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SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

There’s a great story about jazz in Champaign-Urbana. It holds chapters from the past. Sounds from the present. And ideas yet to be lived. Step into the groove of life in C-U.

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z buz Sept. 25-Oct. 1, 2003 Arts | Entertainment | Community

Featuring Cecil Bridgewater September 22-27 December 1-6 March 1-7 April 29-May 2 Arts for Kids Jazz talk and sounds for grades 1 to 4 Saturday, September 27, 1pm Krannert Center Free; tickets required

Jazz Threads Underwriter

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Cecil Bridgewater and guests in Concert at Krannert Center Carl Allen, drums Ron Bridgewater, saxophone Kenny Davis, bass Mulgrew Miller, piano Saturday, September 27, 7:30pm Krannert Center $17 to $23

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Other Cecil Bridgewater Concerts at Krannert Center Saturday, December 6, 7:30pm With Dee Dee Bridgewater, vocals U of I Concert Jazz Band Saturday, March 6, 10am Java and Jazz, a casual morning concert Coffee and bagels on sale at 9am Sunday, March 7, 7:30pm With Clark Terry, trumpet

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Afterglow with Jeff Helgesen and Rachael Lee Casual night music at Krannert Center’s Interlude bar Saturday, September 27, about 9:30pm Krannert Center Free

Mates of State: touring warriors (page 10)

Jazz Vespers The House of Cool meets the House of Prayer Sunday, October 12, 5:30pm Patron Sponsors University Place Christian Church Margaret and Larry Neal 403 S. Wright St., Champaign Free Patron Co-sponsors

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Working the beat with a city cop

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Jazz Threads is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts; and by the Heartland Arts Fund, a program of Arts Midwest funded by the National Endowment for the Arts with additional contributions from General Mills Foundation, Land O’Lakes Foundation, Sprint Corporation, and the Illinois Arts Council.

For information on all events 217/333-6280 800/KCPATIX KrannertCenter.com

CALENDAR

Digital Underground do what they like (page 14)

FILM & TV

Underworld reaches new lows (page 21)


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WHAT IF IT’S SILK, WHAT IF IT’S A THONG | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1 2003 buzz

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COMMUNIT Y

Q & A with Urbana High teacher

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ARTS

13

MUSIC

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Shakespeare meets the 1900s Triple Whip hits a slap shot CALENDAR

Mystikal shakes his ass, watch yourself FILM & TV

Cold Creek Manor ODDS & END

Real life heroes

Volume 1, Number 29 COVER DESIGN | Andy Getz

editor’snote

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hen will America finally have a president worthy of leading this great country? I, for one, am tired of George Bush’s empty-headed policies that are taking the United States and the world down a dangerous road. Similarly, like deja vu, I’m sick of Bill Clinton all over, as he parades the nation in search of personal adulation, pointing out the current crop of “star” Democrats (all two of them). Am I being too picky, or do Americans deserve much better? Clinton and Bush, though different in style, are still predictable politicians in nice suits, with words of little substance or credibility. One man is incredibly slick-talking and the other couldn’t talk his way out of a parking ticket if it weren’t for his heritage, but you get my point: I want a president who inspires with his actions more than with his words, someone who levels with the American people, someone who doesn’t lie, someone who doesn’t have scandal tainting his tenure, and, most importantly, someone willing to lead outside the scripted bounds Washington D.C. has artificially placed. Going back to Richard Nixon, every single president has had a scandal rock his administration, save Jimmy Carter, whose presidency was, from what I’ve read, one big flaw in itself. When will Americans get a leader they can be proud of, and why does big money put up these flawed, dishonest men? Sal Nudo Champaign

BUZZ STAFF

Editor-in-chief Tom Rybarczyk Art Director Meaghan Dee Copy Chief Erin Green Arts Katie Richardson Music Brian Mertz Entertainment Jason Cantone Calendar Marissa Monson Assistant Music Editor Jacob Dittmer Calendar Coordinators Lauren Smith, Cassie Conner, Erin Scottberg Illustrations David Chen Photography Adam Young, Katy Mull, Suzanne Sitrick Copy Editors Jessica Jacko, Elizabeth Zeman Designers Adam Obendorf, Carol Mudra Jason Cantone Production Manager Theon Smith Editorial Adviser Elliot Kolkovich Sales Manager Lindsey Benton Marketing/Distribution Melissa Schleicher, Willis Welch Publisher Mary Cory All editorial questions or letters to the editor should be sent to buzz@readbuzz.com or 2449898 or buzz, 1001 S. Wright St., Champaign, Ill., 61820. Buzz magazine is a student-run publication of Illini Media Company and does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University

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SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 | YOU KNOW YOU WANT TO TALK DIRTY TO ME

AND ANOTHER THING...

Who needs Superman? We have real-life heroes BY MICHAEL COULTER | CONTRIBUTING WRITER

I

got a nice present the other day, a pair of UnderDog boxer shorts. I like them quite a bit and everything, but the gift giver had no idea the can of worms the shorts opened up in my mind. See, when I was a child, I had a bit of an UnderDog problem. I was an only child and grew up in the country, so I pretended a lot. I was hoping the underwear didn’t send me on some sort of weird flashback. I became enraptured around age 4 with the cartoon UnderDog and began to dress like him and fight crime around our house. Whether it be a cat who was jaywalking, a dog who wouldn’t obey orders or a pretend monster who was trying to take over my room, I would defeat them all. When I say I used to dress like him, it wasn’t exactly like him. I had a “U” on my shirt just like him, but mine was put on with Magic Marker. Instead of a cape, I had the arms of a bathrobe tied around my neck. Rather than cool red crime-fighting boots, I had a pair of my mom’s go go boots, but besides all of those things, I was pretty much just like him—except I wasn’t a dog. Let’s face it though, I wasn’t really a superhero, but I think I’ve found someone who is. He’s called Angle Grinder Man and he resides in Britain. Sure, his name isn’t catchy like The Green Lantern or Daredevil. He doesn’t have spidery-sense or the ability to breathe under water, but who needs those things anyway. He cuts through the wheel clamps, or boots, placed on the cars of parking violators. I know, it sounds like an urban legend, but the story was on Reuters News Service last week. He wears a blue spandex jumpsuit, gold gloves, a cape, and most importantly, goggles. Safety first and make it last. Try to follow the progression: the boot is the most effective tool to disable a car, the angle grinder is the best tool to use for getting a car clamp off and the best tool to run the angle grinder is, of course, Angle Grinder Man. There’s no Bat Signal or anything. You just have to call the Angle Grinder Man hotline and he will come out and unboot your vehicle. He insists this is a form of protest against a corrupt government, but whatever, I just like to think of him as someone “who helps people.” I mean, forget the big stuff like Superman changing the rotation of the earth to bring Lois

[

Lane back to life or Spiderman fighting Sandman to save Gwen. Those are just the yearnings of the readers of the comics who’ve never kissed a girl. I need a real hero. For a guy like me, the hero just needs to help with the little stuff like parking. Overall, I’d be a much happier man. Scotland Yard doesn’t find it so amusing and they’re already looking for his ass. Really, it shouldn’t be that hard to catch him. Just call the hotline and wait. Then all you have to do is arrest the first guy in blue spandex and a cape who’s carrying a big-assed angle grinder. Wow, my first case and I’ve already almost solved it. It’ll be too bad when they catch him because he’s probably more respected than Tony Blair. He’s real and he gets something done, even if it is sort of illegal. That’s the problem with Superheroes—it’s mostly fantasy. With the coming of Angle Grinder Man, that could all change. We should be inspired and take his cue. Someone could be a superhero who runs people off the road who are talking on cell phones. This person’s name would be The Cell Phone Eliminator. Someone could turn down stereos that are too loud at stop signs—The Too Much Bass Rectifier. Someone could find dates for the romantically challenged. They could call him The Guy Who Helps My Friend Eddie. I’m just saying, there’s lots of ways to help. One other way is to maybe do some volunteer stuff around the community or just be pleasant to people. You may not get a catchy nickname, but people might look at you differently. You may not be a superhero, but you’ll at least be a hero. That’s probably better anyway. So few people look good wearing capes. buzz

I became enraptured around age 4 with the cartoon UnderDog and began to dress like him and fight crime around our house.

[

Michael Coulter is a videographer at Parkland College and a bartender at Two Main. He writes a weekly e-mail column, “This Sporting Life” and has hosted several local comedy shows. He can be reached at coulter@readbuzz.com.

Submit Dirty Talks! www.readbuzz.com

DirtyTalk

Amy - It’s not the same around here without you. And where can I sleep when my bed’s broken? -A, B, C, D

Kate - I always thought the number 13 was unlucky. I take that back, 13 is now my favorite number. Keep smiling, it's a beautiful thing. -Keir Kasey - No matter how much showering you do with us, there is just some dirty that wont come off Carol - remember how hawt you looked when all you wore was rotis sans and the dante question mark? this time, forgot the indesign and come raw and unformatted -kaiser Carly - You sure can work it, girl. Can't wait to see you climb over that easel tuesday. Til then...

Lauren - You, me, some baskin robbins chocolate chip cookie dough ice cream and coffee poured all over each other as we lick it off... Betsy - I’m on to you! I caught you taking photographs of my breasts (however small) and ass (I don’t know if the whole thing could fit in the window) -Deeznuts Jamie - vroom vroom Stensland - You leave the country and when you return you’re too good for me. You, me and Mary and Supriya (whose name I can never spell) need to get together for some Sex in Urbana. -Wachova

To my favorite RA - blindfolds were hot, but next time let's try handcuffs! -your enginerd lover

Bradley - Want ya badly.

Tom - Want to check out my spreads?

Chad - Your handwriting makes me horney.

Mertz - “Lets get it on”

Aneel - I’d kneel for you.

Cantonio Banderez - Wanna be my zorro?

Rob - Want some slob on your knob?

Jacob - You still haven’t seen my Dits

Christian - I’d like to do some things to you that most organized religions wouldn’t approve of.

Tabitha - How’d you like the big apple and do you want to see mine? Dugan - text me. -Anne Lauren - The last time we hung out it was pouring down rain and you were drenched-- is there any other way I can get you that wet again? Kathleen - You’re hot. Tami - Is there any way I can get in those jeans? Jen - It was fun spending time with ya, I’m glad I’m getting to know you better and I know one way to get to really know you. ;-)

LIVE JAZZ at

Burton - When I’m around you it’s hard to keep my skirt on. Richardson - You’re too cool for school--well, or at least you’re too hot for it. -MAD Doctor SWEET “DIRTY” TALKS ARE FREE. To submit your message go to www.readbuzz.com and click on the Sweet Talk link. Please make your message personal, fun, flirty and entertaining. Leave out last names and phone numbers because we (and probably you!) could get in big fat trouble for printing them. We reserve the right to edit your messages. Sorry, no announcements about events or organizations. (Enter those at cucalendar.com)

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ason Butler and Mark Peaslee of B r a i n s m a r t Productions, the film company featured in this week’s Film & TV section, exhibit what two aspiring filmmakers can do with $1,000. Unfortunately, they show you cannot do that much. I am not saying they possess no talent. Rather, these two local horror moviemakers exhibit a serious problem affecting our community and other communities across the country—a lack of funding for the arts. Since the economic downturn a few years back, local and state governments have slashed arts spending, in favor of more important social services like education, health care and police services. But have they slashed it too much? Arts funding for film companies like Brainsmart and theater groups directly affect a community’s economy. The more active the arts community, the more money the community makes in the form of taxes from the restaurants, bars and other shops that surround these performance areas. More importantly, art-rich communities have less crime, more civicminded citizens and just an overall better place to live. Yes, it seems to difficult to believe that a company like Brainsmart Productions can bring this to Champaign-Urbana if given more tax dollars, especially when they say the $1,000 they did have, they spent on videotape and beer. But imagine how much a typical movie

production company spends on beer and videotape (and illegal substances)—probably much more than a measly $1,000. Still, why should someone want to support a production like Thoraxx II? First, people should be proud of work produced in their community. ChampaignUrbana supports the Illini football and basketball teams every year, showing their hometown pride; this pride may be one reason why both the football and basketball program have consistently good years. Imagine how much better Thoraxx II could have been if they were given the same support from the community. If more people encourage endeavors like Brainsmart Productions, then the world will have better filmmakers, more courageous filmmakers, filmmakers who make a difference. And if they do not make a difference, they will make people laugh, and sometimes, we all need to step back and laugh. Maybe Brainsmart Productions will never have a profound effect on the world, but other budding filmmakers may be stuck in the rough landscape of Champaign-Urbana, scared to come out and show their talents to the world because there is no chance for a living. Who knows, the next Quentin Tarantino or Martin Scorsese may come out of ChampaignUrbana. We may never know if the community does not come out and support artistic endeavors like this.

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WHY DO I ALWAYS GET INSPIRED AT 4 A.M.? | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

ARIES (March 21-April 19): This is a perfect astrological moment for you to become more receptive, Aries. That doesn't mean you should become a lazy do-nothing bereft of goals, waiting around passively for whatever happens to come along. The receptivity I'm advocating is ferocious. It's a robust readiness to be surprised and moved; a vigorous intention to be awake to truths you don't expect and can't control. When you're truly receptive, you have strong ideas and a powerful will and a passion for disseminating your unique blessings, but you're also inspired by a humble certainty that you have a lot to learn, knowing that new teaching might come from unimaginable sources.

gets most turned on by small, subtle secrets, this is a perfect moment to find out what you've been hiding from yourself.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): During my recent visit to the Burning Man festival, I faced a dicey dilemma: what to do with my eyes as I talked with the many women who wore no clothes above the waist? At first I steadfastly kept my gaze from dipping below their necks. Then I decided that was silly; if they were strongly opposed to me looking at their breasts, they wouldn't be naked. On the other hand, I didn't want to be sneaky, stealing furtive glances when they were momentarily distracted. Ultimately, I asked each woman for permission to indulge in a brief ogle. That way we could get the issue out of the way and conduct our conversations in peace. They all thought this was a sensible approach. I hope this tale will inspire you,Taurus, to deal expeditiously with the 900-pound gorilla in the corner of your world.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Here are tasks you should studiously avoid in the coming week: painting the bathroom, fixing the smoke alarm, changing the burned-out light in the hallway, getting an air freshener for the car, and buying new batteries for the TV remote control. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you should instead seek out the following kinds of experiences: Delight in your sudden access to spiritual resources that have been closed to you before; commune with beauty that does not depend on artifice; and capitalize on your new ability to change something about your life that you thought would remain stuck forever.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): I predict that in the coming week you will be invited to partake in a mythic feast. While a gourmet meal may be involved, the essence of the experience will be metaphorical food that nourishes your soul. This uncannily satisfying sustenance will, for all intents and purposes, be a gift from eternity -- a blessing that comes from outside of time. It will be intimately meaningful for the person you are now, but even more so for the person you are striving to become. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If you're fascinated by really big secrets, it will be a banner week for digging up suppressed evidence about the lies and deceptions your government is trying to get away with. If mid-sized secrets are more your style, it'll be a good time to uncover the inner workings of your social circle, place of employment, or local scene. And if you're the kind of person who

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY | SEPTEMBER 25 – OCTOBER 1 2003

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): "If I keep the green bough in my heart," says the Chinese proverb, "the singing bird will come." Have you been doing that, Gemini: cultivating the green bough in your heart? Even when the world around you has been a barren wasteland? If so, the singing bird will alight on your inviting perch very soon. If you haven't, get to work immediately and the singing bird may yet arrive by mid-October.

NECK PAIN RELIEF

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Female officer comes full circle

of the curve. Then, suddenly, instead of surfing the waves, they scrambled for dry land. Each tried to conjure up stability and solidity through more and more monumental undertakings. They lost their former lightness and fluidity, becoming mired in pomposity." This is a worthy meditation for you, Capricorn. Every successful person, you and I included, has to periodically negotiate the turning point that Koons, Amis, and Combs seem to have failed to master.We're all tempted to cling to the winning formula that brought us so far. But this is a perfect time to release your attachment to and dependence on your past triumphs, and go off in quest of fresh magic.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Please remember that you are not competing in a sprint, Virgo. You are running a marathon. You should therefore be sure to pace yourself and not be overly concerned about the fast-starters who have sped ahead of you. I also advise you to clear your beautiful mind of envy and self-doubt, as well as the pushy expectations of people who don't know the intricacies of what you're doing. Now here's the most important thing: Use your fine mind to figure out how to be motivated by pleasure, not pressure.

BY DAN KURASH | STAFF WRITER

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t is a Sunday afternoon, 4:15 p.m., and the gray clouds form a blanket over Champaign’s sky. A train is heading northbound past the Champaign Police Department, which lies just east of the tracks. Lisa Staples, 33, a six-year veteran of the force, walks to her car with a confident stride. She takes a deep breath and gets into her patrol car and starts the engine. “Make it 746 code 29 county,” she says into her radio, and takes off to patrol the streets. Lisa Staples is one of only 10 women officers out of 125 cops in the Champaign Police Department. But being a woman brings no privileges. Staples’ job is to patrol the northwest side of Champaign, the area north of University Avenue and west of Prospect Avenue. The car is cluttered with gadgets—a laptop to track leads and criminal records by license plate numbers and to e-mail dinner plans to other cops; four siren switches, each with a different pitch of intensity; and an eight-channel radio to listen in on state, local and University police chatter. Her car even has a camera to videotape her traffic stops. “This car is pretty loaded,” Staples says. For Staples, becoming a cop was more than

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It'll be a good week to do all of the following: play soccer in the kitchen with Barbie doll heads; wake up in the morning to salsa music and start dancing while you're still half-asleep; talk about your problems until you've talked them to death; get the equivalent of a first kiss or a last laugh; seek out a mystical sign from an enigmatic saint wearing black gloves and a wry smile; call yourself Mumso, Mutiny, or Goofmaster as you upgrade your graffiti-scrawling skills; join Charles M. Young's campaign to change the name of the Pentagon to the "Emma Goldman World Cathedral of Ecofeminist Goddess Worship;" and be a vivid embodiment of Deena Metzger's idea that "Beauty appears when something is completely and absolutely and openly itself."

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): On the eve of the American Revolution in 1775, Paul Revere rode his horse from Charlestown to Lexington, MA, warning the local population that an invasion force of British troops was on its way. Last night I dreamed you were like a modern Paul Revere, only instead of yelling "The British are coming!," you were shouting "The smiling agents of confusion are coming!" What do you think that means, Scorpio? Here's one conceivable dream interpretation: In your waking life, you should expose the dangers posed by fuzzy-brained catalysts, no matter how well-intentioned they might seem. Here's another possible interpretation: Be on the lookout for polite manipulators who use their sweet charm to get their selfish way.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Have you ever played the game of "Tell me the story of all your scars?" It's best to do it when you want to break through to a deeper level of intimacy with a friend or loved one. "How'd you get that blotch on your knee?" he or she begins, and you describe the time in childhood when you fell out of a tree onto the sidewalk.Then maybe he or she says, "Why do you always look so sad when you hear that song on the radio?" And you narrate the tale of how it was playing when an old flame broke your heart. The questions and answers continue until you unveil the entire history of your hurts, both physical and psychic. I suggest you treat yourself to this ritual in the coming week, Pisces. The astrological omens suggest you can achieve a miraculous healing in the presence of a good listener who is curious about your mysteries and skilled at helping you find redemption in your wounds.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): My friend Jane Heaven lives by a motto that would be a good tonic for you this week: "the ruthless truth, kindly told." In other words, it won't be smart or effective for you merely to expose the sticky subtexts that everyone's trying to avoid dealing with. You'll have to convey those unsettling revelations with all the tender compassion you can muster. Expressions of tough love will be half-assed unless the love is at least twice as big as the toughness.

✍ HOMEWORK:

Rob Brezsny's Free Will ☎ Astrology beautyandtruth

Comment on Nietzsche's belief that "One must have chaos within oneself if one is to be a dancing star." Testify at www.freewillastrology.com.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): "Artist Jeff Koons, author Martin Amis, and musician Sean 'Puffy' Combs once had a genius for knowing how the times were changing," wrote Nicholas Blincoe in "Black Book" magazine. "They always managed to stay ahead

@ f r e e w i l l a s t r o l o g y. c o m 415.459.7209(v)• 415.457.3769 http://www.freewillastrology. com P.O. Box 798 San Anselmo, CA 94979

just a way to make ends meet—the job saved drivers are careful to make full stops behind her from feeling inadequate and hopeless. It the white lines. filled a void in her life and allowed her to redeStaples, 5 feet 8 inches tall and 145 pounds, fine herself as a strong, assertive woman. is a tan, broad-shouldered woman with large, “I never thought I would become a cop until powerful hands. Two of her nine tattoos—one I actually gave it a shot,” Staples says. of a spider resting on a web and the other a After graduating from college and getting fancy “X” pattern—are on the upper portion of out of a disastrous relationship with the man her hands between her thumb and first finger. she was dating at the time, she was fearful of Her swept-back ponytail reveals the roundsettling into another serious commitment. ness of her face and the brown eyes tucked “The relationship wore me down to the point behind black frame glasses. She has the look of where I completely a woman who is not to lacked confidence,” she be messed with. She also says. “I needed to find has long, manicured myself.” nails done with burFor about four years gundy polish. after college, Staples In uniform, Staples worked at a local lawn weighs 25 pounds more care service company and due to her bulletproof Lisa Staples hobby shop. It wasn’t vest and extras: a .45 caluntil Staples’ mother got iber pistol; two magaher a volunteer job in the police evidence room zines of bullets, each holding 14 copper hollowthat she thought about being a cop. point bullets; a can of pepper spray; a flashlight; “It looks like today is going to be pretty a retractable baton capable of extending 24 busy,” Staples says as she crosses Neil Street inches; a glove pouch with latex gloves; the and heads west. base for her radio, which she has mounted on A car in front of her is traveling the speed her left shoulder; a double cuff case; and keys. limit. Cars are extra cautious when cops are “Police work is not like normal work—you present, she says. At a four-way stop sign, just never know what’s going to happen,”

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Police work is not like normal work—you just never know what’s going to happen.

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE (ANSWERS ON PAGE 19) ACROSS 1 Do-over command 11 Station along Route 66 15 “My treat next time!” 16 One taking driver’s ed, perhaps 17 Lab protector 18 Cost of living? 19 Poetic dusk 20 Paper piece 21 Doctor’s order 22 One who fought Uitlanders 23 Labor day? 25 Scrap 28 Young traveler, maybe 29 Casts 30 Business section 31 The Diamondbacks, on scoreboards 32 Reword 33 Picks and chooses 34 It’s a guy thing 35 Flipper 36 Pens 37 Bloodsucker 38 Means in all 40 Shrouded 41 Mold over

42 Kind of moss 43 “Ad hominem” source 44 Stick with the herd? 45 Comments around

babies 48 Southern college 49 Is suspicious 52 Ward 53 Stop fighting 54 Certain domino 55 Reaches a crisis point DOWN 1 Marching band instrument 2 Lady Macbeth, e.g. 3 Pulitzer-winning playwright ___ Davis 4 Start of an apology 5 Moguls 6 Like some earrings 7 Author of “Introduction to Algebra” 8 Was a blabbermouth 9 ___ dare 10 Singly 11 Modern buying and selling 12 “S’long!”

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affair 15 14 Dangerous way to pass 17 21 Social 20 19 groups 22 Important 22 23 highway 28 25 26 27 23 Numismatist : coins :: 30 29 plangonologist : ___ 33 32 24 Makes work 36 35 25 Radical group 38 39 26 Foxes used 42 41 to be seen here 43 44 27 Nose’s place? 49 50 48 28 Greeting in 53 52 “Winnie the Pooh” 55 54 30 Hotel offering Puzzle by Manny Nosowsky 33 Andy in the newspapers 40 Aquanaut’s workplace 34 Nazarenes, once 42 Matters of opinion 36 Spanish explorer ___ Bautista de Anza 44 Hanukkah gift 37 Results in 45 Stuck, after “in” 39 Rumpus 46 Chisholm Trail town

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SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

PHOTO | KATY MULL

092503buzz0326

Lisa Staples climbs down a fire truck ladder while searching rooftops for evidence from a local armed robbery in Champaign on Friday, Sept. 19, 2003.

Staples says. “It’s kind of annoying when I always have to meet my friends out after work. They just don’t seem to understand that I have definite hours.” Lisa grew up a rebellious punk-rock teen with an orange and fuchsia Mohawk. In college, her boyfriend bullied her under his thumb, something that’s hard to believe when you look at her today. She tried to leave him. He would call her at work, numerous times a day, badgering her to take him back. “It just got to the point where it was easier to be with him than without him,” she says. It took years to dump him, but she finally did. After graduation, Lisa moved back to Champaign with her mother. “I was sick of walking on eggshells,” Staples says. “I just had to trudge forward and get away from that situation.” Staples rolls through the Burch Village housing projects, all one-floor homes with small patches of grass for front yards. At a slow place, riding the brake, she looks left, then right, sees nothing happening and drives on. The droning static on the radio is interrupted by the dispatcher reporting a car possibly carrying illegal drugs. “10-4,” Staples says as slams down on the gas so hard it pushes her back in her seat.


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She weaves through the two-lane traffic, flipping on the red and blue siren lights. She meets up with other officers who conduct a 10-minute search of a vehicle, a search that yields no drugs. But the officers do discover a case of domestic battery. “Women in this job can’t be real sensitive,” Staples says. “If a guy says something sexual, you can’t let it get to you. In fact, there have been times when I have made the guys blush from what I have said to them.” Being a woman cop has gotten easier for her. Staples recalls her father wondering when she first became a cop whether she would have to wear a skirt to work. She has had only minor conflicts. One time, however, she pulled over a man, and he screamed profanities at her just being a woman with control over him. “He didn’t like the idea that, as a woman, I had authority,” Staples says. Staples decided to be a cop when a sergeant wanted to see if a female could pass the physical agility test. The test consisted of climbing a 5-foot wall, running a quarter mile in zigzags, jumping over a 5-foot trench, dragging a 150pound dummy for 50 feet and picking up an unloaded gun and squeezing the trigger 29 times—all in three and half minutes. Staples did it in 2 minutes, 52 seconds. After that, everyone from the chief down told her to apply. She recalls feeling completely confident in herself for the first time in years. “It was like something clicked inside of me,” she says. “I remember I kept thinking that this was exactly what I should do.” Being a cop requires absolute self-control, and for Staples, that is precisely what she had been searching for in herself. As a cop, she has to be ready to deal with anything. As a cop, she must keep an edge over whomever

Q & A

WillieSummerville

SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

she is dealing with. Staples says the most important part of her job is being able to assert controlled force to calm angry or upset people. “As cops, we run into what everyone runs away from,” Staples says. “I love the sense of control I get by being able to go into somebody’s worst day and making sense of it.” Another call comes in—this one a domestic dispute between two apartment neighbors who keep slamming their doors at each other. Staples isn’t excited about the call. She has dealt with these guys before—many times. She gets out of the car, this time with a flashlight. She marches, arms at her side, up the stairs. She is backed by another female cop. A middle-aged man lets them in his apartment and starts complaining. He’s slurring his words. Inside, the stench of liquor, stale cigarettes and greasy food is sickening. A cigarette is lit, burning away in an ashtray on the table. It needs to be ashed, but has been forgotten. Empty Budweiser cans crowd the table and trash can. Staples listens to the man complain about his neighbor. She crosses her arms, keeps eye contact with him, and patiently listens to his story. The man cools off and they leave. “These are the types of people who call on a regular basis just to complain,” she says. Returning to the station, Staples begins working in the evidence room. She enters a room where chemicals are used to analyze evidence. Staples carefully places a letter on a work table to search it for fingerprints. The scent of oil and grain alcohol fills the air. Staples opens a refrigerator full of chemicals, taking out a bottle of ninhydrin, which reacts to oils in people’s fingers and is used to see fingerprints. She soaks the letter in the ninhydrin. The ink

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illie Summerville has served the community as a music teacher in the Urbana School System for 34 years. His wife of 37 years, Val, is a counselor in the school system as well. Willie has three children and two grandsons. He was born in Sunshine, Arkansas in 1944 and moved to the Champaign-Urbana area in 1966. What is the first instrument you learned to play? How old were you? The flutophone. It’s what’s called a preband instrument. It is basically a plastic flute. That led to piano, tuba, organ and violin. I must have been 8 or 9 years old.

PHOTO | ADAM YOUNG

Why teaching? I was inspired by my first piano teacher, my high school band leader, and my father. He worked in a lumber mill and it was his labor work that earned me a $5,000 scholarship and a ticket to college. What is your favorite thing about the Champaign-Urbana area? The diversity. If you could change your name, what would you change it to? Moses. That was my father’s name and I am his only son. We have a wonderful relationship.

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9/24/03

Lisa Staples looks for a vehicle fitting the description of the suspects’ in a local armed robbery in Champaign on Friday, Sept. 19, 2003.

washes off the paper, and an outline of a purple fingerprint remains. She lays it flat, places a paper bag over the letter and irons it dry. Upon inspection, Staples’ eyes get wide and her mouth drops. “Look at those fingerprints,” Staples says. “We now have so much to work with.” Being a cop changed Staples’ life. “When I got hired on to be a police officer, the confidence I built up carried over to my personal life as well,” she says.

The job comes with a great deal of responsibility, and it took her about a year and a half on the job until she could feel confident about having authority over others. Another call comes in. A car driving from Chicago has been stopped at a gas station on Neil Street and is to be searched for possible illegal drugs. When she arrives, officers are already at the scene. The car from Chicago has its doors and trunk open and its two drivers are secured nearby. Staples joins the conversation

What is the last book you read? The Book of Isaiah. I am reading the Bible from front to back in one year.

What is the biggest problem facing our community? Apathy in politics.

What are you passionate about? The things of Christ.

I’m acting up in your class. How do you deal with me? First, I stare at you. Then everyone gets real quiet. I look at you long enough that, hopefully, you’ll solve your own problem. Then if you don’t, I will. They pay me to be (in) control of the class so that’s what I do.

Who is your favorite musical artist? Dr. Ollie Watts Davis (Professor and Director of the University’s Black Chorus). What is one thing you’d like all your students to learn? Respect for each other and their differences. What is your greatest achievement? I have two. The first is having been honored by President Clinton as a Hometown Hero in Education along with my wife. The second is when our community helped the high school choir raise enough funds for a trip to visit and sing in the Vatican. What has been your biggest challenge as a teacher? To try and always be effective and relevant. To make a connection with the students. If you could relive one day of your life, which would it be? The day I got married. [Smiles] That was a good day. [Laughs]

What is your opinion of the University? The University makes a concerted effort to be personable, which is good. But it still needs more black faculty members. Johnny Cash recently passed away. As an avid music fan, your opinion of him? It was a sad time. I have great respect for how he handled himself throughout his career. He was a solid man with values. He didn’t give in to the pressures of the entertainment industry. He kept some good old, down home, American stuff alive. Do you have any final advice for your students to read in this interview? Maximize your learning efforts in every subject because no class is wasted time. Learn lots of information for you, not just to pass the test.

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film & tv

THE EMMYS ARE OVER ... HERE COME THE OSCARS! | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

Drive-thru Reviews

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9/24/03

ANYTHING ELSE ★★★ JASON BIGGS AND CHRISTINA RICCI Allen’s latest efforts have been flat, lacking in the biting social criticism and tender moments of humility that his older, better films were full of. So with Anything Else, Allen makes a noble, if brittle, effort to translate the soul of his most beloved film to reach a new generation. (John Loos) Now showing at Beverly

CABIN FEVER

no stars JORDAN LADD AND RIDER STRONG Nothing could have saved Cabin Fever from its own devouring illness. Not only did the number of plot flaws rival the body count, but even the overt sexual content and gore lost their appeal after awhile. (Daniel Nosek) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

COLD CREEK MANOR ★ SHARON STONE AND DENNIS QUAID Why on earth Sharon Stone thought this film would boost her floundering career is uncertain; perhaps she thought the pitch for Cold Creek Manor sounded better than the reality of it. The trailers did make it look to be an excellent start to the Halloween movie season. However, this film by Mike Figgis (Leaving Las Vegas and recent art house flops such as The Loss of Sexual Innocence and Timecode) just never becomes the thriller it wants to be. (Jason Cantone) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

DICKIE ROBERTS: FORMER CHILD STAR ★ DAVID SPADE AND JON LOVITZ During his stint as a cast member on Saturday Night Live and even in his supporting role on the television show Just Shoot Me, David Spade demonstrated glimpses of comedic spontaneity and charm.In his latest film, Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star, Spade portrays a childhood star who fades into obscurity. Although the underlying concept of the theme sounds promising and intriguing, Spade is ultimately the wrong comedian to successfully fill this role. (Daniel Nosek) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

THE FIGHTING TEMPTATIONS

CUBA GOODING JR. AND BEYONCE KNOWLES A New York advertising executive travels to a small Southern town to collect an inheritance but finds he must create a gospel choir and lead it to success before he can collect. If you would like to review this film, e-mail movies@readbuzz.com. (Jason Cantone) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

FREAKY FRIDAY ★★★ JAMIE LEE CURTIS AND LINDSAY LOHAN Freaky Friday’s family-friendly plot still includes a mother and daughter unsympathetic to one another’s problems because each is convinced her own life is more difficult than the other’s. After a mysterious fortune cookie puts a fateful spell on the pair, Anna, the daughter, and Tess, the mom, wake up in each other’s bodies. (Janelle Greenwood) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

FREDDY VS. JASON ★★ ROBERT ENGLUND AND MONICA KEENA After all is said and done, Freddy vs. Jason is certainly not the best in either series, but fans of the two super-killers will not be disappointed. While the setup might be long, the payoff has been two decades in the making and is well worth the wait. Bad acting aside, this film still does a lot of things right. (Aaron Leach) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

THE HARD WORD ★★★ GUY PEARCE AND RACHEL GRIFFITHS In terms of heist movies, The Hard Word succeeds in exciting

but fails in delighting.There are guns, gore and getaways, but a noticeable lack of ingenuity. And while it’s fun to watch what the characters are up to, it would have been more interesting to see what they did after the credits (John Loos) Now showing at Beverly

the film plays a little like Gangs of the Old West and anyone who’s even heard of classic Westerns like Shane or The Searchers can pretty much stay two steps ahead of Open Range at all times. (Matt Pais) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

JEEPERS CREEPERS 2 ★

PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: THE CURSE OF THE BLACK PEARL ★★★

RAY WISE AND JONATHAN BRECK When a horror film opens with a haunting message that something will come and eat you, despite all attempts to save one’s self,the immediate gut reaction takes the viewer to a terrifying place where boogie monsters are born. Unfortunately, the answers or motivations of the monster are never fully realized in this film. (Janelle Greenwood) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

SEABISCUIT ★★★★

NICOLAS CAGE AND SAM ROCKWELL No, this isn’t a film about pyromaniacs or arsonists invading a town. Instead, matchstick men are con artists, and here the cons go between friends and family members. When Cage’s character finds out he has a daughter, they meet and she wants to join in on the con.The story is fun and entertaining, but the book is much better and doesn’t have the slow, confusing moments that the movie does. (Jason Cantone) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

TOBEY MAGUIRE, JEFF BRIDGES AND CHRIS COOPER The Seabiscuit phenomenon was one of the most captivating in United States history and this film does it justice. Laura Hillenbrand reported that Seabiscuit took up more newspaper space than any other story in 1938, including Hitler and the spawning world war. (Andrew Crewell) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy.

