in every performance of “Take Me Out to the Ballgame.”

2. Mike Ditka

“singing” would be giving Ditka way too much credit. He has since given several better performances and his title of worst performance was replaced by Ozzy. But Ditka’s first rendition will still be the guest spot Chicago fans talk about for years.

performance was replayed on television broadcasts across the nation. It might have been tough to bear at first, but the look of anger and shock on Kerry Wood’s face made it worth watching the replays.

3. John Cusack

No one can expect the Cubs to get a genuine Cubs fan to sing every time out. But when those fans who grew up with the Cubs make it into the booth, it truly is something special. John Cusack offered up one of those special performances. A Cubs fan for over 37 years, Cusack grew up in Evanston watching the northsiders through the good times and the more frequent bad times. His singing might not have been angelic, but it was certainly full of passion. And how could we have a Top Five list without Rob Gordon?

4. Ozzy Osbourne

The idea of having guest singers to perform “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” seemed a little stupid at first. None of the performers seemed to do anything special with the song after Harry’s passing. Then came “Da Coach.” Running late to the booth, Ditka rushed and grabbed the mic. Out of breath he sped through a version of the song in his gruff voice. Calling it

You’d think that the rock star on the list would have the best singing performance. Think again. Not even donning a Cubs jersey could save this abysmal singing performance. If Ozzy got one line out of “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” right it might be a minor miracle. His wife Sharon’s attempts to help out were to no avail. This horrible

5. Steve McMichael

Former Chicago Bear and part-time wrestler Steve McMichael’s actual performance wasn’t anything out of the ordinary. What made it special was what happened before and after the singing. McMichael, drinking perhaps a few too many Old Styles, witnessed, along with the rest of the Wrigley faithful, a terrible call by umpire Angel Hernandez. Before breaking into his loud version of “Take Me Out to the Ballgame,” McMichael leaned over and said,“I’m going to have to have a talk with that umpire down there.” After singing, midway through his interview in the bottom of the seventh inning, Wrigley Field security removed McMichael from the stadium. It wasn’t pretty, but it was an unforgettable and fun time.

Honorable Mentions: Ryne Sandberg, Bill Murray, Ron Santo & Pat Hughes, Vince Vaughn, Jack Black, Eddie Vedder

Next week: Top Five Autumn Albums. e-mail us at music@readbuzz.com

MUSIC PERFORMANCES Community Drum Circle – Ten Thousand Villages, 7-9pm

LECTURES Now is the Time for Forgiveness – by Myrtle Smith, C.S., inspirational Christian speaker and healer, Irish storyteller of Belfast, Northern Ireland. Smyth overcame an abusive home and has lived in the midst of terrorism for many years. She speaks with authority on the topic of forgiveness. 7:30pm, Hawthorne Suites Hotel Ballroom,101 Trade Center Dr, C. After Identity Politics: Race, Disability, and the New Genomics – Levis Faculty Center, 3rd Flr, 919 W Illinois St, U, 4pm

KARAOKE

FILM

DJ Tim Williams – The Highdive, 10:30, $5 DJ Bozak – Barfly, 9pm, free “G” Force DJ Chad – TK Wendl’s, 9pm-1am DJ Tim Williams – The Highdive, 10pm, $5 DJ Mertz – Joe’s Brewery, 9pm-1am

1. Harry Caray

SundayOct12

DJ

“Take Me Out to the Ballgame” performances

The Cubs are in the National League Championship Series. In honor of that feat and their upcoming World Series run, we present our favorite 7th inning stretch performances.

KARAOKE

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DJ

LECTURES Voices of Authority for Conscience – Latzer Hall, University YMCA, noon

buzz

TuesdayOct14 LIVE MUSIC Verde Hootenanny – bluegrass jam – Verdant News & Coffee, 7pm, free My Private Nation Tour: Train, Vertical Horizon – Assembly Hall, 7:30pm, $29.50 Graham Colton, Roscoe Plush – Canopy Club, 9pm, $10 Adam Wolfe and Kate Schrock – Iron Post, 10pm, TBA Will Rogers Acoustic Night – Tommy G’s, 9pm, free

DJ DJ Bozak – Boltini Lounge, 10pm, free DJ D-Lo and Spinnerty – Barfly, 9pm, free Rock ‘N Roll DJing with Drew Patterson – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, free NOX: DJ Zozo, DJ Kannibal – The Highdive, 10pm, $2 DJ Hoff – Mike ‘n Molly’s, 10pm Live DJ – C-Street, 9pm, no cover

KARAOKE “G” Force Karaoke and DJ – TK Wendl’s, 9pm-1am

COMEDY Spicy Clamato Improv Comedy – Courtyard Cafe, Illini Union, 9pm, free

SoundBlotter All the best that music has to offer this week

SHOW RESCHEDULING Jazz Mandolin Project reschedules Friday, October 10, The Canopy Club, 10 p.m. The Jazz Mandolin Project was supposed to come to town on Friday along with Phish’s John Fishman. But John Fishman’s second child was born a little later than expected. Instead of getting on the road, the band is going to delay the start of its tour. The Canopy Club show has been rescheduled to Friday, Jan. 16 at the Canopy Club. Tickets for the Oct. 10 show will still be honored at the re-scheduled show in January. If you are unable to attend the show in January, a full refund for the tickets will be available at the point of purchase.

ENDLESS “FAREWELL” TOUR Cher Sunday & Monday, October 12 & 13, Allstate Arena, 7:30 p.m. ($37.50 - $79.50) Remember last October when Cher played at Assembly Hall as part of her “farewell” tour? Maybe you paid a whole lot of money to wave goodbye to this aging diva who is struggling to remain relevant in the pop culture world. Or maybe you missed your chance to sing along with the vocoder garbled “Believe.” Whatever reason you want to come up with, this Sunday and Monday you have two more opportunities to waste $80 to see Cher’s farewell tour. Perhaps the idea of “farewell” was never explained to Cher as this tour has been going for over a year. Or maybe, as a Chicago rock legend once said, she’s “retired like Hulk Hogan.”

HOUSE / TECHNO / ELECTRONIC Beth Gibbons & Rustin Mann Wednesday, October 15, The Metro, 8:00 p.m. ($20) In a few short years, Bristol band Portishead released two of the most important trip-hop albums in the young history of the genre. Since then Portishead’s camp has been claiming that band members Beth Gibbons and Geoff Barrow are working on a new album for the past five years. You can believe that at your own idealistic peril. But if you want a dose of reality, get in your car and head to Chicago to catch Beth Gibbons performing tracks off of her acoustic solo release. The show should showcase her haunting and sultry vocals and her gift for songwriting. And maybe if you’re lucky (or you shout requests loud enough), you might get to hear an old Portishead classic.

CHER

HIP-HOP D-Lo and Spinnerty Wednesday, October 15, The Highdive, no charge D-Lo and Spinnerty do not seem to stop working. Any particular week will reveal either D-Lo, Spinnerty

or both spinning at various venues throughout Champaign-Urbana.Their mix CD, Play it on the Porch, is one of the best things you could listen to this year. It never fails when you pop this excellent collection of Hip-Hop and Rap that someone will ask “what is this?” More heads bob to this compilation than the President’s cabinet affirming W’s latest statements. DLo and Spinnerty’s abilities to blend quality tracks without the listener even noticing is unmatched. People will say,“I know this record, but that’s not how it supposed to sound.” These two DJs are capable of creating the perfect groove for a nice night out with your friends.

INDEPENDENT ROCK / PUNK / EMO Johnny Socko, The Pimps, The Pitch Thursday, October 9, The Canopy Club, 10 p.m. ($5) Johnny Socko has played over 1,000 shows in their own tour bus and they are going to add another to that long list tonight at The Canopy Club tonight. If you missed their intense, crazy and hilarious stage show the last time they came through town, then shame on you.Their music has little touches of punk, ska and rock along with the Socko style of humor. If that isn’t incentive enough, the dance contest they hold at every show always has fabulous prizes. Opening will be The Pimps and local fountains of live energy, The Pitch. Death Cab for Cutie, The Long Winters Sunday, October 12, The Highdive, 9:30 p.m. ($12) The Highdive has played host to some stellar indie rock shows recently, including Jets to Brazil, Mates of State and Rainer Maria. This Sunday Seattle emo rockers Death Cab for Cutie play The Highdive. They have a new album called Transatlanticism, but they’ll still be playing their classic introspective tracks from their three previous albums. For more information about Death Cab for Cutie,read our story on page 10.


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HOW DARE YOU COVER RAMBLE ON | OCTOBER 9-15, 2003

buzz

Cubbies playoff wins keep fans dancing in Champaign BY SETH FEIN

MENDOZA MUSIC LINE STAFF WRITER

L

ord Have Mercy....

It would be safe to say at this point that no matter what, I can look back at this season and really feel like the Cubbies turned a corner. It seems apparent that this is not a joke, and more over, that the Central Division was not only the toughest in the National League, but potentially, in the entire country. This weekend was like a roller coaster in the sixth grade: every second felt as if I was going to puke and just the same, I was looking forward to every twist and turn. As I sat on my couch (drinking tea instead of Old Style like a responsible man with a cold) watching game 5, I became so fed up with the FOX announcers that I decided to turn off the volume on the tube and turn on the turntable instead. I needed something to keep my spirits up. I needed something to make me want to dance. I went with one of my newest favorites, Sacramento band, !!!.

Now, I know what you’re probably thinking. “!!!? What the fuck is that?” I thought the same thing too when I first saw their name popping up on the radar in the indie mags and Web sites. I never really gave them a chance until Record Service employee, music lover extraordinaire and former drummer for the Beauty Shop, Joe Martin, spun the CD when he was co-hosting with me this summer at The Iron Post. Their single “Me and Giuliani Down by the Schoolyard” is potentially my favorite song of the year. The music is unstoppable. It just flows so well. And the best part? It’s all done with live musical instruments. Live drummer. Live bassist and so much live percussion that it’s almost impossible to keep track of all the elements at the same time. The name !!! is about as pretentious as it gets. It is actually pronounced “chk, chk, chk,” which to me, is possibly the best name for a band that I have heard in while. Their sound can’t really be described easily. It’s not emo and it’s not classic “indie”. It’s not mainstream and it’s not hip-hop. What it is though, is very dance-able. Now, I am not a dancer per se. Not really anyway. You can generally only find me dancing in two situations: absolutely obliterated on

Jagermeister or totally and completely in love. While both of those scenarios are few and far between for me, this band, as of late, has made me put on my dancing shoes in the friendly confines of my own house and more recently, in the booth at Barfly on Mondays. It feels strange, dancing by yourself. I feel like Elizabeth Shue in the beginning of Adventures in Babysitting, but, for one reason or the next, I never really seem to care. For some people, dancing occurs naturally. I have friends who go out literally just to “dance.” Whether they are in Chicago or merely going to C-Street, that is their goal for the night. For others, like myself, dancing seems irregular and awkward and generally speaking, we need some sort of prop to make ourselves feel like acceptable dancers. (I once used a toothbrush on the dance floor on tour in Austin—needless to say, I went home by myself.) There’s something I’ve learned in the last couple weeks though, and that’s that dancing is a basic human right that doesn’t need justification as much as it just implies it

[

on it’s own. I am dancing for the Cubbies this month, dammit! I am dancing because I feel something tangible in the air and it makes me want to dance. I guess dancing is something I have needed to start doing more for a while. I turn 24 in a few weeks and I don’t want to let my impending midtwenties bitterness get the best of me. With the onset of a newfound love for !!! and the Cubbies one step away from the Series, you very well just might find me dancing in the streets, shirt off and floppy hair blowing in the wind in a matter of weeks. And if that’s the case, you may not see me for a while because I’ll have probably danced my ass to Addison and Clark for what might be the onset of the apocalypse. I can’t wait... buzz Seth Fein is from Urbana. He is a member of Orphans and he spins indie rock at Barfly every Monday night under the moniker 2ON2OUT. He is, in fact, an umpire for men’s softball as well. He can be reached at sethfein@readbuzz.com.

I sat on my couch (drinking tea instead of Old Style like a responsible man with a cold).

[

buzz

OCTOBER 9-15, 2003 | WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com

MUSIC PERFORMANCES Sherban Lupu, violin; Ian Hobson, piano – This all-Bartók program features the composer's first two Violin Sonatas, two sets of Hungarian Dances, and a set of Romanian Dances – Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center, 7:30pm

WednesdayOct15 LIVE MUSIC Open Mic Night – Espresso Royale Caffe, 7:30pm, free Relient K, Anberlin, Don't Look Down – Virginia Theatre, 7:30pm, $16 Open Mic Night hosted by Brandon T. Washington – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $2 Kilborn Alley – blues – Tommy G’s, 9pm, free

DJ Big Sexy Funk with J-Phlip and DJ Bozak – Barfly, 9pm, free The Bridge: A night of old school hip-hop – The Canopy Club, 10pm, $3 DJ Joel Spencer – Mike ‘n Molly’s, 10pm Live DJ – C-Street, 9pm, no cover D-lo & Spinnerty – The Highdive, 10pm DJ Odyssey – Joe’s Brewery, 10pm, free

MUSIC PERFORMANCES Drummers of West Africa – The master drummer of Dakar, Doudou N'Diaye Rose, returns with his family orchestra, again proclaiming a message of peace as they present the rhythms of their Wolof culture used for healing and communication, speaking a universal language through their call-and-response chants and the vibrancy of their sabar "talking" drums – Tryon Festival Theatre, Krannert Center, 7pm, $15-28

WORDS Spoken Wordfest – LaRaviere is a featured artist and will host the upcoming event. Special musical guest Chambana, a local jazz band, will kick the night off with a performance. Chambana will also accompany poets – Cafe Verde, 7:30pm, free

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10/9 Mana @ Allstate Arena 10/9 Graham Colton @ Schubas 10/9 Neko Case @ Field Museum, 6pm 10/10 Death Cab For Cutie, The Long Winters @ Metro 10/10 Keller Williams @ Riviera 10/11 Death Cab For Cutie, Pinebender @ Metro 10/11 Smokey Robinson @ House of Blues 10/11 Abba Mania @ Rialto Square Theatre 10/11 Kid Koala @ Abbey Pub 10/11 Howie Day @ The Vic Theatre 10/12 Howie Day @ The Vic Theatre 10/12 All-American Rejects @ Riviera Theatre, 6pm 10/12 Cher @ Allstate Arena 10/13 Simply Red @ House of Blues

Voted Best Mexican Restaurant in C-U area Enjoy our popular menu: Fajitas Jalisco Carnitas Dinner Chimichanga El Grande Pollo Ranchero Etc.

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10/22 Thin Lizzy @ Double Door 10/23 Think LIzzy @ Double Door 10/23 Broadcast, Iron and WIne @ Abbey Club 10/23 India Arie @ The Vic 10/24 Guster @ Aragon 10/24 Cowboy Mouth, Cracker @ House of Blues 10/24 Aesop Rock @ Metro 10/24 Gov’t Mule, Chris Robinson @ The Vic 10/25 The Walkmen @ Double Door 10/25 Cameron McGill @ Schubas 10/25 Clem Snide @ Logan Square Auditorium 10/25 Particle @ Metro 10/25 Reo Speedwagon @ Star Plaza 10/26 Echo and the Bunnymen @ Metro 10/28 Spiritualized @ The Vic 10/28 Travis @ Riviera 10/29 Fuel @ House of Blues 10/29 American Analog Set @ Abbey Club, 18 & over 10/29 Lyle Lovett @ Chicago Theatre 10/29 Echo & The Bunnymen @ Metro 10/30 Alkaline Trio @ Aragon Ballroom

10/30 Belle & Sebastian @ Congress Theatre 10/30 Mojave 3 @ Abbey Pub 10/31 Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe @ House of Blues 10/31 North Mississippi Allstars, Grandaddy @ Congress Theater

NOVEMBER 11/1 Black Keys @ Abbey Club 11/1 Mya @ House of Blues 11/1 Emmylou Harris @ Symphony Center 11/1 Dirtbombs @ Double Door 11/2 Rza, Ghostface Killah @ House of Blues 11/6 Less That Jake @ Riviera Theater 11/6 Maroon5 @ House of Blues 11/6 The Rapture @ Metro 11/6 Xiu Xiu @ Fireside Bowl 11/7 Big Bad Voodoo Daddy @ House of Blues 11/7 Ween @ The Vic 11/7 David Mead @ Schubas 11/7 Flickerstick @ Metro 11/8 King Crimson @ Park West 11/8 Ween @ The Vic 11/8 Twilight Singers @ Double Door 11/8 Godsmack @ Aragon 11/7 Dropkick Murphys @ Congress Theater 11/9 King Crimson @ Park West 11/12 Badly Drawn Boy @ Park West 11/13 Mike Doughty’s Band @ Double Door 11/15 The Shins @ House of Blues 11/19 Fountains of Wayne @ The Vic 11/21 Anti-Flag, Rise Against @ Metro 11/22 Guided By Voices @ Abbey Pub 11/22 Tom Jones @ House of Blues 11/22 Alabama @ Allstate Arena 11/23 Guided By Voices @ Abbey Pub 11/23 Tom Jones @ House of Blues 11/24 Symphony X @ Metro 11/25 Jaguars @ House of Blues 11/29 Rocket from the Tombs @ Abbey Pu

C-UVENUES

10/14 Alice Cooper @ House of Blues 1014 Mars Volta @ Riviera 10/16 Electric Six, Junior Senior @ Double Door 10/16 Rufio @ Metro, all ages 10/16 Enon @ Abbey Pub 10/16 Randy Newman @ Park West 10/17 Soulive, Me’Shell Ndegeocello @ House of Blues 10/17 Young People @ Schubas 10/17 Luncida Williams, Jayhawks @ Riviera 10/18 DJ Justin Long @ Metro Smart Bar 10/18 The Strokes @ UIC Pavilion 10/19 Longwave/Calla @ Double Door 10/21 The Eagles @ Allstate Arena 10/21 Shelby Lynne @ Abbey Pub 10/22 DADA @ Park West

Assembly Hall First & Florida, Champaign, 333.5000 American Legion Post 24 705 W Bloomington Rd, Champaign, 356.5144 American Legion Post 71 107 N Broadway, Urbana, 367.3121 Barfly 120 N Neil, Champaign,352.9756 Barnes and Noble 51 E Marketview, Champaign, 355.2045 Boltini Lounge 211 N Neil, Champaign, 378.8001 Borders Books & Music 802 W Town Ctr, Champaign, 351.9011 The Brass Rail 15 E University, Champaign, 352.7512 Canopy Club (The Garden Grill) 708 S Goodwin, Urbana, 367.3140