ONCE UPON A TIME IN MEXICO

ROBERT DUVALL AND MICHAEL CAINE Two old men, who might have been successful bank robbers in the 1920s, take custody of their nephew. Melodramatic story, tears and laughter ensure and manipulate your emotions, but make you love every second. (Jason Cantone) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

★★★★

JOHNNY DEPP AND ANTONIO BANDERAS Once Upon a Time in Mexico is an action film that is every bit as intense as it is gorgeous. Fans of the trilogy will not be disappointed, and most audiences will be delighted with the fresh style of action as well as the intelligence present in the script. Paying homage to western campiness with memorable characters and a bit of goofball humor, this is the summer blockbuster that movie-goers should have received two months ago.(Aaron Leach) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

OPEN RANGE ★★ KEVIN COSTNER AND ROBERT DUVALL Open Range mixes slow-paced historical nostalgia with slower-paced Little House on the Prairie references, pitting free range herders against static, prejudiced ranchers. At times,

community

SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

with her fellow cops and both men. sible entry points into the apartment complex. “You guys okay here?” she asks. In the distance, Staples can see two backup “Yep, we are,” a cop answers. police cars. As she walks toward the other offi“What do you have in your trunk anyways?” cers, the man emerges from the complex. a cop asks the men. “Get your arms in the air!” an officer “Just clothes and stuff,” one of them replies. screams. It takes the man a couple seconds but Nothing illegal is found, and the men are he raises his arms. An officer aims a rifle at him. eventually sent on their way. Worried about a possible gun, another cop “It’s frustrating when we come out with shines a flashlight on his hands. Staples pulls nothing, but that’s part of the job,” Staples out her 45-caliber pistol and also takes aim. says and heads back to the station, where she “Put your hands behind your head and lay soon receives another call about a possibly face down on the ground!” an officer yells. armed man. The man obeys. Seven officers help cuff him Staples tightens in apprehension. She has and five search his home for a gun. They find dealt with the man none. Staples and other before. He is 6 feet 4 officers transport the inches tall and 210 man to her car. She pounds. She believes reads him his rights as he is mentally unstashe takes him to jail. ble. This time, he has The man seems allegedly violated a depressed and says he restraining order that was fired from his job prohibits him from that day. Staples tries to Lisa Staples having contact with his calm him down by just daughter. He also has listening to his story. called the police department asking for places She escorts the man to booking where to get a gun. another officer stands him against the wall, “That’s why it’s so important to get him legs and arms spread, empties his pockets and without him knowing,” she says. “We don’t asks him to remove his belt and shoes so he know if he’s going to harm someone or possi- can’t use them as possible weapons. Staples’ bly even harm himself.” business here is done, and she says goodbye to Staples accelerates rapidly going westbound the man and leaves. down Hill Street. She shuts off her car lights “Becoming a cop was the best thing for and parks in a lot where she can’t be seen. me,” she says, as she heads back to close out Using her flashlight as a guide, she walks her shift on the streets. “It helped me get on through grass in the alleyway looking for pos- track. It helped me find my niche.” buzz

JOHNNY DEPP AND GEOFFREY RUSH All eyes are on Depp in his scene-stealing turn as Capt. Jack Sparrow in Pirates of the Caribbean. The characters are not all that developed and sometimes the action scenes are a bit long, but overall the film comes together as a good action flick. (Janelle Greenwood) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

MATCHSTICK MEN ★★★

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SECONDHAND LIONS ★★★★

UNDERWORLD ★★ KATE BECKINSALE AND SCOTT SPEEDMAN Werewolves, vampires and humans, oh my! This Romeo and Juliet tale pits love against an eternal war between vampires and werewolves. Look for great action sequences and a dark tone similar to The Matrix. And then there’s also Kate Beckinsale in all leather to watch for. (Jason Cantone) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy.

OPENING THIS WEEKEND

When I got hired on to be a police officer, the confidence I built up carried over to my personal life as well

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★★★★

PAUL GIAMATTI AND HARVEY PEKAR Both delightfully intricate and amusingly simple, American Splendor is the opposite of this summer’s bloated adaptation of The Hulk. While Ang Lee attempted to transfer a comic book into real life, Berman and Pulcini render real life into a comic book and stretch it into a commentary on happiness, accomplishment and the disheartened lifestyle of Middle America. (Matt Pais) Opening at Beverly on Friday. Showing at Boardman’s tonight

DIRTY PRETTY THINGS

AUDREY TAUTOU AND BENEDICT WONG Stephen Frears serves up a dish of thrills and intrigue as an illegal Nigerian immigrant and Turkish chambermaid discover the unpalatable side of London life. (Jason Cantone) Opening at Boardman’s Art Theatre

Have you ever noticed how much more you can accomplish when you work together?

DUPLEX

DREW BARRYMORE AND BEN STILLER Director Danny DeVito took what worked (both films The Money Pit and Throw Momma From The Train) and turned it into this miserable looking mess. (Jason Cantone) Opening at Beverly and Savoy

At United Way of Champaign County, we bring together community partners to focus on what matters most... results. By giving to United Way, you’re helping not just one group, but our entire community. When you add your investment, to the investments of your family and friends, imagine the positive impact you can make on the people of Champaign County. That, after all, is what matters.

LUTHER

JOSEPH FIENNES AND ALFRED MOLINA Shakespeare in Love introduced Joseph Fiennes to American audiences, but then everything else he’s made has kept him from the mainstream that Jude Law quickly held onto.This is a small, independent film lacking in publicity and most likely won’t bring him back into the spotlight. And, yes, the Luther is Martin Luther. (Jason Cantone) Opening at Beverly

www.uwayhelps.org

THE RUNDOWN

THE ROCK AND SEANN WILLIAM SCOTT America needs a new action hero and this is The Rock’s chance to become that hero. Critically lauded thus far, this action flick should be fun and entertaining. (Jason Cantone) Opening at Beverly and Savoy

THE SCHOOL OF ROCK

JACK BLACK AND JOAN CUSACK Jack Black plays a rock star who bottoms out and becomes a teacher at a prep school. Add in some of the creative power behind High Fidelity and rock music and laughter will ensue. Sneak previews at Beverly this weekend

Lisa Staples searches through a garbage can while looking for evidence from an armed robbery in Champaign on Friday, Sept. 19, 2003. Staples described the evidence search through garbage cans and dumpsters as "all in a day's work."

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Working together matters.

AMERICAN SPLENDOR

PHOTO | KATY MULL

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arts

HOW’D YOU FIND OUT ABOUT THIS PLACE? THIS IS WHERE I GO TO CRY. | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

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PHOTO | SUZANNE SITRICK

n an effort to promote a positive and friendly relationship between Japan and the United States through the arts, the University of Illinois is offering a variety of events this semester featuring Japanese culture and art. A performance entitled Kimono Fantasy: Traditional Japanese Costumes from the Heian Court to the Present Day, will take place in the Colwell Playhouse at the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts on Sunday at 2 p.m. In conjunction with this, the exhibit “Luxurious Layers: Kimonos of the Heian Court” will be on display at the Spurlock Museum from Sept. Saturday to Dec. 13. Other events include lectures, kimono dressing for children and a workshop on making art with Japanese fabric dye. All of these events are free, except the workshop, and all are open to the public.

“This is the first time we have had an event like this,” said George T. Yu, director of the Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies. “It is a rare occasion and a very significant event.” The function of the center is to develop, promote and support East Asian and Pacific studies through various media. “The event will put the aspect of the arts on center stage,” said Yu. “We hope that the community will come to appreciate an important dimension of culture that they may not have appreciated.” “I am very excited for the festival. I am also very appreciative of the leadership role Professor (Kimiko) Gunji has taken,” said Yu. “In order to make it into a reality it has taken the endeavors of many people. This was a collective effort by a group of sponsors.” The kimono is the national costume of Japan and is seen as an art form. This art form is being presented to the University by the Hakubi Kyoto Kimono Schools of Japan. The performance, along with an additional exhibit, will travel from the University to the Art

Kimonos featured at Spurlock Museum from Saturday to December 13.

film & tv

SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003| CHECK OUT THE FRONT COVER

23

WEREWOLVES AND HUMANTS INVADE C-U!

Kimono Fantasy BY SUZANNE SITRICK | STAFF WRITER

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BY MATT PAIS | LEAD REVIEWER Institute of Chicago. These presentations will allow people in the United States to learn more about kimono culture. The Hakubi staff first performed at the University in the spring of 2000 at Japan House. “The place was packed. We had over 100 people in here,” said Nancy Lockmiller, assistant director of Japan House. An important factor that aided in the oppor-

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tunity for the exhibit was direct communication between the Spurlock Museum and the Hakubi schools. Two museum staff members met with the president and other staff members in Tokyo and communicated with the help of an interpreter. This time, both students and instructors from the Hakubi schools will come to Champaign-Urbana, bringing a group of 81 people for the performance and exhibit. “We want to be able to share this art form with a larger body of the community than what we can accommodate at Japan House,” said Lockmiller. “I think people will be amazed by what they see at the performance and at the museum.” Lockmiller said community children will be greeters at the show; they will be wearing kimonos and will be a part of the finale as well. “This is a unique and special opportunity for both the University and the community,” she said. On Dec. 2, there will be a showing of the film The Tale of Genji (for viewers 17 and older). This movie is about the Heian period and shows many of the different styles of kimonos. Tandy Lace, director of education at the Spurlock Museum, said the Hakubi schools provided most of the costumes. “We would like to see a broader understanding of the importance of the kimono not just as attire but as part of cultural expression that is highly developed,” said Lacy. buzz See the Japan House Web site at www.art.uiuc.edu/galleries/japanhouse or the Spurlock Museum web site at www.spurlock.uiuc.edu for more information regarding these events.

hile some horror movies unintentionally elicit laughs from the audience, local filmmakers Jason Butler and Mark Peaslee insist that the comedy that comes from their low-budget horror films is deliberate. “We don’t have the budget to make the violence look real and awful,” says 26-year-old University graduate Butler. “There’s such a formula for horror, it opens the door for comedy.” Apparently, an open door lets in a few other genres as well. Their latest film, Thoraxx II: The Breeding, is a synthesis of horror, comedy, thriller, science fiction and musical. The plot involves a mad scientist who is half-man, halfinsect (dubbed the Humant) who has 48 hours to breed with a woman and perpetuate his mutated species. Butler says the idea for the Humant came from classic horror fare. “It’s a pretty traditional concept to have a half-man, half-insect creature,” he says. “I like the absurd a lot, whether it’s giant monsters or just the ridiculous ways that people interact sometimes.” The film is an expansion of the original Thoraxx, a short film about a giant killer bug, which Butler and Peaslee made in one day. They learned many important lessons in tackling the feature-length version of Thoraxx. “We learned that scripts make things go faster,” Butler says. Erik Martin, one of the stars of Thoraxx II, chimes in: “I think you learned that you have a lot of friends who will work for beer.” Without paying any of the actors, the film cost $1,000 to make, which Butler says paid mostly for videotape and beer. He isn’t kidding. The end credits for Thoraxx II state, “Special Humant effects by Industrial Tape and Cardboard,” a self-referential play on George Lucas’ revolutionary effects studio, Industrial Light and Magic. The violence is undeniably cheesy, the sound is muddled and the lighting design is practically nonexistent, but the filmmakers reiterate the mentality behind the film. “It’s all pretty good-natured gore,” Peaslee explains. “Nothing we ever do is going to seem that real.” Butler adds, “I don’t think anyone went home after seeing Thoraxx II and couldn’t sleep unless they were awake from laughing.” Both are longtime fans of horror. “I used to get all of the special effects books out of the library when I was a kid because I wanted to see the things from all the bloody movies I wasn’t allowed to see,” Peaslee says. When Butler and Peaslee started Brainsmart Productions in 1999, it was never meant to be an official, upstanding business. They wanted to have a float in a local Independence Day parade

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but couldn’t register without being part of an organization. After choosing a name, Butler, Peaslee, and some friends donned monkey masks and labeled their float—a rundown van with the top cut off—with sayings such as “Going ape for America” and “Going bananas for independence.” “It got a fantastic response,” Peaslee says. “There was one guy standing at the edge of the parade, shirtless and holding a beer, who loved it,” Butler remembers. “So that’s our audience,” Peaslee adds with a smile. Somehow this spawned Brainsmart’s first short film, Viva la Terra del Gato, a similarly tongue-in-cheek horror-comedy about crazed monkeys attacking a wall of snow. Butler explains the simple reason for the movie’s existence: “We had a snow wall and a bunch of monkey masks.” Since then, Brainsmart has made numerous short and feature-length productions using a digital video camera, a computer and a tripod. Writer and director Butler and Peaslee, the cameraman, are currently a few days into the shooting of their next film, Werewolf Cemetery. “On this one, we’re really trying to be better prepared,” Peaslee says. “We learned a lot on the last one, and it’s just a matter of putting the work in.” He adds that there is a desire to improve the visual quality of a Brainsmart production. “We are really trying to work on lighting on this one,” he says. Butler says he is already pleased with the film’s progress. “I’m really excited about the werewolves, I’m double excited about the werewolf hunters, and I’m triple excited about our ace werewolf hunter, Skald Wolfcap,” he says. Like Thoraxx II, all of Werewolf Cemetery will be filmed at various locations in Champaign-Urbana. “There’s all kinds of neat stuff around town,” Peaslee says. “It’s amazing what you see once you start looking.” The two friends prepared for filming by watching a lot of old horror movies, particularly The Wolfman. “We have an unreasonable goal

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.. the film cost $1,000 to make, which Butler says paid mostly for videotape and beer.

of getting it done by Halloween,” Peaslee says. “The problem is we have these jobs we have to get to.” Like their werewolf subjects, Butler and Peaslee are different creatures by day. Butler, a graduate of the University of Illinois’ journalism program, works as a clerk at That’s Rentertainment (where Thoraxx II is currently available for rent), and Peaslee washes dishes at Radio Maria in downtown Champaign. They also work together at Sweet Betsy’s. Afterward, these horror fans are nothing if not night owls. They recently held a screening of Thoraxx II at 11 p.m. in the beer garden of Mike ‘n Molly’s bar. Projected onto the outer wall of the bar, Thoraxx II’s campy humor benefited from a good-time atmosphere populated by the clinking of beer bottles, the lighting of cigarettes, and, most importantly, laughter. “It definitely looks better on a big screen,” Butler says. Peaslee adds, “It’s great to actually be able to see a response from it.” They both emphasize how important is to show a film in front of an audience. While showing it in town, Peaslee says, “I’m pretty much just watching the audience the whole time.” “If we go a whole 60 seconds without any response from the audience, that’s a bad sign,” Butler explains. He adds that he has watched Thoraxx II so many times

that his enjoyment is lessened by his own criticism. “All I can do is criticize every iota,” he says. “Things that are great, I think can always be greater.” This was clear throughout the screening, as Butler, in his trademark red baseball cap and faded jeans, gave only a restrained smile at the film’s funniest moments. Before the film started, Peaslee played to the sparse crowd, which consisted largely of friends of the filmmakers. “The next movie is the best movie ever made,” he declared sarcastically. “Anyone who doesn’t think so can fight me outside.” Unfortunately, Butler and Peaslee’s family members might take them up on that. Peaslee says his family is embarrassed by Brainsmart’s films and that his Mom doesn’t understand why he would make movies without making any profits. “She asked me, ‘So you just do this for the good of the world?’” Peaslee recalls. “I said, ‘Have you seen Thoraxx II?’” Butler says his parents’ reaction has been a mix of support and embarrassment. Still, he remains proud of his work. “Thorax II taught me that we could (make) a really entertaining feature film in two months,” he says. Despite how entertaining making a film can be, Butler admits that filming does require some hard work. “Shooting can be really tiring,” he says. “By the end of it everybody’s exhausted.” Everyone involved was extremely eager to be a part of Thoraxx II, Peaslee says. “People are really bored, and if you give them something to do they get really excited about it.” According to Butler,, filmmaking is a very personal form of satisfaction. “Somebody accused me once of making movies only for me and my friends’ enjoyment,” he says. “In fact, it’s only for my enjoyment.”buzz

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ROBERT DUVALL ROCKS HARDCORE. | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

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buzz SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 | PSST! THIS PAGE DESIGNER THINKS THIS WEEK’S FEATURED ARTIST IS DREAMY.

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7

ARTIST’S CORNER

ANYTHING ELSE | CHRISTINA RICCI

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ANYTHING ELSE ★★★

BY JOHN LOOS | STAFF WRITER

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oody Allen began his 1977 Oscar-winning masterpiece Annie Hall with the line “There’s an old joke.” He opens his newest film, Anything Else, with those same four words. Twenty-five years later, the joke is different, but Allen directs it to his younger costar as though he’s humbly passing on his comic philosophies to a new generation. Allen’s latest efforts have been flat, lacking in biting social criticism and tender moments of humility that his older, better films were full of. With Anything Else, Allen makes a noble, if brittle, effort to translate the soul of his most beloved film to reach a new generation. Jason Biggs plays Jerry, a nervous writer madly in love with Amanda (Christina Ricci), a neurotic girl with intimacy problems and a flighty mother (Stockard Channing). The misleading trailer shows no trace of Allen, but he is an enormous part of this film. He plays David, Jerry’s writer friend who tells him jokes and gives him important advice. This mentoring, it turns out, is the true core of the film. Anything Else fits Allen fans like an old glove. There are classic Allen one-liners, as well as helpings of his trademark Jewish paranoia and self-hatred. Danny Devito also joins Allen’s long list of standout supporting players. But where the film doesn’t work is Jerry and Amanda’s relationship. Ricci is wonderful, but her chemistry with a misplaced Biggs is not. In the end, they both seem like children dressed up in grown-up clothing. This mostly stems from the ripe, overly-intelligent dialogue Allen has his young actors deliver. There may have been a time in Allen’s life when twenty-somethings had the life experiences necessary to talk like philosophers, but it isn’t now. David says to Jerry near the end, in reference to his ability to shoot a gun, “Time has diminished my accuracy.” This speaks volumes about Allen’s present filmmaking skills. His aim is shaky in his old age, and Anything Else is hardly the bullseye Annie Hall was. But it’s not entirely his fault. There’s still an old joke he wants to tell, there’s just a new audience who’s less accustomed to hearing it.

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econdhand Lions is one of those feel-good stories that movie critics hate. Tim McCanlies directs an atmosphere resembling one of grandpa’s old anecdotes that keeps everyone coming back for more. It combines tales of grandeur, comedy and even a little sappy family junk to create an enjoyable film that completely ignores successful modern filmmaking convention. The story involves Academy Award-winning actor Robert Duvall and Michael Caine (nominated in 2002 for The Quiet American), along with young former Oscar nominee Haley Joel Osment in the back woods of a broken-down Texas ranch. An unloved child of a traveling mother, Walter (Osment) is forced to spend the summer with his two grizzled great uncles Hub and Garth (Duvall and Caine) in their spooky 100-year-old house. The real fun begins when young Walter learns of his uncles’ fortune and begins to dig deeper into their clouded existence. As the story goes, the young boy chisels through his uncles’ gruff demeanor and becomes wildly attached to their eccentric lifestyles. At the same time, Hub and Garth begin to come alive and are revitalized

SECONDHAND LIONS | MICHAEL CAINE, ROBERT DUVALL office records. So why not have a little fun telling this crazy little story on the big screen? Too often, movies today are judged against the great predecessors, such as Casablanca and Citizen Kane, named the top two American films by the American Film Institute. It is a different world today, a world that calls for a different type of movie. Yes, the audience walks out of the theater happy, and no, the symbolism isn’t so complex it could have been written by Faulkner. But that doesn’t mean critics should give it an uninspired thumbs down. Hopefully, potential viewers won’t be warded off with cautionary tales of banality, because Secondhand Lions is one of those film experiences that everyone will enjoy if they just give it a chance.

COLD CREEK MANOR ★

BY JANELLE GREENWOOD | STAFF WRITER

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he trailer for Cold Creek Manor sets itself up as a great thriller that would follow in the footsteps of other adult thrillers like the Michelle Pfieffer/Harrison Ford thriller What Lies Beneath, which was directed by Robert Zemeckis. Unfortunately, what looks great in the trailer comes yet again from movie editor magic and the film proves to be anything but thrilling. The tedious opening follows the morning of a typical New York couple, Cooper and Leah Tilson (Dennis Quaid, Sharon Stone), who find themselves overwhelmed by the city’s craziness after their son is almost hit in traffic. They then decide to pack up and move to picturesque upstate New York to give their children a chance at childhood and to repair their struggling marriage. Cold Creek Manor is an old house that appeals to the family as their last attempt in a realtor’s brochure. Without questioning the previous family’s departure, they buy the place to fix it up.

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dam Watkins is a recent graduate of the University of Illinois. He received a degree in rhetoric and finance and is hoping to have a career in poetry. He is living in C-U and working at Espresso Royale in Urbana until he decides which graduate schools to apply to. What inspires you? I guess there are a lot of things that inspire

Taming an Audience BY SYD SLOBODNIK | CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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Paradoxically, they try to fix their family too, because it’s always fun to throw in obvious metaphors to compensate for plot structure. Lurking in the background is the youngest heir to the Manor, Dale Massie (Stephen Dorff), who slithers onto the property after his parole to work as a handyman for the Tilson’s. Despite the warnings from the town and Dale Massie’s own creepy behavior, Cooper’s doubts fester too long when he should wise up to this mystery sooner—he works as a documentarian whose new hobby is digging up clues about the Massie family. Yes, this film uses the classic recipe for a successful thriller: a family moving into a large abandoned house with its own creepy Mr. Fix It, but it fails by leaving major gaps in the plot and character development. Nobody ever wonders about Dale’s own family or why they are gone, other than to assume they left all of their belongings in the house when he went to prison, which nobody will find believable. Dorff manages to pull off the creepy and crazed madman with ease, but it’s a role he visits frequently. Stone and Quaid, although playing a couple in a failing marriage, show little chemistry and appear more like their son and daughter, who curiously wander about the property in a Nancy Drew kind of way. The slow and uneventful beginning, followed by a disappointing ending worsens the fact that

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COLD CREEK MANOR | SHARON STONE the trailer broke its promise in that it never gives us a haunted house and it doesn’t even pretend to. Thrillers, like balloons, should pop rather than deflate at the end. Why on earth Sharon Stone thought this film would boost her floundering career is uncertain; perhaps she also thought the pitch for Cold Creek Manor sounded better than the reality of it. The trailers did make it look to be an excellent start to the Halloween movie season. However, this film by Mike Figgis (Leaving Las Vegas) just never becomes the thriller it wants to be.

What environment do you best work in? Probably in my room. I used to really enjoy working in coffee shops because of the distraction. Also, I like to play music when I write ... I guess a lot of indie rock. It’s a good way to maintain a constant tone when you’re writing, but I am pretty sure my roommates hate it because I repeat the same song over and over again.

ome theatrical groups never tire of updating classical Shakespearean plays for contemporary audiences and some, like the Chicago Shakespeare Theatre on Navy Pier, have been consistently successful at it. Under the artistic direction of Barbara Gaines, Chicago Shakespeare begins its 2003-04 season this month with a flashy adaptation of the delightfully accessible The Taming of the Shrew. Scholars may wince at the idea of this production, by director David H. Bell, because the play is set in Padua and Verona in the 1960s. The play’s inventive set, by James Leonard Joy, reminds one of a village setting in any of a number of mid-1950s films by the late great Italian film director, Federico Fellini. As the story begins, a flock of slick-suited, young romantic men are in hot pursuit of Senore Batista’s young daughter, Bianca, who dresses like someone in a ‘60s Annette

me; I end up writing about relationships a lot. I’m also really inspired by awkward situations because I think there’s a lot of honesty in them—my sample piece is about an awkward situation with a friend. What themes are present in your work? I try to write about suburbia and my views on American culture. It’s hard to balance it

Funicello film. But the wealthy Batista will not allow his younger daughter to consider any wedding plans until her older, grouchy sister Katherine finds a mate and is married first. Days later, storming into town on a motor bike arrives Petruchio, dressed like Patrick Swayze in Dirty Dancing, determined to meet the challenge of winning over Katherine and transforming her into a dutiful wife. Loose adaptations of Shakespeare’s plays, especially Taming of the Shrew, have been very successful over the years. Note the recent Broadway Tony Award winning revival of the 1950s Cole Porter musical Kiss Me Kate, the 1999 teen comedy 10 Things I Hate About You, or even the Krannert Center’s amazing country-Westernized production in the late ‘80s, under the imaginative direction of then-theatre head, David Knight. This Chicago version, which runs until Nov. 23, is fun to watch, but has mixed results. Bell, who has directed four other recent productions of Shakespearean comedies at this Chicago venue, misses mostly at developing an effective chemistry between his two leading actors, played by Ryan Shively and Kate Fry.

Where can you find the best conversation in town? Some of the best conversations I’ve had here are on the benches in the front of Murphy’s because you can look out and see everyone. Also when you go to a really lame party with a friend and end up leaving early. You always have really good conversations with that person.

Communication I have spent three full days considering The implicit honesty of actions. I have decided A kiss can bear the weight and complexity That any image might. Tonight, Driving down any rain soaked road I saw a tree newly leaved, It is spring you know, And through its center ran two telephone lines, Buzzing and parallel as our lips had been. The tree was sheared around them, And the blood thick night pulsed through the absence Of branches and leaves in the shape of the heart, And I don’t mean that simulacrum outline Found in any valentine. No, I mean the shape Caged in every person’s ribs, The kind of heart that actually throbs And dies, and symbolizes nothing else.

This is through no fault of Fry’s. Her Katherine is clearly the cast’s most impressive handler of Shakespeare’s witty barbs and exhortations concerning the battle of the sexes. Fry, who has appeared in numerous productions of this Shakespeare company, is most skilled at believable characterization and most faithful to the cadences of Shakespeare’s poetic language. Ryan Shively, a well known New York actor and veteran of a variety of recent Broadway shows, plays an attractive Petruchio, but he lacks the real bravado that this part demands. Not as skilled as Fry with Shakespeare’s verses, it seems he just recites his lines without the emotion the speeches require. TV’s Glen Gordon Caron got better chemistry from Bruce Willis and Cybill Shepard in a Shrew takeoff episode of the ‘80s Moonlighting series. This crowd-pleasing production incorporates many moments of lively theatrical clowning, from characters Tranio (Guy Adkins) asks Baptista for Bianca’s hand. yelling and slamming doors to falling into ponds through wild brawling. Cast members Daniel May and Guy Adkins do Chaon Cross’ Bianca is appealing in a debutant fair jobs at providing these sorts of laughs. sort of way, but Cross is not very skilled in Ross Lehman’s Grumio is the production’s the subtle comic timing of Shakespeare’s most over-the-top performer; he’s especially witty lines. annoying, overplaying obvious laughs and continued on page 9 appearing in drag at one point in the show.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SHAKESPEARE THEATRE

BY ANDREW CREWELL | STAFF WRITER

Why did you choose the piece you are featuring? I wanted to choose something challenging but not ambiguous for an audience that doesn’t usually read poetry. It’s also one of the few poems that I’ve written where I’ve felt like it was finished when I was done writing it.

PHOTO | ADAM YOUNG

★★★★

(between) being a good artistic piece and just me venting.

BUENA VISTA PICTURES

DREAMWORKS FILMS

SECONDHAND LIONS

through Walter and his thirst for the awe-inspiring quests of their youth. The three strike a bond that can’t be broken through the rest of their days as his two crazy uncles and their zest for life ultimately change Walter into a new man. The story is an old hat, but the delivery is top-notch. Duvall and Caine are saddled with a role that is as old as time—the mean exterior facade with a loveable inside—but pull it off without a hitch. And Osment won’t get the billing he did in The Sixth Sense, but after all, he is 14. The endearing nature of this film isn’t necessarily in the story or characters, but in the delivery. In one scene shortly following Walter’s arrival at the ranch, one uncle says, “We don’t know much about kids, so whatever you need you’ll have to get yourself,” as the other chimes in, “or better yet, learn to do without,” and they leave him to sleep alone in a mothball-infested closet of a room. Of course, later in the movie Hub and Garth loosen up and—only with the special style that a 72-year-old Duvall could convey—catch the audience’s hearts. Between fighting kids a quarter their age in knife fights, giving accounts of their French Foreign Legion days and purchasing a “used” lion because they wanted one, Hub and Garth show the boy they’re actually a walking time capsule of his kind of entertainment. All across the United States, national critics will be giving horribly mixed reviews of Secondhand Lions, saying it is filled with too much sap and the ending is too expected. However, this is the type of movie that probably won’t be nominated for best picture, probably won’t receive any attention years down the road and probably won’t set box

NEW LINE LIONS

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THE PHANTOM SQUIRREL STRIKES AGAIN. | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

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Finding that Creative Side O

vercoming fears, guilt and criticism is a struggle that those who aspire to be artists face. Seeing past these obstacles and further into one’s own creative spirit is the focus of The Artist’s Way, a series of group seminars led by Jo Pauly at the McKinley Foundation in Champaign. The curriculum for the group comes from Julia Cameron’s best selling book, The Artist’s Way: A Spiritual Path to Higher Creativity. Like similar Artist’s Way groups in and outside the United States, Pauly’s group meets for 13 weekly sessions, discussing subjects in creativity and the artist’s experience from the book, as well as participating in various group tasks. As Pauly explains, the group is much less a taught seminar than it is a forum for those interested in exploring their own creativities. The first week’s meeting serves as an introduction to the workshop, and subsequent meetings study the book’s chapters, focusing on ways to recover one’s senses of such things as identity, integrity and possibility. The list of supplementary tasks from the book includes listing things one is grateful for, naming dreams and collecting leaves. These activities are used as pivots for discussion and self-discovery, which are meant to release inner aspirations and ideas.

moviereview

UNDER THE TUSCAN SUN

Take-home assignments are also part of the program. “Morning Pages� are daily handwritten three-page pieces that must be written in stream of consciousness. These follow a core concept of the course, which is to get past the daily anxieties and contemplations that can monopolize one’s inner dialogue. The second type of assignment is the “Artist Date.� Pauly describes these as weekly private times of self-nurturing. They can take place at home, outside or walking around in a bookstore. Pauly held the first session of The Artist’s Way in 1997 after she had returned from a three-year stay in San Diego where she happened upon many other fans of the book who had also begun groups. continued on page 9

★★★

BY MATT PAIS | LEAD REVIEWER

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PHOTO | BRIAN WARMOTH

BY BRIAN WARMOTH | CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Jo Pauly, leader of The Artist’s Way Seminar.

ouldn’t it be nice to just escape the rigors of American life and run off to the Italian countryside to start life anew? That’s just what Frances Mayes did after her husband left her for a younger woman, and this San Francisco professor of creative writing later chronicled her experiences in a book called Under the Tuscan Sun (which sounds more like a Beach Boys’ lyric than a book title). The screen adaptation of Mayes’ memoir swells with love for the easygoing indulgence of Italy, but even though it’s based on a true story, it converts everything and every character into a thematically convenient catalyst for the plot. However, this might not be such a bad thing: Under the Tuscan Sun never presumes to be any more or any less than a pure female fantasy, and every moment of this passably preposterous tale

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UNDERWORLD

"

★★ BY JASON CANTONE | ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Sept 27th and 28th

FREE

Magic Shows Face Painting Balloons Sat 10–6 Sun 12–4

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Open 7 days a week in October Our Haunted Room Opens next weekend Oct 4th 101 E University Champaign

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SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 | KATE BECKINSALE IN LEATHER VS. DIANE LANE IN WHITE??

lad in tight black leather, Kate Beckinsale uses her charm, English manners and pointy vampire teeth to get what she wants in Underworld. Flipping in and out of battles like a gymnast on crack, she tries her hardest to string together borrowed plot points while looking more like a china doll than a heartless killer. Beckinsale plays a vampire who seeks out Lycans (werewolves) and kills them one by one before an ancient feud between the two supernatural species re-emerges. However, whether shooting guns with silver nitrate bullets aimed to kill Lycans or racing around in her sports car to save a human wanted by the Lycans, she never changes her clothes or facial expression. And both grow equally tiresome throughout the two hours. Think of her character Selene as Trinity from The Matrix on training wheels. She exudes testosterone and sheer sexuality at the same time. Both female action heroes slink through a rain-beset metropolis coated with a haze of bluish grey. However, Selene proves good looks and occasional talent aren’t enough to lead a film through some dreary and uninspired moments. Underworld is one of those many films that ask viewers, “Were you entertained?� rather than “Did you like this movie?� Sure there are out-

of feminine empowerment seems almost too good to be true. Just as Frances’ husband leaves her, her best lesbian Asian friend happens to have a ticket for a gay tour of Tuscany that she isn’t using. Just after she gawks at a picture of a 300-year-old villa called Bramasole, Frances’ tour bus unexpectedly stops in front of the estate. Just after she spontaneously buys the house and tries to acclimate herself to Italian living, her world fills with friendly, colorful characters just suited for minor subplots in a movie. And how perfect is it that the name Frances allows every man she meets to call her “Francesca� in a thick, romantic accent? Writer/director Audrey Wells is all too cognizant of the shockingly expedient details of Frances’ rite of passage, and her solution for all of this opportune significance is making Under the Tuscan Sun relentlessly and self-referentially cliche. When sweet-talking Italian heartthrob Marcello (Raoul Bova) tells Frances, “You have beautiful eyes; I want to swim in them,� she laughs and responds, “That’s just what American woman think that all Italian men say.� (Yet, when he tells her “I’m going to make love all over you,� she doesn’t seem to mind.) In fact, most of the men she encounters fit some Italian stereotype. But Frances is always there to comment on her love for the Italian people, even though they just happen to look and act like every other passionate, love-hungry Italian caricature ever put on film. Still, there is a pleasant, aesthetic nature to Frances’ experiences; there’s no denying the

landish moments such as when Selene shoots a circle around her in order to fall to the building’s lower level to avoid the Lycans. And then there’s the fact that subways never really sneak up on anyone in real life, but seem to pop out of nowhere for a vampire with better perceptual abilities. Just as nonsensical, ultraviolet light is harnessed into a liquid form and shot into vampires, making them die on the spot without ever having to see natural light. But, in relation to pure campy entertainment value, Underworld provides the gothic imagery required so the film can constantly be playing on a large screen in goth clubs somewhere behind the leather fetishists and makeup-covered vampire wannabes. But much of the film’s sheer entertainment comes from the unintentional humor scattered throughout that is so outlandishly terrible it’s laugh-inducing. When ancient vampire Victor (Bill Nighy) is awakened in a process that seems too bloody simple, the film slowly begins to crumble from gothic splendor into dark mediocrity. Before Victor, viewers can be enthralled with the dark set design ripped from The Matrix, Blade or anything by Tim Burton. It all has that been-there-donethat feel to it, but it’s still entertaining, and learning more about the vampires and Lycans remains interesting. However, despite training in British dramatic arts, Nighy’s Victor is simplified into a comic, overdramatic mess. His lines are all cliches spoken in either Southern or English accents, depending on the scenes. Obviously, vampires can morph their voices while morphing their bodies back to good health as well. Scott Speedman (TV’s Felicity) is thrown into the

natural splendor of Italy, and Diane Lane’s gentle performance shows just how thrilling and scary it can be to take in all the beauty of a foreign country all at once. Frances commits herself to all things Italian, cooking indigenous food for her renovating crew and traveling constantly from cities to the coast. She is a woman determined to prove that she isn’t too old to start over, and Lane’s liveliness gives Frances just the right mix of ambition and anxiety. While her role in Unfaithful had critics running to use the phrase “scorchingly sexy� as often as possible, Lane’s well-maintained, middle-aged beauty is far more subdued in Under the Tuscan Sun. Again, she plays a character who needs to rediscover, as Frances screams to herself after a sexual encounter with Marcello, that she’s “still got it,� but the new setting keeps the idea fresh. Frances is far more insecure and fragile than Unfaithful’s Connie Sumner, but the Italian lifestyle—and in particular, Italian men—push her to indulge in everything her new home has to offer. Lane once again is striking as a vibrant woman pushing 40, striving to rekindle the passion that has washed away from her calm suburban life. But for all of Under the Tuscan Sun’s supposedly true depictions of one woman’s flourishing in a new culture, the portrait feels somewhat less than authentic. Frances encounters an all-too familiar range of Europeans, from American bashers (“You greedy Americans,

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UNDER THE TUSCAN SUN | DIANE LANE you ruin everything,� one woman tells Frances) to goofy, good-natured cartoons. One character even spends all her time namechecking Fellini, as if mentioning Italy’s most famous director validates the reality of Frances’ experiences. It is unfortunate that Under the Tuscan Sun spends two hours proving that Frances can survive without a man but still feels the need to throw in a new love interest at the last second. Maybe that’s how it happened and maybe it isn’t, but not much in this cheerful piece of European escapism really feels like something that would happen under any sun.

C-UViews UNDERWORLD ★★★ Mark Weber SCREEN GEMS INC.

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UNDERWORLD | KATE BECKINSALE mix without many lines and, thus, his chemistry with Selene is lacking. For a movie giving less action than previews promised, one would at least expect a more plausible love story to distract viewers. The film’s most over-the-top moment comes from the periodic use of whips in order to tame these supernatural beasts. In one scene toward the end, a character’s head is whipped but it doesn’t split apart for a matter of seconds. The dying character probably could have written a better screenplay for Underworld in that time.

SCREEN REVIEW GUIDE

★★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★ no stars

Flawless Good Mediocre Bad Unwatchable

Champaign

“Buffy the Vampire Slayer meets The Matrix.�

★★ Matt Maly Champaign

“Neat special effects, but it was just completely ridiculous.�

★★ Mike Almaraz Urbana

“It had vampires, but not much else.�


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WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 buzz

SOCIAL ISSUES Rally for Immigrant Rights! Immigrant Worker Freedom Rides Rally – The Illinois Freedom Rides bus is coming to Champaign-Urbana to highlight the local movement for immigrant rights ! You have a tremendous opportunity to take part in history in the making by attending the Immigrant Worker Freedom Rides Rally in UrbanaChampaign! Speakers willinclude: Immigrant Freedom Riders, Local Immigrant Rights Speakers, and Local Politicians – Champaign County Courthouse 101 E. Main Street, Sept 29, 7pm, free

WORKSHOPS Walking In This World Group – The new sequel to the Artist's Way with 12 new weeks of strategies and techniques for expressing our creative spirit. Wednesdays, Sept 17-Dec 17 (no session Nov 26) from 7:30-9:00pm at McKinley Foundation (free parking). To register or for more information, contact Jo Pauly, MSW, Whole Life Coach at (217) 337-7823 or jopauly@prairienet.org. Artist's Way Group – A 12-week adventure in recovering and celebrating our creative spirit. Wednesdays, Sept 17Dec 17 (no session Nov 26) from 5:45-7:15pm at McKinley Foundation (free parking). To register or for more information, contact Jo Pauly, MSW, Whole Life Coach at (217) 337-7823 or jopauly@prairienet.org. Great Grain Breads – October 18 – Learn to fit whole grains into your diet by creating healthy, simple whole grain breads. The feature recipe can be altered to create many different types of bread from the same basic recipe. The class meets Saturday, October 18 from 10-11:30 a.m. at the Mettler Center, 2906 Crossing Court in Champaign. The registration fee is $20. Registration deadline is October 10. For more information call 217/403-4590. Ballroom I: An Introduction to the World of Ballroom Dancing – October 20 - November 24 – Learn the basic steps of waltz and swing in a fun, easygoing environment. No experience and no partner are necessary. The class meets Mondays from 6:45-8 p.m. at the Refinery, 502 S. Kenwood St., Champaign. The registration fee is $49. Registration deadline is October 13. For more information call 217-403-4590. Salsa and Nightclub Two-Step – October 20 - November 24 – This is a beginning class for club-style partner dancing. Participants will learn salsa and nightclub two-step. No experience and no partner are necessary. The class meets Mondays from 8:15-9:30pm at the Refinery, 502 S. Kenwood St., Champaign. The registration fee is $49. Registration deadline is October 13. For more information call 217-403-4590. TMJ Discomfort: What Can You Do? – October 22 – Learn about the anatomy and function of the jaw and how to keep it functioning optimally. The class will also address the role muscle tension can play in joint dysfunction and how to relieve this tension. Douglas Nelson and the staff of Body Work Associates will teach the class. The class meets Wednesday, October 22 from 7-9pm in room M130 at the Parkland College campus. The registration fee is $16. Registration deadline is October 15. For more information call 217-403-4590.

PUBLIC MEETINGS Code Enforcement Board of Appeals Meeting – Champaign Council Chambers, 102 N. Neil Street, Champaign, Sept. 25, 3-5pm

1906 W. Bradley Ave. Champaign, IL 19 & up to Enter

Housing Authority Board Meeting – Housing Authority of Champaign County, 205 W. Park Avenue, Sept. 25, 7-9pm Tenant Union Apartment Hunting Workshops – The Tenant Union will be presenting 5 workshops at UIUC residence halls – Saunders Lounge, Sept. 29, 7pm

Friday Sept. 26

DROP SIX

Peruvian Coffee Hour – At these informal gatherings coffee, tea and homemade ethnic desserts are served – Cosmopolitan Club, Sept. 25, 7:30pm

Saturday Sept. 27

JAB PRIVATE PARTIES CALL TED 217 766-5108

Community Drum Circle – Ten Thousand Villages, 101 N. Walnut, Champaign, Sept 29, 7-9pm Special City Council Study Session – Champaign Council Chambers 102 N. Neil Street, Sept 30, 7-10pm

Debtors Anonymous – Confidential support and helpful tools for dealing with recurring debt and compulsive spending – Baha'i Center, 807 E. Green St., U, Sept 30, 5:45pm Plan Commission Meeting – Champaign Council Chambers, 102 N. Neil Street, Champaign, Oct. 1, 4-6pm Colleges Against Cancer General Meeting – CAC will hold its first general meeting of the year. Come out to learn more about the organization and how you can help join the fight against cancer. Everyone's welcome! – 100 Noyes Lab, Oct. 1, 7pm Historic Preservation Meeting – City Council Chambers, Oct. 1, 7pm

KIDS AND FAMILIES Baby Time – Lap bouncing, nursery rhymes, music activities and play time for infants with a caregiver – Douglass Branch Library, Sept 25, 10:30-11am Thursday Arts and Crafts for Kids (TACK) – Arts and Crafts for elementary school-age children – Champaign Public Library, Sept. 25, 4-5pm, no registration Talkin’ About Careers – Local professionals talk about career choices. For students in middle school and up, and their parents – Douglass Branch Library, Sept 25, 6:307:45pm Girls, Girls, Girls! – Games, crafts, and reading time for girls in kindergarten to fifth grade – Douglass Branch Library, Sept 26, 4-5pm The P.A.C. – The P.A.C. "Pages For All Ages'" free art class is a brand new series of fun, educational activities focused on developing your child's artistic awareness. Meeting the fourth Saturday of each month at 3:00 p.m., each P.A.C. gathering will focus on the work of one well-known artist. We'll learn a little bit about the life and art of this figure before launching into some exciting craft activites based upon his or her art – Pages For All Ages, Sept 27, 3pm Dallas & Co's Magic Weekend – Hourly drawings, Pre Halloween Fun, and Savings. Free magic shows, face painting, and balloons – Dallis & Co, 101 E. University, Champaign, Sept 27, 28, Sat: 10am-6pm Sun: noon-4pm O Baby! – Lap bouncing, nursery rhymes and music activities for infants with a caregiver – Champaign Public Library, Sept 29, 9:30am and 10:30am Know Zone – Homework help for school-aged children – Douglass Branch Library, Sept 30, 4-5pm Tuesday Twos – Stories, songs and movement activities for two-year-olds with a parent or grandparent – Champaign Public Library, Sept 30, 9:30am and 10:30am Teen Scene – Listen to music, discuss current topics, and snack with your friends – Douglass Branch Library, Sept 29, 4-5pm Art-to-go – Presentation, discussion and hands-on activity led by Krannert Art Museum staff – Douglass Branch Library, Oct 1, 4-5:30pm Arts for Kids with Cecil Bridgewater – Cecil Bridgewater's commitment to jazz education in Champaign-Urbana dates back to his student years when he taught at the Douglass Center in Champaign. Now a veteran of New York's Jazzmobile – an organization founded by Billy Taylor that is dedicated to jazz education – Cecil brings his experience and enthusiasm back to the youth of Champaign-Urbana. This event is planned for kids in grades 1-4 – Tyron Festival Theatre, Krannert Center for the Performaning Arts, Sept 27, 1pm Preschool groups are invited to come to The Phillips Recreation Center for Funfare on Thursday, Oct 2 from 9:45 to 10:15 AM for stories, songs, puppets, and films, presented by The Urbana Free Library Children’s Department. Please register with the Children's Department in advance at 367-4069.

buzz

arts

SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 | I AM A HUNCHBACK WHO LIKES PEGGIN.

Shakespeare

this week

continued from page 7 The Bell’s production seems to go all out on atmosphere to suggest the late 1950s and early ‘60s, which tends toward gimmickry, and distracts playgoers from some of the pleasant and amusing messages Shakespeare had about life and love and the roles we play in courtship, romance and marriage. Not only is the setting like a ‘50s Fellini film, but the costume design and regular appearance of a pack of cameraflashing paparazzi directly connect this production to Fellini’s 1960 classic La dolce vita. This Chicago Shakespeare Theatre production is so typical of the theater’s many serviceable and entertaining adaptations for the Midwestern masses. Frequently more skillful performances take a backseat to pleasurable theatrical silliness and scenes filled with action and music. Kate Fry’s standout performance makes this production memorable in an otherwise infrequently passionate romantic comedy. buzz

Fr Sep 26 Pacifica Quartet 7:30pm, $10-$18

Sa Sep 27 Arts for Kids with Cecil Bridgewater 1pm, free, tickets required Jazz Threads Underwriter:

Sa Sep 27 Timothy McGovern, bassoon 7:30pm, $2-$5 Cecil Bridgewater 7:30pm, $17-$25 Sponsors: Margaret and Larry Neal Anonymous

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SHAKESPEARE THEATRE

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Petruchio (Ryan Shively) whisks away an unwilling Katharine (Kate Fry).

Creative spirit continued from page 8

Coaches meet with their participants both in seminar environments like Pauly’s and in online chat room formats. She has led sessions every spring and fall semester, as well several summers, since 1997. Her background was originally in social work, though she is constantly exploring new applications of creativity in her life, such as through collages and eye pillows, which she makes. One of the most unique attributes of her sessions is the diversity of participants that they continue to draw. Artistic experience in the sense we most often think of it is not at all a prerequisite, though many of those who come have solid backgrounds with various media. Both University faculty and students have attended, as well as community members from the Champaign-Urbana area and even commuters from as far away as Decatur. Marcia Wickes, a Champaign resident enrolled in the class, says people take the class for many different reasons. The various ages, professional backgrounds and creative aspects of everyone’s personalities enrich the course with a dynamic true to the book’s forum concept.

“There’s people you can talk about it with when you get stuck. It’s the whole support thing,” says Wickes. She says the course has enriched her life in two key areas: “teaching (her) ways to look at (her) art without criticizing,” and incorporating creativity into her daily schedule. Linda Scott, an associate professor in advertising, cultivated professional artistic aspirations for years, both throughout childhood and as an art major at the University of Texas. Long after turning away from art as a primary interest and entering into academia, Scott happened upon Pauly’s course after meeting her through a fellow University faculty member. She first took another of Pauly’s seminars— Crafting a Life—last fall, and is now attending The Artist’s Way. Others, such as Wickes, came across the group after reading the book through Pauly’s community e-mails about area art-related events. The Artist’s Way has also drawn followers such as recording artist Kathy Mattea, who credits the book with inspiring her Love Travels album. The book led her to take one of the many workshops and delve further into her own creative well. Pauly’s workshop meets Wednesdays from 5:45 to 7:15 p.m. Those interested in the course can contact her at jopauly@prairienet.org. buzz

Afterglow: Rachael Lee/Jeff Helgesen Jazz Quartet 9:30pm, free

Su Sep 28 Kimono Fantasy: Attire from the Heian Court Era to the Present Day 2pm, $10-$18 UI Wind Symphony and UI Symphonic Band I 7:30pm, $2-$5

@

krannert center

Tu Sep 30

creative intersections

Interval: Sones de México Noon, free Sponsor: Anonymous

Sa Sep 27

Know Your University: Alexander String Quartet Noon, University YMCA (1001 S Wright St, Champaign), free UI Symphonic Band II and UI Concert Band I 7:30pm, $2-$5

We Oct 1

Arts for Kids with Cecil Bridgewater 1pm, free, tickets required

Tu Sep 30 Know Your University: Alexander String Quartet Noon, University YMCA (1001 S Wright St, Champaign), free Creative Intersections Sponsor:

Alexander Quartet Prelude 6:30pm, free Alexander String Quartet 7:30pm, FGH, $16-$32 Sponsors: Avis and Dean Hilfinger Jean and Howard Osborn Dolores and Roger Yarbrough

Th Oct 2 Wine Tasting 5pm, free Chip McNeill, jazz saxophone 7:30pm, $2-$5 Three Tales Beryl Korot, video and Steve Reich, music 7:30pm, $17-$28 Talkback following the show, free

Mo Sep 29 Traffic Jam: Alexander String Quartet 5pm, free

Some Krannert Center programs are supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Illinois Arts Council, and patron and corporate contributions. Cecil Bridgewater’s performance is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts; and by the Heartland Arts Fund, a program of Arts Midwest funded by the National Endowment for the Arts with additional contributions from General Mills Foundation, Land O'Lakes Foundation, Sprint Corporation, and the Illinois Arts Council. Support for this Kimono Fantasy is provided in part by the University of Illinois College of Fine and Applied Arts; Japan House; Krannert Center for the Performing Arts; The Cultural Foundation for Promoting the National Costume of Japan; Hakubi Kyoto Kimono School; and Friends of the World. Funding for Three Tales is provided in part by "Silicon, Carbon, Culture," a joint initiative of the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Fine and Applied Arts, with support from the Madden Initiative and the Offices of the Provost and Chancellor.

KrannertCenter.com

Season Sponsors Coporate Season Underwriters

Patron Season Sponsors

CAROLE AND JERRY RINGER

9

217/333-6280 or 800/KCPATIX 217/333-9714 (TTY) 217/244-SHOW (Fax) 217/244-0549 (Groups) kran-tix@uiuc.edu Ticket Office Open 10am to 6pm daily; on days of performances open 10am through intermission.


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music music

I’M TRYING TO BE SOMEONE ELSE | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

buzz

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ARTIST OPPORTUNITIES

Third time an infectious charm

Call for Entries – Entries needed for juried show at High Cross Road Studio during October. Any 2-D or 3-D collage or assemblage work created in the past two years will be considered. Submit actual work, slides or photos for consideration. Consideration fee is $15. All work must be ready to hang.Work weighing more than 50 pounds must be noted as such. Commission is 25 percent. Mail submissions with check to Sandra Ahten, 1408 S Vine, Urbana, IL 61801. Call or e-mail for more details or other arrangements.Note: It is not necessary for work to be for sale.

Mates of State return to Champaign to support their third album, Team Boo

J

ason Hammel and Kori Gardner don’t make ordinary pop music. It is quirky and complex, and at once it is plain old simple fun. It is a sound developed since 1997 that is so unique that after a few bars of any of their songs, a first time listener will inevitably ask, “What the heck is this?” to which an experienced listener will respond, “A ha! This is Mates of State.” So perhaps the phrase “A ha!” isn’t getting tossed around in conversation very much these days. But the name Mates of State is on the tip of many tongues in the indie rock world lately, due in large part to the buzz surrounding their third full-length album, Team Boo. Some of that comes from the fact that the duo is taking its magical live performance out on the road again for another national tour. One of the stops along the way will be The Highdive in Champaign where Mates will perform with Orphans (members of Absinthe Blind). For those who haven’t yet picked up Team Boo, the show on Sunday night will be a good opportunity to hear most of the material. “We are going to play almost all of the new CD,” said Gardner. “We’ll still play some of the old stuff because I really hate bands that only play stuff off of their new album.” Live performances have been the bread and butter for Mates of State. After moving to San Francisco, the band adopted a “play anywhere, anytime” philosophy. They have done just that, especially supporting new albums. “We’re a touring band first,” Hammel said. “But we still have to have something to be excited about. A lot of times that is the new songs. It is fun to play the new ones for an audience.” Playing in front of an audience certainly wasn’t the duo’s first ambition. Before their decision to work full time as a band, Gardner was a teacher and Hammel was a cancer researcher. They quit those jobs in 2001, got married and started touring heavily. Those plans don’t seem to be changing any time soon. In fact, touring might actually help Hammel and Gardner’s relationship. “We have been in the band since we got married and we are together every day on tour,” Gardner said. “If we were to stop doing this, we wouldn’t see each other as much. It has actually made our relationship stronger. For some marriages it might hurt, but we have made it work.” While the touring schedule might be giving some benefits to Hammel and Gardner’s marriage, Hammel also sees it as a benefit to the fans in the audience.

“We are a live band and when we are start working on the singing part,” Hammel other tried in vein to save him. “It feels like a really different subject for us onstage it gives us a chance to really commu- said, explaining the songwriting process. “If nicate with the listener,” Hammel said. “We we both have good ideas, we will use them to be singing about,” Gardner said. “But it is enjoy that they get something out of it and that both. It is a little more random as to the lyrical an idea that appears in general for us. Death part. On the lyrics we’ll decide what a song is pops up in so many of our songs without it we can feel the excitement.” The live performances also gave Mates of about and give our respective vantage points.” being the main theme.” “Parachutes,” along with the other 11 tracks “We’ll fill in with each other. Neither of us is State a chance to test and refine some of the material that became part of Team Boo. writing the entire melody or lyric,” Gardner on Team Boo, was released on Sept. 16 on Hammel estimates that 60 percent of the songs said. “Lyrics come after the melodies. We’ll ask Champaign label Polyvinyl Records, a record were ones that had been performed on the each other, ‘what were you singing about?’ label that Mates of State saw as a perfect fit road, and the remainder were written when and then we’ll come together on the lyrics. We when they signed. “Matt and Darcie (Lunsford), (owners of both definitely love this way of songwriting the band came off of tour. Polyvinyl), were really easy to communicate Having that material ready to go is one of and we aren’t going to change.” That process has created critical success for with and they were on top of their shit,” the differences between the recording process for Team Boo and Mates of State’s previous Mates of State. Their first album, My Solo Gardner said. “What is great is that everyone Project, was listed in the receives the same attention whether you are a release, Our Constant New York Times as “one smaller band that doesn’t sell many albums or Concern. of the best records you you are the biggest sellers.” “On this album we Whether or not Mates of State become one of probably didn’t hear in were comfortable and 2000.” Team Boo looks the biggest sellers isn’t something that will prepared,” Hammel to build on that success alter the Mates of State sound. said. “We only had “We will never compromise our music,” and the new sonic taneight songs written gents that the album Gardner said. “We might make some changes for Our Constant goes on will most likely so that more people can see our music, but we Concern going into the bring more praise. One will never compromise our creativity.” studio, so we were – Kori Gardner They may not compromise but even their of the most striking scrambling to write tangents is a song entertaining live show has undergone few and we didn’t want to do that again. That creates stress you shouldn’t called “Parachutes (Funeral Song)” that fea- changes. “We have been adding without adding,” tures Gardner on a more traditional sounding have to think about.” Gardner said. “Every tour our energy has been Not only did Hammel and Gardner have piano than her organ. “We decided it sounded cool on the increasing on stage and we’re having fun.” buzz enough material written to fill Team Boo, but piano, but also it was more of a raw song they actually had extra material. “That allows you to capture which songs are and it sounded too rocking on the organ,” really the best and then discard some songs,” Gardner said. The song was inspired by a story the duo Come share in the fun with Mates of State on Sunday when Hammel said. The other difference in the recording process were told where a couple decided to go out they play The Highdive with local trio Orphans. Doors open for Team Boo was the personnel that the duo parachuting and one fell out of their vest as the at 10 p.m. and tickets are $8. relied upon. Our Constant Concern was recorded with Dave Trumfino. Team Boo employed John Croslin (who had worked with Guided By Voices, Spoon, Waylon Jennings and Pavement) and Jim Eno (who had worked with Spoon). But it wasn’t the impressive indie credentials that made recording with Croslin and Eno so special. “We had a good working relationship with Dave, but we had a great relationship with John and Jim,” Hammel said. “They are our friends and so we were open to suggestions when they would say, ‘I like this but I like this a little better.’ It was a four person process with lots of good ideas that Kori and I might not have seen just looking from our angles.” The result of that four person process is an album that sees more complex melodies in Gardner’s organ playing and even tighter drumming from Hammel. And of course, the dual vocals are still on this release, letting Hammel and Gardner’s lyrics contrast, compliment and come together in each song. “When we are writing, we are both working at the same time on the music and then will Mates of State are Kori Gardner and Jason Hammel and will be performing at The Highdive on Sept. 28.

[

We have been in the band since we got married and we are together every day on tour...It has actually made our relationship stronger.

The Springer Cultural Center is seeking local artists to participate in the juried Art Exhibition Series.Individual and group applications will be accepted.Information and applications are available at the Springer Cultural Center, 301 N Randolph, Champaign, 61820, (217) 398-2376, or online at www.champaignparkdistrict.com/pdf. Applications will be accepted from Aug 25 through Sept 26.

ART LISTINGS Portraits – Award winning portrait artist Sandra Ahten is currently accepting commissions for portraits for holiday giving. Portraits are priced at an affordable range and professional exchange or barter may be accepted.For examples of work and a quote,contact Sandra Ahten at (217) 367-6345 or spiritofsandra@hotmail.com

[

Creation Art Studio Art Classes for Children and Adults -- All classes offer technical instruction and the exploration of materials through expressive,spontaneous art and experimentation. Independent studies of personal interests and ideas, dreams, etc. are expressed and developed through collage and assemblage art and through drawing, painting, sculpture and ceramics. Children meet Mon-Thu from 3:30-5pm, and Sat 11am12:30pm. Adolescents meet Fri 4-5:30pm. Adults meet Thu at 10am and Sat between 1:30-5:30pm for two or more hours. Create designs, a still life, portraits, landscapes and more. Open to beginners and advanced students.Adult Open Studio meets Tue 7-9pm.Drop-ins welcome.Come with a friend.Call to make special arrangements for a group. CPDU's offered. For information,contact Jeannine Bestoso at 344-6955.Creation Art Studio is located at 1102 E Washington, Urbana. www.creationartstudios.com Join Artists and Workshops at Gallery Virtu – Gallery Virtu, an artist-owned cooperative, now invite applications from area artists. The Gallery also offers workshops for adults, teens and children in knitting, embroidery, photography, jewelry making, printmaking, papermaking, bookbinding and ribbon flowers. Gallery Virtu offers original works by the members including: jewelry, pottery, collages, sculptures, journals, hats, handbags and other textiles. For more information please call 762-7790, visit our web site at www.galleryvirtu.org, e-mail workshops@galleryvirtu.org or visit the gallery. Regular hours: Thu 12-4pm, Fri 12-8pm, Sat 10am-6pm. 220 W Washington Street in Monticello. Art Classes at High Cross Studio – All classes are held at High Cross Studio in Urbana. 1101 N High Cross Road. E-mail or call for reservations and details. (217) 367-6345 or spiritofsandra@hotmail.com..

PHOTO | KATHY GARDNER COURTESY OF TAG TEAM MEDIA

BY BRIAN MERTZ | MUSIC EDITOR

calendar

SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 | WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com

“Portrait Paintings with Oils” – This course will provide instruction in painting portraits from photographs. Paint a portrait of your loved one or yourself.Mon-Fri daytime class and weekend workshop offered. "Collage for the Soul" – Students will learn a variety of collage techniques, including photo and photocopy transfer, papermaking and manipulation,and frontage,while exploring a particular subject, such as a place, a memory, an experience or a relationship.No art-making experience necessary. "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" – For adults who have always wanted to learn to draw, but felt as if they lacked talent or confidence. Other Classes: “Making Monoprints,” “Art With Intention” (Open Studio). For information on these visit http://www.spiritofsandra.com and click on "classes," then e-mail or call for reservations.

ART GALLERIES AND EXHIBITS Boneyard Pottery – Ceramic Art by Michael Schwegmann and more. 403 Water St, Champaign. (217) 355-5610.Tue-Sat 11am5pm. Broken Oak Gallery – Local and national artists. Original art including photography, watercolors, pottery, oil paintings, colored pencil, woodturning and more. Refreshments served by the garden all day Saturday. 1865 N 1225 E Rd., White Heath. (217) 762-4907.Thu-Sat 10am-4pm. Cinema Galley – Local and regional artists including many University of Illinois and Parkland College faculty members.120

W Main, Urbana. (217) 367-3711. Tue-Sat 10am-4pm. Sun 15pm.

Champaign. (217) 356-8994. Mon-Fri 9am-4pm and by appointment.

Cafe Kopi – Art work from local artist Kate Sammons on display. Artist statement: “The work displayed here was created with several different audiences and appreciations in mind. The artist hopes that it will appeal to a broad range of tastes, styles and levels of art awareness. Primarily, this art is created to have a pleasant character and stimulate its viewer's pleasure of the appreciator by its soft colors and feminine forms.It is perfect for creating a relaxed, casual and contemporary environment, where one can appreciate it without having to devote one's full attention to it. Secondarily, this art is meant to direct one's attention to the meaning or symbolism of its materials and the method that was used to put them together. The materials used to create these pieces were all carefully chosen to resemble certain aspects of the home environment. These pieces were made from materials bought from local home improvement stores ... Finally, this art is designed to entertain one's sense of imagination.These pieces are loaded with details that some people may find relevant and amusing to their knowledge of art or design ...These works,while fulfilling their primary function as wall hangings,make an enigmatic metaphor to the walls themselves.” 109 N Walnut, Champaign. (217) 359-4266. Mon-Thu 7am-11pm, Fri-Sat 7am-12pm, Sun 11am-8pm.

Old Vic Art Gallery – Fine and Original Art. 11 E University, Champaign. (217) 355-8338. Mon-Thu 11am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-4:30pm.

Creation Art Studios – Hosts a continuous and evolving display of works by students and associates of the studio. Landscapes, florals, animal life and expressive art in various mediums by Jeannine Bestoso are also currently on display.For information, contact Jeannine Bestoso.1102 E Washington St.,Urbana.(217) 344-6955. Tue-Sat 1-5:30pm; and scheduled studio sessions. www.creationartstudios.com Country in the City – Antiques, Architectural, Gardening, Home Accessories. Custom designing available. 1104 E Washington St., Urbana.(217) 367-2367.Thu-Sat 10am-5pm. Framer's Market – Frame Designers since 1981.Current featured artists: Charlotte Brady - Botanical Watercolors, Barry Brehm Landscape Photography, Larry Hamlin - Aquatint Etchings, Patrick Harness - Vibrant Oils and Pastels, Hua Nian - Abstract Watercolors & Pastels, David Smith - Original Acrylic Landscapes,Cindy Smith - Stone & Wood Sculpture,Bill Stevens - Humorous Recycled Metal Sculptures,Steve Stoerger - Steel & Glass Sculpture,Bonnie Switzer - Abstract Acrylic Paintings.807 W Springfield Ave.,Champaign.(217) 351-7020.Tue-Fri 9:30am5:30pm, Sat 10am-4pm. Furniture Lounge – Local artist Dean Schwenk along with many other local and fine artwork/pottery. Also specializing in midcentury modern furniture from the 1920s-1980s, retro, Danish modern, lighting, vintage stereo equipment and vinyl records. 9 E University, Champaign. (217) 352-5150. Sun-Mon 124:30pm,Wed-Sat 11am-5:30pm. Gallery Virtu Cooperative – Original fine art and crafts from member artists including jewelry, pottery, paintings, collages, hats, handbags and other textiles, sculptures and journals. The Gallery also offers workshops; a new schedule of classes is on the web site.220 W Washington St.,Monticello.(217) 762-7790. Thu 12-4pm, Fri 12-8pm, Sat 10am-6pm.www.galleryvirtu.org Glass FX – New and Antique Stained Glass Windows, Lamps, and unique glass gifts. Gallery is free and open to the public. Interested in learning the art of Stained Glass? Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced Stained Glass Classes offered. 202 S First St, Champaign. Mon-Thu 10am-5:30pm, Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 9am-4pm.(217) 359-0048. www.glassfx.com. Griggs Street Potters -–Handmade functional and decorative pottery.305 W Grigg St,Urbana.(217) 344-8546.Mon-Fri 11am4pm, or call for appointment. The High Cross Studio Gallery – Works by Sandra Ahtens on display. Artist studio space available. 1101 N High Cross Rd., Urbana. Tue 7-9pm, Thu 3-5pm, Fri 3-5pm and by chance or appointment.spiritofsandra@hotmail.com Hill Street Gallery Inc. – Oil and watercolor paintings, hand painted T-shirts, handmade jewelry. 703 W Hill, Champaign. (217) 359-0675. Sat 12-5pm or by appointment during the week. International Galleries – Works from local artists.Lincoln Square Mall. (217) 328-2254. Mon-Fri 10am-8pm, Sat 10am-6pm, Sun 12-5pm. Larry Kanfer Gallery -- University of Illinois images by photographic artist Larry Kanfer.Unique diploma frames and other UI gifts. Sepia Champaign-Urbana Collection also on display. Available now: 2004 Prairiescapes and University of Illinois calendars.2503 S Neil,Champaign.(217) 398-2000.Free and Open to the Public.Mon-Sat 10am-5:30pm.www.kanfer.com LaPayne Photography – Specializes in panoramic photography up to 6 feet long of different subjects including sporting events, city skylines,national parks and University of Illinois scenes. Las Vegas Strip photo show coming soon. 816 Dennison Dr.,

Springer Cultural Center – cultural,recreational and educational programs for all ages as well as workshops, lectures, exhibits and performances.Offers classes in dance,music,theater,visual arts, health/wellness and for preschool children. 301 N Randolph Street,Champaign.398-2376.Mon-Thu 8am-9pm,Fri 8am-5:30pm, Sat 9am-5pm, Sun 12pm-5pm. www.champaignparkdistrict.com Steeple Gallery – Works from Gary Ingersoll, including many Allerton Park photos on display. Also showing vintage botanical and bird prints,antiques,framed limited edition prints.102 E Lafayette St., Monticello. 762-2924. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat 10am-4pm.www.steeplegallery.com Verdant News and Coffee & Verde Gallery – Magazines, newspapers,coffee,beverages and fine pastries along with the Verde Fine Art Gallery. 17 E Taylor St., Champaign. 366-3204. Cafe hours:Mon-Sat 7am-10 pm;Gallery Hours:Tue-Sat 10am-10pm. www.verdant-systems.com/Verde.htm UIUC Japan House – Public Tours: Every Thursday, 1-4pm, Third Sat of each month, 1-5pm or by appointment. 2000 S Lincoln Ave., Urbana.(217) 244-9934.email japanhouse@uiuc.edu. Ziemer Gallery – Original paintings and limited edition prints by Larry Ziemer. Pottery, weavings, wood turning and glass works by other artists.Gallery visitors are welcome to sit,relax,listen to the music and just enjoy being surrounded by art. 210 W Washington, Monticello. Tue 10am-8pm, Wed-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 10am-4pm.www.ziemergallery.com

THEATER LISTINGS Elysium on the Prairie, Live Action Roleplaying – Vampires stalk the city streets and struggle for dominance in a world of gothic horror. Create your own character and mingle with dozens of players who portray their own undead alter egos. Each session is another chapter in an ongoing story of triumph, tragedy and betrayal. Friday, “Vampire: The Masquerade” For more information visit: http://ww2.uiuc.edu/ro/elysium/intro.html. Check site for location, 7pm. Parkland Theatre presents “The Laramie Project” – Written by Moises Kaufman and the members of the Tectonic Theatre Project, this drama looks at the events surrounding the 1998 death of gay student Matthew Shepard in Laramie,Wyoming as told through the voices of the townspeople. The director, Randi Jennifer Collins Hard, has cast over 70 community members to bring the town of Laramie to life. Performances are Oct 1, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11 at 8pm and Oct 12 at 3pm. A post-performance talk with the director and actors will be held on Fri, Oct 3 after the show. General admission tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for students (over 12) and seniors, and $5 for youths 12 and under. Special priced nights are opening night, Wed, Oct 1 when all tickets are $2.99 and Thu, Oct 9 when all tickets are half their regular price. Call (217) 351-2528 for tickets and information. The Celebration Company at the Station Theatre presents “ Road To Nirvana” – This dark comedy tells a story about two ex-movie moguls on the skids, Al and Jerry, reuniting to co-produce the biggest blockbuster film ever – an autobiographical account of Nirvana, the world’s biggest female pop star. She will even star in it as herself – but only if she can find producers willing to meet her extraordinary terms. – Road To Nirvana runs at The Station Theatre, Thursday to Sunday, Sept 25 - 28 and Wednesday to Saturday, Oct 1-4. All performances are at 8pm. Ticket prices are $8 Thu and Sun, $10 on Fri and Sat, and Wed night is a special two tickets for the price of one. For reservations please call 217-384-4000.