C.O. Daniels 608 E Daniel, Champaign, 337.7411 Cosmopolitan Club 307 E John, Champaign, 367.3079 Courtyard Cafe Illini Union, 1401 W Green, Urbana, 333.4666 Cowboy Monkey 6 Taylor St, Champaign, 398.2688 Clybourne 706 S Sixth, Champaign, 383.1008 Curtis Orchard 3902 S Duncan Rd, Champaign, 359.5565 D.R. Diggers 604 S Country Fair Dr, Champaign, 356.0888 Embassy Tavern & Grill 114 S Race, Urbana, 384.9526 Esquire Lounge 106 N Walnut, Champaign, 398.5858 Fallon’s Ice House 703 N Prospect, Champaign, 398.5760 Fat City Saloon 505 S Chestnut, Champaign, 356.7100 The Great Impasta 114 W Church, Champaign, 359.7377 G.T.’s Western Bowl Francis Dr, Champaign, 359.1678 The Highdive 51 Main, Champaign, 359.4444 Huber’s 1312 W Church, Champaign, 352.0606 Illinois Disciples Foundation 610 E Springfield, Champaign, 352.8721 Independent Media Center 218 W Main St, Urbana, 344.8820 The Iron Post 120 S Race, Urbana, 337.7678 Joe’s Brewery 706 S Fifth, Champaign, 384.1790 Kam’s 618 E Daniel, Champaign, 328.1605 Krannert Art Museum 500 E Peabody, Champaign, 333.1861 Krannert Center for Performing Arts 500 S Goodwin, Urbana, Tickets: 333.6280, 800/KCPATIX La Casa Cultural Latina 1203 W Nevada, Urbana, 333.4950 Lava 1906 W Bradley, Champaign, 352.8714 Legends Bar & Grill 522 E Green, Champaign, 355.7674 Les’s Lounge 403 N Coler, Urbana, 328.4000 Lincoln Castle 209 S Broadway, Urbana, 344.7720 Malibu Bay Lounge North Route 45, Urbana, 328.7415 Mike & Molly’s 105 N Market, Champaign, 355.1236 Mulligan’s 604 N Cunningham, Urbana, 367.5888 Murphy’s 604 E Green, Champaign, 352.7275 Neil Street Pub 1505 N Neil, Champaign, 359.1601 Boardman’s Art Theater 126 W Church, Champaign, 351.0068 The Office 214 W Main, Urbana, 344.7608 Parkland College 2400 W Bradley, Champaign, 351.2528 Phoenix 215 S Neil, Champaign, 355.7866 Pia’s of Rantoul Route 136 E, Rantoul, 893.8244 Pink House Routes 49 & 150, Ogden, 582.9997 The Rainbow Coffeehouse 1203 W Green, Urbana, 766.9500 Red Herring/Channing-Murray Foundation 1209 W Oregon, Urbana, 344.1176 Rose Bowl Tavern 106 N Race, Urbana, 367.7031 Springer Cultural Center 301 N Randolph, Champaign, 355.1406 Spurlock Museum 600 S Gregory, Urbana, 333.2360 Strawberry Fields Cafe 306 W Springfield, Urbana, 328.1655 Ten Thousand Villages 105 N Walnut, Champaign, 352.8938 TK Wendl’s 1901 S Highcross Rd, Urbana, 255.5328 Tommy G’s 123 S. Mattis Ave., Country Fair Shopping Center, 359.2177 Tonic 619 S Wright, Champaign, 356.6768 Two Main 2 Main, Champaign, 359.3148 University YMCA 1001 S Wright, Champaign, 344.0721

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WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com | OCTOBER 19-15, 2003

CROSSWORD PUZZLE ON PAGE 26 R A S H E R S H O I S T S

A Q U A R I A

N U L L I F Y

F I L E C L E R A C K I L S R E H A K O R E L U G E P S

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E R S I T T N E Y A P M O E R R O G O O M

T T O E R H N I N S P O P O T O P Y T E C H C H A S S H E D A N E T T A R T F R E A O M E L R E D C

P A S T

A M I A B U L N E D E B R U T R A R K I E T R O

Z E S T I E R

S T O N E D

O B O I S T S

P A T C H E S

LIVE JAZZ at

627 E. GREEN 344-0710

/ o w ard b i ij ck Kw y De $ nn 5 Da TONIGHT AT 9:30

Working together matters.

Have you ever noticed how much more you can accomplish when you work together? At United Way of Champaign County, we bring together community partners to focus on what matters most... results. By giving to United Way, you’re helping not just one group, but our entire community. When you add your investment, to the investments of your family and friends, imagine the positive impact you can make on the people of Champaign County. That, after all, is what matters. www.uwayhelps.org

Verde/Verdant 17 E Taylor St, Champaign, 366.3204 Virginia Theatre 203 W Park Ave, Champaign, 356.9053 White Horse Inn 112 1/2 E Green, Champaign, 352.5945 Zorba’s 627 E Green, Champaign

CHICAGOVENUES House of Blues 329 N Dearborn, Chicago, 312.923.2000 The Bottom Lounge 3206 N Wilton, Chicago Congress Theatre 2135 N Milwaukee, 312.923.2000 Vic Theatre 3145 N Sheffield, Chicago, 773.472.0449 Metro 3730 N Clark St, Chicago, 773.549.0203 Elbo Room 2871 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago Park West 322 W Armitage, Chicago, 773.929.1322 Riviera Theatre 4746 N Racine at Lawerence, Chicago Allstate Arena 6920 N Mannheim Rd, Rosemont, 847.635.6601 Arie Crown Theatre 2300 S Lake Shore Dr, Chicago, 312.791.6000 UIC Pavilion 1150 W Harrison, Chicago, 312.413.5700 Schubas 3159 N Southport, Chicago, 773.525.2508 Martyrs 3855 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago, 773.288.4545 Aragon 1106 W Lawerence, Chicago, 773.561.9500 Abbey Pub 3420 W Grace, Chicago, 773.478.4408 Fireside Bowl 2646 W Fullerton Ave, Chicago, 773.486.2700 Schubert Theatre 22 W Monroe, Chicago, 312.977.1700

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Art Classes at High Cross Studio – All classes are held at High Cross Studio in Urbana.1101 N High Cross Road.E-mail or call for reservations and details.(217) 367-6345 or spiritofsandra@hotmail.com.. “Portrait Paintings with Oils” – This course will provide instruction in painting portraits from photographs.Paint a portrait of your loved one or yourself.Mon-Fri daytime class and weekend workshop offered. "Collage for the Soul" – Students will learn a variety of collage techniques, including photo and photocopy transfer, papermaking and manipulation, and frontage, while exploring a particular subject, such as a place, a memory, an experience or a relationship.No art-making experience necessary. "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" – For adults who have always wanted to learn to draw, but felt as if they lacked talent or confidence. Other Classes:“Making Monoprints,”“Art With Intention” (Open Studio).For information on these visit http://www.spiritofsandra.com and click on "classes," then e-mail or call for reservations. "Quilting From the Heartland of Illinois" – Featuring: Illini Country Stitchers Boutique - handmade items by our members, Kid's Corner - fun activities for the kids, 2003 Raffle quilt, Door Prizes, Quilt Registration for the Illinois Quilt Research Project, Bake sale —homemade goodies! Story Book Challenge—guild members were challenged to make a childsized quilt based on a storybook.Quilts and books will be donated to the Crisis Nursery in Champaign.Story Quilts.Over 200 items: quilts, wallhangings, antique quilts, wearables. Sweet Treats from the Pincushion Boutique in Davis, CA – Oct. 25, 26, National Guard Armory, 600 E University, Urbana, 10am-4pm

ART EXHIBITS & GALLERIES

ART LISTINGS Workshop – Register now to join artist-instructor Sandra Ahten for "Drawing More," a one-day workshop held on Oct 25 to inspire you to dust off your sketch pad.Call (217) 367-6345 or email spiritofsandra@hotmail.com to register. High Cross Studio.1101 N High Cross Road.

Broken Oak Gallery – Local and national artists.Original art including photography, watercolors, pottery, oil paintings, colored pencil, woodturning and more.Refreshments served by the garden all day Saturday.1865 N 1225 E Rd,White Heath. (217) 762-4907.Thu-Sat 10am-4pm.

Call for Entries – "Affixed" A show of collage or assemblage work: Artists are invited to submit three pieces of work for consideration for show at High Cross Studio.Consideration fee is $15 for one to three pieces of artwork.It is NOT a necessary requirement that the work be for sale.Commission on work that is for sale is 25 percent.Price of the art work, as set by the artist, should include this commission.For details please write to spiritofsandra@hotmail.com or call Sandra Ahten at (217) 367-6345

Cinema Galley – Local and regional artists including many University of Illinois and Parkland College faculty members. 120 W Main, Urbana.(217) 367-3711.Tue-Sat 10am-4pm.Sun 1-5pm.

Creation Art Studio Art Classes for Children and Adults – All classes offer technical instruction and the exploration of materials through expressive, spontaneous art and experimentation.Independent studies of personal interests and ideas, dreams, etc.are expressed and developed through collage and assemblage art and through drawing, painting, sculpture and ceramics.Children meet Mon-Thu from 3:30-5pm, and Sat 11am-12:30pm.Adolescents meet Fri 4-5:30pm.Adults meet Thu at 10am and Sat between 1:30-5:30pm for two or more hours.Create designs, a still life, portraits, landscapes and more.Open to beginners and advanced students.Adult Open Studio meets Tue 7-9pm.Drop-ins welcome.Come with a friend.Call to make special arrangements for a group.CPDU's offered.For information, contact Jeannine Bestoso at 3446955.Creation Art Studio is located at 1102 E Washington, Urbana.www.creationartstudios.com Join Artists and Workshops at Gallery Virtu – Gallery Virtu, an artist-owned cooperative, now invite applications from area artists.The Gallery also offers workshops for adults, teens and children in knitting, embroidery, photography, jewelry making, printmaking, papermaking, bookbinding and ribbon flowers. Gallery Virtu offers original works by the members including: jewelry, pottery, collages, sculptures, journals, hats, handbags and other textiles.For more information please call 762-7790,

Cafe Kopi – Work from local artists on display.109 N Walnut, Champaign.(217) 359-4266.Mon-Thu 7am-11pm, Fri-Sat 7am12pm, Sun 11am-8pm. Creation Art Studios – Hosts a continuous and evolving display of works by students and associates of the studio.Landscapes, florals, animal life and expressive art in various mediums by Jeannine Bestoso are also currently on display.For information, contact Jeannine Bestoso.1102 E Washington St, Urbana. (217) 344-6955.Tue-Sat 1-5:30pm; and scheduled studio sessions.www.creationartstudios.com Country in the City – Antiques, Architectural, Gardening, Home Accessories.Custom designing available.1104 E Washington St, Urbana.(217) 367-2367.Thu-Sat 10am-5pm. Framer's Market -- Frame Designers since 1981.Current featured artists: Charlotte Brady - Botanical Watercolors, Barry Brehm - Landscape Photography, Larry Hamlin - Aquatint Etchings, Patrick Harness - Vibrant Oils and Pastels, Hua Nian Abstract Watercolors & Pastels, David Smith - Original Acrylic Landscapes, Cindy Smith - Stone & Wood Sculpture, Bill Stevens - Humorous Recycled Metal Sculptures, Steve Stoerger - Steel & Glass Sculpture, Bonnie Switzer - Abstract Acrylic Paintings.807 W Springfield Ave, Champaign.(217) 351-7020.Tue-Fri 9:30am-5:30pm, Sat 10am-4pm. Furniture Lounge – Local artist Dean Schwenk along with many other local and fine artwork/pottery. Also specializing in mid-century modern furniture from the 1920s-1980s, retro, Danish modern, lighting, vintage stereo equipment and vinyl records. 9 E University, Champaign.(217) 352-5150.Sun-Mon 12-4:30pm,Wed-Sat 11am-5:30pm.

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OCTOBER 9-15, 2003 | JACK WHITE’S MOUSTACHE IS HOT!

visit our web site at www.galleryvirtu.org, e-mail workshops@galleryvirtu.org or visit the gallery.Regular hours: Thu 12-4pm, Fri 12-8pm, Sat 10am-6pm.220 W Washington Street in Monticello.

Boneyard Pottery – Ceramic Art by Michael Schwegmann and more.403 Water St, Champaign.(217) 355-5610.Tue-Sat 11am-5pm.

Portraits – Award winning portrait artist Sandra Ahten is currently accepting commissions for portraits for holiday giving. Portraits are priced at an affordable range and professional exchange or barter may be accepted.For examples of work and a quote, contact Sandra Ahten at (217) 367-6345 or spiritofsandra@hotmail.com

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CDReviews

1009buzz1118

OUTKAST Speakerboxxx / The Love Below Arista Records

★★★ BY BRIAN MERTZ A wise man once said that Outkast was the Radiohead of the hip-hop world.That seems just about right. Both bands push the limits of their genres but at the same time find widespread acceptance and admiration from pop culture and the critics. Outkast’s fifth album, Speakerboxxx / The Love Below, sees Andre 3000 and Big Boi still pushing up against the boundaries of hip hop, but this time they’re doing it separately. Speakerboxxx / The Love Below is more than a double-disc album; it is two separate solo albums. Speakerboxxx features tracks with Big Boi and The Love Below is Dre’s chance to shine. In the hands of many other rap duos or collectives, this formula might spell certain disaster. There are no such catastrophes on either disc, but there is something missing from this new Outkast adventure. Both discs feature the space-funk, rock and dirty south infused hip-hop beats for Dre and Big Boi to unleash their expert flows over. Big Boi’s disc is a little more smooth and a little funkier than Dre’s eclectic efforts. At the heart of all of their tracks, though, is an admirable balance between innovation and club-friendliness. The music may on first listen cause people to pause, but by the second listen, heads will be bobbing. Speakerboxx has gems like “The Rooster” and the first single “The Way You Move.” Also of note is Big Boi’s take on current events called “War.” He rhymes in his cascading style, “I refuse to sit in the backseat and get handled / Like I do nothing all day but sit around and watch the Cartoon Channel / I’ll rap about the presidential election and the scandal that followed / And we all watched the nation as it swallowed and chalked it up / Basically, America, you got fucked—the media shucked and jived, now we stuck.” Dre’s disc is more of a rollicking collection of tunes that feature guests as varied as Kelis, Bentley Farnsworth, Killer Mike, Norah Jones and actress Rosario Dawson. The Love Below draws out elements from lounge jazz on “Love Hater,” ‘80s electro noises on “Pink & Blue,” good ol’ rock ‘n’ roll on Dre’s first single “Hey Ya” and even a stellar sample of Coltrane on an untitled track. No matter what he is drawing from, Andre manages to put the Outkast sound on everything he does. Couple that with his enormous gift for rhyming, and it is clear that Outkast has another winner here. But after getting through over two hours of material from Andre 3000 and Big Boi, an empty feeling remains. That empty feeling comes from not getting to hear the interplay and trading of verses between these two gifted emcees. If it were possible to squeeze these two discs together and truly bring Outkast together, this might be an instant classic. As it stands now, Speakerboxx / The Love Below is just a good hiphop album from start to finish, and that is something to celebrate.

THE DEREK TRUCKS BAND Soul Serenade Columbia

★★★★ BY MIKE CARBERRY “I should like to say that the true harmony of music comes from the harmony of the soul ... and when it comes from there it must appeal to all souls.”*The music Derek Trucks lays out in this album does not fall short of this description, truly a Soul Serenade. The disc has only seven tracks, but it’s over 40 minutes

long and without a disappointing note. The inherent talent displayed on each track makes it hard to choose a favorite and the cohesive strength of the album as a whole will make you want to listen to it over and over again. There are only lyrics on one tune, “Drown in My Own Tears,” sung by Greg Allman. The rest of the CD has no need for words whatsoever. With the immaculate rhythm and tone Trucks achieves with his six-string, he speaks louder than words. The album opens with the relaxed melodic sounds of his “Soul Serenade.” But the energy builds until it bursts into a bouncing rendition of Bob Marley’s “Rasta Man Chant.” The bass and percussion add a bluesy, gospel-like element and they even jam into “Amazing Grace”briefly in one chorus.The blending of such essential genres such as reggae, jazz, blues, gospel and even Oriental folk music is what makes the album so powerful and gives it soul. Greg Allman defines blues on the third track,“Drown in My Own Tears.” The passion behind Allman’s wailing voice along with Truck’s sweltering solos will leave no doubt in your mind as to what the blues really are after this song is done. Then comes the pearl of the album, the classic song,“Afro Blue,” written by the recently deceased Mongo Santamaria but preformed by such greats as John Coltrane. The song begins with only a flute and then is joined in harmonies with Trucks’ guitar, building into a celebratory ballad. The intensity of the playing on this track makes it hard not to be moved, both physically and spiritually. Drummer Yonriko Scott shows off his jazz chops on “Elvin,” a song obviously dedicated to the quintessential jazz drummer Elvin Jones. This song really demonstrates Scott’s delicate touch and solid groove. His playing, combined with the guitar and piano, creates an improvisational sound delivered with an incredibly tight technique. From there the album moves onto the traditional, yet jazzed up, “Oriental Folk Song” and then closes with an original, “Sierra Leone.” On this track Trucks plays the sarod, an Indian string instrument which creates a mellow, meditative sound that brings the album to a harmonious close, just as it began. The variety and attention with which Trucks chose his tracks and arranged this album seems almost as if he is giving a music history lesson, but he gives much more than that. It’s a spiritual journey and a Soul Serenade.“It would be no exaggeration if I said that music alone can be the means by which the souls of races, nations and families, which are today so apart, may one day be united … Music is not expressed through language, but through beauty of rhythm and tone which reach far beyond language.”* The Derek Trucks Band has given us just that. *Citations from liner notes of Soul Serenade, which originally appeared in The Mysticism of Sound And Music by Hazrat Inayat Khan

RUFUS WAINWRIGHT Want One Dreamworks

★★★ BY JACOB DITTMER Rufus Wainwright is one of those recent artists who has elicited so much praise that often his reputation precedes his accomplishments. Wainwright likely gathers much of his acclaim from his unique songwriting talents coupled with his chamber pop sounds, which achieve operatic grandeur at times and bare-bones troubadour at others. On his third major release, Want One, Wainwright takes on more heavily produced sound than on his previous efforts. Being the son of folk musicians Louden Wainwright III and Katie McGarrigle gave Wainwright a preordained proclivity in the musical arts and by 13 he was touring with his mother. He received much acclaim in his youth in Canada (where he resided with his mother) and even won the “Most Promising Young Artist” at the Juno awards (Canada’s Grammys). America’s Dreamworks label recognized Wainwright’s talents and put out his self-titled debut album in 1998. Often drawing comparison to the singing style of Jeff Buckley, this second generation singer/songwriter has carved out a name for himself without living in the shadows of his much-accomplished parents. Want One is said to be an album that details the things that Wainwright wants from life. Wainwright wants what almost everyone wants, happiness and true love. Make no mistake, he goes down a much-traveled path in songwriting, but ultimately does not lose the listener in a sea of sentimentality and weepiness of lost love. There are other themes interwoven throughout the album with Wainwright often citing the “vicious world” in which we live.Wainwright hopes that through all the complication of living and fervor of modern times those he loves will come to him, for it is the only answer he sees for true happiness. The opening track sets the stage for what this album is all about. He sings,“Oh what a world my parents gave me. Always traveling but not in love. / Still I think I’m doing fine. Wouldn’t it be a lovely headline:‘Life is beautiful’on the New York Times.”

MUSIC REVIEW GUIDE

Flawless Good Mediocre Bad Un-listenable

★★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★ no stars

CHARTS PARASOL RECORDS TOP 10 SELLERS 1. Death Cab For Cutie - Transatlanticism (Barsuk Records) 2. The Ladybug Transistor - The Ladybug Transistor (Merge Records) 3. Belle And Sebastian - Dear Catastrophe Waitress (Rough Trade Records) 4. Various - Lost in Translation - Original Soundtrack (Emperor Norton Records) 5. Various - Stop Me If You Think You’ve Heard This One Before: Rough Trade 25th Anniversary (Rough Trade Records) 6. Kingsbury Manx - Aztec Discipline (Overcoat Records) 7. Stereolab - Instant 0 In The Universe (Elektra Records) 8. Isobel Campbell - Amorino (Instinct Records) 9. The Wrens - Meadowlands (Absolutely Kosher Records) 10. Handsome Family - Singing Bones (Carrot Top Records)

NEW RELEASES Clay Aiken - Measure of a Man The Cansecos - The Cansecos Decibully - City of Festivals Feable Weiner - Dear Hot Chick Edie Brickell - Volcano Hybrid - Morning Sci-Fi Jagged Edge - Hard Kill Hannah - For Never and Ever Meshell Ndegéocello - Comfort Woman Shonen Knife - Heavy Songs Travis - 12 Memories Barbra Streisand - The Movie Album Mariah Carey - Remix Album David Benoit - Right Here, Right Now Bottle Rockets - Blue Sky Children on the Corner - Rebirth John McLaughlin - Thieves and Poets Rod Price - West Four Jonny Lang - Long Time Coming The Frisk - Audio Ransom Note Joshua Collins - Project 3 Jimmy Buffett - Live in Las Vegas 9.20.03 and Live in San Diego, CA 9.23.03

These lyrics will surely strike a chord with many of the clouded optimists in our world. The one area this album fails on is its overproduced sound. Wainwright’s earlier works received so much praise for their simplified sound, which often featured Wainwright’s trembling vocals and pleasant piano playing. On this album, Wainwright employs a full orchestra for some songs with all the lavishness of Puccini opera. A simple comparison is that Wainwright employs production methods similar to pop icon Elton John. Certain times it is done nicely while others it detracts from the message of the song and its often personal nature. Wainwright is said to be releasing a follow-up work entitled Want Two later this year, which will likely entail other themes of what he wants from life. Perhaps the songs that are weakest on this album could have been replaced by the strengths of Want Two and Wainwright could have released one solid album instead of what will likely be two mediocre ones.


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“HEY YA” IS HIP-HOP. DEAL WITH IT. | OCTOBER 9-15, 2003

buzz

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A transatlantic journey to Champaign

Gallery Virtu Cooperative – Original fine art and crafts from member artists including jewelry, pottery, paintings, collages, hats, handbags and other textiles, sculptures and journals. The Gallery also offers workshops; a new schedule of classes is on the web site.220 W Washington St, Monticello.(217) 762-7790. Thu 12-4pm, Fri 12-8pm, Sat 10am-6pm.www.galleryvirtu.org Glass FX – New and Antique Stained Glass Windows, Lamps, and unique glass gifts.Gallery is free and open to the public. Interested in learning the art of Stained Glass? Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced Stained Glass Classes offered.202 S First St, Champaign.Mon-Thu 10am-5:30pm, Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 9am-4pm.(217) 359-0048.www.glassfx.com.

The travels and trials of Death Cab for Cutie’s Ben Gibbard

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his has been a busy year for Ben Gibbard. “I’ve been moving all year. There have been three to four weeks since January that I have been home,” Gibbard said. Most musicians consider it a full year if they are able to record and release one critically praised album as well as to perform to sold out crowds across the nation. Gibbard was able to do that earlier in 2003 with his side project, The Postal Service, when he co-wrote and recorded Give Up and toured as lead singer and guitarist. But it seems that doing that once just isn’t enough for Gibbard. He is now starting the process all over again and leaving home with his full-time band, Death Cab For Cutie. This Seattle quartet released their fourth fulllength album, Transatlanticism, this past Tuesday and is on the road for another national headlining tour. That tour will bring Death Cab’s emotional and introspective rock sound to The Highdive on Sunday. Weaving their way across the nation in a van is nothing new for Death Cab for Cutie, who have, since forming in 1997, reached the upperechelon of the indie-rock world. “Touring is the closest thing you can get to 1950s beat culture,” Gibbard said. “You roll into town in your vans, play songs for your friends, party with your friends afterward and then get back on the road to see more friends. There is no better motivation for creative expression than getting to share it with friends on tour.” Gibbard is quick to point out, in a slightly joking manner, that the repetition of touring can get a little old. “We’ve stopped at the same Thriftway store in Texas every single tour for the past four years,” Gibbard said with a laugh. Traveling down the same old roads year after year is a small drawback to touring. Transatlanticism deals with a bigger one. “You reach a point being in a band, with so much go, go, go and getting on tour, that you start to notice that personal relationships— romantic, friendships, family—they start to suffer,” Gibbard said. “It’s a weird relationship for a band where our friends are sending us off and at times we want to get the fuck away, but those relationships suffer. So the theme of distance is prevalent on the album.” Gibbard doesn’t go into specifics of these relationships, but songs on the album like “Transatlanticism,” “Title and Registration” and “A Lack of Color” all have the musical and lyrical dark clouds of relationships falling apart. In “Title and Registration” Gibbard sings, “But there’s no blame for how our love did slowly fade / And now that it’s gone, it’s like it wasn’t

Presently, Gibbard is focusing on Death Cab there at all / And here I rest: where disappoint- writing so much music that when we finished the D-plan tour (a co-headlining tour Death for Cutie and finding joy in organizing his vinyl ment and regret collide, lying awake at night.” “I will pick up a guitar or sit down at the Cab did with Washington, D.C., group collection, which has grown over the year. “I enjoy putting on a record and being compiano and that’s what comes out,” Gibbard Dismemberment Plan in 2002), that I needed mitted to listening to an album all the way,” said, explaining the songwriting process. “This that break.” The songwriting process worked by Gibbard said. is what I was feeling on this album, and I don’t That vinyl isn’t necessarily the standard indie Tamborello writing beats and sending them to think it will be there on the next one.” In fact, the trademark introspective lyrics Gibbard on a zip disk through the mail (hence fare. Brian Eno’s Ambient 2 was playing on Gibbard’s record player before embarking on might be altogether absent on the next Death the name Postal Service). “I would get a little package in the mail and tour, along with “the B-52’s first two or three Cab release. “The next album is going to be less personal. it would be like getting a new treat every albums.” “I’m really enjoying music that is fun,” I’m drained emotionally,” Gibbard said. “It will week,” Gibbard said. Gibbard would then record vocals and guitar Gibbard said. “I just saw this Seattle band called probably (be) more fictional.” the United States of Electronic that is very cool While Transatlanticism might have been lyri- parts and send them back to Tamborello. “It was great because someone else did the and has this fun Daft Punk vibe to them. I’m cally draining for Gibbard, it seems to have brought the band closer together, even with the hard part. Jimmy wrote the songs.” Gibbard enjoying music like that that is emotional.” Finding more bands like that might be tough said. “I would just step back and clean up.” addition of a new member. Gibbard said that he personally has taken for Gibbard and the rest of Death Cab as they Early demos submitted by Gibbard to the rest of the band weren’t met with as much enthusi- away a few new insights from his Postal Service complete their seven-week tour. After that, and the Postal Service dates, Gibbard said Death asm as prior Death Cab recording sessions. So experience. “I’ve learned to use technology in new ways Cab is looking for a “really good supporting the band, at a laid-back pace, took a year and a and also to look at music in a more linear fash- slot” with a well-established band. half to deconstruct and rebuild the songs. “In a perfect world, we’d open for one of the Guitarist and keyboard player Chris Walla ion. It’s helped me think about taking tracks produced the album. Bassist Nick Harmer and onto a computer and working with loops,” bands on a very short list we have,” Gibbard said, unwilling to deliver any further details. new drummer Jason McGerr also joined in with Gibbard said. Due to his Death Cab commitments and “Just think of the four or five biggest rock bands crafting the tracks. “I think this record is more akin to We Have Tamborello’s schedule with Dntel and remix in the world that are well-respected and you’ll The Facts and We’re Voting Yes. We have a good work, there are no definite plans for a follow-up know who is on that list.” For Gibbard and Death Cab for Cutie, 2004 is balance in the band and I think we’ve managed Postal Service album. “We’ll meet up when the smoke clears,” shaping up to be another busy year. buzz to take the pluses out of catalog and put them Gibbard said. on this album,” Gibbard said. But before all of the smoke clears, Gibbard Another difference between this album and prior Death Cab releases is that the band did not said he will reunite with Tamborello for several Death Cab for Cutie is playing this Sunday at The perform the tracks for live audiences before West and East Coast Postal Service shows in Highdive with The Long Winters. Tickets are $12 and January and possibly a show in Chicago. recording. doors open at 9:30 p.m. “We used to tour and play tracks into the ground and I think that was stifling creatively,” Gibbard said. “We were able to break down the tracks and do a lot more collaboratively. It proved to be much more rewarding.” Gibbard wasn’t only collaborating more this year with his Death Cab mates, but also with Jimmy Tamborello of Dntel. The two came together to create a project called the Postal Service. Their album, Give Up, which was released on Sub Pop records, started out with praise from small publications and eventually built up enough steam that they received an interview and a profile on MTV. “When it started it seemed like a good break,” Gibbard said. “I had been Death Cab for Cutie are Jason McGerr, Nick Harmer, Ben Gibbard and Chris Walla.

Griggs Street Potters – Handmade functional and decorative pottery.305 W Grigg St, Urbana.(217) 344-8546.Mon-Fri 11am-4pm, or call for appointment. The High Cross Studio Gallery – Works by Sandra Ahtens on display.Artist studio space available.1101 N High Cross Rd., Urbana.Tue 7-9pm,Thu 3-5pm, Fri 3-5pm and by chance or appointment.spiritofsandra@hotmail.com Hill Street Gallery Inc. – Oil and watercolor paintings, hand painted T-shirts, handmade jewelry.703 W Hill, Champaign. (217) 359-0675.Sat 12-5pm or by appointment during the week. International Galleries – Works from local artists.Lincoln Square Mall.(217) 328-2254.Mon-Fri 10am-8pm, Sat 10am6pm, Sun 12-5pm. Larry Kanfer Gallery – University of Illinois images by photographic artist Larry Kanfer.Unique diploma frames and other UI gifts.Sepia Champaign-Urbana Collection also on display. Available now: 2004 Prairiescapes and University of Illinois calendars.2503 S Neil, Champaign.(217) 398-2000.Free and Open to the Public.Mon-Sat 10am-5:30pm.www.kanfer.com LaPayne Photography – Specializes in panoramic photography up to 6 feet long of different subjects including sporting events, city skylines, national parks and University of Illinois scenes. Las Vegas Strip photo show coming soon.816 Dennison Dr., Champaign.(217) 356-8994.Mon-Fri 9am-4pm and by appointment. Old Vic Art Gallery – Fine and Original Art.11 E University, Champaign.(217) 355-8338.Mon-Thu 11am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-4:30pm. Springer Cultural Center – Cultural, recreational and educational programs for all ages as well as workshops, lectures, exhibits and performances.Offers classes in dance, music, theater, visual arts, health/wellness and for preschool children.301 N Randolph Street, Champaign.398-2376.Mon-Thu 8am-9pm, Fri 8am-5:30pm, Sat 9am-5pm, Sun 12pm-5pm.www.champaignparkdistrict.com Steeple Gallery – Works from Gary Ingersoll, including many Allerton Park photos on display.Also showing vintage botanical and bird prints, antiques, framed limited edition prints.102 E Lafayette St, Monticello.762-2924.Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat 10am-4pm.www.steeplegallery.com Verdant News and Coffee & Verde Gallery – Magazines, newspapers, coffee, beverages and fine pastries along with the Verde Fine Art Gallery. 17 E Taylor St, Champaign.366-3204. Cafe hours: Mon-Sat 7am-10 pm; Gallery Hours:Tue-Sat 10am10pm.www.verdant-systems.com/Verde.htm UIUC Japan House -- Public Tours: Every Thursday, 1-4pm,Third Sat of each month, 1-5pm or by appointment.2000 S Lincoln Ave, Urbana.(217) 244-9934.email japanhouse@uiuc.edu. Ziemer Gallery – Original paintings and limited edition prints by Larry Ziemer.Pottery, weavings, wood turning and glass works by other artists.Gallery visitors are welcome to sit, relax, listen to the music and just enjoy being surrounded by art. 210 W Washington, Monticello.Tue 10am-8pm,Wed-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 10am-4pm.www.ziemergallery.com

ART OPENINGS PHOTO | COURTESY OF TAG TEAM MEDIA

BY BRIAN MERTZ | MUSIC EDITOR

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OCTOBER 9-15, 2003 | WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com

“Colors of Islam” – In conjunction with Islam Awareness Week, the Muslim Students Association is cosponsoring an art show at the Illini Union Art Gallery until Nov 3.1401 W Green, Urbana.Open Every day 7am-10pm.

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“First Annual Midwest Sequential Art Exhibition” – The Middle Room Gallery hosts an exhibition of comic and sequential art talent from the Midwest.Ranging in visual and narrative style from political to fantasy, from Japanese Manga to the familiar super-heroic conventions, this show will help shine a light on one of the most misunderstood and overlooked art forms today. Artists include Pam Bliss,Tim Broderick, Jacen Burrows, Darrin Drda, Brion Foulke, Hope Larson, Layla Lawler, Dirk Tiede, Dann Tincher, Charlie "Spike" Trotman.On View at the Middle Room Gallery through Oct 31. Opening reception Oct 11 7-9pm.218 W Main St, Urbana. http://www.gallery.ucimc.org/

ART-ON VIEW NOW “Whistler and Japonisme: Selections from the Permanent Collection” – Marking the 100th anniversary of James McNeill Whistler’s death, this exhibition highlights his works on paper and examines the influence that Japanese woodcuts had on his artistic technique. On display at the Krannert Art Museum through March 28, 2004.500 E Peabody, Urbana.Tue, Thu-Sat 9am-5pm,Wed 9am-8pm, Sun 2-5pm.(217) 333-1860. Suggested Donation: $3 "Remnants of Ritual: Selections from the Gelbard Collection of African Art" – The magnificent African art collection of David and Clifford Gelbard focuses on the cultural significance and aesthetic beauty of masks and sculptures - many of which were created for ceremonial and ritual purposes.This exhibition includes a wide array of objects and celebrates the durable, expressive essence of festivals, rites and coming-ofage ceremonies.On display at the Krannert Art Museum through Oct 26.500 E Peabody, Urbana.Tue,Thu-Sat 9am5pm,Wed 9am-8pm, Sun 2-5pm.(217) 333-1860.Suggested Donation: $3 "Visualizing the Blues: Images of the American South,18621999" – Every picture tells a story and this exhibition of more than 100 photographs of the Mississippi Delta region portrays a profoundly vivid narrative of life in the American South. These photographs, taken from the Civil War era through 1999, show the rhythms of life from this almost mythic region and powerfully document the sources of inspiration for the lyrics and melodies of blues musicians.Among the photographers represented are Margaret Bourke-White, Alfred Eisenstaedt,Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Gordon Parks, Andres Serrano and many others.On display at Krannert Art Museum through Nov 2.500 E Peabody, Urbana.Tue,Thu-Sat 9am-5pm,Wed 9am-8pm, Sun 2-5pm.(217) 333-1860. Suggested Donation: $3 Featured Works XIII: "The Spirit of Mediterranean Pathos: The Early Work of Pierre Daura" - Pierre Daura (1896-1976) was a member of significant modern art movements in the early 20th century.This exhibition highlights a recent gift of works by Daura and explores the forms and colors of his paintings and drawings from about 1910 to the late 1930s.On display at Krannert Art Museum through Nov 2.500 E Peabody, Urbana.Tue,Thu-Sat.9am-5pm,Wed 9am-8pm, Sun 2-5pm.(217) 333-1860.Suggested Donation: $3 “Separate and Unequal: Segregation and Three Generations of Black Response,1870-1950.” – This exhibit highlights the Plessy v.Ferguson Supreme Court decision of 1896, which legally sanctioned racial segregation in the United States until 1954 when the Supreme Court overturned Plessy in the landmark Brown v.Board of Education case.Materials from the Library's collections and archives highlight the historical period between these two landmark civil rights cases.Sponsored by the Office of the Chancellor, the Brown v.Board of Education Commemorative Committee and the University of Illinois Library.On view at the University of Illinois Main Library, first floor hallway, during library hours.1408 W Gregory Drive, Urbana.Hours vary.333-2290.http://www.oc.uiuc.edu/brown

SENIORS Intermediate Computers – Nov 6-20 (Register by Oct 30) – What happens to computer files after they are deleted? This course is for those who want to learn more about how their computer operates. Learn to locate lost files, create address labels, insert clip art and make columns.The class meets Thursdays from 1-3pm at the Parkland College Bauman Center, 2104 W Park Ct, in Champaign.The course fee is $41.The registration deadline is Oct 30. Call (217) 403-4590 for more information

MIND BODY & SPIRIT

Come out Sunday Night Sunday Zen Meditation Meeting – Prairie Zen Center, 515 S Prospect, Champaign, NW corner Prospect & Green, enter thru door from parking area. Introduction to Zen Sitting, 10 AM; Full Schedule: Service at 9 followed by sitting, Dharma Talk at 11 followed by tea until about 12 noon. Can arrive at any of above times, open to all, no experience needed, no cost. For info call 355-8835 or www.prairiezen.org

“Through Larry Kanfer’s Lens: From Prariescapes to Cityscapes”– The latest exhibit of photographic artwork by critically acclaimed fine-art photographic artist, Larry Kanfer, features "visually stunning Prairiescapes up to 8 feet wide. Contemplate the vast grandeur of America's heartland, with its rich traditions and seasonal cycles of the prairie, juxtaposed against images of Midwest cityscapes, highlighting intimate architectural details. On display at the Lark Kanfer Gallery through Oct 24.2503 S Neil, Champaign.(217) 398-2000.Free and Open to the Public.Mon-Sat 10am-5:30pm. www.kanfer.com

Prairie Sangha for Mindfullness Meditation – Monday evenings from 7:30-9pm and monthly retreats on Sunday. Theravadan (Vipassana) and Tibetan (Vjrayana & Dzogchen) meditation practice. Meets in Urbana. More information call or email Tom at 356-7413 or shayir@soltec.net. www.prairiesangha.org

BENEFITS

Formerly-Fat Persons’ Support Group – Free social meeting every Saturday at 2pm at Aroma Cafe, 118 N Neil St, C. For more information contact Jessica Watson at 353-4934.