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CHOREOGRAPHERS WANTED Choreographers Wanted for 22nd Annual B.A.T.S. Fashion Show at Lincoln Avenue Residence Halls – Requirements for the Choreographers include: Letter of Interest , Script of Fashion Show, Have envelope addressed to B.A.T.S. (LAR) C/O Denise Ward. Last day to submit is Oct 3rd. For more information and interviews contact: Denise Ward at 332-2825 or Stefanie Jones at 332-2843.

MIND BODY SPIRIT Loose Womyn Discussion Group – (discussion topics are loose, the women need not be) 7pm Thu, Sept 18 we'll discuss the book The Dance of the Dissident Daughter by Sue Monk Kidd. Borders Bookstore, 802 Town Center Blvd, Champaign (217) 351-9011. Sunday Zen Meditation Meeting – Prairie Zen Center, 515 S Prospect, Champaign, NW corner Prospect & Green, enter thru door from parking area. Introduction to Zen Sitting, 10am; Full Schedule: Service at 9 followed by sitting, Dharma Talk at 11 followed be tea until about 12 noon. Can arrive at any of above times, open to all, no experience needed, no cost. For info call 355-8835 or www.prairiezen.org Prairie Sangha for Mindfulness Meditation – Monday evenings from 7:30-9pm and monthly retreats on Sunday. Theravadan (Vipassana) and Tibetan (Vjrayana & Dzogchen) meditation practice. Meets in Urbana. More information call or email Tom at 356-7413 or shayir@soltec.net. www.prairiesangha.org Clear Sky Zen Group – Meets on Thursday evenings in the Geneva Room of the McKinley Foundation. Newcomers to meditation and people of all traditions and faiths are welcome – McKinley Foundation, 809 S Fifth St, 6:25-9pm Formerly-Fat Persons’ Support Group – Free social meeting every Saturday at 2pm at Aroma Cafe, 118 N Neil St, Champaign. For more information contact Jessica Watson at 353-4934. Artist’s Way Group – A 12-week adventure in recovering and celebrating our creative spirit. Wednesdays, Sept 17Dec 17 (no session Nov 26) from 5:45-7:15pm at McKinley Foundation (free parking). To register or for more information, contact Jo Pauly, MSW, Whole Life Coach at (217) 3377823 or jopauly@prairienet.org. Life Map Workshop – A life map is a collection of visual images, a method of connecting with your intuition, a tool for visualizing your dreams or goals. Come explore life mapping – approaches, uses, and the opportunity to create your own life map. 9:15am-1pm on Oct 4 at McKinley Foundation, Champaign. To register or for information, contact Jo Pauly, MSW, Whole Life Coach at (217) 337-7823 or jopauly@prairienet.org

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C-UVENUES Assembly Hall First & Florida, Champaign, 333.5000 American Legion Post 24 705 W Bloomington Rd, Champaign, 356.5144 American Legion Post 71 107 N Broadway, Urbana, 367.3121 Barfly 120 N Neil, Champaign,352.9756 Barnes and Noble 51 E Marketview, Champaign, 355.2045 Boltini Lounge 211 N Neil, Champaign, 378.8001 Borders Books & Music 802 W Town Ctr, Champaign, 351.9011 The Brass Rail 15 E University, Champaign, 352.7512 Canopy Club (The Garden Grill) 708 S Goodwin, Urbana, 367.3140 C.O. Daniels 608 E Daniel, Champaign,337.7411 Cosmopolitan Club 307 E John, Champaign, 367.3079 Courtyard Cafe Illini Union, 1401 W Green, Urbana, 333.4666 Cowboy Monkey 6 Taylor St, Champaign, 398.2688 Clybourne 706 S Sixth, Champaign, 383.1008 Curtis Orchard 3902 S Duncan Rd, Champaign, 359.5565 D.R. Diggers 604 S Country Fair Dr, Champaign, 356.0888 Embassy Tavern & Grill 114 S Race, Urbana, 384.9526 Esquire Lounge 106 N Walnut, Champaign, 398.5858 Fallon’s Ice House 703 N Prospect, Champaign, 398.5760 Fat City Saloon 505 S Chestnut, Champaign, 356.7100 The Great Impasta 114 W Church, Champaign, 359.7377 G.T.’s Western Bowl Francis Dr, Champaign, 359.1678 The Highdive 51 Main, Champaign, 359.4444 Huber’s 1312 W Church, Champaign, 352.0606 Illinois Disciples Foundation 610 E Springfield, Champaign, 352.8721 Independent Media Center 218 W Main St, Urbana, 344.8820 The Iron Post 120 S Race, Urbana, 337.7678 Joe’s Brewery 706 S Fifth, Champaign, 384.1790 Kam’s 618 E Daniel, Champaign, 328.1605 Krannert Art Museum 500 E Peabody, Champaign, 333.1861 Krannert Center for Performing Arts 500 S Goodwin, Urbana, Tickets: 333.6280, 800/KCPATIX La Casa Cultural Latina 1203 W Nevada, Urbana, 333.4950 Lava 1906 W Bradley, Champaign, 352.8714 Legends Bar & Grill 522 E Green, Champaign, 355.7674 Les’s Lounge 403 N Coler, Urbana, 328.4000 Lincoln Castle 209 S Broadway, Urbana, 344.7720 Malibu Bay Lounge North Route 45, Urbana, 328.7415 Mike & Molly’s 105 N Market, Champaign, 355.1236 Mulligan’s 604 N Cunningham, Urbana, 367.5888 Murphy’s

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WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

604 E Green, Champaign, 352.7275 Neil Street Pub 1505 N Neil, Champaign, 359.1601 Boardman’s Art Theater 126 W Church, Champaign, 351.0068 The Office 214 W Main, Urbana, 344.7608 Parkland College 2400 W Bradley, Champaign, 351.2528 Phoenix 215 S Neil, Champaign, 355.7866 Pia’s of Rantoul Route 136 E, Rantoul, 893.8244 Pink House Routes 49 & 150, Ogden, 582.9997 The Rainbow Coffeehouse 1203 W Green, Urbana, 766.9500 Red Herring/Channing-Murray Foundation 1209 W Oregon, Urbana, 344.1176 Rose Bowl Tavern 106 N Race, Urbana, 367.7031 Springer Cultural Center 301 N Randolph, Champaign, 355.1406 Spurlock Museum 600 S Gregory, Urbana, 333.2360 Strawberry Fields Café 306 W Springfield, Urbana, 328.1655 Ten Thousand Villages 105 N Walnut, Champaign, 352.8938 TK Wendl’s 1901 S Highcross Rd, Urbana, 255.5328 Tonic 619 S Wright, Champaign, 356.6768 Two Main 2 Main, Champaign, 359.3148 University YMCA 1001 S Wright, Champaign, 344.0721 Verde/Verdant 17 E Taylor St, Champaign, 366.3204 Virginia Theatre 203 W Park Ave, Champaign, 356.9053 White Horse Inn 112 1/2 E Green, Champaign, 352.5945 Zorba’s 627 E Green, Champaign

CHICAGOVENUES House of Blues 329 N Dearborn, Chicago, 312.923.2000 The Bottom Lounge 3206 N Wilton, Chicago Congress Theatre 2135 N Milwaukee, 312.923.2000 Vic Theatre 3145 N Sheffield, Chicago, 773.472.0449 Metro 3730 N Clark St, Chicago, 773.549.0203 Elbo Room 2871 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago Park West 322 W Armitage, Chicago, 773.929.1322 Riviera Theatre 4746 N Racine at Lawerence, Chicago Allstate Arena 6920 N Mannheim Rd, Rosemont, 847.635.6601 Arie Crown Theatre 2300 S Lake Shore Dr, Chicago, 312.791.6000 UIC Pavilion 1150 W Harrison, Chicago, 312.413.5700 Schubas 3159 N Southport, Chicago, 773.525.2508 Martyrs 3855 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago, 773.288.4545 Aragon 1106 W Lawerence, Chicago, 773.561.9500 Abbey Pub 3420 W Grace, Chicago, 773.478.4408 Fireside Bowl 2646 W Fullerton Ave, Chicago, 773.486.2700 Schubert Theatre 22 W Monroe, Chicago, 312.977.1700

ART-OPENINGS Luxurious Layers: Kimonos of the Heian Court – The exhibit features beautiful silk clothing of the style worn by the Japanese aristocracy 1000 years ago – Spurlock Museum, Sept 27- Dec 13. Hours: Tue noon-5pm;Wed,Thu, Fri, 9am-5pm; Sat 10am-4pm

ART-ON VIEW NOW "Held Together" & "Unopened Places" – Verde Gallery presents "Held Together," sculptures by Sandra Ahtens and "Unopened Places," paintings and drawings from Jana Manson on display through Oct 4. Opening reception on Thu Sept 18, 7-9pm. Gallery Hours: Tue-Sat 10am-10pm. www.verdantsystems.com/Verde.htm "mistaken" – featuring painting by Steven Hudson, installation by Christina March and mixed media works by Victoria Outerbridge. The exhibit opens on Sept 17 and runs through Oct 12 at The Springer Cultural Center All are invited to a reception on Sept 19 from 6-8pm. That night, from 6-7pm we will have live music by Desdafinado, followed by an artists' talk at 7pm "Full Circle" – Gallery Virtue presents a solo exhibition of black and white photography by Anna Barnes.The photographs will be on display throughout September. 220 W Washington, Monticello. Thu 12-4pm, Fri 10am-8pm, Sat 10am-6pm. (217) 762-7790. www.galleryvirtu.org. "Remnants of Ritual: Selections from the Gelbard Collection of African Art" – The magnificent African art collection of David and Clifford Gelbard focuses on the cultural significance and aesthetic beauty of masks and sculptures - many of which were created for ceremonial and ritual purposes.This exhibition includes a wide array of objects and celebrates the durable, expressive essence of festivals, rites and coming-of-age ceremonies. On display at the Krannert Art Museum through Oct 26. 500 E Peabody, Urbana. Tue, Thu-Sat 9am-5pm, Wed 9am8pm, Sun 2-5pm.(217) 333-1860.Suggested Donation: $3 "Visualizing the Blues: Images of the American South, 18621999" - Every picture tells a story and this exhibition of more than 100 photographs of the Mississippi Delta region portrays a profoundly vivid narrative of life in the American South.These photographs, taken from the Civil War era through 1999, show the rhythms of life from this almost mythic region and powerfully document the sources of inspiration for the lyrics and melodies of Blues musicians.Among the photographers represented are Margaret Bourke-White, Alfred Eisenstaedt, Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Gordon Parks, Andres Serrano and many others.On display at Krannert Art Museum through Nov

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2. 500 E Peabody, Urbana. Tue, Thu-Sat 9am-5pm, Wed 9am8pm, Sun 2-5pm.(217) 333-1860.Suggested Donation: $3 Featured Works XIII:"The Spirit of Mediterranean Pathos:The Early Work of Pierre Daura" - Pierre Daura (1896-1976) was a member of significant modern art movements in the early 20th century. This exhibition highlights a recent gift of works by Daura and explores the forms and colors of his paintings and drawings from about 1910 to the late 1930s. On display at Krannert Art Museum through Nov 2. 500 E Peabody, Urbana. Tue, Thu-Sat. 9am-5pm, Wed 9am-8pm, Sun 2-5pm. (217) 3331860.Suggested Donation: $3 "Land and Water" – The Middle Room Gallery @ the UCIMC presents "Land and Water," a group photography show curated by Lissa Raybon on display through Sept 30. The group show will focus on landscape and nature photography and will feature local photographers Lisa Billman, Jennifer Gentry and Lissa Raybon.218 W Main St, Urbana.http://www.gallery.ucimc.org/ “Separate and Unequal: Segregation and Three Generations of Black Response, 1870-1950.” – This exhibit highlights the Plessy v. Ferguson Supreme Court decision of 1896, which legally sanctioned racial segregation in the United States until 1954 when the Supreme Court overturned Plessy in the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case. Materials from the Library's collections and archives highlight the historical period between these two landmark civil rights cases. Sponsored by the Office of the Chancellor, the Brown v. Board of Education Commemorative Committee and the University of Illinois Library. On view at the University of Illinois Main Library, first floor hallway, during library hours. 1408 W Gregory Drive, Urbana. Hours vary. (217) 333-2290 http://www.oc.uiuc.edu/brown

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SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 | TIME TO GET READDDDDYYYYY

CDReviews

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ATMOSPHERE Seven’s Travels Epitaph

★★★★ BY ANDY SIMNICK Epitaph records, years separated from their hot streak of Rancid and Offspring releases in the early 1990s, has stumbled upon a masterpiece of a record through one of the most baffling crossovers in recent times. Seven’s Travels, the latest release from the independent hip-hop group Atmosphere, not only has catchy beats and the fantastic rhymes by Slug but also will be a staple on “best of” lists when they are complied at the end of the year. I have a confession to make before the review continues. My experience with the hip-hop genre is rather limited. The few rap CDs I own are Snoop Dogg’s Doggystyle, Nas’s Illmatic, and the two mainstream releases by Jurassic 5. That said, from what little I have seen, there seems to be two schools of music within the realm: those that support the music and those that support Cristal. Atmosphere is not going to be lumped with 50 Cent, DMX, or Nelly, as their style is much smoother and intense. His vocals convey a level of sincere, nonviolent intensity that I have never heard before in an album of this type. The beats contained within the album are catchy and perfectly matched to the songs.The mixing and sampling is done correctly. And most of all, every song on the CD is listenable and unique. One standout is “Suicidegirls,” a track containing phone messages overlaid onto a backing of bass and guitar that puts Linkin Park to shame. Another track that jumps off the album is “Shoes,” a simple track with beautiful pacing and impeccable timing. Most of all, the track “The Keys to Life Vs. 15 Minutes of Fame” has hit written all over it. If Atmosphere makes a huge debut with this album, this song will be the first single, guaranteed. It is unfair to label individual tracks as hits since this album does not let up for 19 straight songs. Perhaps the universality of this LP is the reason Epitaph picked up the rights to this album.The quality of this album is unmistakable. And the raw emotion is very similar to that found in the punk genre prior to the Blink-182 invasion. True feeling is an integral part of any type of music, and to be able to put that emotion to use in such an accessible product is a rarity. Seven’s Travels does just that, and this album will be the one that puts Slug in the ranks of elite MCs. Atmosphere does not produce rap heard in the bars on John Street, but this album will maintain a place in record collections of connoisseurs and hip-hop amateurs alike.

THE VERTEBRATS A Thousand Day Dream Reaction Recordings

★★★★ BY BRIAN MERTZ History is all a matter of who is telling it. That is even true when asking to recount the history of music in Champaign-Urbana. Ask a young indie-rocker about the Champaign scene and you will get the often repeated list that will inevitably include HUM, The Poster Children, Braid, Sarge and maybe even Lovecup. Ask a member of the house scene and they’ll remind you that both Cajmere and Mazi resided in Champaign for a few years, throwing some of the best parties and raves this town has ever seen. Power balladeers will tell you about REO. People with folk leanings will cite Alison Krauss. But for the people who were actually taking an active part in the scene between the years of 1979 and 1982, the history of Champaign music must include The Vertebrats. During that

era, this reviewer aged from being born to reaching the age of three. So it is impossible for this review to make any judgments on whether A Thousand Day Dream does the magic of that era justice. That can be left to the informative and genuinely interesting liner notes included in this re-release. All that this reviewer needs to note is that A Thousand Day Dream fully captures why The Vertebrats were respected worldwide as garage rock pioneers. Years before The Strokes decked themselves in denim or Jack White magically became a guitar legend, The Vertebrats were churning out thrashing rock numbers that had guitars jangling and lead singer Ken Draznik wailing out his lyrics like nobody’s business. The 22 tracks on this album range in recording quality from studio time with Mark Rubel to an early performance of “Put Your Toys Away” in the WPGU studios to a gaggle of rough demos. Original fans of The Vertebrats will most likely love having all these songs assembled in one place instead of scattered over traded tapes. But newcomers to The Vertebrats will have much to enjoy here as well. “Diamonds in the Rough” is a classic late ‘60s sounding, upbeat garage rock song with the infectious vocal hook of “Nothing is what it is before / Everybody’s talking war / Turning 19 is no fun anymore.” It is a brilliant fusing of bubbly rock that makes the listener want to dance, but the song still carries a message (it is also the most political the band got, according to Draznik). Then of course there is the Vertebrat classic, “Left in the Dark,” which has been covered by many, including The Replacements and most recently Courtney Love. And yes, that track still is that good. The seven demo cuts near the end of A Thousand Day Dream are very rough in terms of production quality. But the songwriting skills and the superb vocal harmonies still manage to make their way through the faint tape hiss.That sound quality is all at once a tiny flaw and a little bit more of the charm of this collection. There is always time to learn more about any period of history. Those who are trying to better understand the progression of music in C-U, or who just want some garage rock in its true form with no studio wizardry owe it to themselves to pick up A Thousand Day Dream.

KILL HANNAH For Never and Ever Atlantic

★★★ BY MARISSA MONSON Kill Hannah could quite possibly be one of the hardest working bands in Chicago right now: fliering constantly, meeting with fans, touring all the time, handing out stickers out at their own shows to possibly everyone in the damn room. They do it all. But, alas, they are not exactly what the Chicago rock scene was looking for to get it out of the post-Smashing Pumpkins rut. They sound like The Cure, but as it turns out, bands that sound like The Cure leave something to be desired, kind of like the way some people like bananas, but not things that have banana flavoring in them. You just end up with an artificial taste in your mouth, and a yearning for the real thing. I had the pleasure of seeing their live show at The Highdive about a month ago, and I noticed one thing, not the tube socks on their wrists, but the shining light of their somewhat typical Cure-esqe show, the song,“Kennedy.”This song will be their ticket to stardom, and whether they can continue to crank out songs of this caliber will decide if their place will be in the one hit wonder bin, or in heavy rotation. Lead singer Mat Devine provides the haunting, melodic vocals, and the band accompanies with electronic beats and fine musicianship that compares to the likes of My Bloody Valentine and Joy Division. “Kennedy” begins with a soft electronic ooze as Devine proclaims “I want to be a Kennedy / I want to be a real heartbreaker”and so on until the drums, guitars and Devine take off in a frenzy to proclaim “and die young!” This was what I was waiting for, on the CD as well as at the show,a well-crafted,smart song that didn’t use cliche lyrics like “I hate the rain” and epiphanies about high school romances gone sour. Reviewing this CD was a difficult task with “Kennedy” anxiously awaiting as the second track amidst the songs that were a good effort, but lacking the same kicker of “Kennedy”. Kill Hannah has been around the Chicago scene for awhile, and their Metro-packing shows are proof of their fanappeal. As far as the album goes, seeing the glimpse of the quality they can produce on “Kennedy,” one would hope they will continue pushing their ability to create more songs of that manner, and steer away from the places all Cure-like bands go, like “Raining All The Time.” This album and Kill Hannah’s apparent fervor for their music and their fans leads me to believe they have already figured out what they did right and wrong on For Never and Ever and how they want to fix it. This band will only get better.

PEDAL STEEL TRANSMISSION The Angel of the Squared Circle ★★★ BY JACOB DITTMER If there is an absolute truth in indie rock, it is that indie rock that it is ever-expansive and allencompassing of musical genres. There are regional indie rock scenes (the Northwest, New York and even ChampaignUrbana), individuals find themselves constantly joining and creating their own bands, and this culture of people really enjoys discovering and expanding their knowledge of musical acts. Chicago is another region with a strong indie rock scene and one such act to come out of there is Pedal Steel Transmission.This is a “do it yourself”type of band as they have taken on the position of producing all three of their albums completely independently. With four members and a variety of influences backing their sound, Pedal Steel Transmission may not have the crossover pop success of some indie rockers, but still have something to offer. What makes some indie rock CDs so difficult to review is the lack of obvious influences and sounds the group is trying to emulate, and that is a good thing. Creativity in pop music seems to be something left in the ‘60s and today we are forced to seek out groups that offer something aside from the pop jingle that pleases the ear but fails to provoke the mind. Now let’s get things straight, music has come a long way since the ‘60s, it is merely the lack of people achieving something like the Beatles did and doing the creative things that they did with everybody and their dog taking notice. But that is something for an entirely different day, today it’s Pedal Steel Transmission taking the spotlight. The best way to describe how this album sounds is to compare them to Yo La Tengo or Modest Mouse. Sure, they don’t have the same sound and styling of these much-accomplished acts, but what this CD does do is travel around in soundscape, style, genre and emotions much like a they do (listen to one of their CDs and try saying the songs all sound the same). From one track to the next, the songs are different and creative, but all the while the CD still comes together to form a nice overall album. Now do not go out buy this disc and find yourself perturbed that it doesn’t sound like the above-mentioned groups, it’s merely a comparison to the production style, not the music itself. Songs travel between melodic folk sounds accompanied by piano to a synthesized brooding like that of Radiohead’s “Treefingers.” Other tracks achieve a garage rock sound with the whines from distorted guitars and loud cymbal crashes. But what makes indie rock cool is the method of touring that places emphasis on smaller venues, because these acts often recognize the greatness of a more personalized environment. It may happen to you one night; you walk into a bar, a band is playing that you’ve never heard of, and the music they play hits your ear just right and you are sold. Not everyone is into this idea of discovery and adventure in music, but those who are know what it is like.

TRIPLE WHIP Slapshot

nect chase out”from the song “Ace”will drive the listener back to the music instead of the words after the first read of the liner notes. Not that it would be a bad thing as Triple Whip has some stellar and tight sounds as a band. But for a band that puts intense focus into the creation of their music, a new approach to the lyrics might yield another piece of the puzzle. When Rahman does get into a groove with his vocals, magic happens. “Delight” starts out like most of the other songs from Slapshot with Rushakoff laying down a heavy bass line. But the conviction in Rahman’s voice when he sings out the chorus of “No matter what’s your side / Of the divide you’re on / All sides will get their chance / Revel in charmed hindrance”shows that there is a bright future for him as a vocalist with Triple Whip. To truly appreciate Slapshot, a listener has to be willing to devote their full attention to all of the intricacies in the songs and interplay amongst the trio. Those people looking for an album to put on in the background or to serve as the soundtrack to a party should keep looking. For music fans who like to put thought into the albums they listen to and get thoughtprovoking music in return, Slapshot is the way to go. If you can’t catch their CD release party on Saturday, Sept. 27 at the Brass Rail, the album will be officially released on Sept. 30 on Innocent Words Records. Get yours while the getting’s good.

MUSIC REVIEW GUIDE

Flawless Good Mediocre Bad Un-listenable

★★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★ no stars

CHARTS PARASOL RECORDS TOP 10 SELLERS 1. Secret Shine - After Years (Clairecords) 2. The Green Pajamas - Through Glass Colored Roses (A Hidden Agenda Record) 3. The Perishers - From Nothing To One (NONS Records - Sweden) 4. Mojave 3 - Spoon And Rafter (4AD Records) 5. Bjorn Olsson - Bjorn Olsson (Gravitation Records - Sweden) 6. The Lucksmiths - A Little Distraction (Matinée Records) 7. Quasi - Hot Shit!/Live Shit (Touch And Go Records) 8. The Decemberists - Her Majesty, The Decemberists (Merge Records) 9. Mates Of State - Team Boo (Polyvinyl Records) 10. The Twilight Singers - Black Is The Color Of My True Love's Hair (Birdman Records)

Innocent Words Records

★★★ BY BRIAN MERTZ Triple Whip’s debut fulllength album Slapshot is just familiar enough to be enticing, but still different enough to remain intriguing. It is a very delicate balance crafted with precision and purpose. In short, another Champaign-Urbana rock outfit has turned out another album worth picking up in 2003. The pseudo-math rock and bass intensive sounds might not appeal to audiences raised on the notion that Dashboard Confessional is the beginning and end of the indie rock sound. But the dark and rumbling sounds of the ten tracks on Slapshot should resonate with music fans with broader palates. What helps Triple Whip carve out a sonic niche, even in Champaign, is the decision to let Holly Rushakoff’s chunky, funky bass lines stand as the dominant sound most of the time. While lead singer and guitarist Santanu Rahman adds essential elements with chopped vocals and distortion-free guitars, it is the loose sound of Rushakoff’s bass that gives Triple Whip their sound. Add to the pot Brett Sanderson’s frantic but simple and precise drumming and you’ve got a winner. What will be unsettling to some is the lyrical content. Rahman goes off on some odd tangents, especially in songs like “Ace” and “Double Feature.” However, phrases that don’t really make much sense like “Backbone strikes to super soul / All this could lead to just one place / Cool brute Mac close on his mark / Intense crime con-

NEW RELEASES Paul Oakenfold - Perfecto Presents: Great Wall Bad Boy’s da Band - Too Hot for T.V. Leslie Mills - Different for Girls Kin Za Za - Number One in Shambala Alice Cooper - The Eyes of Martina McBride - Martina Merle Haggard - Haggard Like Never Before Thousand Foot Krutch - Phenomenon Jethro Tull - Christmas Album Cappadonna - The Struggle Incognito - Who Needs Love Lyle Lovett - My Baby Don’t Tolerate Dismemberment Plan - A People’s History of (fan remixes) Autumn Rhythm - Secret Songs Billy Currington - Billy Currington Lo-Pro - Lo-Pro Maria - My Soul Sting - Sacred Love Dido - Life for Rent Bent - The Everlasting Blink


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FOR THE BIG PAY BACK | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

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SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 | WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com

COMEDY

TopFive Party Albums

de Bono Improv Comedy – Courtyard Cafe, Illini Union, 9pm, free

MUSIC PERFORMANCES Community Drum Circle – All levels welcome – Ten Thousand Villages, 7-9pm

Parkland Theatre presents “The Laramie Project” – Written by Moises Kaufman and the members of the Tectonic Theatre Project, this drama looks at the events surrounding the 1998 death of gay student Matthew Shepard in Laramie, Wyoming as told through the voices of the townspeople. The director, Randi Jennifer Collins Hard, has cast over 70 community members to bring the town of Laramie to life – Parkland Theatre, 8pm, $2.99

FILM 1. Doggystyle - Snoop Doggy Dogg

Snoop Doggy Dogg sent shockwaves through the rap community on Dr. Dre’s breakthrough smash The Chronic. With his laid back drawl in delivering his trademark ryhmes Snoop Dogg was the quintessential gangsta rapper. Doggystyle was Snoop’s debut solo work and became the first rap album to debut at number one on the Billboard charts. Although it should be mentioned that Snoop was facing murder charges at the time, which helped get his name in the news. Even so, Doggystyle offers some quality rap in its heyday. With tracks like “Gin and Juice,” “What’s My Name,” and “Lodi Dodi,” Doggystyle continues in the tradition of The Chronic and that’s a good thing.

2. 40 Oz. to Freedom Sublime

Sublime was one of those bands that everyone missed while they were around and then it was too late when they broke through to the mainstream. On their debut, 40 Oz. to Freedom, Sublime mixes up their talents with a knack for punk-driven songs mixed with some ska influences and funky reggae beats. Overall the album forms an eclectic sound that presents several songs just right for partying. “Smoke Two Joints,” “Badfish,” and “What Happened” are songs revolving around drugs and alcohol.

3. Funkentelechy Vs. the Placebo Syndrome Parliament

Before hip hop was the bump and grind music of choice, people got their groove on to funk. No one is better known for their funk stylings or left a bigger impact than Parliament Funkadelic and George Clinton. Funkentelechy Vs.the Placebo Syndrome may have an odd title, but it also has one of Parliament’s greatest hits in “Flash Light.” That tune by itself has rocked a ton of parties over the years with its sing-a-long vocal hook and the bumping basslines. The rest of the album showcases Parliament’s weird obsessions with space villains and “The Bop Gun.”But no matter what strange excursion of the mind Parliament goes on, the funk still remains and that makes this one beautiful record to drop at any party.

Once again we’ve hit an era where grungy looking rockstars decked out in denim with giant mops of hair are ruling the party scenes of America. Def Leppard may deny up and down that they had anything to do with the rash of 1980s hair metal, but they’ll never deny that they loved to party. Hysteria isn’t their most critically acclaimed album, but it does contain party essentials like “Rocket” and “Pour Some Sugar On Me.” If your party is going to be loud and full of guitar anthems, then Hysteria needs to be your soundtrack.

Reader’s top five party album 1. Get Rich or Die Tryin’ 50 Cent 2. Homework Daft Punk 3. Chronic 2001 Dr. Dre 4. Voyage Into Trance Paul Oakenfold 5. I Get Wet Andrew WK

4. Lazy Dog Volume 2 - Lazy Dog

If you are trying to set the mood for a more upscale party, nothing says class like well mixed deep house. Ben Watt and Jay Hannan’s second Lazy Dog release features underground house classics and remixes of R&B performers like Sade, Lucy Pearl and Sunshine Anderson. There is more than enough class to impress partygoers who want to sit back and sip their martinis, and there is also enough funk in the bass lines to get the booties shakin’.

Submitted by Jeff Stahl Next week: Top Five Makeout Albums e-mail us at music@readbuzz.com

MENDOZA MUSIC LINE

Finding your favorite band du jour BY SETH FEIN | STAFF WRITER

M

y brother is pretty much responsible for most of my taste in music. With the exception of Frank Zappa and possibly Ween, he has always been one step ahead of me. That being said, I think it’s only fair to credit him with introducing me to a band that often gets overlooked by the industry and is definitely underappreciated by modern day music listeners. Most people that I know either have never heard of them, or haven’t thought about them in years. This is a band with so much integrity that they actually fought off their mega-label from 1992 to 1999 in order to get dropped so they could sign with a smaller, more artist-friendly label. It was their only choice, considering the fact that they haven’t performed live in over 20 years. They are truly unique and perhaps partially responsible for much of the “pop” music that we all listen to and appreciate today. The band that I am so generously referring to is XTC. Andy Partridge, Colin Moulding and until recently, David Gregory have

released 12 LPs and countless other reissues, singles, EPs and outtake demos. To state that they are prolific recording artists would be the greatest understatement that I have, potentially, ever written. Allmusic.com hits the nail on the head when they write “... the band has left behind a remarkably rich and varied series of albums that make a convincing argument that XTC is the great lost pop band.” I couldn’t agree more. Their albums require thought. The lyrics are always insightful, witty and relevant. Their melodies always push the border between insanity and sweetness. Their tones are arguably as good as anyone’s in that they are only a studio band, thus, allowing them to spend as much time as they want tweaking and twisting the knobs. In short, they might be my favorite band right now. I bring them up because I think that it’s important for all people who love music to consider who their favorite band is for the time being. Granted, it’s something that should fluctuate based on where we are in our lives. I know that Nine Inch Nails has been my favorite band for a while in the past. Just the same, so has Tears for Fears. The point is this: Having a favorite band at all times helps out in many situations. Whether you’ve just fallen in love or just had your heart ripped out of your ass, music is there to aid us

Separate But Equal – Showing of the 1991 Film starring Sidney Poitier with introduction by UIUC Chancellor Nancy Cantor – Virginia Theatre, 7pm, $5

5. Hysteria - Def Leppard

in whatever we are involved in. Without it, I think that we cease to be passionate about music and merely become average listeners rather than avid listeners. I never want to become that. We live in a world that is dominated by bad news and lost hope. Having a favorite band du jour, if you will, opens us up to the idea that this life is worth living. Essentially, I am just throwing out a suggestion to anyone who is reading this column. There is a strong chance that if any of you do actually seek out XTC, you may not like it at all. I know that when my brother first inundated me with what I consider to be their masterpiece, Nonsuch, I couldn’t fucking stand it. Now, I can’t go a month without it. But, at the very least, you’ll have heard them and given yourself a chance to formulate your own opinion. And that idea makes me a very satisfied XTC fan. Enjoy. buzz

Green Mountain Grass– The Iron Post 9:30pm

LECTURES Recalcitrant Modernities: Spain, Difference, and the Construction of European Modernism –Invited participants will examine the historical conditions and functions of the construction of Spanish modernism as an exception outside of, or as unique case within, European modernism – Levis Center, 9:30am-6pm

FILM GLBT Welcome Back Party – showing movie But I’m A Cheerleader – Courtyard Cafe, Illini Union, 8pm, $2 public, UIUC students free

MARKETS Market at the Square – Art, crafts, produce, flowers, plants, food, coffee, music & more; every Saturday morning through Nov 8 – SE Lot of Lincoln Square, Downtown Urbana, 7am-noon

SundaySept28 LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC Verde Hootenanny – Verdant News and Coffee, 7pm, free Open Mic Night – Espresso Royale Cafe, 7:30pm, free Lanky – Iron Post, 9pm, TBA Open Mic/Open Jam – The Canopy Club, 10pm, $2

DJ DJ D-LO and DJ Spinnerty – Barfly, 9pm, free Drew Patterson & 2ON2OUT – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, free G-Force DJ – TK Wendl’s, 9pm-close Seduction with DJ Resonate – Barfly, 10pm, free DJ Hoff – Mike ‘n Molly’s, 10pm Live DJ – C-Street, 9pm, no cover

COMEDY Spicy Clamato Improv Comedy – Courtyard Cafe, Illini Union, 9pm, free

DANCING Salsa Dancing – salsa every Tuesday to recorded music – McKinley Foundation, 9:45-11:45pm

Kevin Flowers Jam – Iron Post, 9pm, TBA The Blues Jam hosted by Kilborn Alley – The Canopy Club, 10pm, $2 Mates of State, Victory at Sea, Orphans – The Highdive, 10pm, $8 Red Hot Valentines – Best Buy, Champaign, 7pm, free Mystikal with special guest Licwadatid & Reese T – Malibu Bay Lounge, 1pm-5pm, $15 advance, $20 at door

Feminism, Empire and National Histories: The Case of Victorian Britain – Feminist scholarship series with Antoinette Burton, History – Gender and Women’s Studies Program, UIUC, noon

CHICAGOSHOWS 9/25 Ted Nugent @ House of Blues 9/25 Jackie O Motherfucker, Priest, james Chance Terminal City @ Empty Bottle 9/26 SIZZLA @ House of Blues 9/26 !!! @ Empty Bottle 9/26 Houston @ Double Door 9/27 Lake Trout @ Schubas 9/27 Bouncing Souls, Tsunami Bomb @ Metro 9/27 Burning Spear @ House of Blues 9/27 Some Girls @ Double Door 9/27 Black Rebel Motorcycle Club @ Metro, 18 + 9/28 Adult, Michael Gira @ Empty Bottle 9/29 Lisa Marie Presley @ House of Blues

OCTOBER 10/1 Saves the Day @ House of Blues 10/1 Calexico @ Metro, 18+ 10/3 Leftover Salmon @ House of Blues 10/3 Nada Surf @ Metro 10/3 Dashboard Confessional @ Aragon Ballroom 10/4 IDA @ Schubas 10/4 Steve Winwood @ House of Blues 10/5 56 Hope Road/Down the Line @ Metro 10/5 Fischerspooner @ House of Blues

DJ Fresh Face Guest DJ – Barfly, 9pm, free DJ Spinnerty – Mike ‘n Molly’s, 10pm, TBA Live DJ – C-Street, 9pm-1am, cover

MUSIC PERFORMANCES Kimono Fantasy: Attire from the Heian Court Era to the Present Day – the Hakubi Kyoto Kimono School of Tokyo partners with U of I’s Japan House for a presentation of historical and modern day kimonos – Colwell Playhouse, Krannert Center, 2pm, $10-18 UI Wind Symphony and UI Symphonic Band I – musical selections by John Gibson, Bob Margolis, Mendelssohn, and Bernstein, among others Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center, 7:30pm, $2-5

ON STAGE The Celebration Company at the Station Theatre presents “ Road To Nirvana” – This dark comedy tells a story about two ex-movie moguls on the skids, Al and Jerry, reuniting to co-produce the biggest blockbuster film ever – an autobiographical account of Nirvana, the world’s biggest female pop star. She will even star in it as herself – but only if she can find producers willing to meet her extraordinary terms – Station Theatre, 8pm, $8

MondaySept29 LIVE MUSIC Openingbands.com Showcase: Grinner, Solips, Resident Genius – The Canopy Club, 10pm, $3

Seth Fein is from Urbana. He is a member of Orphans and he spins indie rock at Barfly every Monday night under the moniker 2ON2OUT. He is, in fact, an umpire for men’s softball as well. He can be reached at sethfein@readbuzz.com.