Hip-Hop Benefit Show – local hip hop performers will gather to support our local chapters of NORML (National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws) and SSDP (Students for Sensible Drug Policy). DJs include Joe Castro, Derek Wahl, Al-literation, Independent Descendents, and Katastrophe – University YMCA, 8pm

Clear Sky Zen Group – Meets on Thursday evenings in the Geneva Room of the McKinley Foundation. Newcomers to meditation and people of all traditions and faiths are welcome – McKinley Foundation, 809 S Fifth St, 6:25-9pm

Reel to Reel and the Wheels of Steel Movies with Spinnerty and Bozak spinning in the background. Still time for Oktoberfest Beers. Main Market

3:25 PM

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105 N. Market St. Downtown Champaign 355.1236


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Life Map Workshop – A life map is a collection of visual images, a method of connecting with your intuition, a tool for visualizing your dreams or goals. Come explore life mapping--approaches, uses, and the opportunity to create your own life map. 9:15am-1:00pm on Saturday, November 1 at McKinley Foundation, C. To register or for information, contact Jo Pauly, MSW, Whole Life Coach at (217) 337-7823 or jopauly@prairienet.org

THEATER LISTINGS Elysium on the Prairie, Live Action Roleplaying – Vampires stalk the city streets and struggle for dominance in a world of gothic horror. Create your own character and mingle with dozens of players who portray their own undead alter egos. Each session is another chapter in an ongoing story of triumph, tragedy and betrayal. Friday, “Vampire: The Masquerade” For more information visit: http://ww2.uiuc.edu/ro/elysium/intro.html. Check site for location, 7pm. Parkland Theatre presents “The Laramie Project” – Written by Moises Kaufman and the members of the Tectonic Theatre Project, this drama looks at the events surrounding the 1998 death of gay student Matthew Shepard in Laramie,Wyoming as told through the voices of the townspeople. The director, Randi Jennifer Collins Hard, has cast over 70 community members to bring the town of Laramie to life. Performances are Oct 1, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11 at 8pm and Oct 12 at 3pm. A post-performance talk with the director and actors will be held on Fri, Oct 3 after the show. General admission tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for students (over 12) and seniors, and $5 for youths 12 and under. Special priced nights are opening night, Wed, Oct 1 when all tickets are $2.99 and Thu, Oct 9 when all tickets are half their regular price. Call (217) 351-2528 for tickets and information.

AUDITIONS Calling All Models Including Males – Oct. 11 – Model auditions for the 22nd Annual B.A.T.S. fashion Show – FAR 13:30pm

ENVIRONMENT 6th Annual Salt Fork River Clean-up – Come out to the Salt Fork River and help clean up a local treasure. Meet at the Preserve, 2573 South Homer Lake Road, at 8:30 am. Enjoy refreshments, free t-shirts, and a prize raffle complements of C-U businesses – Salt Fork River Forest Preserve, October 4-30, 8:30am-1pm

WORKSHOPS Artist’s Way Group – A 12-week adventure in recovering and celebrating our creative spirit. Wednesdays, Sept 17Dec 17 (no session Nov 26) from 5:45-7:15pm at McKinley Foundation (free parking). To register or for more information, contact Jo Pauly, MSW, Whole Life Coach at (217) 3377823 or jopauly@prairienet.org. Walking In This World Group – The new sequel to the Artist's Way with 12 new weeks of strategies and techniques for expressing our creative spirit. Wednesdays, Sept 17-Dec 17 (no session Nov 26) from 7:30-9:00pm at McKinley Foundation (free parking). To register or for Great Grain Breads – October 18 – Learn to fit whole grains into your diet by creating healthy, simple whole grain breads. The feature recipe can be altered to create many different types of bread from the same basic recipe. The class meets Saturday, October 18 from 10-11:30 a.m. at the Mettler Center, 2906 Crossing Court in Champaign. The registration fee is $20. Registration deadline is October 10. For more information call 217/403-4590. Ballroom I: An Introduction to the World of Ballroom Dancing – October 20 - November 24 – Learn the basic steps of waltz and swing in a fun, easygoing environment. No experience and no partner are necessary. The class meets Mondays from 6:45-8 p.m. at the Refinery, 502 S. Kenwood St., Champaign. The registration fee is $49. Registration deadline is October 13. For more information call 217-403-4590. Salsa and Nightclub Two-Step – October 20 - November 24 – This is a beginning class for club-style partner dancing. Participants will learn salsa and nightclub two-step. No experience and no partner are necessary. The class meets Mondays from 8:15-9:30pm at the Refinery, 502 S. Kenwood St., Champaign. The registration fee is $49.

WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com | OCTOBER 19-15, 2003

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TMJ Discomfort: What Can You Do? – October 22 – Learn about the anatomy and function of the jaw and how to keep it functioning optimally. The class will also address the role muscle tension can play in joint dysfunction and how to relieve this tension. Douglas Nelson and the staff of Body Work Associates will teach the class. The class meets Wednesday, October 22 from 7-9pm in room M130 at the Parkland College campus. The registration fee is $16. Registration deadline is October 15. For more information call 217-403-4590.

Topdog/Underdog ★★

Suzan-Lori Parks

BY SYD SLOBODNIK | CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Faux Finshing Workshop - Marble – October 16 – Faux Finish Painting Workshops. $20 for one evening session. Tools and supplies provided. Register online at www.boyerdrawing.com or call. – Boyer Drawing & Painting Lincoln Square Mall, 7-9pm

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ho can figure the rationale behind the politics of a Pulitzer Prize committee? Since 1918, this committee, endowed by former NY World publisher, Joseph Pulitzer, in a bequest to Columbia University, has awarded nearly annual prizes for excellence in journalism and letters, drama being one category. With much anticipation, Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre Company, at 1650 N. Halsted St., has staged the Midwest premiere of the 2002 Pulitzer Prize winner for drama, Suzan-Lori Parks’ Topdog/Underdog. This present run is planned until Nov. 2. Though this production features some of the Steppenwolf’s usual fine acting caliber—K. Todd Freeman and David Rainey—the impact of Parks’ themes and messages is underwhelming. Also, theater-goers should not have to consult Cliff Notes interpretations before attending this production. The contemporary, two-person drama details several days in the lives of a pair of inner city African-American brothers, Lincoln and Booth, who seem to suffer from two of the

Faux Finshing Workshop - Faux Wood – October 23 – Faux Finish Painting Workshops. Oct. 23 - Faux Wood; Oct. 30 - Stone and Brick. 7-9pm. Tools and supplies provided. Register online at www.boyerdrawing.com or call – Boyer Drawing & Painting - Lincoln Square Mall, 7-9pm New Catalog Basics – October 17 – At this small-group beginners' class, we'll demonstrate the basics of the new catalog, then answer questions while you try it yourself. Please register by calling – Champaign Public Library, Information Desk, 9:30-10:30am

SOCIAL ISSUES "Silent Witness Project" – October 15-17 – This project consists of lifesize cutouts that have a story of a real-life domestic violence situation attached. (The project will not be shown on the 16th.) – Champaign-Urbana Public Health District

arts

OCTOBER 9-15, 2003 | YOU DON’T MAKE FRIENDS BY MAKING FUN, AND YOU DON’T WIN FRIENDS WITH SALAD.

playreview

Registration deadline is October 13. For more information call 217-403-4590.

Anti-Columbus Day Rally featuring Charlene Teeters – October 10 – The Progressive Resource/Action Cooperative will be holding its annual anti-Columbus day event. This event will make the connections between the legacy of Christopher Columbus and the presence of the mascot "Chief Illiniwek" at the U of I. There will be a picket and speakers from 11:30am-2pm on the UI Quad in front of the Henry Administration building. The keynote speaker will be Charlene Teeters, founder of the anti-"Chief" movement

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most common types of social deficits. Both have had minimal success connecting with women in their lives, and both are marginally employed. The elder brother, a 30-something recent divorcee, dresses as his namesake and plays the Great Emancipator in an arcade where the Lincoln assassination is repeatedly re-enacted daily for audiences’ amusements. The slightly younger brother, Booth, opens the play practicing his elaborate lyrical street hustle of Three-Card Monte. Booth lives in a rundown flat with a single cot and a recliner chair. Even though Lincoln pays to stay there while he’s in transition, he comments critically, “You live in the Third World, fool.” As Booth, K. Todd Freeman, a regular member of the Steppenwolf ensemble, brings life and dimension to this rather cliched and unlikable pistol-packing thug. Freeman’s realistic staccato delivery of his lines and natural outbursts are the highlight of his skilled performance. Early in the play Booth refers to how their father named them, saying, “It was his idea of a joke.” This line telegraphs several key events in the play. The rest of this plotless drama seems more like a series of long monologues of past memories, love relationships gone wrong and pipe dreams of either attaining greater easy wealth, or vulgar opportunities with sexy girlfriends or one-night stands who will heal their chronic sufferings. So what makes this play a supposed modern Cain and Abel parable or an insightful,

Rookie Cookies – Hands-on cooking class for elementary

cutting edge analysis of modern brotherhood, worthy of the Pulitzer honor? As a character study of two seemingly social losers, it’s only director Amy Morton’s skilled direction of Freeman and Rainey that squeeze what little life and emotional intensity can be pulled out of these loosely drawn characters. At one point in the play, there appears to be an attempt of social criticism of a sort of bizarre reversal of the minstrel show character humiliation. The character Lincoln

Su Oct 12

Habitat For Humanity – October 10 – Sign up today for Habitat for Humanity's at the University of Illinois co-ed volleyball tournament. The tournament will take place on Saturday, participants will receive a free t-shirt at the event and refreshments will be served. The registration fee is $13 per individual, or $72 per team of six players. Those interested may register by downloading a registration form at http://habitat.union.uiuc.edu, and mailing it to 266 Illini Union, 1401 W. Green St., Urbana IL 61801

appears in white face, with complete fake beard and black coat and stovepipe hat. But unlike Spike Lee’s underrated satire of minstrel show characters in Bamboozled, Parks’ satire is only fleeting cynicism without elaboration on racist employment practices, discrimination and exploitation. This depressing tale of these conventional inner city brother ends so abruptly it leaves even the most patient theater-goer perplexed and dissatisfied. Don’t be fooled by this play’s Pulitzer honors! buzz

K. Todd Freeman (Booth) and David Rainey (Lincoln) in Topdog/Underdog.

this week

National Coming Out Day Rally – October 10 – A rally in support of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered persons. There will be live performances and guest speakers – North End of Quad, noon-1pm

UI Philharmonia 3pm, $2-$5 Jazz Vespers 5:30pm, University Place Christian Church, free Sponsors:

@

krannert center

We Oct 15

Th Oct 16

Drummers of West Africa 7pm, $15-$28 Sponsors: Jean Huddleston and Paul and Kelly Foster

Wine Tasting 5pm, free

KIDS & FAMILIES Tu Oct 14

Girls, Girls, Girls! – October 10 – Games, crafts, and reading time for girls in kindergarten to fifth grade – Douglas Branch Library, 4-5pm

It's Storytime! – October 11 – Join us at Pages for this free children's storytelling event, each and every week! Our booksellers are excellent readers, and we choose two new (or classic) storybooks to read each week. Drop in and join the fun! This event is recommended for children ages 1 to 8. Cookies served – Pages For All Ages, 11:30am TotNotes – Come to one of our favorite activities: TotNotes-Pages For All Ages' music appreciation class for babies! Pages is very happy to welcome instructor Lisa Cerezo into our store for a free class in music appreciation that's just right for infants and toddlers – Pages For All Ages, 10am

Denyce Graves, mezzo-soprano 7:30pm, $25-$42 Sponsors: Mary and George Perlstein Dolores and Roger Yarbrough Anonymous

Sherban Lupu, violin and Ian Hobson, piano 7:30pm, $2-$5

First Step Fitness – October 9 – Learn about health and join in fun group exercise activities. Class meets Fridays through October 17. (ages 4-5) – Phillips Recreation Center, 3:30-4:20pm ABC 123 – October 9 – Preschoolers will learn creatively thought, games and crafts – Phillips Recreation Center, 1111:45am

EAT IN TAKE OUT l

l

Jazz Vespers 5:30pm, University Place Christian Church, free

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Free Delivery for orders over $12 $1 Delivery Charge for orders between $8-$12

$4.99ALL DAY

Some Krannert Center programs are supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Illinois Arts Council, and patron and corporate contributions.

Season Sponsors Coporate Season Underwriters

1209 N. Prospect Ave • Phone 351-8808 • Fax 351-9878

Phone 351-8808

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9

PHOTO COURTESY OF STEPPENWOLF THEATRE

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Patron Season Sponsors

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The Jazz Threads project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts Challenge America—Access to the Arts Program.

KrannertCenter.com 217/333-6280 or 800/KCPATIX 217/333-9714 (TTY) 217/244-SHOW (Fax) 217/244-0549 (Groups) kran-tix@uiuc.edu Ticket Office Open 10am to 6pm daily; on days of performances open 10am through intermission.


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arts

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FOUR FUNNY SENTENCES WALK INTO A BAR, ONLY ONE COMES OUT. HERE IT IS | OCTOBER 9-15, 2003 buzz

The spirit of Mediterranean Pathos: The early works of Pierre Daura P

ierre Daura was a Catalonian-American artist who lived from 1896 to 1976, and during his life created many pieces of art. A number of his earlier works are currently on display at the Krannert Art Museum and will remain so until Nov. 2. The exhibit includes charcoal nude drawings, engravings, a still life painting, a self-portrait and others. All of the artwork in the exhibit was received as a gift from Martha Daura, Pierre’s daughter. The museum was given 12 paintings and 56 works on paper, said Roxanne Stanulis, curator of collections at the Krannert Art Museum. “This gift is unique because of the number of works and the quality of those works,� she said. “The work in the exhibit highlights parts of our permanent collection.� In 1914, Daura moved from Spain to Paris to continue his work as an artist. A few years later, Daura returned to Menorca to serve in the military. On display at the museum are charcoal nude sketchings from this period in his life. “We worked together and went through the larger body of work to choose the pieces for the exhibit,� said Jordana Mendelson, guest curator for the exhibit and assistant professor of art and design at the University of Illinois. “The work is pretty (much) arranged in a

chronological framework and there are a variety of different works.� Daura met in 1927 his wife, Louise, who, after graduating from Bryn Mawr College, went to Paris to travel. A year later they married and traveled together throughout Spain. Another piece on display is an engraving of his hometown, Ascu. His skillful technique of wood and bronze engraving is visible in this piece. Also featured are books from the University library that supplement the art and history of Daura. “His work has the greatest impact on learning communities in places like university art museums,� Mendelson said. “We try to tie the works in with things we have here in order to give a sense of the way his work resonated among critics.� Daura’s work tended to display a tension between figuration and abstraction. This is apparent in many of his still lifes during the 1920s and 1930s. One such painting can be seen at the Krannert exhibit. “Martha has donated work to various places where Pierre Daura lived and worked. These were carefully thought out choices,� Mendelson said. “(Martha) was here for the fundraising gala benefit in September just recently,� Stanulis said. “She is very interested in having her father’s work on exhibit where it can be studied and appreciated.�

Virginia and St. Cirq. Today, the house that Daura owned in St. Cirq has been given to the government to serve as an artists’ colony. “We hope to bring recognition to this important artist who probably hasn’t received enough attention and to get his work better known,� said Stanulis. buzz

★★★★

B

An engraving from Civilisation by Pierre Daura

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haunted house

LOST IN TRANSLATION BY MATT PAIS | LEAD REVIEWER

0$5&+,1* ,//,1,

Come visit our free this weekend!

Daura’s work, during his lifetime, was displayed in many different places. He made pieces that reflected the places he had seen during his travels. Daura helped organize a number of events, including a group called Agrupaciu d’Artistes Catalans (Group of Catalan Artists) and Cerle et CarrĂŠ (Circle and Square) which emphasized the strategic creation of art, as opposed to surrealism. “There is a precociousness to his production,â€? Mendelson said. In 1930, Pierre and Louise moved to St. CirqLapopie, France. In their first year there, their daughter Martha was born. Then from 1934 to 1935, they went to Louise’s hometown in Virginia. From this experience Daura created a series of American landscapes. At age 41, Daura served in the Spanish Civil War on the Republican side. After returning from the war upon a result of being wounded, Daura created a series of engravings called Civilisation, 1937-1939, showing the shocking experiences he observed and sketched. Both Pierre and Louise wrote letters during this time, which were afterwards published; Daura wrote to Louise and Louise wrote to her family in Virginia. While living in Virginia, World War II broke out, and Daura and his family stayed in Virginia. They became naturalized citizens and Daura became a college art teacher. Beginning in 1947, Daura alternated living between

moviereview

PHOTO | SUZANNE SITRICK

BY SUZANNE SITRICK | STAFF WRITER

ill Murray has a great face for movies. Thin and droopy, proud and weary, Murray’s mug has developed lines that perpetually crawl down his face and neck and pull down the corners of his mouth. The actor’s befuddled maturity has ripened with age, shining most recently in Wes Anderson’s Rushmore and The Royal Tennenbaums. His rough, ragged face sags with outstanding, temperate sadness throughout the stunningly nuanced Lost in Translation, a moving, enigmatic dissection of the human condition. And as former movie star Bob Harris (Murray) struggles to understand a Japanese commercial director’s request to imitate the members of the “Lot Pock� (a garbled “Rat Pack�), Murray settles into one of the most triumphant comedic and dramatic performances of his career. At 53, he still has the same knack for physical

moviereview

OUT OF TIME ★★★ BY ANDREW CREWELL | STAFF WRITER

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•Retail and rental costumes •Theatrical and clown makeup •Face painting supplies •Wigs, hats and accessories •Decorations galore! •Strobes & Blacklights too.