TuesdaySept30

LECTURES

DJ 2ON2OUT – Barfly, 9pm, free G-Force DJ – Kam’s, 10pm-close Rock ‘n’ Roll DJing with Drew Patterson – The Iron Post, 10pm

WednesdayOct1 LIVE MUSIC Hayseed Dixie, Kerosene Brothers – The Highdive, 7:30pm, $10 The Teller’s Art: A Storytelling Concert Series for Adults – traditional world folk tales, personal narratives told to guitar, banjo and spoons – Verde Gallery/Verdent Coffee & News, 8pm Digital Underground, Too White Crew – The Canopy Club, 10pm, $10 Chip McNeall – The Iron Post, 6-8pm Green Mountain Grass – The Iron Post, 9:30pm

DJ Chef Ra – Barfly, 10pm DJ Joel Spencer – Mike ‘n Molly’s, 10pm Live DJ – C-Street, 9pm, no cover

ON STAGE The Celebration Company at the Station Theatre presents “ Road To Nirvana” – This dark comedy tells a story about two ex-movie moguls on the skids, Al and Jerry, reuniting to co-produce the biggest blockbuster film ever – an autobiographical account of Nirvana, the world’s biggest female pop star. She will even star in it as herself – but only if she can find producers willing to meet her extraordinary terms – Station Theatre, 8pm, $10 2 for 1 night!

10/7 The Polyphonic Spree, Starlight Mints @ Metro 10/8 Switchfoot, Blue @ Metro 10/10 Death Cab For Cutie, The Long Winters @ Metro 10/11 Death Cab For Cutie, Pinebender @ Metro 10/11 Smokey Robinson @ House of Blues 10/11 Kid Koala @ Abbey Pub 10/13 Simply Red @ House of Blues 10/14 Alice Cooper @ House of Blues 10/16 Electric Six @ Double Door 10/16 Rufio @ Metro, all ages 10/17 Soulive, Me’Shell Ndegeocello @ House of Blues 10/18 DJ Justin Long @ Metro Smart Bar 10/19 Longwave/Calla @ Double Door 10/24 Cowboy Mouth, Cracker @ House of Blues 10/25 The Walkmen @ Double Door 10/26 Echo and the Bunnymen @ Metro 10/29 Fuel @ House of Blues 10/31 Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe @ House of Blues

NOVEMBER 11/1 Dirtbombs @ Double Door 11/7 Big Bad Voodoo Daddy @ House of Blues 11/15 The Shins @ House of Blues, tickets on sale 8/13 11/22 Tom Jones @ House of Blues 11/22 Alabama @ Allstate Arena 11/23 Tom Jones @ House of Blues 11/24 Symphony X @ Metro

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WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 buzz

DJ – Two Main Lounge, 10pm-1am, cover

DANCING Ballroom Dancing – Non-smoking, cash bar – Regent Ballroom, 7:30-10:30pm, $7 Salsa Dancing – Non-smoking, cash bar; dress code: no blue jeans, tennis shoes or hats – Regent Ballroom, 11pm-1am, $4

MUSICAL PERFORMANCES Pacifica Quartet – the newest quartet-in-residence at the UIUC School of Music – Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center, 7:30pm, $18 Leo Kottke – world-renowned guitarist – Virginia Theatre, 7:30pm, reserved seating, floor and mezz, $23, balcony, $21

The Celebration Company at the Station Theatre presents “ Road To Nirvana” – This dark comedy tells a story about two ex-movie moguls on the skids, Al and Jerry, reuniting to co-produce the biggest blockbuster film ever – an autobiographical account of Nirvana, the world’s biggest female pop star. She will even star in it as herself – but only if she can find producers willing to meet her extraordinary terms – Station Theatre, 8pm, $10

LECTURES Recalcitrant Modernities: Spain, Difference, and the Construction of European Modernism –Invited participants will examine the historical conditions and functions of the construction of Spanish modernism as an exception outside of, or as unique case within, European modernism – Levis Faculty Center, 9am-5:30pm

ThursdaySept25 LIVE MUSIC Angie Heaton – Aroma, 8pm, free Gabe Rosen – acoustic – Embassy Tavern, 8pm, free Boneyard Jazz Quintet – Iron Post, 6pm U of I Jazz Combo #2 – Iron Post, 9pm Tom Paynter Trio – Zorba’s, 9:30pm, $3 Pedal Steel Transmission, Tractor Kings – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $3 Grass Roots Revival with Michael (Homer) Jones and Jamie Lou – Verde & Verdent Coffee, 7:30-9:30pm, free The Green Book Tour – Twiztid, Marz, Society 1 – The New Lafayette Club, Bloomington, 6pm, all ages, $20

DJ In the Red Room with J-Phlip – Barfly, 9pm, free DJ Orby – Joe’s Brewery, 10pm, cover Live DJ – C-Street, 9pm, free Live DJ – Ruby’s, 9pm-1am, free Live DJ – Two Main Lounge, 10pm-close, free

KARAOKE G- Force Karaoke – Pia’s in Rantoul, 9pm-close

MUSIC PERFORMANCES Indian Women’s Cultural Night – Courtyard Cafe, Illini Union, 8pm, $3

ON STAGE The Celebration Company at the Station Theatre presents “ Road To Nirvana” – This dark comedy tells a story about two ex-movie moguls on the skids, Al and Jerry, reuniting to co-produce the biggest blockbuster film ever – an autobiographical account of Nirvana, the world’s biggest female pop star. She will even star in it as herself – but only if she can find producers willing to meet her extraordinary terms – Station Theatre, 8pm, $8

FridaySept26 LIVE MUSIC Bryan Holloway Trio – Cowboy Monkey, 5pm, free Jeff Helgesen Quintet – Iron Post, 5pm The Noisy Gators – Alto Vineyards, 7pm Dropsixx, Honest Pod, TBA – Lava, 9pm, $5 Larry O. Dean – Iron Post, 9pm, TBA

Reggae Cowboys – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $8 The Mezzanines, Little Black Spiders, Felix – Mike ‘n Molly’s, 10pm, $3 UC Hip Hop – Courtyard Cafe, Illini Union, 9pm, $5 ESP – Tommy G’s, 10pm-2am, cover

DJ DJ Bozak – Barfly, 9pm, free DJ Tim Williams – The Highdive, 10pm, $5 DJ Mertz – Joe’s Brewery, 11pm, cover

SaturdaySept27 LIVE MUSIC Eleni Moraites – Borders, 8pm, free Triple Whip CD Release Show: Triple Whip, Fourth Rotor, The Violent – Brass Rail, 9pm, $3 Candy Foster and Shades of Blue – Cowboy Monkey, 9pm, $3 Desafinado – Steep and Brew Cafe, Pages For All Ages, 7pm No Secret Band – Hubers, 8pm, free Dank 454, Jaded Kayne, Leave, Model 1 – The Canopy Club, 9pm, $5

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SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 | MILTONNN.... WHAT’S HAPPENING?

Troubled Waters – Iron Post, 9pm, TBA Might Groove Trio – Embassy Tavern, 9:30pm, free Renegade – Tommy G’s, 10pm-2am, cover Reasonable Doubt – The Phoenix, 9pm-1am Maurice and The Mindset – The Pink House, Ogden, IL, 9pm The Brat Pack – Ju-Ju’s, Bloomington, 9pm

Champaign trio Triple Whip gear up for release of Slapshot

DJ

BY BRIAN MERTZ | MUSIC EDITOR

DJ Hipster Sophisto – Barfly, 9pm, free DJ Tim Williams – The Highdive, 10pm, $5 DJ Asiatic’s Mixology 101 Saturdays: DJ Asiatic, Tsunami Entertainment – Tonic, 10pm, $5 G-Force DJ – hip-hop – White Horse, 10pm-close The Naughty Boy – Joe’s Brewery, 11pm, cover Noiseboy – Mike ‘n Molly’s, 10pm, $1

KARAOKE G-Force Karaoke – Lincoln Castle Lodge, 9pm-close

ON STAGE

buzz

DANCING Nightclub Dancing – Two Main Lounge, 5-7pm Salsa Dancing – Two Main Lounge, 7-10pm

MUSIC PERFORMANCES Afterglow: Rachel Lee with the Jeff Helgesen Quartet – free late-night jazz – Lobby and Interlude Bar, Krannert Center, 9:30pm, free Cecil Bridgewater – renowned jazz trumpet player, educator, producer, composer, and arranger – Tryon Festival Theatre, Krannert Center, 7:30pm, $17-23 Timothy McGovern, bassoon – a program of works by Telemann, Steinmetz, Stockigt, Ancelin, and other composers who have written for the bassoon – Foellinger Great Hall, $5 Little Wolf and the Wolf Pack: Drum and Dance – This event will feature American Indian storytelling, dance, and singing – Spurlock Museum, Knight Auditorium, 10:30am-noon, free

ON STAGE The Celebration Company at the Station Theatre presents “ Road To Nirvana” – This dark comedy tells a story about two ex-movie moguls on the skids, Al and Jerry, reuniting to co-produce the biggest blockbuster film ever – an autobiographical account of Nirvana, the world’s biggest female pop star. She will even star in it as herself – but only if she can find producers willing to meet her extraordinary terms – Station Theatre, 8pm, $10 The Sound of Music – Assembly Hall, 7:30pm

Rushakoff said. “With the guitar I wasn’t ith his cat Curley roaming around his feet, compelled to learn Santanu Rahman stands, his legs and arms further. The third spread open in a Tai Chi position called the sin- thing was the bass gle whip. His arms are stretched out in oppo- and I felt like when I site directions, one hand curled back, the other tried that and I learned some of the pointing forward. Rahman’s mind one day wandered to what a riffs that Santanu had double whip would be. Showing what he came me practice, I felt ‘this up with, he curls his other hand back so the I like.’” Sanderson, who two are pointing in towards his body. “That is a double whip.” So what would be a triple was in a band called whip? Out of limbs, Rahman lifts his leg, bend- the April Crash with ing it at the knee, striking a familiar “crane Rahman in 1997, was kick” pose. “Oh this looks like the Karate Kid,” the last piece of the Rahman says, unable to contain a hearty laugh. Triple Whip puzzle. “I love being in a He breaks the pose smiling at the explanation band with him,” said for how his band, Triple Whip, got their name. of That demonstration, blending humor, intro- Sanderson spection and intelligence, pretty much sums up Rahman. “There is no Triple Whip as a band. Brett Sanderson, their ego. There is none of bass player, describes their sound in three that stuff that you get with a lot of people in words, “Quirky, mathematical, rock.” That clean, distortion-free sound is amply bands. And that goes displayed on Triple Whip’s album Slapshot, for Holly too.” Sanderson knew which will be released on Tuesday and at a CD release show this Saturday at the Brass Rail. what to expect from Slapshot is the first full-length for the band, Rahman, but he also Triple Whip are Brett Sanderson, Santanu Rahman and Holly Rushakoff. which has been in existence since 2001. It is also was not worried Rushakoff’s the first for seasoned veterans Rahman and about where there is such an intense vocal emphasis,” inexperience on the bass. Sanderson as well as bassist Holly Rushakoff. “I don’t really get worried until I have a rea- Rahman said. “I have been listening a lot to “I have been a musician since 1989 and this is my first real album to be released on a record son to get worried and I never had a reason to that structure and how that element can actuallabel,” Rahman said. “All my musical experi- get worried. She really just dug into the bass,” ly fill in gaps we’ve never even thought of ences since then have led to this and it is very said Sanderson, who also plays bass for before, so I’m coming to the table with voice Absinthe Blind. “I’m totally impressed. I start- parts in mind as well.” exciting to me.” Triple Whip plans to evolve with their tour“I have had several records that have never ed playing bass not much longer after she starting schedule as well, hoping to play more been officially released,” Sanderson said. “It has ed and I would not touch what she does.” Rushakoff’s bass lines are the strongest parts events. Presently they have their CD release been a long time coming. It seems a like a short time, but we’ve put a lot of work into it so it will of some of the tracks on Slapshot and often pro- show, a showcase for their label, Innocent vide the melody while Words, and the Chicagoland version of the be good to get something out Rahman’s guitar and Great Cover Up, at the end of which they will there finally.” Sanderson’s drumming pro- be performing a few Afghan Whigs tunes. The work that has gone With Triple Whip and Absinthe Blind both vide tight rhythmic backing. into Triple Whip began when “It felt like the antithesis of picking up steam, Sanderson has had to balRahman wanted to try his me,” said Rushakoff of her ance his commitments. But despite having to hand at recreating Asian bass playing. “I’m not a more carefully plan his calendar, Sanderson Underground music that he booming person. I can ask has no intention to leave either project. was listening to, in particular “I really love playing the drums and I really someone a question or say Talvin Singh’s fusion of – Santanu Rahman ‘Hi’ to them and they might love playing bass and I don’t want to give up drum ‘n’ bass and traditional not even hear me. And I’ll be either,” Sanderson said. “They are both differIndian music. To create his own take on the sound, Rahman employed a like okay, whatever, I’ll ask them later. But this ent products musically so it is good to have flutist, a violinist and a keyboardist. But it was- is so forceful and commanding and I love the those outlets creatively.” Triple Whip has been playing more shows, feeling.” n’t exactly what he was looking for. The final ingredient to the Triple Whip including a few spots on the Asians in Rock “I would have to sample everyone’s playing and then edit and make my own thing,” sound is Rahman’s lyrics, which are sung in a Tour, a project that Rahman feels very proud of. “Just the idea of promoting Asian Americans Rahman said. “It was cool, but it was a lot of punctuated style. But like so many other comwork. I had to take everyone’s music and ponents of the Triple Whip songwriting who are doing the rock thing, on a social justice process, there is constant evolution from new and activism level, it is a great thing to push decide what to use as samples.” Rahman trimmed down the lineup and influences. Rahman says that working on new that Asians can do this thing as well (as) just to brought on Rushakoff to play bass. At the time tracks after recording Slapshot have been influ- broaden the mindset of the public when they think about Asians,” Rahman said. though, Rushakoff didn’t play an instrument enced again by far-off musical sources. Locally, the band is drawing bigger crowds. “Recently I’ve been spending a little more and had never been in a band. “We’re starting to attract (a) more and more “I tried the keyboard and I didn’t know what time developing the vocal parts because I have it was doing and it was very intimidating,” been listening to more of these Bollywood parts diverse crowd,” Rahman said. “I used to think

W

[ [ You can’t just go from your soul and your gut anymore because everyone has done that.

PHOTO | TED VEATCH COURTSEY OF OF TRIPLE WHIP

092503buzz1316

we were purely a musician’s band. Only musicians would understand what we’re doing and everyone else would be like ‘when is he going to kick that distortion pedal on.’” At the same time, Rushakoff and Rahman don’t want to overextend Triple Whip’s Champaign presence. “We do want to take the next step. We don’t want to just be a Champaign band,” Rushakoff said. “I really like this music and we’re all really proud to be from Champaign. We’re happy to go out and be a representative of Champaign. We believe in the music to find a way to be a little different. We don’t want to sound like everyone else.” Wherever the future may lead this trio, one thing is certain: Triple Whip will create music in their own creative and introspective way. “Being a musician today, you can’t just go from your soul and your gut anymore because everyone has done that. Everything you come up with has already been done before,” Rahman said. “You have to take that and know what’s out there. It’s like a research project. You have to know what other people have made and then know what your own true self is and then put those things together and create what you would consider your own identity.” buzz

Triple Whip will perform at The Brass Rail on Saturday, Sept. 27 with The Violents and The Fourth Rotor. Tickets are $3 and the show is 21 and over.


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buzzpicks Digital Underground does his dance at The Canopy

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ednesday, fans will once again get the chance to do the hump. Yes, the Humpty Dance, a dance craze that has exceeded the status of trendy clubs and entered into venues like wedding receptions and high school proms. Brought to you by Digital Underground, an essential hip-hop outfit that has continued to make quality music past their days of “Humpty Dance” and “Do Whatcha Like.” After releasing their newest album, No Nose Job, Shock G and the crew are back on the circuit, putting on the impressive live show they have been known for.

Miller Lite Logo Glass at Murphy’s Pub. Its Miller Time!

Mystikal shakes his ass at Malibu

T

his Sunday mega-platinum rapper Mystikal will come to Champaign for a performance at the Malibu Bay Festival Grounds. The New Orleans native was one of the original stars of Master P’s No Limit record label. Since leaving No Limit, Mystikal has had major hits with song like “Bouncin’ Back,” “Danger,” and his breakthrough smash, “Shake Ya Ass.” The show this Sunday starts at 1 p.m. and ends at 5 p.m. Tickets are $15 and $20 at the gate. Also appearing will be Licwadatid, Reese T and Twin Folkz.

Mates of State at The Highdive

T

he husband and wife duo Mates of State blends experimental rock with an upbeat pop edge. Their new album Team Boo is another notch in the Lawerence, Kan., natives’ belts. As a new fixture on Polyvinyl’s label, Mates of State has a shining future ahead of them in the indie rock scene. See the full story on Mates of State on page 10.

For extra photos, check out readbuzz.com


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9/24/03

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buzzpicks Digital Underground does his dance at The Canopy

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ednesday, fans will once again get the chance to do the hump. Yes, the Humpty Dance, a dance craze that has exceeded the status of trendy clubs and entered into venues like wedding receptions and high school proms. Brought to you by Digital Underground, an essential hip-hop outfit that has continued to make quality music past their days of “Humpty Dance” and “Do Whatcha Like.” After releasing their newest album, No Nose Job, Shock G and the crew are back on the circuit, putting on the impressive live show they have been known for.

Miller Lite Logo Glass at Murphy’s Pub. Its Miller Time!

Mystikal shakes his ass at Malibu

T

his Sunday mega-platinum rapper Mystikal will come to Champaign for a performance at the Malibu Bay Festival Grounds. The New Orleans native was one of the original stars of Master P’s No Limit record label. Since leaving No Limit, Mystikal has had major hits with song like “Bouncin’ Back,” “Danger,” and his breakthrough smash, “Shake Ya Ass.” The show this Sunday starts at 1 p.m. and ends at 5 p.m. Tickets are $15 and $20 at the gate. Also appearing will be Licwadatid, Reese T and Twin Folkz.

Mates of State at The Highdive

T

he husband and wife duo Mates of State blends experimental rock with an upbeat pop edge. Their new album Team Boo is another notch in the Lawerence, Kan., natives’ belts. As a new fixture on Polyvinyl’s label, Mates of State has a shining future ahead of them in the indie rock scene. See the full story on Mates of State on page 10.

For extra photos, check out readbuzz.com


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WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 buzz

DJ – Two Main Lounge, 10pm-1am, cover

DANCING Ballroom Dancing – Non-smoking, cash bar – Regent Ballroom, 7:30-10:30pm, $7 Salsa Dancing – Non-smoking, cash bar; dress code: no blue jeans, tennis shoes or hats – Regent Ballroom, 11pm-1am, $4

MUSICAL PERFORMANCES Pacifica Quartet – the newest quartet-in-residence at the UIUC School of Music – Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center, 7:30pm, $18 Leo Kottke – world-renowned guitarist – Virginia Theatre, 7:30pm, reserved seating, floor and mezz, $23, balcony, $21

The Celebration Company at the Station Theatre presents “ Road To Nirvana” – This dark comedy tells a story about two ex-movie moguls on the skids, Al and Jerry, reuniting to co-produce the biggest blockbuster film ever – an autobiographical account of Nirvana, the world’s biggest female pop star. She will even star in it as herself – but only if she can find producers willing to meet her extraordinary terms – Station Theatre, 8pm, $10

LECTURES Recalcitrant Modernities: Spain, Difference, and the Construction of European Modernism –Invited participants will examine the historical conditions and functions of the construction of Spanish modernism as an exception outside of, or as unique case within, European modernism – Levis Faculty Center, 9am-5:30pm

ThursdaySept25 LIVE MUSIC Angie Heaton – Aroma, 8pm, free Gabe Rosen – acoustic – Embassy Tavern, 8pm, free Boneyard Jazz Quintet – Iron Post, 6pm U of I Jazz Combo #2 – Iron Post, 9pm Tom Paynter Trio – Zorba’s, 9:30pm, $3 Pedal Steel Transmission, Tractor Kings – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $3 Grass Roots Revival with Michael (Homer) Jones and Jamie Lou – Verde & Verdent Coffee, 7:30-9:30pm, free The Green Book Tour – Twiztid, Marz, Society 1 – The New Lafayette Club, Bloomington, 6pm, all ages, $20

DJ In the Red Room with J-Phlip – Barfly, 9pm, free DJ Orby – Joe’s Brewery, 10pm, cover Live DJ – C-Street, 9pm, free Live DJ – Ruby’s, 9pm-1am, free Live DJ – Two Main Lounge, 10pm-close, free

KARAOKE G- Force Karaoke – Pia’s in Rantoul, 9pm-close

MUSIC PERFORMANCES Indian Women’s Cultural Night – Courtyard Cafe, Illini Union, 8pm, $3

ON STAGE The Celebration Company at the Station Theatre presents “ Road To Nirvana” – This dark comedy tells a story about two ex-movie moguls on the skids, Al and Jerry, reuniting to co-produce the biggest blockbuster film ever – an autobiographical account of Nirvana, the world’s biggest female pop star. She will even star in it as herself – but only if she can find producers willing to meet her extraordinary terms – Station Theatre, 8pm, $8

FridaySept26 LIVE MUSIC Bryan Holloway Trio – Cowboy Monkey, 5pm, free Jeff Helgesen Quintet – Iron Post, 5pm The Noisy Gators – Alto Vineyards, 7pm Dropsixx, Honest Pod, TBA – Lava, 9pm, $5 Larry O. Dean – Iron Post, 9pm, TBA

Reggae Cowboys – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $8 The Mezzanines, Little Black Spiders, Felix – Mike ‘n Molly’s, 10pm, $3 UC Hip Hop – Courtyard Cafe, Illini Union, 9pm, $5 ESP – Tommy G’s, 10pm-2am, cover

DJ DJ Bozak – Barfly, 9pm, free DJ Tim Williams – The Highdive, 10pm, $5 DJ Mertz – Joe’s Brewery, 11pm, cover

SaturdaySept27 LIVE MUSIC Eleni Moraites – Borders, 8pm, free Triple Whip CD Release Show: Triple Whip, Fourth Rotor, The Violent – Brass Rail, 9pm, $3 Candy Foster and Shades of Blue – Cowboy Monkey, 9pm, $3 Desafinado – Steep and Brew Cafe, Pages For All Ages, 7pm No Secret Band – Hubers, 8pm, free Dank 454, Jaded Kayne, Leave, Model 1 – The Canopy Club, 9pm, $5

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SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 | MILTONNN.... WHAT’S HAPPENING?

Troubled Waters – Iron Post, 9pm, TBA Might Groove Trio – Embassy Tavern, 9:30pm, free Renegade – Tommy G’s, 10pm-2am, cover Reasonable Doubt – The Phoenix, 9pm-1am Maurice and The Mindset – The Pink House, Ogden, IL, 9pm The Brat Pack – Ju-Ju’s, Bloomington, 9pm

Champaign trio Triple Whip gear up for release of Slapshot

DJ

BY BRIAN MERTZ | MUSIC EDITOR

DJ Hipster Sophisto – Barfly, 9pm, free DJ Tim Williams – The Highdive, 10pm, $5 DJ Asiatic’s Mixology 101 Saturdays: DJ Asiatic, Tsunami Entertainment – Tonic, 10pm, $5 G-Force DJ – hip-hop – White Horse, 10pm-close The Naughty Boy – Joe’s Brewery, 11pm, cover Noiseboy – Mike ‘n Molly’s, 10pm, $1

KARAOKE G-Force Karaoke – Lincoln Castle Lodge, 9pm-close

ON STAGE

buzz

DANCING Nightclub Dancing – Two Main Lounge, 5-7pm Salsa Dancing – Two Main Lounge, 7-10pm

MUSIC PERFORMANCES Afterglow: Rachel Lee with the Jeff Helgesen Quartet – free late-night jazz – Lobby and Interlude Bar, Krannert Center, 9:30pm, free Cecil Bridgewater – renowned jazz trumpet player, educator, producer, composer, and arranger – Tryon Festival Theatre, Krannert Center, 7:30pm, $17-23 Timothy McGovern, bassoon – a program of works by Telemann, Steinmetz, Stockigt, Ancelin, and other composers who have written for the bassoon – Foellinger Great Hall, $5 Little Wolf and the Wolf Pack: Drum and Dance – This event will feature American Indian storytelling, dance, and singing – Spurlock Museum, Knight Auditorium, 10:30am-noon, free

ON STAGE The Celebration Company at the Station Theatre presents “ Road To Nirvana” – This dark comedy tells a story about two ex-movie moguls on the skids, Al and Jerry, reuniting to co-produce the biggest blockbuster film ever – an autobiographical account of Nirvana, the world’s biggest female pop star. She will even star in it as herself – but only if she can find producers willing to meet her extraordinary terms – Station Theatre, 8pm, $10 The Sound of Music – Assembly Hall, 7:30pm

Rushakoff said. “With the guitar I wasn’t ith his cat Curley roaming around his feet, compelled to learn Santanu Rahman stands, his legs and arms further. The third spread open in a Tai Chi position called the sin- thing was the bass gle whip. His arms are stretched out in oppo- and I felt like when I site directions, one hand curled back, the other tried that and I learned some of the pointing forward. Rahman’s mind one day wandered to what a riffs that Santanu had double whip would be. Showing what he came me practice, I felt ‘this up with, he curls his other hand back so the I like.’” Sanderson, who two are pointing in towards his body. “That is a double whip.” So what would be a triple was in a band called whip? Out of limbs, Rahman lifts his leg, bend- the April Crash with ing it at the knee, striking a familiar “crane Rahman in 1997, was kick” pose. “Oh this looks like the Karate Kid,” the last piece of the Rahman says, unable to contain a hearty laugh. Triple Whip puzzle. “I love being in a He breaks the pose smiling at the explanation band with him,” said for how his band, Triple Whip, got their name. of That demonstration, blending humor, intro- Sanderson spection and intelligence, pretty much sums up Rahman. “There is no Triple Whip as a band. Brett Sanderson, their ego. There is none of bass player, describes their sound in three that stuff that you get with a lot of people in words, “Quirky, mathematical, rock.” That clean, distortion-free sound is amply bands. And that goes displayed on Triple Whip’s album Slapshot, for Holly too.” Sanderson knew which will be released on Tuesday and at a CD release show this Saturday at the Brass Rail. what to expect from Slapshot is the first full-length for the band, Rahman, but he also Triple Whip are Brett Sanderson, Santanu Rahman and Holly Rushakoff. which has been in existence since 2001. It is also was not worried Rushakoff’s the first for seasoned veterans Rahman and about where there is such an intense vocal emphasis,” inexperience on the bass. Sanderson as well as bassist Holly Rushakoff. “I don’t really get worried until I have a rea- Rahman said. “I have been listening a lot to “I have been a musician since 1989 and this is my first real album to be released on a record son to get worried and I never had a reason to that structure and how that element can actuallabel,” Rahman said. “All my musical experi- get worried. She really just dug into the bass,” ly fill in gaps we’ve never even thought of ences since then have led to this and it is very said Sanderson, who also plays bass for before, so I’m coming to the table with voice Absinthe Blind. “I’m totally impressed. I start- parts in mind as well.” exciting to me.” Triple Whip plans to evolve with their tour“I have had several records that have never ed playing bass not much longer after she starting schedule as well, hoping to play more been officially released,” Sanderson said. “It has ed and I would not touch what she does.” Rushakoff’s bass lines are the strongest parts events. Presently they have their CD release been a long time coming. It seems a like a short time, but we’ve put a lot of work into it so it will of some of the tracks on Slapshot and often pro- show, a showcase for their label, Innocent vide the melody while Words, and the Chicagoland version of the be good to get something out Rahman’s guitar and Great Cover Up, at the end of which they will there finally.” Sanderson’s drumming pro- be performing a few Afghan Whigs tunes. The work that has gone With Triple Whip and Absinthe Blind both vide tight rhythmic backing. into Triple Whip began when “It felt like the antithesis of picking up steam, Sanderson has had to balRahman wanted to try his me,” said Rushakoff of her ance his commitments. But despite having to hand at recreating Asian bass playing. “I’m not a more carefully plan his calendar, Sanderson Underground music that he booming person. I can ask has no intention to leave either project. was listening to, in particular “I really love playing the drums and I really someone a question or say Talvin Singh’s fusion of – Santanu Rahman ‘Hi’ to them and they might love playing bass and I don’t want to give up drum ‘n’ bass and traditional not even hear me. And I’ll be either,” Sanderson said. “They are both differIndian music. To create his own take on the sound, Rahman employed a like okay, whatever, I’ll ask them later. But this ent products musically so it is good to have flutist, a violinist and a keyboardist. But it was- is so forceful and commanding and I love the those outlets creatively.” Triple Whip has been playing more shows, feeling.” n’t exactly what he was looking for. The final ingredient to the Triple Whip including a few spots on the Asians in Rock “I would have to sample everyone’s playing and then edit and make my own thing,” sound is Rahman’s lyrics, which are sung in a Tour, a project that Rahman feels very proud of. “Just the idea of promoting Asian Americans Rahman said. “It was cool, but it was a lot of punctuated style. But like so many other comwork. I had to take everyone’s music and ponents of the Triple Whip songwriting who are doing the rock thing, on a social justice process, there is constant evolution from new and activism level, it is a great thing to push decide what to use as samples.” Rahman trimmed down the lineup and influences. Rahman says that working on new that Asians can do this thing as well (as) just to brought on Rushakoff to play bass. At the time tracks after recording Slapshot have been influ- broaden the mindset of the public when they think about Asians,” Rahman said. though, Rushakoff didn’t play an instrument enced again by far-off musical sources. Locally, the band is drawing bigger crowds. “Recently I’ve been spending a little more and had never been in a band. “We’re starting to attract (a) more and more “I tried the keyboard and I didn’t know what time developing the vocal parts because I have it was doing and it was very intimidating,” been listening to more of these Bollywood parts diverse crowd,” Rahman said. “I used to think

W

[ [ You can’t just go from your soul and your gut anymore because everyone has done that.

PHOTO | TED VEATCH COURTSEY OF OF TRIPLE WHIP

092503buzz1316

we were purely a musician’s band. Only musicians would understand what we’re doing and everyone else would be like ‘when is he going to kick that distortion pedal on.’” At the same time, Rushakoff and Rahman don’t want to overextend Triple Whip’s Champaign presence. “We do want to take the next step. We don’t want to just be a Champaign band,” Rushakoff said. “I really like this music and we’re all really proud to be from Champaign. We’re happy to go out and be a representative of Champaign. We believe in the music to find a way to be a little different. We don’t want to sound like everyone else.” Wherever the future may lead this trio, one thing is certain: Triple Whip will create music in their own creative and introspective way. “Being a musician today, you can’t just go from your soul and your gut anymore because everyone has done that. Everything you come up with has already been done before,” Rahman said. “You have to take that and know what’s out there. It’s like a research project. You have to know what other people have made and then know what your own true self is and then put those things together and create what you would consider your own identity.” buzz

Triple Whip will perform at The Brass Rail on Saturday, Sept. 27 with The Violents and The Fourth Rotor. Tickets are $3 and the show is 21 and over.