101 E. University • FREE PARKING IN REAR • Mon-Fri: 10-9 Sat: 10-8 Sun: 12-6 • 351-5974

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21

film & tv

OCTOBER 9-15, 2003| BILL MURRAY’S FINEST WORK

ut of Time is a refreshing film that revisits a genre seldom used and reunites a successful actor-director combination. Film noir is rarely employed in current filmmaking, but director Carl Franklin rejoins with Academy Award winning actor Denzel Washington (Training Day) for a repeat of the 1995 detective thriller Devil in a Blue Dress. In this 2003 reunion, Denzel stars as Matt Lee Whitlock, a small-town police chief in Florida. Whitlock, who has been down on his luck with his estranged wife played by Eva Mendez (2 Fast 2 Furious), finds himself in the throes of an affair with an old flame. Just as his life couldn’t seem any more mixed up, Whitlock makes an enormous half-million dollar drug bust and sees his life turn upside down as he starts to get into trouble. It’s at this point that Whitlock realizes he is being used by con artists trying to get through him to the drug money he has access to. Looking for an answer, he decides to run away from his troubles with his cancer-ridden high school sweetheart, and nurse her back to health with the drug money. Unfortunately, by this time, Whitlock is in over his head, has

comedy, but with a more adult sense of awshucks hopelessness. Murray provides virtually every one of the many laugh-out-loud moments in Lost in Translation, which balance its varying tones with competent, gentle grace. Hilarious and heartbreaking, the film is driven by Murray’s worn-in performance, which is as mesmerizing as it is memorable. All alone in the glowing neon city of Tokyo, Bob is far from the fame he knew in the 1970s. His hair has thinned, and his sense of Hollywood hegemony has dwindled into a languid passivity that falls a few steps short of alcoholism. But Bob, endorsing Japanese liquor, isn’t the only lost soul in the city: he meets Charlotte (Scarlett Johansson), a moody Yale graduate staying in the same hotel while her husband (Giovanni Ribisi) photographs celebrities. The two lonely hearts gradually bond, and their calm flirtation forms an entrancing, whirlwind romance of platonic infatuation. Lost in Translation is noticeably different in content but markedly similar in mood as writer/director Sofia Coppola’s debut, the wonderfully ambiguous The Virgin Suicides. While Coppola’s first film addressed sexual repression and miscommunication through the eyes of small-town teenagers, her poignant follow-up spins an entirely new incarnation of wandering alienation. Again employing an atmospheric, dream-pop soundscape, Coppola creates lush, liquid sequences of tremendous humor and heart. been framed for murder, and everyone he knew has suddenly abandoned him. As he sits down to think through the problem, the DEA shows up wanting the cash, and his wife shows up as a homicide detective brought in to solve the very murder Whitlock had been framed for. The entire film turns out to be Denzel racing against time, police and the criminals he’s tracking as he tries to stay one step ahead of everyone. The film is very enticing to watch, and the understated action builds suspense as the audience finds themselves enthralled by the story and rooting for Denzel. Denzel, a pillar of support for the black acting community after winning the Oscar, varies a lot in the film, leading some scenes to be more believable than others. However, his presence and ability to assert himself allow him to be truly amazing. The rest of the cast is relatively unknown but very supportive of Denzel. This is especially seen in John Billingsley as Chae, who always turns up at just the right time to save his buddy and provide a chuckle. All in all, this could be Carl Franklin’s best work. His scenes string together in an extremely fluid motion that makes Out of Time inherently easy and thrilling to watch. The tension never dies and builds to the end and a fan-favorite conclusion. The plot may not be the most exciting in the history of suspense films, but the diligent work of cast and crew bring it together in fine fashion. The overall feel of the movie resembles Touch of Evil, an Orson Welles film noir from

And once again, Coppola’s work may not sink in until an hour, a day or a week after the credits roll. On the surface, there may not appear to be anything especially noteworthy to the story of two Americans, lost in a city where the only thing that makes any sense is each other. But Coppola cares not for the standard love affair; Bob and Charlotte are not horny philanderers looking for a good time to quell their pain. Instead, thousands of miles from home and separated by years of experience, they find freedom in their undefined relationship. The enigmatic serenity of Lost in Translation confounds and astonishes while it simultaneously embraces and rejects convention. The link between Bob and Charlotte feels a touch familiar but, more importantly, perfectly natural. The simple, step-by-step evolution of their friendship has an idealistic purity not found in most cinematic representations of the older man, younger woman relationship. Age has nothing to do with their connection; these are two people who, not in mind and body, but in spirit, truly understand each other. After only two features, Coppola has proven herself a master of constructing films that are much more than the sum of their parts. Emotionally rich and psychologically complex, her work is a feast for the senses; these are movies meant to be felt rather than seen. This time, she strips celebrities of their pretense and young adults of their naivetÊ. Bob and Charlotte are human in the purest sense of

FOCUS FEATURES

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10/8/03

LOST IN TRANSLATION | BILL MURRAY the word, and their need to establish themselves in a large, faceless city is completely reciprocal and sincere. Coppola has a unique ability to evoke gradually a great deal of meaning that doesn’t present itself until the last possible moment. While The Virgin Suicides magnified the fascination and confusion that exists between the sexes with startling density, her latest work embodies the importance of a familiar face in a country full of strangers. But throughout the subtle, stupendous Lost in Translation, Bob and Charlotte discover in each other not just a friendly face but an ally in the universal game of lost and found.

C-UViews THE SCHOOL OF ROCK ★★★ WIll Osler Champaign MGM FILMS

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OUT OF TIME | DENZEL WASHINGTON the 1950s where Charlton Heston and Welles star opposite each other and create the same sort of inter-police office strain, a film still receiving accolades to this day. Out of Time is a film that has the scope to revitalize a genre in dire straits, and adds one more notch to the already stunning career of possibly the most popular actor in America. For an actionpacked two hours before Thursday night’s big frat park concert, get to the theater and take in Out of Time.

SCREEN REVIEW GUIDE

★★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★ no stars

Flawless Good Mediocre Bad Unwatchable

"It's off the meat racks."

★★★★ Jason Townsend Urbana

"Jack Black rocks!"

UNDER THE TUSCAN SUN ★★★ Carla Brown Champaign

"It had beautiful cinematography from Tuscany.�


Page 1

SPONGEBOB SQUAREPANTS IS OUR GOD. | OCTOBER 9-15, 2003

moviereview

THIRTEEN ★★★ MIRAMAX FILMS

BY JANELLE GREENWOOD | STAFF WRITER

THE DANCER UPSTAIRS | JOHN MALKOVICH

dvdpreview

THE DANCER UPSTAIRS

★★

BY RACHEL TOLER | STAFF WRITER

R

egrettably, actor John Malkovich’s directorial debut is not about dancing. The Dancer Upstairs tells the story of Agustin Rejas, a police detective trying to unmask the guerrilla terrorists who have been wreaking havoc in Latin America. In the process, Agustin falls in love with his daughter’s ballet teacher. These two different plot lines could potentially lead to an interesting and original film—unfortunately, the screenplay tackles only one at a given time. Javier Bardem makes Agustin’s jaded character accessible to the audience despite his subdued tone of voice and no-nonsense manner. Laura Morante also delivers a strong performance as Yolanda, the beautiful and secretive ballet teacher. Morante demonstrates her range as an actress in this demanding role, and becomes the center of the film despite the screenplay’s battling plot lines. Even with her impressive performance, though, the film’s constant shift in focus becomes a distraction instead of an intricacy and the main cause of the movie’s downfall. The screenplay’s failure to unite these plot lines is most apparent at the end of the film. The lackluster, drawn-out conclusion attempts to reconstruct the gaps left between the two plot lines, but the attempt comes too late. Fortunately, Malkovich’s impressive direction saves this film from complete failure. In The Dancer Upstairs, Malkovich channels his background in theater to create the artful and provocative scenes that highlight the most dramatic parts of the film. His alternate use of bright colors and shadow suggest the film’s struggle between good and evil forces. Malkovich’s film noir approach also defines the struggles between good and evil characters in a way that the screenplay fails to do. Malkovich’s wise directorial decisions unite the poorly structured screenplay, perhaps suggesting that power lies not in words (as the terrorists in the film might suggest), but—as the dancer proves—in the beauty and grace of the artistic spirit.

I

n an exercise to show parents the truth of today’s youth comes a disturbing look into their lives in Thirteen. Thirteen follows the squeaky-clean teen Tracy (Evan Rachel Wood), fresh from the dramatic series Once and Again, who longs to fit in with the popular and fast-paced Evie (Nicki Reed). Evie epitomizes the ideal L.A. teenager by representing everything that magazines and television highlight as important to these girls. Tracy, in an attempt to ditch her goody-goody image, steals a wallet on Melrose Avenue, eventually proving her worth to Evie’s gang. From that point, despite knowing better, Tracy attempts to shed her innocence through every new experience Evie puts her in. At first glance, the film looks like it’s simply going to showcase midriffs and tongue piercings in order to shock parents, but it does move into serious issues. Despite wanting to appear older, both Tracy’s and Evie’s youth comes through in the film’s beautiful cinematography and script, which highlight their youth effortlessly. When the girls come home after dropping acid in a sprinkler

dvdreview

SPONGEBOB SQUAREPANTS TIDE AND SEEK ★★

BY THOMAS ABBATACOLA | STAFF WRITER

W

hy has SpongeBob SquarePants become so popular that he has his own DVDs, video games and upcoming film? The answer can be found by watching a few episodes of the Nickelodeon show. This animated series is so entertaining that families gladly watch alongside children, but its odd humor has also attracted a college-aged following. While SpongeBob SquarePants is still very much aimed at kids, interest among other age groups triggered the release of several DVD collections of episodes. However, SpongeBob SquarePants: Tide and Seek is not the best way for children or adults to enjoy the adventures of their favorite sponge. This cartoon is adored by all ages because of the original characters and their environment. SpongeBob, voiced by Tom Kenny, is an optimistic and cheerful sponge living under the sea. His voice, facial expressions and outfit make him a likeable character even though he often

park, Evie begins to sing, “the itsy bitsy spider dropped acid in the park,” showing a bizarre, yet poignant look at her own attempt to mask her innocence through a false maturity by using drugs. The cinematography really draws on the experience, like eavesdropping into the unseen world that teens today are apparently keeping from the rest of us. Co-written by one of the film’s stars, Reed, Thirteen hits on the feelings surrounding selfesteem and the need to fit in through making Tracy’s character steal, experience awkward sexual encounters and experiment with drugs. Just as many teens try out new personas, Tracy’s life becomes dissected, but the film goes beyond a superficial shell to reveal a disturbed youth who cuts herself repeatedly in the bathroom to deal with her stress. We clearly see Tracy’s physical transformation through her disappearing clothes; however, it’s her shift from a considerate young girl to a self-centered teen that really showcases Tracy’s insecurities. Thirteen could have taken the after-school special route and used cheesy cliches, especially given that a 13-year-old girl helped write the script, but it doesn’t. Instead, the film is brave and rewards the viewer with a breakout performance that showcases Wood’s ability to draw empathy and distaste in the same action. The unobtrusive cinematography brings the viewer right into the fast world that these girls see in the Los Angeles lifestyle. In another glimpse of the 13-year-old girl, both girls try to outdo each acts like a “square.” The slow witted Patrick, a sea star, deserves the most credit for laughs, as he and SpongeBob team up in most episodes. In two episodes on this DVD, adults might catch references to Abbot and Costello Meet Frankenstein and The Marx Brothers’ Duck Soup. The show takes place in a strange underwater world filled with seaweed and bubbles, which looks great on DVD. SpongeBob, who lives in a pineapple and works at a fast food restaurant called The Krusty Krab, walks and talks freely with the other sea creatures. The squirrel, however, lives in a bubble and must travel in scuba gear. The unusual environment separates SpongeBob SquarePants from other cartoons, but still allows for normal storylines. Kids accept the show because it is bright and optimistic but does not get preachy with morals. There is great energy and you can tell kids feel it when they shout along with the theme song, “Who lives in a pineapple under the sea? SPONGEBOB SQUAREPANTS!” It is hard to find more excitement than this in most Saturday morning style cartoons. SpongeBob is a simple form of silliness but parents shouldn’t expect any smart humor. It succeeds in making the viewer feel like a child. But despite the fun and games, the DVD can often disappoint the show’s biggest fans. Tide and Seek is a collection of 10 old episodes and a few special features. These randomly selected episodes have no relation to each other. Fans may be disappointed to spend money on these DVD collections if Nickelodeon releases the full seasons later. Another disappointing part of Tide and Seek is

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Shotgun

other while making out with two boys. It draws on the awkwardness of the situation; Tracy pays more attention to Evie in order to mimic her behavior and “one up” her, rather than realizing the weight of the situation. Holly Hunter’s performance as Melanie, Tracy’s mother, appears endearing and honest, and it should earn her a nod for best supporting actress in the Oscar run in February. Her feelings come through as lost and truly frightened of her daughter’s capabilities when trying to confront and comfort Tracy. More importantly, however, Hunter’s performance mirrors the same confused feelings of her daughter. Thirteen really reflects society’s desire to move forward, even at the cost of its youth, and the result is an overbearing world of chaos that today’s teens are thrown into too early in life.

Said the Shotgun to the Head is now available at local bookstores. Retail price runs at $11.95.

comingthismonth BY JEFF NELSON | CONTRIBUTING WRITER

A

SPONGEBOB SQUAREPANTS | SPONGEBOB a lack of extras. Those interested in animation may enjoy a storyboard for one episode but most fans could probably care less. The socalled “Behind the Scenes” feature is only a minute long. Two episodes have commentary by creator Stephen Hillenburg and Kenny. Such a fast paced, energetic cartoon deserves the same kind of attitude from commentators. But these two mumble through both episodes lifelessly sounding like Jay and Silent Bob. While the older audience may find the monotone commentary hilarious, most kids will be bored. There is nothing great about the SpongeBob SquarePants: Tide and Seek DVD that would make kids beg for it. Big fans may want to add it to their collection of SpongeBob merchandise, but most should be cautious if full seasons are ever released. With a movie on the way, the fad of SpongeBob does not seem to be ending soon and this DVD is just another way of cashing in.

C

Our narrator is a babbling prophet who spouts his fear of a nation being dictated by a burning bush. He aspires to be someone among us who is content. Though the poetry of our generation has been filled with angst, there is a sense of longing in all that we write, along with a plea behind the complaints that says, “I do love, I just don’t understand how it can survive.” Saul Williams is a man who can do no more than breathe, which in itself is inspiration, portraying the type of voice we represent as the youth of a world, not a nation. We are confused, we are scared and we are anxious. We turn to goods instead of gods and seek enlightenment in three-minute intervals. This is not our failure but our programming. So what happens when we call God a woman? When we buck the trend of spending our money and begin to spin our minds? We find that contention that we long for, and this epic poem is the transcription of a generation who seeks as though they have been followed, not blindly led.

s the fall arts season gears up, that big building that occupies an entire block of the east University of Illinois campus, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, is one place to look for a variety of offerings in the performing arts. October and November are Krannert’s peak months, and this autumn there is something for everyone. For those who follow the University’s various symphonic and chamber music outlets, the Illini Symphony will perform Sunday at 3 p.m. Also next week, faculty members Serban Lupu and Ian Hobson will perform violin and piano music Oct. 14. The month finishes with offerings from the University’s Wind Symphony/ Symphonic Band on Oct. 17 and its Chamber Singers on Oct. 25. Cellist Maya Beiser will perform some contemporary compositions in the Tryon Festival Theatre on Oct. 17, while across the lobby in Foellinger, the Champaign-Urbana Symphony Orchestra will perform youthful works of great composers such as Bizet’s “Symphony

This statue sits in front of the University’s main library. It was created by former University Art Instructor Lorado Taft as part of his “Fountain of Creation” series.

No. 1.” The month draws to a close with a visit from the extraordinary National Dance Company of Siberia on Oct. 23 and violinist Joan Kwoun on Oct. 26. Vocal music fans can enjoy the Oct. 19 tribute to former faculty member William Warfield and a visit from soprano Denise Graves on Oct. 16. Also, look forward to a double treat from Bulgaria on Oct. 21; Opera Verdi Europe will perform Mozart’s 40th symphony and the ultimate vocal work, Mozart’s “Requiem.” If you expect theater at the Krannert Center, this month will not disappoint. In what has already been declared a Sondheim year, the University of Illinois Department of Theatre will open his brilliantly musical bittersweet fairy tale montage, Into the Woods, on Oct. 24. It will run weekends until Nov. 2. If Barbara Cook’s Mostly Sondheim concert on Sept. 16 didn’t hint of great Sondheim events around the corner, please note that the University’s Opera will present Sweeney Todd beginning Feb. 20. Finally, if you like your plays without music, Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde will run in rotation with the comedy Anton in Show Business from Oct. 28 to Nov. 16 at the Studio Theatre. Just in case nothing here really grabs you and your entertainment is gut level, try The Drummers of West Africa on Oct. 15. This great group from Senegal may be the one that does take hold. FYI: This year, most evening Krannert events start at 7:30 p.m. and a few start at 7 p.m.

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THIRTEEN | HOLLY HUNTER

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OCTOBER 9-15, 2003 | WHAT KIND OF BEE GIVES MILK? A BOO-BEE!

ZAR Absolute is a spoken word artist who lives in Urbana and is a student at the University of Illinois. He is the emcee in a hip-hop band called Animate Objects, which won this year’s Battle of the Bands. His producer is PROTOTYPE from the Bankiet Sound System. He sees spoken word as contributing to hip hop and that, as a medium, hip hop is “expanding, not dying. Instead of being one thing it is evolving into a genre that incorporates more and more aspects.”

Concrete Gemini

What inspires you? My love for the craft and my desire to do something therapeutic for myself and for others inspires me. I am studying psychiatry and I strive to enrich people through the enrichment of myself.

Have patience, because once our consciousness is awakened I guarantee that we can make it I can’t take it I made a living out of channeling my hatred To conquer anything that I’m faced with I ain’t complacent; I’ll destroy anything that you’ve created To get my people emancipated

What themes are present in your work? Eclecticism is present along with different art forms that preceded hip hop. For example, bebop, jazz and swing. What environment do you best work in? I work well in a place where I could be intimately connected with the audience. This way I can educate while performing. Where can you find the best conversation in town? The best conversations are found anywhere following a U-C Hip-Hop function. You get to open up and talk to each other as individuals.