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FOR THE BIG PAY BACK | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

buzz

buzz

SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 | WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com

COMEDY

TopFive Party Albums

de Bono Improv Comedy – Courtyard Cafe, Illini Union, 9pm, free

MUSIC PERFORMANCES Community Drum Circle – All levels welcome – Ten Thousand Villages, 7-9pm

Parkland Theatre presents “The Laramie Project” – Written by Moises Kaufman and the members of the Tectonic Theatre Project, this drama looks at the events surrounding the 1998 death of gay student Matthew Shepard in Laramie, Wyoming as told through the voices of the townspeople. The director, Randi Jennifer Collins Hard, has cast over 70 community members to bring the town of Laramie to life – Parkland Theatre, 8pm, $2.99

FILM 1. Doggystyle - Snoop Doggy Dogg

Snoop Doggy Dogg sent shockwaves through the rap community on Dr. Dre’s breakthrough smash The Chronic. With his laid back drawl in delivering his trademark ryhmes Snoop Dogg was the quintessential gangsta rapper. Doggystyle was Snoop’s debut solo work and became the first rap album to debut at number one on the Billboard charts. Although it should be mentioned that Snoop was facing murder charges at the time, which helped get his name in the news. Even so, Doggystyle offers some quality rap in its heyday. With tracks like “Gin and Juice,” “What’s My Name,” and “Lodi Dodi,” Doggystyle continues in the tradition of The Chronic and that’s a good thing.

2. 40 Oz. to Freedom Sublime

Sublime was one of those bands that everyone missed while they were around and then it was too late when they broke through to the mainstream. On their debut, 40 Oz. to Freedom, Sublime mixes up their talents with a knack for punk-driven songs mixed with some ska influences and funky reggae beats. Overall the album forms an eclectic sound that presents several songs just right for partying. “Smoke Two Joints,” “Badfish,” and “What Happened” are songs revolving around drugs and alcohol.

3. Funkentelechy Vs. the Placebo Syndrome Parliament

Before hip hop was the bump and grind music of choice, people got their groove on to funk. No one is better known for their funk stylings or left a bigger impact than Parliament Funkadelic and George Clinton. Funkentelechy Vs.the Placebo Syndrome may have an odd title, but it also has one of Parliament’s greatest hits in “Flash Light.” That tune by itself has rocked a ton of parties over the years with its sing-a-long vocal hook and the bumping basslines. The rest of the album showcases Parliament’s weird obsessions with space villains and “The Bop Gun.”But no matter what strange excursion of the mind Parliament goes on, the funk still remains and that makes this one beautiful record to drop at any party.

Once again we’ve hit an era where grungy looking rockstars decked out in denim with giant mops of hair are ruling the party scenes of America. Def Leppard may deny up and down that they had anything to do with the rash of 1980s hair metal, but they’ll never deny that they loved to party. Hysteria isn’t their most critically acclaimed album, but it does contain party essentials like “Rocket” and “Pour Some Sugar On Me.” If your party is going to be loud and full of guitar anthems, then Hysteria needs to be your soundtrack.

Reader’s top five party album 1. Get Rich or Die Tryin’ 50 Cent 2. Homework Daft Punk 3. Chronic 2001 Dr. Dre 4. Voyage Into Trance Paul Oakenfold 5. I Get Wet Andrew WK

4. Lazy Dog Volume 2 - Lazy Dog

If you are trying to set the mood for a more upscale party, nothing says class like well mixed deep house. Ben Watt and Jay Hannan’s second Lazy Dog release features underground house classics and remixes of R&B performers like Sade, Lucy Pearl and Sunshine Anderson. There is more than enough class to impress partygoers who want to sit back and sip their martinis, and there is also enough funk in the bass lines to get the booties shakin’.

Submitted by Jeff Stahl Next week: Top Five Makeout Albums e-mail us at music@readbuzz.com

MENDOZA MUSIC LINE

Finding your favorite band du jour BY SETH FEIN | STAFF WRITER

M

y brother is pretty much responsible for most of my taste in music. With the exception of Frank Zappa and possibly Ween, he has always been one step ahead of me. That being said, I think it’s only fair to credit him with introducing me to a band that often gets overlooked by the industry and is definitely underappreciated by modern day music listeners. Most people that I know either have never heard of them, or haven’t thought about them in years. This is a band with so much integrity that they actually fought off their mega-label from 1992 to 1999 in order to get dropped so they could sign with a smaller, more artist-friendly label. It was their only choice, considering the fact that they haven’t performed live in over 20 years. They are truly unique and perhaps partially responsible for much of the “pop” music that we all listen to and appreciate today. The band that I am so generously referring to is XTC. Andy Partridge, Colin Moulding and until recently, David Gregory have

released 12 LPs and countless other reissues, singles, EPs and outtake demos. To state that they are prolific recording artists would be the greatest understatement that I have, potentially, ever written. Allmusic.com hits the nail on the head when they write “... the band has left behind a remarkably rich and varied series of albums that make a convincing argument that XTC is the great lost pop band.” I couldn’t agree more. Their albums require thought. The lyrics are always insightful, witty and relevant. Their melodies always push the border between insanity and sweetness. Their tones are arguably as good as anyone’s in that they are only a studio band, thus, allowing them to spend as much time as they want tweaking and twisting the knobs. In short, they might be my favorite band right now. I bring them up because I think that it’s important for all people who love music to consider who their favorite band is for the time being. Granted, it’s something that should fluctuate based on where we are in our lives. I know that Nine Inch Nails has been my favorite band for a while in the past. Just the same, so has Tears for Fears. The point is this: Having a favorite band at all times helps out in many situations. Whether you’ve just fallen in love or just had your heart ripped out of your ass, music is there to aid us

Separate But Equal – Showing of the 1991 Film starring Sidney Poitier with introduction by UIUC Chancellor Nancy Cantor – Virginia Theatre, 7pm, $5

5. Hysteria - Def Leppard

in whatever we are involved in. Without it, I think that we cease to be passionate about music and merely become average listeners rather than avid listeners. I never want to become that. We live in a world that is dominated by bad news and lost hope. Having a favorite band du jour, if you will, opens us up to the idea that this life is worth living. Essentially, I am just throwing out a suggestion to anyone who is reading this column. There is a strong chance that if any of you do actually seek out XTC, you may not like it at all. I know that when my brother first inundated me with what I consider to be their masterpiece, Nonsuch, I couldn’t fucking stand it. Now, I can’t go a month without it. But, at the very least, you’ll have heard them and given yourself a chance to formulate your own opinion. And that idea makes me a very satisfied XTC fan. Enjoy. buzz

Green Mountain Grass– The Iron Post 9:30pm

LECTURES Recalcitrant Modernities: Spain, Difference, and the Construction of European Modernism –Invited participants will examine the historical conditions and functions of the construction of Spanish modernism as an exception outside of, or as unique case within, European modernism – Levis Center, 9:30am-6pm

FILM GLBT Welcome Back Party – showing movie But I’m A Cheerleader – Courtyard Cafe, Illini Union, 8pm, $2 public, UIUC students free

MARKETS Market at the Square – Art, crafts, produce, flowers, plants, food, coffee, music & more; every Saturday morning through Nov 8 – SE Lot of Lincoln Square, Downtown Urbana, 7am-noon

SundaySept28 LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC Verde Hootenanny – Verdant News and Coffee, 7pm, free Open Mic Night – Espresso Royale Cafe, 7:30pm, free Lanky – Iron Post, 9pm, TBA Open Mic/Open Jam – The Canopy Club, 10pm, $2

DJ DJ D-LO and DJ Spinnerty – Barfly, 9pm, free Drew Patterson & 2ON2OUT – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, free G-Force DJ – TK Wendl’s, 9pm-close Seduction with DJ Resonate – Barfly, 10pm, free DJ Hoff – Mike ‘n Molly’s, 10pm Live DJ – C-Street, 9pm, no cover

COMEDY Spicy Clamato Improv Comedy – Courtyard Cafe, Illini Union, 9pm, free

DANCING Salsa Dancing – salsa every Tuesday to recorded music – McKinley Foundation, 9:45-11:45pm

Kevin Flowers Jam – Iron Post, 9pm, TBA The Blues Jam hosted by Kilborn Alley – The Canopy Club, 10pm, $2 Mates of State, Victory at Sea, Orphans – The Highdive, 10pm, $8 Red Hot Valentines – Best Buy, Champaign, 7pm, free Mystikal with special guest Licwadatid & Reese T – Malibu Bay Lounge, 1pm-5pm, $15 advance, $20 at door

Feminism, Empire and National Histories: The Case of Victorian Britain – Feminist scholarship series with Antoinette Burton, History – Gender and Women’s Studies Program, UIUC, noon

CHICAGOSHOWS 9/25 Ted Nugent @ House of Blues 9/25 Jackie O Motherfucker, Priest, james Chance Terminal City @ Empty Bottle 9/26 SIZZLA @ House of Blues 9/26 !!! @ Empty Bottle 9/26 Houston @ Double Door 9/27 Lake Trout @ Schubas 9/27 Bouncing Souls, Tsunami Bomb @ Metro 9/27 Burning Spear @ House of Blues 9/27 Some Girls @ Double Door 9/27 Black Rebel Motorcycle Club @ Metro, 18 + 9/28 Adult, Michael Gira @ Empty Bottle 9/29 Lisa Marie Presley @ House of Blues

OCTOBER 10/1 Saves the Day @ House of Blues 10/1 Calexico @ Metro, 18+ 10/3 Leftover Salmon @ House of Blues 10/3 Nada Surf @ Metro 10/3 Dashboard Confessional @ Aragon Ballroom 10/4 IDA @ Schubas 10/4 Steve Winwood @ House of Blues 10/5 56 Hope Road/Down the Line @ Metro 10/5 Fischerspooner @ House of Blues

DJ Fresh Face Guest DJ – Barfly, 9pm, free DJ Spinnerty – Mike ‘n Molly’s, 10pm, TBA Live DJ – C-Street, 9pm-1am, cover

MUSIC PERFORMANCES Kimono Fantasy: Attire from the Heian Court Era to the Present Day – the Hakubi Kyoto Kimono School of Tokyo partners with U of I’s Japan House for a presentation of historical and modern day kimonos – Colwell Playhouse, Krannert Center, 2pm, $10-18 UI Wind Symphony and UI Symphonic Band I – musical selections by John Gibson, Bob Margolis, Mendelssohn, and Bernstein, among others Foellinger Great Hall, Krannert Center, 7:30pm, $2-5

ON STAGE The Celebration Company at the Station Theatre presents “ Road To Nirvana” – This dark comedy tells a story about two ex-movie moguls on the skids, Al and Jerry, reuniting to co-produce the biggest blockbuster film ever – an autobiographical account of Nirvana, the world’s biggest female pop star. She will even star in it as herself – but only if she can find producers willing to meet her extraordinary terms – Station Theatre, 8pm, $8

MondaySept29 LIVE MUSIC Openingbands.com Showcase: Grinner, Solips, Resident Genius – The Canopy Club, 10pm, $3

Seth Fein is from Urbana. He is a member of Orphans and he spins indie rock at Barfly every Monday night under the moniker 2ON2OUT. He is, in fact, an umpire for men’s softball as well. He can be reached at sethfein@readbuzz.com.

TuesdaySept30

LECTURES

DJ 2ON2OUT – Barfly, 9pm, free G-Force DJ – Kam’s, 10pm-close Rock ‘n’ Roll DJing with Drew Patterson – The Iron Post, 10pm

WednesdayOct1 LIVE MUSIC Hayseed Dixie, Kerosene Brothers – The Highdive, 7:30pm, $10 The Teller’s Art: A Storytelling Concert Series for Adults – traditional world folk tales, personal narratives told to guitar, banjo and spoons – Verde Gallery/Verdent Coffee & News, 8pm Digital Underground, Too White Crew – The Canopy Club, 10pm, $10 Chip McNeall – The Iron Post, 6-8pm Green Mountain Grass – The Iron Post, 9:30pm

DJ Chef Ra – Barfly, 10pm DJ Joel Spencer – Mike ‘n Molly’s, 10pm Live DJ – C-Street, 9pm, no cover

ON STAGE The Celebration Company at the Station Theatre presents “ Road To Nirvana” – This dark comedy tells a story about two ex-movie moguls on the skids, Al and Jerry, reuniting to co-produce the biggest blockbuster film ever – an autobiographical account of Nirvana, the world’s biggest female pop star. She will even star in it as herself – but only if she can find producers willing to meet her extraordinary terms – Station Theatre, 8pm, $10 2 for 1 night!

10/7 The Polyphonic Spree, Starlight Mints @ Metro 10/8 Switchfoot, Blue @ Metro 10/10 Death Cab For Cutie, The Long Winters @ Metro 10/11 Death Cab For Cutie, Pinebender @ Metro 10/11 Smokey Robinson @ House of Blues 10/11 Kid Koala @ Abbey Pub 10/13 Simply Red @ House of Blues 10/14 Alice Cooper @ House of Blues 10/16 Electric Six @ Double Door 10/16 Rufio @ Metro, all ages 10/17 Soulive, Me’Shell Ndegeocello @ House of Blues 10/18 DJ Justin Long @ Metro Smart Bar 10/19 Longwave/Calla @ Double Door 10/24 Cowboy Mouth, Cracker @ House of Blues 10/25 The Walkmen @ Double Door 10/26 Echo and the Bunnymen @ Metro 10/29 Fuel @ House of Blues 10/31 Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe @ House of Blues

NOVEMBER 11/1 Dirtbombs @ Double Door 11/7 Big Bad Voodoo Daddy @ House of Blues 11/15 The Shins @ House of Blues, tickets on sale 8/13 11/22 Tom Jones @ House of Blues 11/22 Alabama @ Allstate Arena 11/23 Tom Jones @ House of Blues 11/24 Symphony X @ Metro

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C-UVENUES Assembly Hall First & Florida, Champaign, 333.5000 American Legion Post 24 705 W Bloomington Rd, Champaign, 356.5144 American Legion Post 71 107 N Broadway, Urbana, 367.3121 Barfly 120 N Neil, Champaign,352.9756 Barnes and Noble 51 E Marketview, Champaign, 355.2045 Boltini Lounge 211 N Neil, Champaign, 378.8001 Borders Books & Music 802 W Town Ctr, Champaign, 351.9011 The Brass Rail 15 E University, Champaign, 352.7512 Canopy Club (The Garden Grill) 708 S Goodwin, Urbana, 367.3140 C.O. Daniels 608 E Daniel, Champaign,337.7411 Cosmopolitan Club 307 E John, Champaign, 367.3079 Courtyard Cafe Illini Union, 1401 W Green, Urbana, 333.4666 Cowboy Monkey 6 Taylor St, Champaign, 398.2688 Clybourne 706 S Sixth, Champaign, 383.1008 Curtis Orchard 3902 S Duncan Rd, Champaign, 359.5565 D.R. Diggers 604 S Country Fair Dr, Champaign, 356.0888 Embassy Tavern & Grill 114 S Race, Urbana, 384.9526 Esquire Lounge 106 N Walnut, Champaign, 398.5858 Fallon’s Ice House 703 N Prospect, Champaign, 398.5760 Fat City Saloon 505 S Chestnut, Champaign, 356.7100 The Great Impasta 114 W Church, Champaign, 359.7377 G.T.’s Western Bowl Francis Dr, Champaign, 359.1678 The Highdive 51 Main, Champaign, 359.4444 Huber’s 1312 W Church, Champaign, 352.0606 Illinois Disciples Foundation 610 E Springfield, Champaign, 352.8721 Independent Media Center 218 W Main St, Urbana, 344.8820 The Iron Post 120 S Race, Urbana, 337.7678 Joe’s Brewery 706 S Fifth, Champaign, 384.1790 Kam’s 618 E Daniel, Champaign, 328.1605 Krannert Art Museum 500 E Peabody, Champaign, 333.1861 Krannert Center for Performing Arts 500 S Goodwin, Urbana, Tickets: 333.6280, 800/KCPATIX La Casa Cultural Latina 1203 W Nevada, Urbana, 333.4950 Lava 1906 W Bradley, Champaign, 352.8714 Legends Bar & Grill 522 E Green, Champaign, 355.7674 Les’s Lounge 403 N Coler, Urbana, 328.4000 Lincoln Castle 209 S Broadway, Urbana, 344.7720 Malibu Bay Lounge North Route 45, Urbana, 328.7415 Mike & Molly’s 105 N Market, Champaign, 355.1236 Mulligan’s 604 N Cunningham, Urbana, 367.5888 Murphy’s

4:51 PM

WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

604 E Green, Champaign, 352.7275 Neil Street Pub 1505 N Neil, Champaign, 359.1601 Boardman’s Art Theater 126 W Church, Champaign, 351.0068 The Office 214 W Main, Urbana, 344.7608 Parkland College 2400 W Bradley, Champaign, 351.2528 Phoenix 215 S Neil, Champaign, 355.7866 Pia’s of Rantoul Route 136 E, Rantoul, 893.8244 Pink House Routes 49 & 150, Ogden, 582.9997 The Rainbow Coffeehouse 1203 W Green, Urbana, 766.9500 Red Herring/Channing-Murray Foundation 1209 W Oregon, Urbana, 344.1176 Rose Bowl Tavern 106 N Race, Urbana, 367.7031 Springer Cultural Center 301 N Randolph, Champaign, 355.1406 Spurlock Museum 600 S Gregory, Urbana, 333.2360 Strawberry Fields Café 306 W Springfield, Urbana, 328.1655 Ten Thousand Villages 105 N Walnut, Champaign, 352.8938 TK Wendl’s 1901 S Highcross Rd, Urbana, 255.5328 Tonic 619 S Wright, Champaign, 356.6768 Two Main 2 Main, Champaign, 359.3148 University YMCA 1001 S Wright, Champaign, 344.0721 Verde/Verdant 17 E Taylor St, Champaign, 366.3204 Virginia Theatre 203 W Park Ave, Champaign, 356.9053 White Horse Inn 112 1/2 E Green, Champaign, 352.5945 Zorba’s 627 E Green, Champaign

CHICAGOVENUES House of Blues 329 N Dearborn, Chicago, 312.923.2000 The Bottom Lounge 3206 N Wilton, Chicago Congress Theatre 2135 N Milwaukee, 312.923.2000 Vic Theatre 3145 N Sheffield, Chicago, 773.472.0449 Metro 3730 N Clark St, Chicago, 773.549.0203 Elbo Room 2871 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago Park West 322 W Armitage, Chicago, 773.929.1322 Riviera Theatre 4746 N Racine at Lawerence, Chicago Allstate Arena 6920 N Mannheim Rd, Rosemont, 847.635.6601 Arie Crown Theatre 2300 S Lake Shore Dr, Chicago, 312.791.6000 UIC Pavilion 1150 W Harrison, Chicago, 312.413.5700 Schubas 3159 N Southport, Chicago, 773.525.2508 Martyrs 3855 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago, 773.288.4545 Aragon 1106 W Lawerence, Chicago, 773.561.9500 Abbey Pub 3420 W Grace, Chicago, 773.478.4408 Fireside Bowl 2646 W Fullerton Ave, Chicago, 773.486.2700 Schubert Theatre 22 W Monroe, Chicago, 312.977.1700

ART-OPENINGS Luxurious Layers: Kimonos of the Heian Court – The exhibit features beautiful silk clothing of the style worn by the Japanese aristocracy 1000 years ago – Spurlock Museum, Sept 27- Dec 13. Hours: Tue noon-5pm;Wed,Thu, Fri, 9am-5pm; Sat 10am-4pm

ART-ON VIEW NOW "Held Together" & "Unopened Places" – Verde Gallery presents "Held Together," sculptures by Sandra Ahtens and "Unopened Places," paintings and drawings from Jana Manson on display through Oct 4. Opening reception on Thu Sept 18, 7-9pm. Gallery Hours: Tue-Sat 10am-10pm. www.verdantsystems.com/Verde.htm "mistaken" – featuring painting by Steven Hudson, installation by Christina March and mixed media works by Victoria Outerbridge. The exhibit opens on Sept 17 and runs through Oct 12 at The Springer Cultural Center All are invited to a reception on Sept 19 from 6-8pm. That night, from 6-7pm we will have live music by Desdafinado, followed by an artists' talk at 7pm "Full Circle" – Gallery Virtue presents a solo exhibition of black and white photography by Anna Barnes.The photographs will be on display throughout September. 220 W Washington, Monticello. Thu 12-4pm, Fri 10am-8pm, Sat 10am-6pm. (217) 762-7790. www.galleryvirtu.org. "Remnants of Ritual: Selections from the Gelbard Collection of African Art" – The magnificent African art collection of David and Clifford Gelbard focuses on the cultural significance and aesthetic beauty of masks and sculptures - many of which were created for ceremonial and ritual purposes.This exhibition includes a wide array of objects and celebrates the durable, expressive essence of festivals, rites and coming-of-age ceremonies. On display at the Krannert Art Museum through Oct 26. 500 E Peabody, Urbana. Tue, Thu-Sat 9am-5pm, Wed 9am8pm, Sun 2-5pm.(217) 333-1860.Suggested Donation: $3 "Visualizing the Blues: Images of the American South, 18621999" - Every picture tells a story and this exhibition of more than 100 photographs of the Mississippi Delta region portrays a profoundly vivid narrative of life in the American South.These photographs, taken from the Civil War era through 1999, show the rhythms of life from this almost mythic region and powerfully document the sources of inspiration for the lyrics and melodies of Blues musicians.Among the photographers represented are Margaret Bourke-White, Alfred Eisenstaedt, Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Gordon Parks, Andres Serrano and many others.On display at Krannert Art Museum through Nov

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2. 500 E Peabody, Urbana. Tue, Thu-Sat 9am-5pm, Wed 9am8pm, Sun 2-5pm.(217) 333-1860.Suggested Donation: $3 Featured Works XIII:"The Spirit of Mediterranean Pathos:The Early Work of Pierre Daura" - Pierre Daura (1896-1976) was a member of significant modern art movements in the early 20th century. This exhibition highlights a recent gift of works by Daura and explores the forms and colors of his paintings and drawings from about 1910 to the late 1930s. On display at Krannert Art Museum through Nov 2. 500 E Peabody, Urbana. Tue, Thu-Sat. 9am-5pm, Wed 9am-8pm, Sun 2-5pm. (217) 3331860.Suggested Donation: $3 "Land and Water" – The Middle Room Gallery @ the UCIMC presents "Land and Water," a group photography show curated by Lissa Raybon on display through Sept 30. The group show will focus on landscape and nature photography and will feature local photographers Lisa Billman, Jennifer Gentry and Lissa Raybon.218 W Main St, Urbana.http://www.gallery.ucimc.org/ “Separate and Unequal: Segregation and Three Generations of Black Response, 1870-1950.” – This exhibit highlights the Plessy v. Ferguson Supreme Court decision of 1896, which legally sanctioned racial segregation in the United States until 1954 when the Supreme Court overturned Plessy in the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case. Materials from the Library's collections and archives highlight the historical period between these two landmark civil rights cases. Sponsored by the Office of the Chancellor, the Brown v. Board of Education Commemorative Committee and the University of Illinois Library. On view at the University of Illinois Main Library, first floor hallway, during library hours. 1408 W Gregory Drive, Urbana. Hours vary. (217) 333-2290 http://www.oc.uiuc.edu/brown

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SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 | TIME TO GET READDDDDYYYYY

CDReviews

092503buzz1118

ATMOSPHERE Seven’s Travels Epitaph

★★★★ BY ANDY SIMNICK Epitaph records, years separated from their hot streak of Rancid and Offspring releases in the early 1990s, has stumbled upon a masterpiece of a record through one of the most baffling crossovers in recent times. Seven’s Travels, the latest release from the independent hip-hop group Atmosphere, not only has catchy beats and the fantastic rhymes by Slug but also will be a staple on “best of” lists when they are complied at the end of the year. I have a confession to make before the review continues. My experience with the hip-hop genre is rather limited. The few rap CDs I own are Snoop Dogg’s Doggystyle, Nas’s Illmatic, and the two mainstream releases by Jurassic 5. That said, from what little I have seen, there seems to be two schools of music within the realm: those that support the music and those that support Cristal. Atmosphere is not going to be lumped with 50 Cent, DMX, or Nelly, as their style is much smoother and intense. His vocals convey a level of sincere, nonviolent intensity that I have never heard before in an album of this type. The beats contained within the album are catchy and perfectly matched to the songs.The mixing and sampling is done correctly. And most of all, every song on the CD is listenable and unique. One standout is “Suicidegirls,” a track containing phone messages overlaid onto a backing of bass and guitar that puts Linkin Park to shame. Another track that jumps off the album is “Shoes,” a simple track with beautiful pacing and impeccable timing. Most of all, the track “The Keys to Life Vs. 15 Minutes of Fame” has hit written all over it. If Atmosphere makes a huge debut with this album, this song will be the first single, guaranteed. It is unfair to label individual tracks as hits since this album does not let up for 19 straight songs. Perhaps the universality of this LP is the reason Epitaph picked up the rights to this album.The quality of this album is unmistakable. And the raw emotion is very similar to that found in the punk genre prior to the Blink-182 invasion. True feeling is an integral part of any type of music, and to be able to put that emotion to use in such an accessible product is a rarity. Seven’s Travels does just that, and this album will be the one that puts Slug in the ranks of elite MCs. Atmosphere does not produce rap heard in the bars on John Street, but this album will maintain a place in record collections of connoisseurs and hip-hop amateurs alike.

THE VERTEBRATS A Thousand Day Dream Reaction Recordings

★★★★ BY BRIAN MERTZ History is all a matter of who is telling it. That is even true when asking to recount the history of music in Champaign-Urbana. Ask a young indie-rocker about the Champaign scene and you will get the often repeated list that will inevitably include HUM, The Poster Children, Braid, Sarge and maybe even Lovecup. Ask a member of the house scene and they’ll remind you that both Cajmere and Mazi resided in Champaign for a few years, throwing some of the best parties and raves this town has ever seen. Power balladeers will tell you about REO. People with folk leanings will cite Alison Krauss. But for the people who were actually taking an active part in the scene between the years of 1979 and 1982, the history of Champaign music must include The Vertebrats. During that

era, this reviewer aged from being born to reaching the age of three. So it is impossible for this review to make any judgments on whether A Thousand Day Dream does the magic of that era justice. That can be left to the informative and genuinely interesting liner notes included in this re-release. All that this reviewer needs to note is that A Thousand Day Dream fully captures why The Vertebrats were respected worldwide as garage rock pioneers. Years before The Strokes decked themselves in denim or Jack White magically became a guitar legend, The Vertebrats were churning out thrashing rock numbers that had guitars jangling and lead singer Ken Draznik wailing out his lyrics like nobody’s business. The 22 tracks on this album range in recording quality from studio time with Mark Rubel to an early performance of “Put Your Toys Away” in the WPGU studios to a gaggle of rough demos. Original fans of The Vertebrats will most likely love having all these songs assembled in one place instead of scattered over traded tapes. But newcomers to The Vertebrats will have much to enjoy here as well. “Diamonds in the Rough” is a classic late ‘60s sounding, upbeat garage rock song with the infectious vocal hook of “Nothing is what it is before / Everybody’s talking war / Turning 19 is no fun anymore.” It is a brilliant fusing of bubbly rock that makes the listener want to dance, but the song still carries a message (it is also the most political the band got, according to Draznik). Then of course there is the Vertebrat classic, “Left in the Dark,” which has been covered by many, including The Replacements and most recently Courtney Love. And yes, that track still is that good. The seven demo cuts near the end of A Thousand Day Dream are very rough in terms of production quality. But the songwriting skills and the superb vocal harmonies still manage to make their way through the faint tape hiss.That sound quality is all at once a tiny flaw and a little bit more of the charm of this collection. There is always time to learn more about any period of history. Those who are trying to better understand the progression of music in C-U, or who just want some garage rock in its true form with no studio wizardry owe it to themselves to pick up A Thousand Day Dream.

KILL HANNAH For Never and Ever Atlantic

★★★ BY MARISSA MONSON Kill Hannah could quite possibly be one of the hardest working bands in Chicago right now: fliering constantly, meeting with fans, touring all the time, handing out stickers out at their own shows to possibly everyone in the damn room. They do it all. But, alas, they are not exactly what the Chicago rock scene was looking for to get it out of the post-Smashing Pumpkins rut. They sound like The Cure, but as it turns out, bands that sound like The Cure leave something to be desired, kind of like the way some people like bananas, but not things that have banana flavoring in them. You just end up with an artificial taste in your mouth, and a yearning for the real thing. I had the pleasure of seeing their live show at The Highdive about a month ago, and I noticed one thing, not the tube socks on their wrists, but the shining light of their somewhat typical Cure-esqe show, the song,“Kennedy.”This song will be their ticket to stardom, and whether they can continue to crank out songs of this caliber will decide if their place will be in the one hit wonder bin, or in heavy rotation. Lead singer Mat Devine provides the haunting, melodic vocals, and the band accompanies with electronic beats and fine musicianship that compares to the likes of My Bloody Valentine and Joy Division. “Kennedy” begins with a soft electronic ooze as Devine proclaims “I want to be a Kennedy / I want to be a real heartbreaker”and so on until the drums, guitars and Devine take off in a frenzy to proclaim “and die young!” This was what I was waiting for, on the CD as well as at the show,a well-crafted,smart song that didn’t use cliche lyrics like “I hate the rain” and epiphanies about high school romances gone sour. Reviewing this CD was a difficult task with “Kennedy” anxiously awaiting as the second track amidst the songs that were a good effort, but lacking the same kicker of “Kennedy”. Kill Hannah has been around the Chicago scene for awhile, and their Metro-packing shows are proof of their fanappeal. As far as the album goes, seeing the glimpse of the quality they can produce on “Kennedy,” one would hope they will continue pushing their ability to create more songs of that manner, and steer away from the places all Cure-like bands go, like “Raining All The Time.” This album and Kill Hannah’s apparent fervor for their music and their fans leads me to believe they have already figured out what they did right and wrong on For Never and Ever and how they want to fix it. This band will only get better.

PEDAL STEEL TRANSMISSION The Angel of the Squared Circle ★★★ BY JACOB DITTMER If there is an absolute truth in indie rock, it is that indie rock that it is ever-expansive and allencompassing of musical genres. There are regional indie rock scenes (the Northwest, New York and even ChampaignUrbana), individuals find themselves constantly joining and creating their own bands, and this culture of people really enjoys discovering and expanding their knowledge of musical acts. Chicago is another region with a strong indie rock scene and one such act to come out of there is Pedal Steel Transmission.This is a “do it yourself”type of band as they have taken on the position of producing all three of their albums completely independently. With four members and a variety of influences backing their sound, Pedal Steel Transmission may not have the crossover pop success of some indie rockers, but still have something to offer. What makes some indie rock CDs so difficult to review is the lack of obvious influences and sounds the group is trying to emulate, and that is a good thing. Creativity in pop music seems to be something left in the ‘60s and today we are forced to seek out groups that offer something aside from the pop jingle that pleases the ear but fails to provoke the mind. Now let’s get things straight, music has come a long way since the ‘60s, it is merely the lack of people achieving something like the Beatles did and doing the creative things that they did with everybody and their dog taking notice. But that is something for an entirely different day, today it’s Pedal Steel Transmission taking the spotlight. The best way to describe how this album sounds is to compare them to Yo La Tengo or Modest Mouse. Sure, they don’t have the same sound and styling of these much-accomplished acts, but what this CD does do is travel around in soundscape, style, genre and emotions much like a they do (listen to one of their CDs and try saying the songs all sound the same). From one track to the next, the songs are different and creative, but all the while the CD still comes together to form a nice overall album. Now do not go out buy this disc and find yourself perturbed that it doesn’t sound like the above-mentioned groups, it’s merely a comparison to the production style, not the music itself. Songs travel between melodic folk sounds accompanied by piano to a synthesized brooding like that of Radiohead’s “Treefingers.” Other tracks achieve a garage rock sound with the whines from distorted guitars and loud cymbal crashes. But what makes indie rock cool is the method of touring that places emphasis on smaller venues, because these acts often recognize the greatness of a more personalized environment. It may happen to you one night; you walk into a bar, a band is playing that you’ve never heard of, and the music they play hits your ear just right and you are sold. Not everyone is into this idea of discovery and adventure in music, but those who are know what it is like.

TRIPLE WHIP Slapshot

nect chase out”from the song “Ace”will drive the listener back to the music instead of the words after the first read of the liner notes. Not that it would be a bad thing as Triple Whip has some stellar and tight sounds as a band. But for a band that puts intense focus into the creation of their music, a new approach to the lyrics might yield another piece of the puzzle. When Rahman does get into a groove with his vocals, magic happens. “Delight” starts out like most of the other songs from Slapshot with Rushakoff laying down a heavy bass line. But the conviction in Rahman’s voice when he sings out the chorus of “No matter what’s your side / Of the divide you’re on / All sides will get their chance / Revel in charmed hindrance”shows that there is a bright future for him as a vocalist with Triple Whip. To truly appreciate Slapshot, a listener has to be willing to devote their full attention to all of the intricacies in the songs and interplay amongst the trio. Those people looking for an album to put on in the background or to serve as the soundtrack to a party should keep looking. For music fans who like to put thought into the albums they listen to and get thoughtprovoking music in return, Slapshot is the way to go. If you can’t catch their CD release party on Saturday, Sept. 27 at the Brass Rail, the album will be officially released on Sept. 30 on Innocent Words Records. Get yours while the getting’s good.