I spent too many cold winters with a frozen heart in the Chi So now I watch my own back like a Gemini Hard knocks aficionado, who wears a blank face like Movado But found hiding from his own emotions is Bravado Things get hard to swallow, and inside you feel hollow Looking for some guide to follow

We need freedom, need to know doubts and regrets are our demons That’s why I can’t sleep, but I’m still dreaming Ain’t no reason, for my people to sit around weeping Stand strong and follow what you believe in Hope it’s your heart Mine is embedded in art, to the point that I don’t think I can tell them apart Whether a gift or a curse To uplift or to hurt I try to see both sides through the eyes of my verse

PHOTO | ADAM YOUNG

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PHOTO | KATIE RICHARDSON

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WHAT IS FUNNY? REALLY? | OCTOBER 9-15, 2003

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rt audiences and historians spend their lives trying to reconstruct the worlds in which art pieces were created. Over time, this cultural process has given birth to a self-conscious art world, to a limited extent. Some artists and historians have begun to look at art as not only a source of sensory and emotional pleasure, but also as a product that represents the social sphere in which it was produced. The upcoming symposium at the Levis Faculty Center, “After Whiteness: Race and the Visual Arts,” will serve as a forum for artists, historians and art critics who have begun exploring unconscious social biases and privileges they believe have unfairly shaded the art world. “Whiteness consists of the presumptive, often unconscious power brought about by being classified as white in social and cultural settings,” said Suk Ja Kang Engles, a University of Illinois graduate student in fine and applied arts and co-organizer (along with Tim Engles) of the symposium. “Social relations, media portrayals and life chances remain set up for white people to function as the idealized, ‘normal citizens.’ Therefore, for people of color, it becomes a constant struggle to be like whites in some ways, especially like middle-class whites, if they want to be treated like dignified human beings.” Kang Engles, along with other panelists at Saturday’s symposium, believes that as a result of these ongoing social realities, it remains difficult for minorities to justify their art to consumers and critics in an art world

bookreview

Said the Shotgun to the Head ★★★★

Saul Williams

BY NIC WEBER | STAFF WRITER

A

t a time when Mars, god of war, is closest to our planet, comes a call for peace. We have long forgotten that we personified nature as a woman, and her creator a man. What if we don’t believe in a god that is defined by man’s word? Do we simply disregard God? There has been a movement of our young minds to do so because we don’t believe in a religion. Who among us has not known God

BY JASON CANTONE AND JENNIFER KEAST | ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR AND STAFF WRITER

dominated by “whiteness.” “Although I, for instance, have exhibited and sold abstract paintings, I am continually asked to explain them in terms of my Asian femininity, while race and gender are largely considered insignificant aspects of artistic production by white men,” Kang Engles said. One of the most challenging concepts for white audiences and artists, according to Kang Engles, is the fact that although whites don’t usually realize it, they are just as racialized as the groups they have deemed “minorities.” “If the art that I make that addresses whiteness works for white viewers, it helps them see something they hadn’t seen before about the racialized side of themselves, and/or about the racially whitened norm that they take part in,” said Kang Engles. Much like the practice of art history, cultural whiteness has solidified over a long period of time. David Roediger, a University history professor, approaches whiteness from a historical standpoint. “The system of white privilege focuses the attention of those categorized as white on the narrow privileges they gain as a result of something as literally superficial Workers set up for “After Whiteness: Race and Visual Arts,” which is free and open to the public. as their skins. It leaves no room for imagining that new worlds are possible, either in search for safety in art can lead artists into a “After Whiteness: Race and the Visual Arts” art or everyday life,” Roediger said. Roediger believes that whiteness in the art career of appeasing or pandering to white Levis Faculty Center, 4th Floor world is quite similar to racism in every- audiences without challenging the concept Saturday, Oct. 11, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Free and open to the public of whiteness. day life. “Artists play a key role in exposing the con- Keynote speech: “Now What? Awakening from “Whiteness is a failure of—and even an assault on—the imagination. (Whiteness) nections of whiteness to misery—not only the the Dream of Whiteness” by artist/philosophy coerces its bearers, as James Baldwin once miseries racism inflicts on people of color but professor Adrian Piper in the Knight wrote, into choosing the illusion of safety over those it fastens on the whole society,” Auditorium, Spurlock Museum at 3:30 p.m. creative life and spirit,” said Roediger. The Roediger said. buzz intimately? Has not known the passion behind a sober embrace that leaves us speechless, leaves us grasping for breath and understanding? We personify nature and believe deeply in her preservation but lack the comprehension of her creation. If we equate God and love, why can we not equate our divinity toward God and sex? More simply, though, who has not been so branded by a kiss that they were not forever changed? Saul Williams boldly pens the epic poem Said the Shotgun to the Head at a time when our attention span dictates three-minute radio songs and 90-minute movies. Our ability to focus is so pertinent in all that we consume. Our literature, our conversation, our relationships: They all revolve around our ability, or lack thereof, to hold interest. But what happens when we are so ravished by an event that our attention span is shaken and we become different in that moment,

forever changed? Williams is writing a poem to our generation. Years from now we will look back on our time in the early 21st century and say, here is what we truly believed in and were looking for. Ten pseudo-chapters break down, with uncontrollable alliteration, what we have feared for a long time: the ability to recognize a woman as our savior. Through the chaos of our consumption we find order. This is not a poem directed at the “slacker generation,” as we have from time to time been labeled. It is instead a complicated piece that will contribute to the intellectual evolution of the sons and daughters of a sexual revolution. Our parents fought against, or bought into a society that they believed would somehow be better for us. This poem is the manifestation of that hope and the dream of past generations. continued on page 7

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PHOTO | MATT COHN

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Make ‘em laugh: NBC tries to get funny

After Whiteness BY MATT COHN | STAFF WRITER

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| FRIENDS WILL DIE BUT SCRUBS WILL NEVER LEAVE YOU.

nce every few years, a great comedy comes along and grabs hold of the American public. Sometimes the show blasts out of the starting gates and quickly pulls viewers in with its uproarious scenarios and high quality writing, directing or acting. Other times, the show needs to be nurtured and becomes a sensation in its own right only after the audience has realized that when they went to bed laughing that night, it wasn’t just a fluke. However, the popularity of the sitcom is slowly deteriorating, forcing reviewers and network executives alike to ask the simple question: Is it worth spending millions of dollars on a comedy when a cheaper, low-budget reality show can guarantee good ratings some comedies could never dream of? Look at the Nielsen ratings of which comedies perform the best. Friends, Will & Grace and recent Emmy winner Everybody Loves Raymond are at the top of the heap, building on their already strong fan bases to stay on their thrones as ratings kings and also Emmy Awards regulars, as all three were nominated for Best Comedy last month. The old mainstays are keeping their reign while newer shows are often canceled before they’re given a chance. So, how do little shows become big hits? The following three shows build on one these two concepts: well-known stars or well-watched time slots. Maybe these shows (or the two intelligent ones) can help ebb the death of the television sitcom and remind viewers there is more to television than eating slimy bugs.

HAPPY FAMILY

★★★★

Few shows will ever live up to the King and Queen of NBC comedy: Friends and Will & Grace. but the new comedy Happy Family has the potential to reach those ranks. The show stars five-time Emmy award-winner John Larroquette as Peter and Emmy award-winner Christine Barnaski as Annie. They play parents whose children are all in their 20s and finally getting out of the house. This means they will be able to be just a couple again. Except not really. First, there is Tim (Tyler Fracavilla of Boston Public), their 20-year-old junior college graduate. Except he didn’t graduate. But he didn’t bother telling anyone this. He instead went out and bought a graduation gown. When his parents find out that he didn’t actually graduate, they decide he needs to learn responsibility and tell him to move out. So he does; he moves in next door with Mrs. Harris, his mom’s tennis partner—and his (until then) secret girlfriend. Todd (Jeff Davis) is the eldest and Annie and Peter’s favorite. He’s engaged to one wonderful woman. And dating another. Upon discovering this, Annie asks Todd what about his fiancee, to which he replies: “I love her, she is my fiancee, she is totally in the mix.” Sara (Melanie Paxson) is the overachieving career success who is in the middle of a mid-life crisis. She can’t get a date to save her life and her social life consists of wearing a cocktail dress to play Scrabble with her parents on a Friday night. With all this hilarious drama laid out in the pilot episode, it looks as if Happy Family will continue to deliver laughs throughout the season. The show is

highly entertaining and smartly written with witty punch lines and wonderful acting, particularly by Larroquette and Barnaski. Larroquette is hilarious to watch, especially when he takes the blame for everything that has gone wrong with his children, exclaiming, “I was too focused on keeping them off drugs!” Happy Family explores the trials and tribulations of having older children and shows that no matter where they are living, parents are always dealing with all the trouble their kids get into. If you are looking for an entertaining and funny show to add to the mix of Friends and Will & Grace, check out Happy Family—it’s a comedy worth watching. (Jennifer Keast)

WHOOPI

Every year a whole group of new comedies hits prime time—most of which fail faster than we even have time to try to enjoy them. NBC’s new celebrity comedy Whoopi is destined to be one of those shows. Whoopi Goldberg is an ex-diva named Mavis Rae who runs the Lamont Hotel she bought with her money as a one-hit wonder in New York City. She is assisted by the goofy Nasim (Omid Djalili), her Peruvian (not Arab!) friend. Add to the mix Mavis’ brother Courtney (Wren T. Brown) who moves into the hotel with her to start a law practice, along with his girlfriend Rita (Elizabeth Regen) who is white, but talks “black,” and you’ve got the main cast. So what happens in this show? Unfortunately for viewers, not a whole lot. Whoopi—er, Mavis just runs around her hotel talking trash about people. By the end of each episode, each viewer is sure to be cringing at her overexaggerated and squawky slang voice. Whoopi attempts to get at the issues of diversity and America’s recent fear of Middle Eastern people by poking fun at it. Instead of being funny, this is pulled off as inappropriate and almost rude. Some of Mavis’ comments to Nasim (who is constantly referred to as “Arab”) include “all you people look alike to me,” “you people scare me” and “I see three or four of you on an airplane—I take off.” The show is trying to make light of some serious issues, but it seems these are the kinds of issues that should just be left alone. The Arab issue comes up again later when Mavis is returning an unwanted TV to a store in the show’s first episode. When the clerk refuses the return, she lies to the clerk and says that Nasim is her boss and to take it up with him. As she is explaining why Nasim would want to return a nonrefundable TV, she refers to him saying: “you know how these Arabs are.” By the time of this fourth or fifth Arab comment, it is not only not funny, but it is enough to make one want to turn the show off. For a show produced by the producers of That 70’s Show and 3rd Rock From the Sun, two

NBC ENTERTAINMENT

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WHOOPI | WHOOPI GOLDBERG highly successful comedies, one would expect more out of Whoopi. One can only wonder if the reason why the show is so unappealing has to do with Whoopi Goldberg’s presence, as it seems she’s only doing this to get back into the limelight she’s lost. It is hard not to think that with a show named Whoopi when that isn’t even her character’s name! (Jennifer Keast)

SCRUBS ★★★★ When NBC threatened to pull Scrubs off of its lineup after two hilarious seasons, a fan-based writing campaign immediately started and put the show back into its Thursday time slot. But even wedged between Friends and Will & Grace, many Americans are missing the funniest show on network television. Scrubs focuses on the lives of medical residents and the doctors that make their lives a living hell. Although the show centers on residents J.D. (Zach Braff), Elliot (Sarah Chalke) and Turk (Donald Faison), the show’s true brilliance comes through supporting character Dr. Cox (John C. McGinley). Dr. Cox spews sarcasm more than any character on television and has no problem calling each male resident a girl’s name, demanding that they call him The Big Cheese or trying to beat Dr. Kelso at Pac-Man, although Kelso has allowed people to die just so he could get a better score. In one episode, Dr. Cox defines his character’s impressive dichotomy. After inviting guys at the hospital to watch a wrestling match and eat pizza, no one shows up except for J.D., the resident he enjoys ridiculing so much. But instead of showing his sadness witnessed by the TV audience, he mocks J.D., saying, “Would you stay ... and watch the game with me? Maybe have a slice of pizza? I can braid your hair,” forcing J.D. to leave. Scrubs is truly a rare event: a sitcom so fresh and funny that it’ll leave you rolling on the floor, but filled with important messages such as how to deal with loss: loss of a loved one, loss of a relationship or loss of sanity when entering a new environment or fighting against adversity. Within a minute, an episode can make you laugh, cry and laugh again. Now starting its third season, Scrubs is not something to miss. (Jason Cantone)


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TEXAS IS KNOWN FOR MANY THINGS: IDIOTS AND MASSACRES. | OCTOBER 9-15, 2003 buzz

Drive-thru Reviews

MATCHSTICK MEN

AMERICAN SPLENDOR ★★★★

PAUL GIAMATTI AND HARVEY PEKAR Both delightfully intricate and amusingly simple, American Splendor is the opposite of this summer’s bloated adaptation of The Hulk. While Ang Lee attempted to transfer a comic book into real life, Berman and Pulcini render real life into a comic book and stretch it into a commentary on happiness, accomplishment and the disheartened lifestyle of Middle America. (Matt Pais) Now showing at Beverly.

CABIN FEVER

no stars JORDAN LADD AND RIDER STRONG Nothing could have saved Cabin Fever from its own devouring illness. Not only did the number of plot flaws rival the body count, but even the overt sexual content and gore lost their appeal after awhile. (Daniel Nosek) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy.

FREAKY FRIDAY ★★★ JAMIE LEE CURTIS AND LINDSAY LOHAN Freaky Friday’s family-friendly plot still includes a mother and daughter unsympathetic to one another’s problems because each is convinced her own life is more difficult than the other’s. After a mysterious fortune cookie puts a fateful spell on the pair, Anna, the daughter, and Tess, the mom, wake up in each other’s bodies. One of Jamie Lee Curtis’ most successful films in 20 years. (Janelle Greenwood) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

LOST IN TRANSLATION ★★★★ BILL MURRAY AND SCARLETT JOHANSSON Bill Murray finds a relationship with a younger woman in this intelligent film set in Japan and directed by Sofia Coppola. The enigmatic serenity of Lost in Translation confounds and astonishes while it simultaneously embraces and rejects convention. The link between Bob and Charlotte feels a touch familiar but, more importantly, perfectly natural. (Matt Pais) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

THE MAGDALENE SISTERS ★★★ NORA-JANE NOONE This is the true story of women who were sent to a convent/laundry facility to be cleaned of their sins. However, they were also beaten and brutalized along the way. This story powerfully shows women who rose against the Catholic Church in the name of decency. This film won Best Picture at the Venice Film Festival. (Janelle Greenwood) Opening at Boardman’s Art Theatre

★★★

NICOLAS CAGE AND SAM ROCKWELL No, this isn’t a film about pyromaniacs or arsonists invading a town. Instead, matchstick men are con artists, and here the cons go between friends and family members. When Cage’s character finds out he has a daughter, they meet and she wants to join in on the con.The story is fun and entertaining, but the book is much better and doesn’t have the slow, confusing moments that the movie does. (Jason Cantone) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

The Seabiscuit phenomenon was one of the most captivating in United States history and this film does it justice. (Andrew Crewell) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy.

THE SCHOOL OF ROCK ★★★★

Ahhhhhhh!!!!!

JACK BLACK AND JOAN CUSACK Jack Black plays a rock star who bottoms out and becomes a teacher at a prep school. (Matt Mitchell) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

Do you like scary movies?

ONCE UPON A TIME IN MEXICO

SECONDHAND LIONS ★★★★

Exorcist. Omen. Halloween.

JOHNNY DEPP AND ANTONIO BANDERAS Once Upon a Time in Mexico is an action film that is every bit as intense as it is gorgeous. Fans of the trilogy will not be disappointed, and most audiences will be delighted with the fresh style of action as well as the intelligence present in the script. Paying homage to western campiness with memorable characters and a bit of goofball humor, this is the summer blockbuster that moviegoers should have received two months ago.(Aaron Leach) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

ROBERT DUVALL AND MICHAEL CAINE Two old men, who might have been successful bank robbers in the 1920s, take custody of their nephew. Melodramatic story, tears and laughter ensure and manipulate your emotions, but make you love every second. (Jason Cantone) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

★★★★

OPEN RANGE ★★ KEVIN COSTNER AND ROBERT DUVALL Open Range mixes slow-paced historical nostalgia with slower-paced Little House on the Prairie references, pitting free range herders against static, prejudiced ranchers. At times, the film plays a little like Gangs of the Old West and anyone who’s even heard of classic Westerns like Shane or The Searchers can pretty much stay two steps ahead of Open Range at all times. (Matt Pais) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

OUT OF TIME ★★★ DENZEL WASHINGTON AND SANAA LATHAN Denzel Washington, fresh from his Oscar-winning performance in Training Day and his lead role in the crappy John Q., portrays a cop framed for a heinous crime in this film, which uses a little-used genre effectively to provide an interesting and suspenseful thriller. (Andrew Crewell) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: THE CURSE OF THE BLACK PEARL ★★★ JOHNNY DEPP AND GEOFFREY RUSH All eyes are on Depp in his scene-stealing turn as Capt. Jack Sparrow in Pirates of the Caribbean.The characters are not all that developed and sometimes the action scenes are a bit long, but overall the film comes together as a good action flick. (Janelle Greenwood) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

THE RUNDOWN ★★★ THE ROCK AND SEANN WILLIAM SCOTT The Rundown is pure entertainment, plain and simple. It’s hard to lump it into one genre as it reaches into action, adventure and comedy in order to come up with an exhilarating and fun combination that will leave audiences more than satisfied. (Aaron Leach) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

SEABISCUIT ★★★★ TOBEY MAGUIRE, JEFF BRIDGES AND CHRIS COOPER

UNDERWORLD ★★ KATE BECKINSALE AND SCOTT SPEEDMAN Werewolves, vampires and humans, oh my! This Romeo and Juliet tale pits love against an eternal war between vampires and werewolves. Look for great action sequences and a dark tone similar to The Matrix. And then there’s also Kate Beckinsale in all leather to watch for. (Jason Cantone) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy.

OPENING THIS WEEKEND

Submit your list of the Top 10 Horror Films of All-Time to cantone@uiuc.edu by Oct. 22!

SAVOY 16 Route 45 & Burwash Ave. $5.50 Kids all shows

(217)

355-FILM

$5.75 DAILY Matinees til 6pm & Seniors $6.25 Late Shows Fri & Sat $6.25 Students $7.25 Evenings Mon - Thurs No passes DIGITAL STEREO Unlimited Free Drink Refills & .25¢ Corn Refills

BUFFALO SOLDIERS

ED HARRIS AND ANNA PAQUIN This story tells a less than flattering tale of American soldiers in Germany. These soldiers aren’t the heroes idolized after Sept. 11, which made this film delay for 3 years.These soldiers are thieves and criminals. (Jason Cantone) Opening at Beverly

GOOD BOY!