MUSIC REVIEW GUIDE

Flawless Good Mediocre Bad Un-listenable

★★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★ no stars

CHARTS PARASOL RECORDS TOP 10 SELLERS 1. Secret Shine - After Years (Clairecords) 2. The Green Pajamas - Through Glass Colored Roses (A Hidden Agenda Record) 3. The Perishers - From Nothing To One (NONS Records - Sweden) 4. Mojave 3 - Spoon And Rafter (4AD Records) 5. Bjorn Olsson - Bjorn Olsson (Gravitation Records - Sweden) 6. The Lucksmiths - A Little Distraction (Matinée Records) 7. Quasi - Hot Shit!/Live Shit (Touch And Go Records) 8. The Decemberists - Her Majesty, The Decemberists (Merge Records) 9. Mates Of State - Team Boo (Polyvinyl Records) 10. The Twilight Singers - Black Is The Color Of My True Love's Hair (Birdman Records)

Innocent Words Records

★★★ BY BRIAN MERTZ Triple Whip’s debut fulllength album Slapshot is just familiar enough to be enticing, but still different enough to remain intriguing. It is a very delicate balance crafted with precision and purpose. In short, another Champaign-Urbana rock outfit has turned out another album worth picking up in 2003. The pseudo-math rock and bass intensive sounds might not appeal to audiences raised on the notion that Dashboard Confessional is the beginning and end of the indie rock sound. But the dark and rumbling sounds of the ten tracks on Slapshot should resonate with music fans with broader palates. What helps Triple Whip carve out a sonic niche, even in Champaign, is the decision to let Holly Rushakoff’s chunky, funky bass lines stand as the dominant sound most of the time. While lead singer and guitarist Santanu Rahman adds essential elements with chopped vocals and distortion-free guitars, it is the loose sound of Rushakoff’s bass that gives Triple Whip their sound. Add to the pot Brett Sanderson’s frantic but simple and precise drumming and you’ve got a winner. What will be unsettling to some is the lyrical content. Rahman goes off on some odd tangents, especially in songs like “Ace” and “Double Feature.” However, phrases that don’t really make much sense like “Backbone strikes to super soul / All this could lead to just one place / Cool brute Mac close on his mark / Intense crime con-

NEW RELEASES Paul Oakenfold - Perfecto Presents: Great Wall Bad Boy’s da Band - Too Hot for T.V. Leslie Mills - Different for Girls Kin Za Za - Number One in Shambala Alice Cooper - The Eyes of Martina McBride - Martina Merle Haggard - Haggard Like Never Before Thousand Foot Krutch - Phenomenon Jethro Tull - Christmas Album Cappadonna - The Struggle Incognito - Who Needs Love Lyle Lovett - My Baby Don’t Tolerate Dismemberment Plan - A People’s History of (fan remixes) Autumn Rhythm - Secret Songs Billy Currington - Billy Currington Lo-Pro - Lo-Pro Maria - My Soul Sting - Sacred Love Dido - Life for Rent Bent - The Everlasting Blink


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I’M TRYING TO BE SOMEONE ELSE | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

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ARTIST OPPORTUNITIES

Third time an infectious charm

Call for Entries – Entries needed for juried show at High Cross Road Studio during October. Any 2-D or 3-D collage or assemblage work created in the past two years will be considered. Submit actual work, slides or photos for consideration. Consideration fee is $15. All work must be ready to hang.Work weighing more than 50 pounds must be noted as such. Commission is 25 percent. Mail submissions with check to Sandra Ahten, 1408 S Vine, Urbana, IL 61801. Call or e-mail for more details or other arrangements.Note: It is not necessary for work to be for sale.

Mates of State return to Champaign to support their third album, Team Boo

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ason Hammel and Kori Gardner don’t make ordinary pop music. It is quirky and complex, and at once it is plain old simple fun. It is a sound developed since 1997 that is so unique that after a few bars of any of their songs, a first time listener will inevitably ask, “What the heck is this?” to which an experienced listener will respond, “A ha! This is Mates of State.” So perhaps the phrase “A ha!” isn’t getting tossed around in conversation very much these days. But the name Mates of State is on the tip of many tongues in the indie rock world lately, due in large part to the buzz surrounding their third full-length album, Team Boo. Some of that comes from the fact that the duo is taking its magical live performance out on the road again for another national tour. One of the stops along the way will be The Highdive in Champaign where Mates will perform with Orphans (members of Absinthe Blind). For those who haven’t yet picked up Team Boo, the show on Sunday night will be a good opportunity to hear most of the material. “We are going to play almost all of the new CD,” said Gardner. “We’ll still play some of the old stuff because I really hate bands that only play stuff off of their new album.” Live performances have been the bread and butter for Mates of State. After moving to San Francisco, the band adopted a “play anywhere, anytime” philosophy. They have done just that, especially supporting new albums. “We’re a touring band first,” Hammel said. “But we still have to have something to be excited about. A lot of times that is the new songs. It is fun to play the new ones for an audience.” Playing in front of an audience certainly wasn’t the duo’s first ambition. Before their decision to work full time as a band, Gardner was a teacher and Hammel was a cancer researcher. They quit those jobs in 2001, got married and started touring heavily. Those plans don’t seem to be changing any time soon. In fact, touring might actually help Hammel and Gardner’s relationship. “We have been in the band since we got married and we are together every day on tour,” Gardner said. “If we were to stop doing this, we wouldn’t see each other as much. It has actually made our relationship stronger. For some marriages it might hurt, but we have made it work.” While the touring schedule might be giving some benefits to Hammel and Gardner’s marriage, Hammel also sees it as a benefit to the fans in the audience.

“We are a live band and when we are start working on the singing part,” Hammel other tried in vein to save him. “It feels like a really different subject for us onstage it gives us a chance to really commu- said, explaining the songwriting process. “If nicate with the listener,” Hammel said. “We we both have good ideas, we will use them to be singing about,” Gardner said. “But it is enjoy that they get something out of it and that both. It is a little more random as to the lyrical an idea that appears in general for us. Death part. On the lyrics we’ll decide what a song is pops up in so many of our songs without it we can feel the excitement.” The live performances also gave Mates of about and give our respective vantage points.” being the main theme.” “Parachutes,” along with the other 11 tracks “We’ll fill in with each other. Neither of us is State a chance to test and refine some of the material that became part of Team Boo. writing the entire melody or lyric,” Gardner on Team Boo, was released on Sept. 16 on Hammel estimates that 60 percent of the songs said. “Lyrics come after the melodies. We’ll ask Champaign label Polyvinyl Records, a record were ones that had been performed on the each other, ‘what were you singing about?’ label that Mates of State saw as a perfect fit road, and the remainder were written when and then we’ll come together on the lyrics. We when they signed. “Matt and Darcie (Lunsford), (owners of both definitely love this way of songwriting the band came off of tour. Polyvinyl), were really easy to communicate Having that material ready to go is one of and we aren’t going to change.” That process has created critical success for with and they were on top of their shit,” the differences between the recording process for Team Boo and Mates of State’s previous Mates of State. Their first album, My Solo Gardner said. “What is great is that everyone Project, was listed in the receives the same attention whether you are a release, Our Constant New York Times as “one smaller band that doesn’t sell many albums or Concern. of the best records you you are the biggest sellers.” “On this album we Whether or not Mates of State become one of probably didn’t hear in were comfortable and 2000.” Team Boo looks the biggest sellers isn’t something that will prepared,” Hammel to build on that success alter the Mates of State sound. said. “We only had “We will never compromise our music,” and the new sonic taneight songs written gents that the album Gardner said. “We might make some changes for Our Constant goes on will most likely so that more people can see our music, but we Concern going into the bring more praise. One will never compromise our creativity.” studio, so we were – Kori Gardner They may not compromise but even their of the most striking scrambling to write tangents is a song entertaining live show has undergone few and we didn’t want to do that again. That creates stress you shouldn’t called “Parachutes (Funeral Song)” that fea- changes. “We have been adding without adding,” tures Gardner on a more traditional sounding have to think about.” Gardner said. “Every tour our energy has been Not only did Hammel and Gardner have piano than her organ. “We decided it sounded cool on the increasing on stage and we’re having fun.” buzz enough material written to fill Team Boo, but piano, but also it was more of a raw song they actually had extra material. “That allows you to capture which songs are and it sounded too rocking on the organ,” really the best and then discard some songs,” Gardner said. The song was inspired by a story the duo Come share in the fun with Mates of State on Sunday when Hammel said. The other difference in the recording process were told where a couple decided to go out they play The Highdive with local trio Orphans. Doors open for Team Boo was the personnel that the duo parachuting and one fell out of their vest as the at 10 p.m. and tickets are $8. relied upon. Our Constant Concern was recorded with Dave Trumfino. Team Boo employed John Croslin (who had worked with Guided By Voices, Spoon, Waylon Jennings and Pavement) and Jim Eno (who had worked with Spoon). But it wasn’t the impressive indie credentials that made recording with Croslin and Eno so special. “We had a good working relationship with Dave, but we had a great relationship with John and Jim,” Hammel said. “They are our friends and so we were open to suggestions when they would say, ‘I like this but I like this a little better.’ It was a four person process with lots of good ideas that Kori and I might not have seen just looking from our angles.” The result of that four person process is an album that sees more complex melodies in Gardner’s organ playing and even tighter drumming from Hammel. And of course, the dual vocals are still on this release, letting Hammel and Gardner’s lyrics contrast, compliment and come together in each song. “When we are writing, we are both working at the same time on the music and then will Mates of State are Kori Gardner and Jason Hammel and will be performing at The Highdive on Sept. 28.

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We have been in the band since we got married and we are together every day on tour...It has actually made our relationship stronger.

The Springer Cultural Center is seeking local artists to participate in the juried Art Exhibition Series.Individual and group applications will be accepted.Information and applications are available at the Springer Cultural Center, 301 N Randolph, Champaign, 61820, (217) 398-2376, or online at www.champaignparkdistrict.com/pdf. Applications will be accepted from Aug 25 through Sept 26.

ART LISTINGS Portraits – Award winning portrait artist Sandra Ahten is currently accepting commissions for portraits for holiday giving. Portraits are priced at an affordable range and professional exchange or barter may be accepted.For examples of work and a quote,contact Sandra Ahten at (217) 367-6345 or spiritofsandra@hotmail.com

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Creation Art Studio Art Classes for Children and Adults -- All classes offer technical instruction and the exploration of materials through expressive,spontaneous art and experimentation. Independent studies of personal interests and ideas, dreams, etc. are expressed and developed through collage and assemblage art and through drawing, painting, sculpture and ceramics. Children meet Mon-Thu from 3:30-5pm, and Sat 11am12:30pm. Adolescents meet Fri 4-5:30pm. Adults meet Thu at 10am and Sat between 1:30-5:30pm for two or more hours. Create designs, a still life, portraits, landscapes and more. Open to beginners and advanced students.Adult Open Studio meets Tue 7-9pm.Drop-ins welcome.Come with a friend.Call to make special arrangements for a group. CPDU's offered. For information,contact Jeannine Bestoso at 344-6955.Creation Art Studio is located at 1102 E Washington, Urbana. www.creationartstudios.com Join Artists and Workshops at Gallery Virtu – Gallery Virtu, an artist-owned cooperative, now invite applications from area artists. The Gallery also offers workshops for adults, teens and children in knitting, embroidery, photography, jewelry making, printmaking, papermaking, bookbinding and ribbon flowers. Gallery Virtu offers original works by the members including: jewelry, pottery, collages, sculptures, journals, hats, handbags and other textiles. For more information please call 762-7790, visit our web site at www.galleryvirtu.org, e-mail workshops@galleryvirtu.org or visit the gallery. Regular hours: Thu 12-4pm, Fri 12-8pm, Sat 10am-6pm. 220 W Washington Street in Monticello. Art Classes at High Cross Studio – All classes are held at High Cross Studio in Urbana. 1101 N High Cross Road. E-mail or call for reservations and details. (217) 367-6345 or spiritofsandra@hotmail.com..

PHOTO | KATHY GARDNER COURTESY OF TAG TEAM MEDIA

BY BRIAN MERTZ | MUSIC EDITOR

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SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 | WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com

“Portrait Paintings with Oils” – This course will provide instruction in painting portraits from photographs. Paint a portrait of your loved one or yourself.Mon-Fri daytime class and weekend workshop offered. "Collage for the Soul" – Students will learn a variety of collage techniques, including photo and photocopy transfer, papermaking and manipulation,and frontage,while exploring a particular subject, such as a place, a memory, an experience or a relationship.No art-making experience necessary. "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" – For adults who have always wanted to learn to draw, but felt as if they lacked talent or confidence. Other Classes: “Making Monoprints,” “Art With Intention” (Open Studio). For information on these visit http://www.spiritofsandra.com and click on "classes," then e-mail or call for reservations.

ART GALLERIES AND EXHIBITS Boneyard Pottery – Ceramic Art by Michael Schwegmann and more. 403 Water St, Champaign. (217) 355-5610.Tue-Sat 11am5pm. Broken Oak Gallery – Local and national artists. Original art including photography, watercolors, pottery, oil paintings, colored pencil, woodturning and more. Refreshments served by the garden all day Saturday. 1865 N 1225 E Rd., White Heath. (217) 762-4907.Thu-Sat 10am-4pm. Cinema Galley – Local and regional artists including many University of Illinois and Parkland College faculty members.120

W Main, Urbana. (217) 367-3711. Tue-Sat 10am-4pm. Sun 15pm.

Champaign. (217) 356-8994. Mon-Fri 9am-4pm and by appointment.

Cafe Kopi – Art work from local artist Kate Sammons on display. Artist statement: “The work displayed here was created with several different audiences and appreciations in mind. The artist hopes that it will appeal to a broad range of tastes, styles and levels of art awareness. Primarily, this art is created to have a pleasant character and stimulate its viewer's pleasure of the appreciator by its soft colors and feminine forms.It is perfect for creating a relaxed, casual and contemporary environment, where one can appreciate it without having to devote one's full attention to it. Secondarily, this art is meant to direct one's attention to the meaning or symbolism of its materials and the method that was used to put them together. The materials used to create these pieces were all carefully chosen to resemble certain aspects of the home environment. These pieces were made from materials bought from local home improvement stores ... Finally, this art is designed to entertain one's sense of imagination.These pieces are loaded with details that some people may find relevant and amusing to their knowledge of art or design ...These works,while fulfilling their primary function as wall hangings,make an enigmatic metaphor to the walls themselves.” 109 N Walnut, Champaign. (217) 359-4266. Mon-Thu 7am-11pm, Fri-Sat 7am-12pm, Sun 11am-8pm.

Old Vic Art Gallery – Fine and Original Art. 11 E University, Champaign. (217) 355-8338. Mon-Thu 11am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-4:30pm.

Creation Art Studios – Hosts a continuous and evolving display of works by students and associates of the studio. Landscapes, florals, animal life and expressive art in various mediums by Jeannine Bestoso are also currently on display.For information, contact Jeannine Bestoso.1102 E Washington St.,Urbana.(217) 344-6955. Tue-Sat 1-5:30pm; and scheduled studio sessions. www.creationartstudios.com Country in the City – Antiques, Architectural, Gardening, Home Accessories. Custom designing available. 1104 E Washington St., Urbana.(217) 367-2367.Thu-Sat 10am-5pm. Framer's Market – Frame Designers since 1981.Current featured artists: Charlotte Brady - Botanical Watercolors, Barry Brehm Landscape Photography, Larry Hamlin - Aquatint Etchings, Patrick Harness - Vibrant Oils and Pastels, Hua Nian - Abstract Watercolors & Pastels, David Smith - Original Acrylic Landscapes,Cindy Smith - Stone & Wood Sculpture,Bill Stevens - Humorous Recycled Metal Sculptures,Steve Stoerger - Steel & Glass Sculpture,Bonnie Switzer - Abstract Acrylic Paintings.807 W Springfield Ave.,Champaign.(217) 351-7020.Tue-Fri 9:30am5:30pm, Sat 10am-4pm. Furniture Lounge – Local artist Dean Schwenk along with many other local and fine artwork/pottery. Also specializing in midcentury modern furniture from the 1920s-1980s, retro, Danish modern, lighting, vintage stereo equipment and vinyl records. 9 E University, Champaign. (217) 352-5150. Sun-Mon 124:30pm,Wed-Sat 11am-5:30pm. Gallery Virtu Cooperative – Original fine art and crafts from member artists including jewelry, pottery, paintings, collages, hats, handbags and other textiles, sculptures and journals. The Gallery also offers workshops; a new schedule of classes is on the web site.220 W Washington St.,Monticello.(217) 762-7790. Thu 12-4pm, Fri 12-8pm, Sat 10am-6pm.www.galleryvirtu.org Glass FX – New and Antique Stained Glass Windows, Lamps, and unique glass gifts. Gallery is free and open to the public. Interested in learning the art of Stained Glass? Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced Stained Glass Classes offered. 202 S First St, Champaign. Mon-Thu 10am-5:30pm, Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 9am-4pm.(217) 359-0048. www.glassfx.com. Griggs Street Potters -–Handmade functional and decorative pottery.305 W Grigg St,Urbana.(217) 344-8546.Mon-Fri 11am4pm, or call for appointment. The High Cross Studio Gallery – Works by Sandra Ahtens on display. Artist studio space available. 1101 N High Cross Rd., Urbana. Tue 7-9pm, Thu 3-5pm, Fri 3-5pm and by chance or appointment.spiritofsandra@hotmail.com Hill Street Gallery Inc. – Oil and watercolor paintings, hand painted T-shirts, handmade jewelry. 703 W Hill, Champaign. (217) 359-0675. Sat 12-5pm or by appointment during the week. International Galleries – Works from local artists.Lincoln Square Mall. (217) 328-2254. Mon-Fri 10am-8pm, Sat 10am-6pm, Sun 12-5pm. Larry Kanfer Gallery -- University of Illinois images by photographic artist Larry Kanfer.Unique diploma frames and other UI gifts. Sepia Champaign-Urbana Collection also on display. Available now: 2004 Prairiescapes and University of Illinois calendars.2503 S Neil,Champaign.(217) 398-2000.Free and Open to the Public.Mon-Sat 10am-5:30pm.www.kanfer.com LaPayne Photography – Specializes in panoramic photography up to 6 feet long of different subjects including sporting events, city skylines,national parks and University of Illinois scenes. Las Vegas Strip photo show coming soon. 816 Dennison Dr.,

Springer Cultural Center – cultural,recreational and educational programs for all ages as well as workshops, lectures, exhibits and performances.Offers classes in dance,music,theater,visual arts, health/wellness and for preschool children. 301 N Randolph Street,Champaign.398-2376.Mon-Thu 8am-9pm,Fri 8am-5:30pm, Sat 9am-5pm, Sun 12pm-5pm. www.champaignparkdistrict.com Steeple Gallery – Works from Gary Ingersoll, including many Allerton Park photos on display. Also showing vintage botanical and bird prints,antiques,framed limited edition prints.102 E Lafayette St., Monticello. 762-2924. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat 10am-4pm.www.steeplegallery.com Verdant News and Coffee & Verde Gallery – Magazines, newspapers,coffee,beverages and fine pastries along with the Verde Fine Art Gallery. 17 E Taylor St., Champaign. 366-3204. Cafe hours:Mon-Sat 7am-10 pm;Gallery Hours:Tue-Sat 10am-10pm. www.verdant-systems.com/Verde.htm UIUC Japan House – Public Tours: Every Thursday, 1-4pm, Third Sat of each month, 1-5pm or by appointment. 2000 S Lincoln Ave., Urbana.(217) 244-9934.email japanhouse@uiuc.edu. Ziemer Gallery – Original paintings and limited edition prints by Larry Ziemer. Pottery, weavings, wood turning and glass works by other artists.Gallery visitors are welcome to sit,relax,listen to the music and just enjoy being surrounded by art. 210 W Washington, Monticello. Tue 10am-8pm, Wed-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 10am-4pm.www.ziemergallery.com

THEATER LISTINGS Elysium on the Prairie, Live Action Roleplaying – Vampires stalk the city streets and struggle for dominance in a world of gothic horror. Create your own character and mingle with dozens of players who portray their own undead alter egos. Each session is another chapter in an ongoing story of triumph, tragedy and betrayal. Friday, “Vampire: The Masquerade” For more information visit: http://ww2.uiuc.edu/ro/elysium/intro.html. Check site for location, 7pm. Parkland Theatre presents “The Laramie Project” – Written by Moises Kaufman and the members of the Tectonic Theatre Project, this drama looks at the events surrounding the 1998 death of gay student Matthew Shepard in Laramie,Wyoming as told through the voices of the townspeople. The director, Randi Jennifer Collins Hard, has cast over 70 community members to bring the town of Laramie to life. Performances are Oct 1, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11 at 8pm and Oct 12 at 3pm. A post-performance talk with the director and actors will be held on Fri, Oct 3 after the show. General admission tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for students (over 12) and seniors, and $5 for youths 12 and under. Special priced nights are opening night, Wed, Oct 1 when all tickets are $2.99 and Thu, Oct 9 when all tickets are half their regular price. Call (217) 351-2528 for tickets and information. The Celebration Company at the Station Theatre presents “ Road To Nirvana” – This dark comedy tells a story about two ex-movie moguls on the skids, Al and Jerry, reuniting to co-produce the biggest blockbuster film ever – an autobiographical account of Nirvana, the world’s biggest female pop star. She will even star in it as herself – but only if she can find producers willing to meet her extraordinary terms. – Road To Nirvana runs at The Station Theatre, Thursday to Sunday, Sept 25 - 28 and Wednesday to Saturday, Oct 1-4. All performances are at 8pm. Ticket prices are $8 Thu and Sun, $10 on Fri and Sat, and Wed night is a special two tickets for the price of one. For reservations please call 217-384-4000.

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CHOREOGRAPHERS WANTED Choreographers Wanted for 22nd Annual B.A.T.S. Fashion Show at Lincoln Avenue Residence Halls – Requirements for the Choreographers include: Letter of Interest , Script of Fashion Show, Have envelope addressed to B.A.T.S. (LAR) C/O Denise Ward. Last day to submit is Oct 3rd. For more information and interviews contact: Denise Ward at 332-2825 or Stefanie Jones at 332-2843.

MIND BODY SPIRIT Loose Womyn Discussion Group – (discussion topics are loose, the women need not be) 7pm Thu, Sept 18 we'll discuss the book The Dance of the Dissident Daughter by Sue Monk Kidd. Borders Bookstore, 802 Town Center Blvd, Champaign (217) 351-9011. Sunday Zen Meditation Meeting – Prairie Zen Center, 515 S Prospect, Champaign, NW corner Prospect & Green, enter thru door from parking area. Introduction to Zen Sitting, 10am; Full Schedule: Service at 9 followed by sitting, Dharma Talk at 11 followed be tea until about 12 noon. Can arrive at any of above times, open to all, no experience needed, no cost. For info call 355-8835 or www.prairiezen.org Prairie Sangha for Mindfulness Meditation – Monday evenings from 7:30-9pm and monthly retreats on Sunday. Theravadan (Vipassana) and Tibetan (Vjrayana & Dzogchen) meditation practice. Meets in Urbana. More information call or email Tom at 356-7413 or shayir@soltec.net. www.prairiesangha.org Clear Sky Zen Group – Meets on Thursday evenings in the Geneva Room of the McKinley Foundation. Newcomers to meditation and people of all traditions and faiths are welcome – McKinley Foundation, 809 S Fifth St, 6:25-9pm Formerly-Fat Persons’ Support Group – Free social meeting every Saturday at 2pm at Aroma Cafe, 118 N Neil St, Champaign. For more information contact Jessica Watson at 353-4934. Artist’s Way Group – A 12-week adventure in recovering and celebrating our creative spirit. Wednesdays, Sept 17Dec 17 (no session Nov 26) from 5:45-7:15pm at McKinley Foundation (free parking). To register or for more information, contact Jo Pauly, MSW, Whole Life Coach at (217) 3377823 or jopauly@prairienet.org. Life Map Workshop – A life map is a collection of visual images, a method of connecting with your intuition, a tool for visualizing your dreams or goals. Come explore life mapping – approaches, uses, and the opportunity to create your own life map. 9:15am-1pm on Oct 4 at McKinley Foundation, Champaign. To register or for information, contact Jo Pauly, MSW, Whole Life Coach at (217) 337-7823 or jopauly@prairienet.org

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WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 buzz

SOCIAL ISSUES Rally for Immigrant Rights! Immigrant Worker Freedom Rides Rally – The Illinois Freedom Rides bus is coming to Champaign-Urbana to highlight the local movement for immigrant rights ! You have a tremendous opportunity to take part in history in the making by attending the Immigrant Worker Freedom Rides Rally in UrbanaChampaign! Speakers willinclude: Immigrant Freedom Riders, Local Immigrant Rights Speakers, and Local Politicians – Champaign County Courthouse 101 E. Main Street, Sept 29, 7pm, free

WORKSHOPS Walking In This World Group – The new sequel to the Artist's Way with 12 new weeks of strategies and techniques for expressing our creative spirit. Wednesdays, Sept 17-Dec 17 (no session Nov 26) from 7:30-9:00pm at McKinley Foundation (free parking). To register or for more information, contact Jo Pauly, MSW, Whole Life Coach at (217) 337-7823 or jopauly@prairienet.org. Artist's Way Group – A 12-week adventure in recovering and celebrating our creative spirit. Wednesdays, Sept 17Dec 17 (no session Nov 26) from 5:45-7:15pm at McKinley Foundation (free parking). To register or for more information, contact Jo Pauly, MSW, Whole Life Coach at (217) 337-7823 or jopauly@prairienet.org. Great Grain Breads – October 18 – Learn to fit whole grains into your diet by creating healthy, simple whole grain breads. The feature recipe can be altered to create many different types of bread from the same basic recipe. The class meets Saturday, October 18 from 10-11:30 a.m. at the Mettler Center, 2906 Crossing Court in Champaign. The registration fee is $20. Registration deadline is October 10. For more information call 217/403-4590. Ballroom I: An Introduction to the World of Ballroom Dancing – October 20 - November 24 – Learn the basic steps of waltz and swing in a fun, easygoing environment. No experience and no partner are necessary. The class meets Mondays from 6:45-8 p.m. at the Refinery, 502 S. Kenwood St., Champaign. The registration fee is $49. Registration deadline is October 13. For more information call 217-403-4590. Salsa and Nightclub Two-Step – October 20 - November 24 – This is a beginning class for club-style partner dancing. Participants will learn salsa and nightclub two-step. No experience and no partner are necessary. The class meets Mondays from 8:15-9:30pm at the Refinery, 502 S. Kenwood St., Champaign. The registration fee is $49. Registration deadline is October 13. For more information call 217-403-4590. TMJ Discomfort: What Can You Do? – October 22 – Learn about the anatomy and function of the jaw and how to keep it functioning optimally. The class will also address the role muscle tension can play in joint dysfunction and how to relieve this tension. Douglas Nelson and the staff of Body Work Associates will teach the class. The class meets Wednesday, October 22 from 7-9pm in room M130 at the Parkland College campus. The registration fee is $16. Registration deadline is October 15. For more information call 217-403-4590.

PUBLIC MEETINGS Code Enforcement Board of Appeals Meeting – Champaign Council Chambers, 102 N. Neil Street, Champaign, Sept. 25, 3-5pm

1906 W. Bradley Ave. Champaign, IL 19 & up to Enter

Housing Authority Board Meeting – Housing Authority of Champaign County, 205 W. Park Avenue, Sept. 25, 7-9pm Tenant Union Apartment Hunting Workshops – The Tenant Union will be presenting 5 workshops at UIUC residence halls – Saunders Lounge, Sept. 29, 7pm

Friday Sept. 26

DROP SIX

Peruvian Coffee Hour – At these informal gatherings coffee, tea and homemade ethnic desserts are served – Cosmopolitan Club, Sept. 25, 7:30pm

Saturday Sept. 27

JAB PRIVATE PARTIES CALL TED 217 766-5108

Community Drum Circle – Ten Thousand Villages, 101 N. Walnut, Champaign, Sept 29, 7-9pm Special City Council Study Session – Champaign Council Chambers 102 N. Neil Street, Sept 30, 7-10pm

Debtors Anonymous – Confidential support and helpful tools for dealing with recurring debt and compulsive spending – Baha'i Center, 807 E. Green St., U, Sept 30, 5:45pm Plan Commission Meeting – Champaign Council Chambers, 102 N. Neil Street, Champaign, Oct. 1, 4-6pm Colleges Against Cancer General Meeting – CAC will hold its first general meeting of the year. Come out to learn more about the organization and how you can help join the fight against cancer. Everyone's welcome! – 100 Noyes Lab, Oct. 1, 7pm Historic Preservation Meeting – City Council Chambers, Oct. 1, 7pm

KIDS AND FAMILIES Baby Time – Lap bouncing, nursery rhymes, music activities and play time for infants with a caregiver – Douglass Branch Library, Sept 25, 10:30-11am Thursday Arts and Crafts for Kids (TACK) – Arts and Crafts for elementary school-age children – Champaign Public Library, Sept. 25, 4-5pm, no registration Talkin’ About Careers – Local professionals talk about career choices. For students in middle school and up, and their parents – Douglass Branch Library, Sept 25, 6:307:45pm Girls, Girls, Girls! – Games, crafts, and reading time for girls in kindergarten to fifth grade – Douglass Branch Library, Sept 26, 4-5pm The P.A.C. – The P.A.C. "Pages For All Ages'" free art class is a brand new series of fun, educational activities focused on developing your child's artistic awareness. Meeting the fourth Saturday of each month at 3:00 p.m., each P.A.C. gathering will focus on the work of one well-known artist. We'll learn a little bit about the life and art of this figure before launching into some exciting craft activites based upon his or her art – Pages For All Ages, Sept 27, 3pm Dallas & Co's Magic Weekend – Hourly drawings, Pre Halloween Fun, and Savings. Free magic shows, face painting, and balloons – Dallis & Co, 101 E. University, Champaign, Sept 27, 28, Sat: 10am-6pm Sun: noon-4pm O Baby! – Lap bouncing, nursery rhymes and music activities for infants with a caregiver – Champaign Public Library, Sept 29, 9:30am and 10:30am Know Zone – Homework help for school-aged children – Douglass Branch Library, Sept 30, 4-5pm Tuesday Twos – Stories, songs and movement activities for two-year-olds with a parent or grandparent – Champaign Public Library, Sept 30, 9:30am and 10:30am Teen Scene – Listen to music, discuss current topics, and snack with your friends – Douglass Branch Library, Sept 29, 4-5pm Art-to-go – Presentation, discussion and hands-on activity led by Krannert Art Museum staff – Douglass Branch Library, Oct 1, 4-5:30pm Arts for Kids with Cecil Bridgewater – Cecil Bridgewater's commitment to jazz education in Champaign-Urbana dates back to his student years when he taught at the Douglass Center in Champaign. Now a veteran of New York's Jazzmobile – an organization founded by Billy Taylor that is dedicated to jazz education – Cecil brings his experience and enthusiasm back to the youth of Champaign-Urbana. This event is planned for kids in grades 1-4 – Tyron Festival Theatre, Krannert Center for the Performaning Arts, Sept 27, 1pm Preschool groups are invited to come to The Phillips Recreation Center for Funfare on Thursday, Oct 2 from 9:45 to 10:15 AM for stories, songs, puppets, and films, presented by The Urbana Free Library Children’s Department. Please register with the Children's Department in advance at 367-4069.

buzz

arts

SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 | I AM A HUNCHBACK WHO LIKES PEGGIN.

Shakespeare

this week

continued from page 7 The Bell’s production seems to go all out on atmosphere to suggest the late 1950s and early ‘60s, which tends toward gimmickry, and distracts playgoers from some of the pleasant and amusing messages Shakespeare had about life and love and the roles we play in courtship, romance and marriage. Not only is the setting like a ‘50s Fellini film, but the costume design and regular appearance of a pack of cameraflashing paparazzi directly connect this production to Fellini’s 1960 classic La dolce vita. This Chicago Shakespeare Theatre production is so typical of the theater’s many serviceable and entertaining adaptations for the Midwestern masses. Frequently more skillful performances take a backseat to pleasurable theatrical silliness and scenes filled with action and music. Kate Fry’s standout performance makes this production memorable in an otherwise infrequently passionate romantic comedy. buzz

Fr Sep 26 Pacifica Quartet 7:30pm, $10-$18

Sa Sep 27 Arts for Kids with Cecil Bridgewater 1pm, free, tickets required Jazz Threads Underwriter:

Sa Sep 27 Timothy McGovern, bassoon 7:30pm, $2-$5 Cecil Bridgewater 7:30pm, $17-$25 Sponsors: Margaret and Larry Neal Anonymous

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SHAKESPEARE THEATRE

092503buzz0920

Petruchio (Ryan Shively) whisks away an unwilling Katharine (Kate Fry).

Creative spirit continued from page 8

Coaches meet with their participants both in seminar environments like Pauly’s and in online chat room formats. She has led sessions every spring and fall semester, as well several summers, since 1997. Her background was originally in social work, though she is constantly exploring new applications of creativity in her life, such as through collages and eye pillows, which she makes. One of the most unique attributes of her sessions is the diversity of participants that they continue to draw. Artistic experience in the sense we most often think of it is not at all a prerequisite, though many of those who come have solid backgrounds with various media. Both University faculty and students have attended, as well as community members from the Champaign-Urbana area and even commuters from as far away as Decatur. Marcia Wickes, a Champaign resident enrolled in the class, says people take the class for many different reasons. The various ages, professional backgrounds and creative aspects of everyone’s personalities enrich the course with a dynamic true to the book’s forum concept.