MATTHEW BRODERICK AND BRITTANY MURPHY An alien dog talks to kids. Simply amazing. Watch Matthew Broderick’s career sink even further. (Jason Cantone) Opening at Beverly and Savoy

HOUSE OF THE DEAD

JONATHAN CHERRY AND CLINT HOWARD A group of ecstacy-loving kids sail out to an island by Seattle and find zombies. Or is it just a drug-induced parable to get kids off drugs? Nope, it’s probably zombies. (Jason Cantone) Opening at Beverly and Savoy

INTOLERABLE CRUELTY

GEORGE CLOONEY AND CATHERINE ZETA-JONES Miles Massey (Clooney), the nimblest divorce attorney in L.A., is out to trap the gold-digging wife (Zeta-Jones) of a client. But beautiful people can't help falling in love, no matter which side of the table they’re on. It’s the Coen Brothers, so it’s probably not the crap it sounds like. (Jason Cantone) Opening at Beverly and Savoy

KILL BILL: VOLUME ONE

UMA THURMAN AND DAVID CARRADINE Quentin Tarantino has been considered cool ever since his first films hit America. In this film (split into two parts because of all of the action scenes), he tries to reinvent himself while proving he’s still the King of Cool. (Jason Cantone) Opening at Beverly and Savoy

Stadium Seating Gives YOU An Unobstructed View All Rocking Chairs

SHOWTIMES 10/10 - 10/16

INTOLERABLE CRULETY (PG-13) DIGITAL/STADIUM SEATING 12:45, 2:50, 4:55, 7:00, 9:05 FRI/SAT LS 11:10 KILL BILL, VOLUME 1 (R) DIGITAL 2 PRINTS/ 2 SCREENS 12:20, 1:05, 2:35, 3:20, 4:50, 5:35, 7:05, 7:50, 9:20, 10:00 FRI/SAT LS 11:35, 12:10 GOOD DOG! (PG) 2 PRINTS/ 2 SCREENS DIGITAL 12:40, 2:40, 4:40, 6:40, 9:00 FRI/SAT LS 11:00 DIGITAL/STADIUM SEATING (SAT/SUN 11:20) 1:20, 3:20, 5:25, 7:20, 9:20 FRI/SAT LS 11:20 THE HOUSE OF THE DEAD (R) DIGITAL/STADIUM SEATING 1:30, 3:25, 5:20, 7:15, 9:10 FRI/SAT LS 11:25 SCHOOL OF ROCK (PG-13) 2 PRINTS/ 2 SCREENS 12:15, 12:55, 2:25, 3:00, 4:35, 5:15, 6:45, 7:30, 8:55, 9:35 FRI/SAT LS 11:05, 11:45 OUT OF TIME (PG-13) 2 PRINTS/ 2 SCREENS 12:30, 1:00, 2:40, 3:10, 4:50, 5:20, 7:00, 7:30, 9:10, 9:40 FRI/SAT LS 11:20, 11:50 THIRTEEN (R) 9:15PM THE RUNDOWN (PG-13) DIGITAL/STADIUM SEATING 12:50, 2:55, 5:00, 7:05, 9:10 FRI/SAT LS 11:15 UNDER THE TUSCAN SUN (PG-13) 11:50, 2:10, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10 FRI/SAT LS 11:25 LOST IN TRANSLATION (R) DIGITAL/STADIUM SEATING 12:55, 3:05, 5:15, 7:25, 9:35 FRI/SAT LS 11:50 UNDERWORLD (R) DIGITAL/STADIUM SEATING 12:30, 5:10, 9:45FRI/SAT LS 11:55 SECONDHAND LIONS (PG) DIGITAL 12:25, 2:35, 4:45, 6:55, 9:05 FRI/SAT LS 11:15 COLD CREEK MANOR (R)12:00, 5:00, 9:40 FRI/SAT LS 12:00 MATCHSTICK MEN (PG-13) 2:40, 7:20

ONCE UPON A TIME IN MEXICO (R) DIGITAL/STADIUM SEATING

buzz

community

OCTOBER 9-15, 2003

“I felt like some kind of deadbeat,” she said. “I pay my taxes. I’ve never asked for government help before and now that I need it, I’m not going to go without it.” In contrast, unlicensed foster care families are eligible to receive $292 for one child each month, according to the Department of Child and Family Services. Many grandparents facing money problems, like the Lemkes, turn to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families for help. Unfortunately, there may not be enough room for them all in the national budget. According to the Children’s Defense Fund, the Bush Administration’s proposal does not add additional money to the TANF block grant. Inflation was not taken into account for the five-year plan. The money these families will receive will go less and less far as costs increase; the block grant is expected to lose 29 percent of its current value over the next five years. In 2000, states spent $2 billion more than the annual block grant by dipping into previous years’ funds. Since existing welfare reform laws expired at the end of last year, President George Bush has placed more demands on families to qualify for the grant. According to White House press releases, the president’s plan requires welfare recipients to work 40 hours per week—either at a job, in school or in other training programs “designed to help them achieve independence.” This a one-third increase from the current 30 hour requirement of most families, and a 50

percent increase from 20 hours for single parents with young children. Spokespersons for President Bush did not return daily phone calls over a period of two weeks. Lynette feels comfortable at the support group headed by Gritten, who has raised her grandson since he was 3 years old. There, they discuss where to find used clothing, how to apply for financial aid, and laugh and cry together over shared problems. “When we raised our kids, we had a whole network of friends with kids,” said Lynette. “Now, our friends’ kids are grown and off with their own families. There isn’t anybody for Bobby to play with, and I worry that he won’t learn to be social with other kids if he’s always around us old people. Parents have to do more than feed, clean and keep them warm. Someday they’ll have to go out there and be a whole person.” Lynette credits Lynda and the support group with getting her started. When she first tried to apply for guardianship of Bobby, lawyers wanted $1,000 just for a consultation, something the family couldn’t afford. Instead, she filed the necessary papers at the County Clerk’s office and applied for guardianship without a lawyer. The court appointed a lawyer to act in Bobby’s best interest. Because of Lynda’s help, the entire process cost only $180. Lynette is grateful for small blessings. She does the best she can; her faith in God comforts her. Twelve years ago, she was rushed to the

hospital when her colon burst. While doctors investigated the problem, they discovered huge tumors on her uterus and informed Lynette that unless the tumors were benign, there was a good chance she would not survive. “I went under the knife for my colon knowing I could die,” she said. “And I got right with that. I know I won’t live to raise Bobby fully, but there will be someone to take care of him.” The tumors were benign and the colon repair went better than doctors expected.

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Now, the doctors have told her that if they operate on the tumor crouched in the nerves of her right hip, there’s a 90 percent chance that she won’t be able to walk out of the hospital. Instead, she chooses to live with the pain until the tumor takes away her ability to walk for good. In the meantime, Lynette does the best she can to raise Bobby, giving him a stable, loving home. “It always comes back to Bobby,” Lynette said. “Whatever I do, it’s for him now.” buzz

Above: Bobby holds his Elmo as he gets ready to take his afternoon nap. Since gaining custody of Bobby, the biggest thing Lynette misses is her independence. "We hardly go out anywhere during the week anymore," she said.

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Left: Lynette Lemke, 56, kisses her 18month-old grandson Bobby Lemke. Lynette and her husband Dave have been raising Bobby since last October. "We had no choice. He needed us, turns out we needed him more than we thought," said Lynette.


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Lynda saved Lynette the worry of applying for guardianship, having done it with her own grandson. She took copies of the papers she had filed years before over to Lynette’s house in order to show her how it was done. Together, they worked their way through the complicated legal wording and three weeks after she filed, Lynette had a court date and eventually gained custody. After gaining custody of Bobby, Lynette and Dave would confront the hassles of raising their grandson, scouring garage sales for baby blankets, clipping coupons to buy diapers and jars of strained peaches. Every day, Lynette searches through the ads in the newspaper for sales coming up. Maybe there’ll be another sale on diapers. Bobby goes through about 150 dia-

OCTOBER 9-15, 2003

pers a month. Last winter he outgrew two coats. They still need a playpen and cannot afford it. As he grows, Bobby will need more. He’ll need books and binders after enrolling in school. Then there are immunizations and dentist appointments, a bicycle and more clothes, shoes and haircuts and more. “I’m not going to worry about that until I get to it,” said Lynette. “We’ve done pretty well so far. The Lord will provide.” Sometimes Lynette stops to worry about Bobby going to school because the kids are sure to ask why his grandma always picks him up instead of his mom. “I worry that he’ll blame us,” she said. “I don’t want him to think we took him away

from his mom because we wanted him so much. I decided to let him find out the truth about his parents for himself when he’s old enough to understand.” This family is not alone in raising their grandchildren. According to the 2000 Census, more than 4 million children in the United States live in a grandparent-headed household. The number increased by more than 1 million children from 1990. In Champaign County, 951 grandparents listed themselves as solely responsible for the needs of their grandchildren with almost 2,000 grandchildren in the county living with their grandparents. Few who have not raised their grandchildren realize what a physical, emotional and mental strain it is, as a senior citizen, to take on the responsibilities of a parent—and society offers little help. Bobby’s mother, Laura McGath, is bipolar and struggles with an addiction to prescription painkillers and other drugs. Right now, she lives in Oxford House, a drug treatment center in Springfield. She calls her parents sporadically, but only when she needs something. The first thing Lynette did was throw Laura out of her house. In an earlier attempt to get clean, Laura began to attend meetings at Prairie Center Health Systems in Champaign. She attended two or three meetings a day, said Lynette, to stay out of the house with her exhusband, Scott McGath. But Laura dropped out of the program. Lynette let her borrow the car one morning to go to a meeting and babysat Bobby all day. Laura didn’t return after her meeting was over and Scott called, looking for his wife. By the time Laura walked through the front door, as dusk was falling, Lynette was angry.

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“Where have you been?” she asked. At a meeting, Laura said. “Open your purse,” she said. Laura refused. “You took my car and left Bobby here. You’ve been out all day and I want to know what’s in your purse.” When Laura finally opened her handbag and turned it upside down on the kitchen table, what Lynette described as “a whole lot of marijuana” fell out. “That’s it,” Lynette said. “I don’t want to see you again until you’ve straightened yourself out. I think you should go.” After establishing guardianship, Lynette applied for the Child Only Grant, which comes from federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families funding. For a single child, Lynette collects $108 a month. She also gets a medical card that will save them money on medicine and covers their insurance co-payment, as well as dental and eye care, which Dave’s work insurance does not cover. Another program available for grandparents raising grandchildren is KidCare, a state program that offers health care coverage to children if they live in families with incomes up to 185 percent of the poverty level. Lynette and Dave do not qualify for that program. In his recent budget proposal, Governor Blagojevich pledged to increase state health insurance programs for low-income families, including a $4 million increase for KidCare. When Lynette went to apply for her Child Only Grant check from the Department of Human Services, an agency representative asked her: “You don’t really need this, do you? It’s only $108.” Lynette felt ashamed, but she signed up to receive the grant anyway.

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Above: Lynette feeds Bobby mashed potatoes for lunch. When asked how she felt about the future Lynette said, "We're worried. We don't ever want him to feel unloved by anyone." Left: Bobby stuffs fried chicken into his mouth during lunch. "The other day he was running around with a fly swatter he was dipping in the toilet and patting in his hair...there's never a calm moment around here," said Lynette.

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26odds & end

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DON’T GIVE UP | OCTOBER 9-15, 2003

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): "I've been practicing radical authenticity lately," my Aries friend Steve told me. "I'm revealing the blunt truth about unmentionable subjects to everyone I know. It's been pretty hellish -- no one likes having the social masks stripped away -- but it's been ultimately rewarding." I thought a minute, then said, "I admire your boldness in naming the currents flowing beneath the surface, but I'm curious as to why you imply they're all negative.To practice radical authenticity, shouldn't you also express the raw truth about what's right, good, and beautiful? Shouldn't you unleash the praise and gratitude that normally go unspoken?" Steve sneered. He thought my version of radical authenticity was wimpy. I hope you don't, Aries. You have an astrological mandate to be honest in both ways.

working behind the scenes, weaving connections that are invisible to us in our normal state of awareness. I predict that you will be awash in synchronicities in the coming week, Leo.You will get concrete proof that everything is far more intertwined that you've ever dared to imagine.

cent of vintage roadsters," says CMG. 2. Shimma. "A shimmer, a shake, a lustrous flake, this pearlized metallic adds a savvy crackle to your communications." 3. Iron Ore-ange: "The influence of copper on orange creates a sophisticated background with primal undertones." 4. Exploring Khaki. "This safari green recalls rain forest moss and buried treasure."

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): If you want to place yourself in alignment with the current cosmic trends, you will seek out more than the usual amount and quality of your favorite physical sensations. My advice is to compose a list of your top five, then write out a proposed plan for getting those needs met and met and met. For instance, if you normally have a massage every once in a while, arrange to have at least two in the coming week, and make sure you enlist the services of the very best masseuse or masseur you know. Use the same approach to sex, food, sleep, aromas, beautiful sights, and any other experience that thrills your body.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): One of my favorite obscure holidays is International Moment of Frustration Scream Day. Observed every October 12, it's meant to release pent-up tension resulting from the gap between what we have and what we think we want. Given the fact that your gap is particularly gaping right now, you Tauruses would especially benefit from throwing yourself into this fierce enjoyment with all your angst unfurled. The holiday's founders, Thomas and Ruth Roy, suggest that everyone should go outside sometime during the day and yell for 30 seconds. I hope the sound of you bellowing Bulls will be heard around the world. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): It looks like you're poised to put the finishing touches on something that will last a very long time -an expression or creation that will be a defining monument to your essential self. If I'm right and you're really ready, let me offer a suggestion. This masterpiece should not only reflect what's excellent and successful about you; it should also acknowledge the role that your failures have played in growing your beauty. CANCER (June 21-July 22): This is one of those rare moments when laziness can be an asset. Fate is conspiring to rejuvenate you, and all you have to do is make sure you don't get in the way. I suggest, therefore, that you follow the advice of the Zen master who said, "Don't just do something, sit there!" I mean it, Cancerian. Empty yourself of ambitions. Burn your to-do list. Tell your monkey mind you're taking a sabbatical from its obsessive leaping and shrieking. Feel absolutely no guilt as you practice the art of making yourself a tabula rasa.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Given how fresh and strong you've been feeling lately, you may not be in the mood to initiate a showdown with The Problem That Refused to Die. Why risk getting demoralized by that boring old energy drain when you're so peppy? I'll tell you why: You now have a new and unprecedented advantage over The Problem That Refused To Die. You may not be able to kill it off completely, but then again you might. And you will at least be able to dramatically limit its power to mess with you.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): "There is only one thing in the world worse than being talked about," wrote Libran Oscar Wilde, "and that is not being talked about." You won't have to worry about the latter problem in the next two weeks. The number of discussions about your character and behavior will probably exceed that of any other 14-day period in the past five years. Fortunately, the astrological indicators suggest that a relatively high percentage of the gossip flying around will be benevolent and even flattering. It will be a good time, therefore, for a marketing campaign or networking blitz.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): "No work is more worthwhile than to be a sign of divine joy and a fountain of divine love." So says mystic and scholar Andrew Harvey, and I fervently agree. Not everyone is cut out for such an exacting career, of course. The pay isn't great, the hours are long, and the heroes who make it their main gig rarely get the appreciation they deserve. It's best to try it out for a while on the side without quitting your day job. Having provided those caveats, Aquarius, I'm pleased to inform you that this is the best time in years for you to work hard at being a sign of divine joy and a fountain of divine love.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You are potentially a genius. Maybe not in the same way that Einstein and Beethoven were, but still: You possess some capacity or set of skills that is exquisitely unique.You are a work of art unlike any other that has ever lived. Furthermore, the precise instructions you need to ripen into that glorious state have always been with you, even from before you were born. In the words of psychologist James Hillman, you have a soul's code.You might also call it the master plan of your heart's deepest desire; the special mission that the Divine Wow sent you here to carry out; the blueprint that contains the secret of how to be perfectly, gracefully, unpredictably yourself. Now here's the really good news, Scorpio: You're at a turning point when you have extraordinary power to tune in to and activate untapped areas of your soul's code.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Your flavor of the week will be ginger peach or vanilla clove or some other blend of piquant spiciness and smooth sweetness. The kitchen accessory that best symbolizes your special skills will be a thick sponge that has an abrasive surface on one side for scrubbing dirty pots. The recurring dream you're most likely to dream for the last time, triumphing forever over the past trauma that originally spawned it, is the nightmare in which you feel like a cornered animal. Your haiku of power will be "melodious struggle where the soul turns crap into fertilizer."

✍ HOMEWORK:

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Every year the Color Marketing Group (CMG) at www.colormarketing.org issues a report that identifies the new colors coming into fashion, as well as their symbolic meaning. From their long list, I have selected the specific hues you should surround yourself with if you'd like to be in harmony with cosmic forces during the rest of 2003. 1. Lemon Meringue. "Silver flirts with gold in this zesty confection reminis-

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): According to author Colin Wilson, synchronicities are meaningful coincidences that are created by the unconscious mind to jar the conscious mind into a keener state of perception. They imbue us with a powerful sense that there are hidden meanings beneath the surface of everyday life; they lead us to suspect that a huge, benevolent intelligence is always

What image best symbolizes the love you want in your life all the time? Put that image in a prominent place in your home. www.freewillastrology.com

Rob Brezsny's Free Will ☎ Astrology beautyandtruth @ f r e e w i l l a s t r o l o g y. c o m 415.459.7209(v)• 415.457.3769 http://www.freewillastrology. com P.O. Box 798 San Anselmo, CA 94979

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Grandparents raising grandchildren in Illinois BY BETH ROGERS | STAFF WRITER

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lowly, so she would not disturb her sleeping husband, Lynette rolled over, tugging the quilt up to her chin. Bobby, her mind whispered. What am I going to do? How am I going to come up with the money for his next winter coat? I have to remember to buy more diapers. In the cradle he was fast outgrowing at the foot of their bed, Bobby’s breathing was slow and even. The silence closed in around Lynette, and she looked at her husband, David, in the moonlight. Thank God, she thought. Thank God I don’t have to do this alone. Lying awake at night, worrying about money for a bigger baby bed, food and clothes for Bobby has come more and more easily to Lynette Lemke, 56. She is Bobby’s grandmother and she and her husband Dave, 55, are raising the baby, who was only 5 months old when he came to live with them in their double-wide on Independence Street in Urbana. It might not have happened at all. When Lynette realized she was going to have to take Bobby into her home, she was glad to do it. “The thought of what would have happened to him if I hadn’t taken him in scares me,” she

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said. “His father said things like, ‘Well, I guess aside for the program next year in Governor he’ll have to go into foster care.’” Rod Blagojevich’s budget proposal, presented But Lynette had no idea where to start. to the Illinois General Assembly on April 9, it Deciding to apply for legal guardianship of the must serve the needs of over 103,000 grandparbaby, she went to the Urbana Free Library to ents solely responsible for their grandchildren’s look for information. The best the library could needs across Illinois. offer were law books from the 1950s, which “The Department on Aging programs held no answers for her. Scanning the shelves weren’t really designed for this. We have to and desktops for something that might help, a adjust to a different set of legal issues like pamphlet for the Illinois custody and health care for Department on Aging caught grandparents raising grandher eye. children,” said Barb Lynette called the hotline Schwartz, coordinator of number on the back of the the Grandparents Raising pamphlet and got in touch Grandchildren program. with Barb Schwartz, coordi“The most important thing nator of the Grandparents is that grandparents know Lynette Lemke Raising Grandchildren we’re here. We may help Program for the Illinois them apply for the Child Department on Aging. Through the agency, Only Grant and never hear from them Lynette found out that one of more than 80 supagain, but they know we’re here.” port groups for grandparents raising grandchilThe money from the new state budget will dren throughout the state was located in cover maintenance of the current program, but Champaign. no new services, Schwartz said. The money will The Illinois Department on Aging began the allow them to set up conferences around the Grandparents Raising Grandchildren program state to discuss grandparents’ issues, to fund in 1996. Although $139,600 in grants was set support groups, regional quarterly conferences

and an emergency fund. “Sometimes grandparents will call to tell us that their electricity is about to get turned off,” said Schwartz. Most grandparents raising grandchildren have an average family income of $18,000 to $25,000, according to the Illinois Department on Aging. Grandparent caregivers are also 60 percent more likely to live in poverty than grandparents not caring for their grandchildren. Every third Wednesday of the month, Lynette and Dave take Bobby to the Senior Citizens Center to meet with a handful of other grandparents in the same boat. The children play together in the next room while their grandparents sit around worn card tables, drinking coffee and talking about their problems. These grandparents have been hurt, resigned to their broken families and irresponsible children. Some have children in jail, in rehabilitation centers, or those who picked up and left, abandoning their children to fate. “Our kids are adult children who don’t do what they’re supposed to do,” said Lynda Gritten, support group leader. “They guilt trip you and say ‘Oh, it’s not my fault,’ and ask you to constantly pick up the pieces.”

Who has been the biggest musical influence in your life? Wes Montgomery because I listen to him a lot, but Kenny Burrell, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis and Grant Green have also been major influences. My biggest influence was probably my musical mentor, Charles Morris. Morris was a piano player who taught me how to play chords and read music. We nicknamed him “The High Priest.”

What is the best piece of advice you can give to aspiring musicians? You’ve got to practice and get a good teacher if you can find one. They will eliminate many technical problems. Practice consistently.

[

Our kids are adult children who don’t do what they’re supposed to do.

[

Q & A

www.tommygs.com

Without Drugs.....

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1 Took off at full speed 9 Kind of quartz 14 Like Sherlock

Holmes’s nose

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America” star 17 Anne ___, Helen Keller’s teacher 18 Refuse to compromise 19 Vigor 20 Campbell’s soup selection 21 N.H.L. star Lindros 22 Transplant 24 Holder of recyclables 25 Springfield, e.g. 27 Walkie-talkie answer 28 Beekeeper in a highly rated 1997 film 29 “The Five Red Herrings” author 31 Putdown for a computer whiz 33 “Norma Rae” director 35 One that’s punched out 36 Coaches 40 1984 Cyndi Lauper hit

44 Bath additions 45 Simulated 47 Dutch-speaking

Caribbean isle 48 “It could not slake mine ___, nor ease my heart”: Shak. 49 Painter of haystacks and poplars 51 Fair pace 52 Millennial Church member 55 ___ acid (baking powder ingredient) 57 Performer who’s charged 58 Once-in-a-lifetime 59 Comic strip character surnamed Smith 60 Folded comestible 61 Three-year-olds compete here 62 Blood group? DOWN 1 Some thin slices 2 Tanks 3 Invalidate 4 Cabinet workers? 5 Ken of “thirty-something”

6 Bank deposi-

tor? 7 Momentarily 8 One with the backing of the U.S. Treasury? 9 Paintings on hinged panels 10 “I must’ve forgot …!” 11 Previous 12 Complaisant 13 More flavorful 16 Blitzed 23 Price-setting grp. 26 Port ___ (Isle of Man resort) 28 One working on a plot 30 Robed benchsitter’s place 32 Derisive comeback 34 Tears for Fears, e.g. 36 Cranes 37 Pet carrier feature 38 Resolve 39 Summoned

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Puzzle by Patrick Berry

downloads

46 “Heavens to Betsy!”

If you could meet any two people, living or dead, who would they be? Jesus Christ and Wes Montgomery. Wes Montgomery is a guitar player from Indianapolis. His style of playing has made a difference in the way the guitar is played.

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What is the most important life lesson you’ve learned so far? Do unto others that you would have them do unto you.

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Where do you see yourself in five years? Probably doing some recording and expanding on where I play. I don’t want to travel very much though.

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How much did you practice the guitar to get to where you are today musically? A lot. Initially, five to seven hours a day.

Stuck up? Powder containers Consequently Baby shower?

or the better part of 30 years, Lemont Parsons has been entertaining the Champaign-Urbana community with his jazz guitar. Parsons, a Danville native, lives in Urbana with his wife, Edna. Along with other local jazz musicians, Parsons has played such venues as the Monday Night Jam Session at Two Main Lounge. Now, the 63-year-old plays at the Senator’s Inn, 1001 N. Dunlap Ave., from 8 to 10 p.m. Thursdays.

If you could play any other instrument besides the guitar, which instrument would it be and why? The piano because it is an instrument that covers everything, the bass and treble clefs. It is probably the mother of all instruments because of its capabilities. Describe your favorite music-related moment. The moment when the band is really gelling and the feeling is good. It gets your adrenaline up. You don’t get that feeling all the time. Maybe only one time a year; it’s something that’s elusive but you try.

When you were 20 years old, did you imagine yourself to be where you are in life now? No, when I was 20 I was just trying to survive, trying to work to make a living. It was the early ‘60s and things were different back then. There was not a lot of opportunity for young black males.

What is the greatest musical performance you have ever seen? Ravi Shanker and Marcus Roberts. Ravi Shanker plays the sitar and Marcus Roberts plays the piano. They are virtuosos. Both shows were seen at the Krannert Center.

Do you have any regrets? Yes, but I don’t dwell on them. One of the main regrets is not getting a college education.

What are your thoughts on talent? Talent is not “you’ve got it or you don’t.” Practicing makes you have it.

What is the best piece of advice you have ever gotten? My grandparents used to say to try to make a difference in a positive way and to make something of yourself. When you play your music, what feelings and messages do you hope to evoke in your listeners? I want people to leave feeling good. I want them to have a good listening experience. Any other comments on music that you would like to convey to readers? People need to get in the habit of supporting live music. Especially jazz, because jazz is a dying art form and it’s America’s music. It’s the most sophisticated form of American music (out of blues, country, etc). I don’t want to take away from the other kinds of music, but that’s the reality. Jazz is on the level of European classical music. I would also like to applaud the Krannert Center in how they are trying to bring jazz to the musical forefront and make people understand that it is a music that needs to be listened to. What is your dream? To play as well as I can.


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WHO NEEDS SHOUT OUTS WHEN WE HAVE DIRTY TALKS | OCTOBER 9-15, 2003 buzz

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COMMUNIT Y

Q & A with local jazz man ARTS

Discovering the Mediterranean MUSIC

Outkast casts off tradition

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CALENDAR

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FILM & TV

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ODDS & END

See all there is to do in C-U Get lost in the Translation Tigers and Rush Limbaugh, oh my

Volume 1, Number 31 COVER DESIGN | Meaghan Dee

BUZZ STAFF Editor-in-chief Tom Rybarczyk Art Director Meaghan Dee Copy Chief Erin Green Arts Katie Richardson Music Brian Mertz Entertainment Jason Cantone Calendar Marissa Monson Assistant Music Editor Jacob Dittmer Calendar Coordinators Lauren Smith, Cassie Conner, Erin Scottberg Photography Christine Litas, Adam Young Copy Editors Elizabeth Zeman Designers Adam Obendorf, Carol Mudra, Jason Cantone Production Manager Theon Smith Editorial Adviser Elliot Kolkovich Sales Manager Lindsey Benton Marketing/Distribution Melissa Schleicher, Willis Welch Publisher Mary Cory All editorial questions or letters to the editor should be sent to buzz@readbuzz.com or 244-9898 or buzz, 1001 S. Wright St., Champaign, Ill., 61820. Buzz magazine is a student-run publication of Illini Media Company and does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. Copyright Illini Media Company 2003

editor’snote

F

or the past 95 years, Cubs fans have waited to hear those cherished words “Cubs win, Cubs win the World Series.” And, it looks like that dream may soon come true. The Cubs have always been something special. They represent the lovable losers, the underdog that America has always loved. Maybe that’s why America has embraced these Cubbies. Suddenly fans all over the country have shown their Cub pride, a pride based on the idea of the Cubs. They love the idea of David and Goliath. They love the idea of the loser winning it all. That’s why if the Yankees go to the series, it will seem like the entire country versus New York City. Everybody hates the Yankees and loves the Cubs. America has always loved the underdogs, ever since its inception—when the United States was only colonies looking to free themselves from an overbearing empire. The Cubs are that group of colonies and the overbearing empire is the World Series. Yet, most of these fans do not claim to be lifelong Cubs’ fans. These fans embrace the Cubs because their team is not in the playoffs. Now there are true Cubs fans from sea to shining sea and beyond. The Cubs have fans in Australia, Japan and other distant lands. Some have even traveled to Chicago to see their lovable losers, the team they can never give up on. And the team they never will give up on. The fans that bother thousands of Cubs fans are the ones that claim they have been Cubs fans their whole life and have since begun to party every time the Cubs play. They ask when the Cubs will be playing and then plan parties around their “beloved” Cubs. After the game starts, they get smashed and do not even seem to care what happens to their team. They ask who every player is. They have no idea what a full count is. They do not even know that Sammy Sosa broke the old record set for home runs years ago. “Who is Ron Santo?” they say. All these individuals care about is the party. Why do they have to ruin other Cubs’ fans joy by pretending? If a fan of another team supports the Cubs because of the deep mythological meaning a Cubs victory symbolizes, great. If a true Cubs fan from across the world supports the Cubs, great. But do not be that person who sits at the bar, screaming for the Cubs and Sammy Sosa (the only Cubs player you know). If you want to party and do no work, do not use the Cubs as an excuse. It offends those of us who have waited most of our lives for our team to win it all. GO CUBBIES! –TR

letterstotheeditor

I

t was refreshing to read an article on Burch Village. There are still many questions that linger after reading it. Who else benefits from the rebuilding, which contractors? What are the typical renting options after being forced to leave? The broken down older homes that have been rampantly selling as “investment properties,” or the large apartment complexes like Prairie Greens, Sunny Crest II, which builders receive a tax credit on for 10 years. These two apartment complexes each have surpassed crime rates of public housing—look at the data via the Freedom of Information Act from the local police. The park districts do not provide landscaped green space or trained personnel or activities expressly for the large numbers of working families in these places. The schools are bursting without the builders’ tax dollars to match the increase in student population. Places like Burch Village look unappealing. Why? Because very low-cost basic maintenance has not been done? Has the park district refused to lead volunteers in landscaping projects? Have companies like Lowes refused donation requests for materials for new screens, gutters or paint for front doors? Or has no member of management supported those efforts? The University Orchard Downs where students with families live is virtually the same tiny style of construction, built about the same time with only two laundry stations and has no plans to be torn down. The grounds are picturesque and spare acreage is used for gardens. Is it the difference of education levels, wholesome recreation options or basic caretaking? Or is it that no contractors are lobbying for funds to redo the facilities? -Andrea Antulov Urbana

I

applaud Buzz for taking the time last issue to recognize the movie mirth and mayhem produced by Jason Butler, Mark Peaslee and their colleagues. With Thoraxx II and last year’s Teeth in the Bottle, the man known to many as “JB” has certainly come a long way, baby. However, the accompanying editorial applauding their efforts is mildly degrading and rather ill-informed about film arts and Champaign-Urbana. While the general train of thought encouraging our twin cities to support their artists a lot more then they do is appreciated, please look around you a bit closer for proof that moviemaking does exist, here and now. We have other neighbors taking film activity seriously that deserve our community’s support. These include people like documentary filmmaker Jay Rosenstein, whose new film The Amasong Chorus makes its local

debut on Oct. 8 at Beckman Auditorium, and Mike Trippiedi, who has been making lowbudget black comedies on his own dime for 20 years, such as Dogs in Quicksand and Bucky McSnead. The university’s film club, Illini Film & Video, which was founded by engineering students Andrew McAllister and Mike Stone almost four years ago, has collectively produced dozens of films, with Chris Folkens’ production Triad setting the bar of public recognition with three capacity-crowd screenings at the Armory in May. Your most glaring omission, of course, is the family drama Crab Orchard, a feature-length production produced by local filmmaker Robin Peters through his company Dreamscape Cinema. This film is indeed a professional independent film made with professional talent from Los Angeles, professional crew and equipment from Chicago, and most importantly for pride (if not sales potential), local people, area locations and—get this— central Illinois money. Not that much money, compared to beefy Hollywood productions, but enough to make it happen. Sure, Thoraxx II might only accomplish so much with a “measly $1,000.” But, you know what? At least the Brainsmart brethren hunkered down and did what most people in Champaign-Urbana HAVEN’T done—they made a movie. By the same token, Peters might only be able to accomplish so much with his projected $600,000 budget for Crab Orchard, but you know what? He’s doing what most of us WISH we could do—produce a movie with name talent (Ed Asner, Judge Reinhold) that has a chance of being completed, distributed and seen by people the world over, not just in C-U. So, it leads back to the question—can Champaign-Urbana support its filmmaking artists, let alone the artists of all stripes who learn, teach and attempt to ply their trade here? Does it have to be a foregone conclusion—or rather, a cynical myth spoken by many without much thought behind it—that creative people have to leave this place sooner or later in order for them to be creative AND financially sound? It’s your call as well as mine. -Jason Pankoke Champaign

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buzz OCTOBER 9-15, 2003 | DON’T PLAY WITH TIGERS

AND ANOTHER THING...

Mama told you not to play with tigers, you got what you deserve T

here are some stupid people out there. I’m not talking about the ones who make that Darwin List every year. If you leave your wallet at the scene of a burglary or light a cigarette in a fireworks store, then you know whom I am talking about. I’m talking about the special stupid. I’m talking about doing something so blatantly stupid that folks appear surprised when it doesn’t work out. The first example of this is easy. Siegfried and Roy. Say what you will about two flamboyantly dressed men in their 60s wearing tights on a daily basis. It’s strange maybe, but it happens. It’s not necessarily stupid on it’s face. It becomes stupid, however, when you throw some large wild animals into the mix. Last Friday, Roy was mauled by a tiger during their act in Las Vegas. He ended up with a severe wound to the neck and almost died. He can now move his fingers and toes, so I suppose when he can make a full sweeping motion with his hand he’ll be cleared to return to the stage as that appears to be the only skill he has. The tiger was named “Montecore.” I don’t know what the name means really, but I do know this. You name a dog, or a cat, or maybe even a gerbil. You don’t name anything that could conceivably drag you around by the neck like a pork chop. Hundreds turned out to hold a candlelight vigil for him outside the hospital. I knew a guy in high school who took a lot of speed, drank a lot of beer and drove around all the time. Eventually, he pulled in front of a train and was killed. We were upset and sad, but there was no candlelight vigil. He was doing something dangerous and completely ignorant on a fairly regular basis and if I were to be completely honest about it, he probably deserved what he got. No one acted surprised in the least bit. Out in Vegas though, you got people crying and hugging and saying: “I can’t believe this happened to Roy.” Well, let’s see, he’s screwing with 600 pound tigers that are all drugged up in front of 1,000 intoxicated people every night. Geez, man, I don’t know what happened there either. I can’t believe the tiger didn’t bite his ass a long time ago. I’m not taking the tiger’s side exactly, but that’s what they do, right? They attack other animals to get meat. I haven’t really taken any survival courses or anything, yet I have a pret-

ty good idea that you shouldn’t go around yanking tigers all over a stage. In fact, if you ever see one you should run like hell. The second example is just as stupid, but maybe not as obvious. Rush Limbaugh resigned from his commentator gig at ESPN after some flack over a statement he made, that the media wanted Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb to succeed because he was black. Rush was amazed at the controversy. He claimed the media treated him different because of his status. That might be true at a Klan rally or a Denny’s, but I think you have to figure it’d be noticed on ESPN. Forget that he’s just plain wrong. I mean, McNabb’s a damned good quarterback. Why the hell was he offering his opinion anyway? Because some idiots hired him to do just that. ESPN said they were shocked and concerned about his comments before he resigned. Really, why? You hired a guy who’s apparent goal in life is to say things to piss people off, to speak about something he’s shockingly unqualified to talk about on national TV. Yeah, something like that should have worked out fine. Don’t let the fact that you’re owned by Disney affect your decision. They screw up, too. I mean, you still can’t get Song of the South on video. Rush was on his radio show Friday whining about his right to free speech being violated and crying that you can’t say what you want anymore in this country. See, Rush, that’s not exactly right. You said what you wanted and you had the right to say that. Your problem is that other folks also have the right to free speech and can change the channel if your tired ass shows up on the screen. ESPN doesn’t like such things and exercised their rights to free speech by canning your ass. The system works just fine from what I can tell. Screw with a tiger, hire an idiot. Most people would never do the former and probably will do the later at one time or another. Neither of them usually works out for very long. Do what you have to, go to the hospital or fire the idiot, but don’t pretend you’re surprised. Everyone else saw it coming.

Michael Coulter is a videographer at Parkland College and a bartender. He writes a weekly email column, “This Sporting Life” and has hosted several local comedy shows. He can be reached at coulter@readbuzz.com.

DirtyTalk

you're awesome. Wanna go out some time? -- NDJ Roses are red, violets are blue. Compared to the shoutouts, Sweet Talk is poo. :-(

KMY1002- You have no idea what I want to do with those pig tails. What do I have to do to get that number? - Jon Katie-- your form and composition render you a masterpiece of ass! --Carly Danye- Drop the dwarf and come get yourself an older and much taller man. -Your pool partner Your Miss U of I girlie misses her Miss Polish U of I girlie. Hope your still jumping up and down with that #1 finger at Kams! -your old iD-er! Vitai - Booty Call! Angelique, I'll love you forever and ever, and I'm sorrier than I have ever been. Girls of 408: Why are we always the hottest ladies everywhere we go? Beauty is a curse sometimes. Skaterboy--show me your bling bling and I'll show you mine! You have a small penis- You know who you are. XPM -- I'm probably not your type, but I think

Hanlon- I can’t wait to get my hands on you. Betsy- You’re hot. Chad- I’ll show you some decoration ;-) You fail life. Lauren- Have you gotten a parking violation recently? because you’ve got fine written all over you. Adam- If you put an S in front of your name, it’s like Sadam, but with an emphasis on SA, which is cooler. Let me put the SA to your dam(n). Carol- Your name reversed is Lorac, which sounds like Low Rack, but yours is hot and perky- ironic. Adam- Can I jiggle your apples? SWEET “DIRTY” TALKS ARE FREE. To submit your message go to www.readbuzz.com and click on the Sweet Talk link. Please make your message personal, fun, flirty and entertaining. Leave out last names and phone numbers because we (and probably you!) could get in big fat trouble for printing them. We reserve the right to edit your messages. Sorry, no announcements about events or organizations. (Enter those at cucalendar.com)

WHITE MAN


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FIND YOUR PASSION | OCTOBER 9-15, 2003

buzz

z buz Oct. 9-15, 2003

Arts | Entertainment | Community

FREE!

COMMUNIT Y

Grandparents raising grandchildren (page 3) ARTS

Race and art in C-U (page 6)

MUSIC

Top five 7th inning stretch performances (page 13) CALENDAR

Gloria Steinem plus special guests from advertising & academia northwestern university, thorne auditorium, chicago saturday, october 18th 2003, 9am-5pm admission & lunch: $35 888 986 8060 students: $15 special guests include Susan Bordo, Amy Richards, and Jennifer Scanlon Sponsored by the ADVERTISING EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION Symposium Chair: Linda Scott, PhD, University of Illinois.

Roots of Orchis, The Blackouts, Graham Coulton (page 14)

FILM & TV

Scrubs gets the last laugh (page 23)

death cab for cutie’s transatlantic journey to champaign


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