“There’s people you can talk about it with when you get stuck. It’s the whole support thing,” says Wickes. She says the course has enriched her life in two key areas: “teaching (her) ways to look at (her) art without criticizing,” and incorporating creativity into her daily schedule. Linda Scott, an associate professor in advertising, cultivated professional artistic aspirations for years, both throughout childhood and as an art major at the University of Texas. Long after turning away from art as a primary interest and entering into academia, Scott happened upon Pauly’s course after meeting her through a fellow University faculty member. She first took another of Pauly’s seminars— Crafting a Life—last fall, and is now attending The Artist’s Way. Others, such as Wickes, came across the group after reading the book through Pauly’s community e-mails about area art-related events. The Artist’s Way has also drawn followers such as recording artist Kathy Mattea, who credits the book with inspiring her Love Travels album. The book led her to take one of the many workshops and delve further into her own creative well. Pauly’s workshop meets Wednesdays from 5:45 to 7:15 p.m. Those interested in the course can contact her at jopauly@prairienet.org. buzz

Afterglow: Rachael Lee/Jeff Helgesen Jazz Quartet 9:30pm, free

Su Sep 28 Kimono Fantasy: Attire from the Heian Court Era to the Present Day 2pm, $10-$18 UI Wind Symphony and UI Symphonic Band I 7:30pm, $2-$5

@

krannert center

Tu Sep 30

creative intersections

Interval: Sones de México Noon, free Sponsor: Anonymous

Sa Sep 27

Know Your University: Alexander String Quartet Noon, University YMCA (1001 S Wright St, Champaign), free UI Symphonic Band II and UI Concert Band I 7:30pm, $2-$5

We Oct 1

Arts for Kids with Cecil Bridgewater 1pm, free, tickets required

Tu Sep 30 Know Your University: Alexander String Quartet Noon, University YMCA (1001 S Wright St, Champaign), free Creative Intersections Sponsor:

Alexander Quartet Prelude 6:30pm, free Alexander String Quartet 7:30pm, FGH, $16-$32 Sponsors: Avis and Dean Hilfinger Jean and Howard Osborn Dolores and Roger Yarbrough

Th Oct 2 Wine Tasting 5pm, free Chip McNeill, jazz saxophone 7:30pm, $2-$5 Three Tales Beryl Korot, video and Steve Reich, music 7:30pm, $17-$28 Talkback following the show, free

Mo Sep 29 Traffic Jam: Alexander String Quartet 5pm, free

Some Krannert Center programs are supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Illinois Arts Council, and patron and corporate contributions. Cecil Bridgewater’s performance is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts; and by the Heartland Arts Fund, a program of Arts Midwest funded by the National Endowment for the Arts with additional contributions from General Mills Foundation, Land O'Lakes Foundation, Sprint Corporation, and the Illinois Arts Council. Support for this Kimono Fantasy is provided in part by the University of Illinois College of Fine and Applied Arts; Japan House; Krannert Center for the Performing Arts; The Cultural Foundation for Promoting the National Costume of Japan; Hakubi Kyoto Kimono School; and Friends of the World. Funding for Three Tales is provided in part by "Silicon, Carbon, Culture," a joint initiative of the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Fine and Applied Arts, with support from the Madden Initiative and the Offices of the Provost and Chancellor.

KrannertCenter.com

Season Sponsors Coporate Season Underwriters

Patron Season Sponsors

CAROLE AND JERRY RINGER

9

217/333-6280 or 800/KCPATIX 217/333-9714 (TTY) 217/244-SHOW (Fax) 217/244-0549 (Groups) kran-tix@uiuc.edu Ticket Office Open 10am to 6pm daily; on days of performances open 10am through intermission.


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THE PHANTOM SQUIRREL STRIKES AGAIN. | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

buzz

buzz

Finding that Creative Side O

vercoming fears, guilt and criticism is a struggle that those who aspire to be artists face. Seeing past these obstacles and further into one’s own creative spirit is the focus of The Artist’s Way, a series of group seminars led by Jo Pauly at the McKinley Foundation in Champaign. The curriculum for the group comes from Julia Cameron’s best selling book, The Artist’s Way: A Spiritual Path to Higher Creativity. Like similar Artist’s Way groups in and outside the United States, Pauly’s group meets for 13 weekly sessions, discussing subjects in creativity and the artist’s experience from the book, as well as participating in various group tasks. As Pauly explains, the group is much less a taught seminar than it is a forum for those interested in exploring their own creativities. The first week’s meeting serves as an introduction to the workshop, and subsequent meetings study the book’s chapters, focusing on ways to recover one’s senses of such things as identity, integrity and possibility. The list of supplementary tasks from the book includes listing things one is grateful for, naming dreams and collecting leaves. These activities are used as pivots for discussion and self-discovery, which are meant to release inner aspirations and ideas.

moviereview

UNDER THE TUSCAN SUN

Take-home assignments are also part of the program. “Morning Pages� are daily handwritten three-page pieces that must be written in stream of consciousness. These follow a core concept of the course, which is to get past the daily anxieties and contemplations that can monopolize one’s inner dialogue. The second type of assignment is the “Artist Date.� Pauly describes these as weekly private times of self-nurturing. They can take place at home, outside or walking around in a bookstore. Pauly held the first session of The Artist’s Way in 1997 after she had returned from a three-year stay in San Diego where she happened upon many other fans of the book who had also begun groups. continued on page 9

★★★

BY MATT PAIS | LEAD REVIEWER

W

PHOTO | BRIAN WARMOTH

BY BRIAN WARMOTH | CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Jo Pauly, leader of The Artist’s Way Seminar.

ouldn’t it be nice to just escape the rigors of American life and run off to the Italian countryside to start life anew? That’s just what Frances Mayes did after her husband left her for a younger woman, and this San Francisco professor of creative writing later chronicled her experiences in a book called Under the Tuscan Sun (which sounds more like a Beach Boys’ lyric than a book title). The screen adaptation of Mayes’ memoir swells with love for the easygoing indulgence of Italy, but even though it’s based on a true story, it converts everything and every character into a thematically convenient catalyst for the plot. However, this might not be such a bad thing: Under the Tuscan Sun never presumes to be any more or any less than a pure female fantasy, and every moment of this passably preposterous tale

moviereview

UNDERWORLD

"

★★ BY JASON CANTONE | ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Sept 27th and 28th

FREE

Magic Shows Face Painting Balloons Sat 10–6 Sun 12–4

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Open 7 days a week in October Our Haunted Room Opens next weekend Oct 4th 101 E University Champaign

C

film & tv

SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 | KATE BECKINSALE IN LEATHER VS. DIANE LANE IN WHITE??

lad in tight black leather, Kate Beckinsale uses her charm, English manners and pointy vampire teeth to get what she wants in Underworld. Flipping in and out of battles like a gymnast on crack, she tries her hardest to string together borrowed plot points while looking more like a china doll than a heartless killer. Beckinsale plays a vampire who seeks out Lycans (werewolves) and kills them one by one before an ancient feud between the two supernatural species re-emerges. However, whether shooting guns with silver nitrate bullets aimed to kill Lycans or racing around in her sports car to save a human wanted by the Lycans, she never changes her clothes or facial expression. And both grow equally tiresome throughout the two hours. Think of her character Selene as Trinity from The Matrix on training wheels. She exudes testosterone and sheer sexuality at the same time. Both female action heroes slink through a rain-beset metropolis coated with a haze of bluish grey. However, Selene proves good looks and occasional talent aren’t enough to lead a film through some dreary and uninspired moments. Underworld is one of those many films that ask viewers, “Were you entertained?� rather than “Did you like this movie?� Sure there are out-

of feminine empowerment seems almost too good to be true. Just as Frances’ husband leaves her, her best lesbian Asian friend happens to have a ticket for a gay tour of Tuscany that she isn’t using. Just after she gawks at a picture of a 300-year-old villa called Bramasole, Frances’ tour bus unexpectedly stops in front of the estate. Just after she spontaneously buys the house and tries to acclimate herself to Italian living, her world fills with friendly, colorful characters just suited for minor subplots in a movie. And how perfect is it that the name Frances allows every man she meets to call her “Francesca� in a thick, romantic accent? Writer/director Audrey Wells is all too cognizant of the shockingly expedient details of Frances’ rite of passage, and her solution for all of this opportune significance is making Under the Tuscan Sun relentlessly and self-referentially cliche. When sweet-talking Italian heartthrob Marcello (Raoul Bova) tells Frances, “You have beautiful eyes; I want to swim in them,� she laughs and responds, “That’s just what American woman think that all Italian men say.� (Yet, when he tells her “I’m going to make love all over you,� she doesn’t seem to mind.) In fact, most of the men she encounters fit some Italian stereotype. But Frances is always there to comment on her love for the Italian people, even though they just happen to look and act like every other passionate, love-hungry Italian caricature ever put on film. Still, there is a pleasant, aesthetic nature to Frances’ experiences; there’s no denying the

landish moments such as when Selene shoots a circle around her in order to fall to the building’s lower level to avoid the Lycans. And then there’s the fact that subways never really sneak up on anyone in real life, but seem to pop out of nowhere for a vampire with better perceptual abilities. Just as nonsensical, ultraviolet light is harnessed into a liquid form and shot into vampires, making them die on the spot without ever having to see natural light. But, in relation to pure campy entertainment value, Underworld provides the gothic imagery required so the film can constantly be playing on a large screen in goth clubs somewhere behind the leather fetishists and makeup-covered vampire wannabes. But much of the film’s sheer entertainment comes from the unintentional humor scattered throughout that is so outlandishly terrible it’s laugh-inducing. When ancient vampire Victor (Bill Nighy) is awakened in a process that seems too bloody simple, the film slowly begins to crumble from gothic splendor into dark mediocrity. Before Victor, viewers can be enthralled with the dark set design ripped from The Matrix, Blade or anything by Tim Burton. It all has that been-there-donethat feel to it, but it’s still entertaining, and learning more about the vampires and Lycans remains interesting. However, despite training in British dramatic arts, Nighy’s Victor is simplified into a comic, overdramatic mess. His lines are all cliches spoken in either Southern or English accents, depending on the scenes. Obviously, vampires can morph their voices while morphing their bodies back to good health as well. Scott Speedman (TV’s Felicity) is thrown into the

natural splendor of Italy, and Diane Lane’s gentle performance shows just how thrilling and scary it can be to take in all the beauty of a foreign country all at once. Frances commits herself to all things Italian, cooking indigenous food for her renovating crew and traveling constantly from cities to the coast. She is a woman determined to prove that she isn’t too old to start over, and Lane’s liveliness gives Frances just the right mix of ambition and anxiety. While her role in Unfaithful had critics running to use the phrase “scorchingly sexy� as often as possible, Lane’s well-maintained, middle-aged beauty is far more subdued in Under the Tuscan Sun. Again, she plays a character who needs to rediscover, as Frances screams to herself after a sexual encounter with Marcello, that she’s “still got it,� but the new setting keeps the idea fresh. Frances is far more insecure and fragile than Unfaithful’s Connie Sumner, but the Italian lifestyle—and in particular, Italian men—push her to indulge in everything her new home has to offer. Lane once again is striking as a vibrant woman pushing 40, striving to rekindle the passion that has washed away from her calm suburban life. But for all of Under the Tuscan Sun’s supposedly true depictions of one woman’s flourishing in a new culture, the portrait feels somewhat less than authentic. Frances encounters an all-too familiar range of Europeans, from American bashers (“You greedy Americans,

21 BUENA VISTA PICTURES

9/24/03

UNDER THE TUSCAN SUN | DIANE LANE you ruin everything,� one woman tells Frances) to goofy, good-natured cartoons. One character even spends all her time namechecking Fellini, as if mentioning Italy’s most famous director validates the reality of Frances’ experiences. It is unfortunate that Under the Tuscan Sun spends two hours proving that Frances can survive without a man but still feels the need to throw in a new love interest at the last second. Maybe that’s how it happened and maybe it isn’t, but not much in this cheerful piece of European escapism really feels like something that would happen under any sun.

C-UViews UNDERWORLD ★★★ Mark Weber SCREEN GEMS INC.

092503buzz0821

UNDERWORLD | KATE BECKINSALE mix without many lines and, thus, his chemistry with Selene is lacking. For a movie giving less action than previews promised, one would at least expect a more plausible love story to distract viewers. The film’s most over-the-top moment comes from the periodic use of whips in order to tame these supernatural beasts. In one scene toward the end, a character’s head is whipped but it doesn’t split apart for a matter of seconds. The dying character probably could have written a better screenplay for Underworld in that time.

SCREEN REVIEW GUIDE

★★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★ no stars

Flawless Good Mediocre Bad Unwatchable

Champaign

“Buffy the Vampire Slayer meets The Matrix.�

★★ Matt Maly Champaign

“Neat special effects, but it was just completely ridiculous.�

★★ Mike Almaraz Urbana

“It had vampires, but not much else.�


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film & tv

ROBERT DUVALL ROCKS HARDCORE. | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

arts

buzz SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 | PSST! THIS PAGE DESIGNER THINKS THIS WEEK’S FEATURED ARTIST IS DREAMY.

buzz

7

ARTIST’S CORNER

ANYTHING ELSE | CHRISTINA RICCI

moviereview

ANYTHING ELSE ★★★

BY JOHN LOOS | STAFF WRITER

W

oody Allen began his 1977 Oscar-winning masterpiece Annie Hall with the line “There’s an old joke.” He opens his newest film, Anything Else, with those same four words. Twenty-five years later, the joke is different, but Allen directs it to his younger costar as though he’s humbly passing on his comic philosophies to a new generation. Allen’s latest efforts have been flat, lacking in biting social criticism and tender moments of humility that his older, better films were full of. With Anything Else, Allen makes a noble, if brittle, effort to translate the soul of his most beloved film to reach a new generation. Jason Biggs plays Jerry, a nervous writer madly in love with Amanda (Christina Ricci), a neurotic girl with intimacy problems and a flighty mother (Stockard Channing). The misleading trailer shows no trace of Allen, but he is an enormous part of this film. He plays David, Jerry’s writer friend who tells him jokes and gives him important advice. This mentoring, it turns out, is the true core of the film. Anything Else fits Allen fans like an old glove. There are classic Allen one-liners, as well as helpings of his trademark Jewish paranoia and self-hatred. Danny Devito also joins Allen’s long list of standout supporting players. But where the film doesn’t work is Jerry and Amanda’s relationship. Ricci is wonderful, but her chemistry with a misplaced Biggs is not. In the end, they both seem like children dressed up in grown-up clothing. This mostly stems from the ripe, overly-intelligent dialogue Allen has his young actors deliver. There may have been a time in Allen’s life when twenty-somethings had the life experiences necessary to talk like philosophers, but it isn’t now. David says to Jerry near the end, in reference to his ability to shoot a gun, “Time has diminished my accuracy.” This speaks volumes about Allen’s present filmmaking skills. His aim is shaky in his old age, and Anything Else is hardly the bullseye Annie Hall was. But it’s not entirely his fault. There’s still an old joke he wants to tell, there’s just a new audience who’s less accustomed to hearing it.

S

econdhand Lions is one of those feel-good stories that movie critics hate. Tim McCanlies directs an atmosphere resembling one of grandpa’s old anecdotes that keeps everyone coming back for more. It combines tales of grandeur, comedy and even a little sappy family junk to create an enjoyable film that completely ignores successful modern filmmaking convention. The story involves Academy Award-winning actor Robert Duvall and Michael Caine (nominated in 2002 for The Quiet American), along with young former Oscar nominee Haley Joel Osment in the back woods of a broken-down Texas ranch. An unloved child of a traveling mother, Walter (Osment) is forced to spend the summer with his two grizzled great uncles Hub and Garth (Duvall and Caine) in their spooky 100-year-old house. The real fun begins when young Walter learns of his uncles’ fortune and begins to dig deeper into their clouded existence. As the story goes, the young boy chisels through his uncles’ gruff demeanor and becomes wildly attached to their eccentric lifestyles. At the same time, Hub and Garth begin to come alive and are revitalized

SECONDHAND LIONS | MICHAEL CAINE, ROBERT DUVALL office records. So why not have a little fun telling this crazy little story on the big screen? Too often, movies today are judged against the great predecessors, such as Casablanca and Citizen Kane, named the top two American films by the American Film Institute. It is a different world today, a world that calls for a different type of movie. Yes, the audience walks out of the theater happy, and no, the symbolism isn’t so complex it could have been written by Faulkner. But that doesn’t mean critics should give it an uninspired thumbs down. Hopefully, potential viewers won’t be warded off with cautionary tales of banality, because Secondhand Lions is one of those film experiences that everyone will enjoy if they just give it a chance.

COLD CREEK MANOR ★

BY JANELLE GREENWOOD | STAFF WRITER

T

he trailer for Cold Creek Manor sets itself up as a great thriller that would follow in the footsteps of other adult thrillers like the Michelle Pfieffer/Harrison Ford thriller What Lies Beneath, which was directed by Robert Zemeckis. Unfortunately, what looks great in the trailer comes yet again from movie editor magic and the film proves to be anything but thrilling. The tedious opening follows the morning of a typical New York couple, Cooper and Leah Tilson (Dennis Quaid, Sharon Stone), who find themselves overwhelmed by the city’s craziness after their son is almost hit in traffic. They then decide to pack up and move to picturesque upstate New York to give their children a chance at childhood and to repair their struggling marriage. Cold Creek Manor is an old house that appeals to the family as their last attempt in a realtor’s brochure. Without questioning the previous family’s departure, they buy the place to fix it up.

A

dam Watkins is a recent graduate of the University of Illinois. He received a degree in rhetoric and finance and is hoping to have a career in poetry. He is living in C-U and working at Espresso Royale in Urbana until he decides which graduate schools to apply to. What inspires you? I guess there are a lot of things that inspire

Taming an Audience BY SYD SLOBODNIK | CONTRIBUTING WRITER

moviereview

Paradoxically, they try to fix their family too, because it’s always fun to throw in obvious metaphors to compensate for plot structure. Lurking in the background is the youngest heir to the Manor, Dale Massie (Stephen Dorff), who slithers onto the property after his parole to work as a handyman for the Tilson’s. Despite the warnings from the town and Dale Massie’s own creepy behavior, Cooper’s doubts fester too long when he should wise up to this mystery sooner—he works as a documentarian whose new hobby is digging up clues about the Massie family. Yes, this film uses the classic recipe for a successful thriller: a family moving into a large abandoned house with its own creepy Mr. Fix It, but it fails by leaving major gaps in the plot and character development. Nobody ever wonders about Dale’s own family or why they are gone, other than to assume they left all of their belongings in the house when he went to prison, which nobody will find believable. Dorff manages to pull off the creepy and crazed madman with ease, but it’s a role he visits frequently. Stone and Quaid, although playing a couple in a failing marriage, show little chemistry and appear more like their son and daughter, who curiously wander about the property in a Nancy Drew kind of way. The slow and uneventful beginning, followed by a disappointing ending worsens the fact that

S

COLD CREEK MANOR | SHARON STONE the trailer broke its promise in that it never gives us a haunted house and it doesn’t even pretend to. Thrillers, like balloons, should pop rather than deflate at the end. Why on earth Sharon Stone thought this film would boost her floundering career is uncertain; perhaps she also thought the pitch for Cold Creek Manor sounded better than the reality of it. The trailers did make it look to be an excellent start to the Halloween movie season. However, this film by Mike Figgis (Leaving Las Vegas) just never becomes the thriller it wants to be.

What environment do you best work in? Probably in my room. I used to really enjoy working in coffee shops because of the distraction. Also, I like to play music when I write ... I guess a lot of indie rock. It’s a good way to maintain a constant tone when you’re writing, but I am pretty sure my roommates hate it because I repeat the same song over and over again.

ome theatrical groups never tire of updating classical Shakespearean plays for contemporary audiences and some, like the Chicago Shakespeare Theatre on Navy Pier, have been consistently successful at it. Under the artistic direction of Barbara Gaines, Chicago Shakespeare begins its 2003-04 season this month with a flashy adaptation of the delightfully accessible The Taming of the Shrew. Scholars may wince at the idea of this production, by director David H. Bell, because the play is set in Padua and Verona in the 1960s. The play’s inventive set, by James Leonard Joy, reminds one of a village setting in any of a number of mid-1950s films by the late great Italian film director, Federico Fellini. As the story begins, a flock of slick-suited, young romantic men are in hot pursuit of Senore Batista’s young daughter, Bianca, who dresses like someone in a ‘60s Annette

me; I end up writing about relationships a lot. I’m also really inspired by awkward situations because I think there’s a lot of honesty in them—my sample piece is about an awkward situation with a friend. What themes are present in your work? I try to write about suburbia and my views on American culture. It’s hard to balance it

Funicello film. But the wealthy Batista will not allow his younger daughter to consider any wedding plans until her older, grouchy sister Katherine finds a mate and is married first. Days later, storming into town on a motor bike arrives Petruchio, dressed like Patrick Swayze in Dirty Dancing, determined to meet the challenge of winning over Katherine and transforming her into a dutiful wife. Loose adaptations of Shakespeare’s plays, especially Taming of the Shrew, have been very successful over the years. Note the recent Broadway Tony Award winning revival of the 1950s Cole Porter musical Kiss Me Kate, the 1999 teen comedy 10 Things I Hate About You, or even the Krannert Center’s amazing country-Westernized production in the late ‘80s, under the imaginative direction of then-theatre head, David Knight. This Chicago version, which runs until Nov. 23, is fun to watch, but has mixed results. Bell, who has directed four other recent productions of Shakespearean comedies at this Chicago venue, misses mostly at developing an effective chemistry between his two leading actors, played by Ryan Shively and Kate Fry.

Where can you find the best conversation in town? Some of the best conversations I’ve had here are on the benches in the front of Murphy’s because you can look out and see everyone. Also when you go to a really lame party with a friend and end up leaving early. You always have really good conversations with that person.

Communication I have spent three full days considering The implicit honesty of actions. I have decided A kiss can bear the weight and complexity That any image might. Tonight, Driving down any rain soaked road I saw a tree newly leaved, It is spring you know, And through its center ran two telephone lines, Buzzing and parallel as our lips had been. The tree was sheared around them, And the blood thick night pulsed through the absence Of branches and leaves in the shape of the heart, And I don’t mean that simulacrum outline Found in any valentine. No, I mean the shape Caged in every person’s ribs, The kind of heart that actually throbs And dies, and symbolizes nothing else.

This is through no fault of Fry’s. Her Katherine is clearly the cast’s most impressive handler of Shakespeare’s witty barbs and exhortations concerning the battle of the sexes. Fry, who has appeared in numerous productions of this Shakespeare company, is most skilled at believable characterization and most faithful to the cadences of Shakespeare’s poetic language. Ryan Shively, a well known New York actor and veteran of a variety of recent Broadway shows, plays an attractive Petruchio, but he lacks the real bravado that this part demands. Not as skilled as Fry with Shakespeare’s verses, it seems he just recites his lines without the emotion the speeches require. TV’s Glen Gordon Caron got better chemistry from Bruce Willis and Cybill Shepard in a Shrew takeoff episode of the ‘80s Moonlighting series. This crowd-pleasing production incorporates many moments of lively theatrical clowning, from characters Tranio (Guy Adkins) asks Baptista for Bianca’s hand. yelling and slamming doors to falling into ponds through wild brawling. Cast members Daniel May and Guy Adkins do Chaon Cross’ Bianca is appealing in a debutant fair jobs at providing these sorts of laughs. sort of way, but Cross is not very skilled in Ross Lehman’s Grumio is the production’s the subtle comic timing of Shakespeare’s most over-the-top performer; he’s especially witty lines. annoying, overplaying obvious laughs and continued on page 9 appearing in drag at one point in the show.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SHAKESPEARE THEATRE

BY ANDREW CREWELL | STAFF WRITER

Why did you choose the piece you are featuring? I wanted to choose something challenging but not ambiguous for an audience that doesn’t usually read poetry. It’s also one of the few poems that I’ve written where I’ve felt like it was finished when I was done writing it.

PHOTO | ADAM YOUNG

★★★★

(between) being a good artistic piece and just me venting.

BUENA VISTA PICTURES

DREAMWORKS FILMS

SECONDHAND LIONS

through Walter and his thirst for the awe-inspiring quests of their youth. The three strike a bond that can’t be broken through the rest of their days as his two crazy uncles and their zest for life ultimately change Walter into a new man. The story is an old hat, but the delivery is top-notch. Duvall and Caine are saddled with a role that is as old as time—the mean exterior facade with a loveable inside—but pull it off without a hitch. And Osment won’t get the billing he did in The Sixth Sense, but after all, he is 14. The endearing nature of this film isn’t necessarily in the story or characters, but in the delivery. In one scene shortly following Walter’s arrival at the ranch, one uncle says, “We don’t know much about kids, so whatever you need you’ll have to get yourself,” as the other chimes in, “or better yet, learn to do without,” and they leave him to sleep alone in a mothball-infested closet of a room. Of course, later in the movie Hub and Garth loosen up and—only with the special style that a 72-year-old Duvall could convey—catch the audience’s hearts. Between fighting kids a quarter their age in knife fights, giving accounts of their French Foreign Legion days and purchasing a “used” lion because they wanted one, Hub and Garth show the boy they’re actually a walking time capsule of his kind of entertainment. All across the United States, national critics will be giving horribly mixed reviews of Secondhand Lions, saying it is filled with too much sap and the ending is too expected. However, this is the type of movie that probably won’t be nominated for best picture, probably won’t receive any attention years down the road and probably won’t set box

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HOW’D YOU FIND OUT ABOUT THIS PLACE? THIS IS WHERE I GO TO CRY. | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

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PHOTO | SUZANNE SITRICK

n an effort to promote a positive and friendly relationship between Japan and the United States through the arts, the University of Illinois is offering a variety of events this semester featuring Japanese culture and art. A performance entitled Kimono Fantasy: Traditional Japanese Costumes from the Heian Court to the Present Day, will take place in the Colwell Playhouse at the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts on Sunday at 2 p.m. In conjunction with this, the exhibit “Luxurious Layers: Kimonos of the Heian Court” will be on display at the Spurlock Museum from Sept. Saturday to Dec. 13. Other events include lectures, kimono dressing for children and a workshop on making art with Japanese fabric dye. All of these events are free, except the workshop, and all are open to the public.

“This is the first time we have had an event like this,” said George T. Yu, director of the Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies. “It is a rare occasion and a very significant event.” The function of the center is to develop, promote and support East Asian and Pacific studies through various media. “The event will put the aspect of the arts on center stage,” said Yu. “We hope that the community will come to appreciate an important dimension of culture that they may not have appreciated.” “I am very excited for the festival. I am also very appreciative of the leadership role Professor (Kimiko) Gunji has taken,” said Yu. “In order to make it into a reality it has taken the endeavors of many people. This was a collective effort by a group of sponsors.” The kimono is the national costume of Japan and is seen as an art form. This art form is being presented to the University by the Hakubi Kyoto Kimono Schools of Japan. The performance, along with an additional exhibit, will travel from the University to the Art

Kimonos featured at Spurlock Museum from Saturday to December 13.

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SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003| CHECK OUT THE FRONT COVER

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WEREWOLVES AND HUMANTS INVADE C-U!

Kimono Fantasy BY SUZANNE SITRICK | STAFF WRITER

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BY MATT PAIS | LEAD REVIEWER Institute of Chicago. These presentations will allow people in the United States to learn more about kimono culture. The Hakubi staff first performed at the University in the spring of 2000 at Japan House. “The place was packed. We had over 100 people in here,” said Nancy Lockmiller, assistant director of Japan House. An important factor that aided in the oppor-

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tunity for the exhibit was direct communication between the Spurlock Museum and the Hakubi schools. Two museum staff members met with the president and other staff members in Tokyo and communicated with the help of an interpreter. This time, both students and instructors from the Hakubi schools will come to Champaign-Urbana, bringing a group of 81 people for the performance and exhibit. “We want to be able to share this art form with a larger body of the community than what we can accommodate at Japan House,” said Lockmiller. “I think people will be amazed by what they see at the performance and at the museum.” Lockmiller said community children will be greeters at the show; they will be wearing kimonos and will be a part of the finale as well. “This is a unique and special opportunity for both the University and the community,” she said. On Dec. 2, there will be a showing of the film The Tale of Genji (for viewers 17 and older). This movie is about the Heian period and shows many of the different styles of kimonos. Tandy Lace, director of education at the Spurlock Museum, said the Hakubi schools provided most of the costumes. “We would like to see a broader understanding of the importance of the kimono not just as attire but as part of cultural expression that is highly developed,” said Lacy. buzz See the Japan House Web site at www.art.uiuc.edu/galleries/japanhouse or the Spurlock Museum web site at www.spurlock.uiuc.edu for more information regarding these events.

hile some horror movies unintentionally elicit laughs from the audience, local filmmakers Jason Butler and Mark Peaslee insist that the comedy that comes from their low-budget horror films is deliberate. “We don’t have the budget to make the violence look real and awful,” says 26-year-old University graduate Butler. “There’s such a formula for horror, it opens the door for comedy.” Apparently, an open door lets in a few other genres as well. Their latest film, Thoraxx II: The Breeding, is a synthesis of horror, comedy, thriller, science fiction and musical. The plot involves a mad scientist who is half-man, halfinsect (dubbed the Humant) who has 48 hours to breed with a woman and perpetuate his mutated species. Butler says the idea for the Humant came from classic horror fare. “It’s a pretty traditional concept to have a half-man, half-insect creature,” he says. “I like the absurd a lot, whether it’s giant monsters or just the ridiculous ways that people interact sometimes.” The film is an expansion of the original Thoraxx, a short film about a giant killer bug, which Butler and Peaslee made in one day. They learned many important lessons in tackling the feature-length version of Thoraxx. “We learned that scripts make things go faster,” Butler says. Erik Martin, one of the stars of Thoraxx II, chimes in: “I think you learned that you have a lot of friends who will work for beer.” Without paying any of the actors, the film cost $1,000 to make, which Butler says paid mostly for videotape and beer. He isn’t kidding. The end credits for Thoraxx II state, “Special Humant effects by Industrial Tape and Cardboard,” a self-referential play on George Lucas’ revolutionary effects studio, Industrial Light and Magic. The violence is undeniably cheesy, the sound is muddled and the lighting design is practically nonexistent, but the filmmakers reiterate the mentality behind the film. “It’s all pretty good-natured gore,” Peaslee explains. “Nothing we ever do is going to seem that real.” Butler adds, “I don’t think anyone went home after seeing Thoraxx II and couldn’t sleep unless they were awake from laughing.” Both are longtime fans of horror. “I used to get all of the special effects books out of the library when I was a kid because I wanted to see the things from all the bloody movies I wasn’t allowed to see,” Peaslee says. When Butler and Peaslee started Brainsmart Productions in 1999, it was never meant to be an official, upstanding business. They wanted to have a float in a local Independence Day parade

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but couldn’t register without being part of an organization. After choosing a name, Butler, Peaslee, and some friends donned monkey masks and labeled their float—a rundown van with the top cut off—with sayings such as “Going ape for America” and “Going bananas for independence.” “It got a fantastic response,” Peaslee says. “There was one guy standing at the edge of the parade, shirtless and holding a beer, who loved it,” Butler remembers. “So that’s our audience,” Peaslee adds with a smile. Somehow this spawned Brainsmart’s first short film, Viva la Terra del Gato, a similarly tongue-in-cheek horror-comedy about crazed monkeys attacking a wall of snow. Butler explains the simple reason for the movie’s existence: “We had a snow wall and a bunch of monkey masks.” Since then, Brainsmart has made numerous short and feature-length productions using a digital video camera, a computer and a tripod. Writer and director Butler and Peaslee, the cameraman, are currently a few days into the shooting of their next film, Werewolf Cemetery. “On this one, we’re really trying to be better prepared,” Peaslee says. “We learned a lot on the last one, and it’s just a matter of putting the work in.” He adds that there is a desire to improve the visual quality of a Brainsmart production. “We are really trying to work on lighting on this one,” he says. Butler says he is already pleased with the film’s progress. “I’m really excited about the werewolves, I’m double excited about the werewolf hunters, and I’m triple excited about our ace werewolf hunter, Skald Wolfcap,” he says. Like Thoraxx II, all of Werewolf Cemetery will be filmed at various locations in Champaign-Urbana. “There’s all kinds of neat stuff around town,” Peaslee says. “It’s amazing what you see once you start looking.” The two friends prepared for filming by watching a lot of old horror movies, particularly The Wolfman. “We have an unreasonable goal

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.. the film cost $1,000 to make, which Butler says paid mostly for videotape and beer.

of getting it done by Halloween,” Peaslee says. “The problem is we have these jobs we have to get to.” Like their werewolf subjects, Butler and Peaslee are different creatures by day. Butler, a graduate of the University of Illinois’ journalism program, works as a clerk at That’s Rentertainment (where Thoraxx II is currently available for rent), and Peaslee washes dishes at Radio Maria in downtown Champaign. They also work together at Sweet Betsy’s. Afterward, these horror fans are nothing if not night owls. They recently held a screening of Thoraxx II at 11 p.m. in the beer garden of Mike ‘n Molly’s bar. Projected onto the outer wall of the bar, Thoraxx II’s campy humor benefited from a good-time atmosphere populated by the clinking of beer bottles, the lighting of cigarettes, and, most importantly, laughter. “It definitely looks better on a big screen,” Butler says. Peaslee adds, “It’s great to actually be able to see a response from it.” They both emphasize how important is to show a film in front of an audience. While showing it in town, Peaslee says, “I’m pretty much just watching the audience the whole time.” “If we go a whole 60 seconds without any response from the audience, that’s a bad sign,” Butler explains. He adds that he has watched Thoraxx II so many times

that his enjoyment is lessened by his own criticism. “All I can do is criticize every iota,” he says. “Things that are great, I think can always be greater.” This was clear throughout the screening, as Butler, in his trademark red baseball cap and faded jeans, gave only a restrained smile at the film’s funniest moments. Before the film started, Peaslee played to the sparse crowd, which consisted largely of friends of the filmmakers. “The next movie is the best movie ever made,” he declared sarcastically. “Anyone who doesn’t think so can fight me outside.” Unfortunately, Butler and Peaslee’s family members might take them up on that. Peaslee says his family is embarrassed by Brainsmart’s films and that his Mom doesn’t understand why he would make movies without making any profits. “She asked me, ‘So you just do this for the good of the world?’” Peaslee recalls. “I said, ‘Have you seen Thoraxx II?’” Butler says his parents’ reaction has been a mix of support and embarrassment. Still, he remains proud of his work. “Thorax II taught me that we could (make) a really entertaining feature film in two months,” he says. Despite how entertaining making a film can be, Butler admits that filming does require some hard work. “Shooting can be really tiring,” he says. “By the end of it everybody’s exhausted.” Everyone involved was extremely eager to be a part of Thoraxx II, Peaslee says. “People are really bored, and if you give them something to do they get really excited about it.” According to Butler,, filmmaking is a very personal form of satisfaction. “Somebody accused me once of making movies only for me and my friends’ enjoyment,” he says. “In fact, it’s only for my enjoyment.”buzz

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THE EMMYS ARE OVER ... HERE COME THE OSCARS! | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

Drive-thru Reviews

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ANYTHING ELSE ★★★ JASON BIGGS AND CHRISTINA RICCI Allen’s latest efforts have been flat, lacking in the biting social criticism and tender moments of humility that his older, better films were full of. So with Anything Else, Allen makes a noble, if brittle, effort to translate the soul of his most beloved film to reach a new generation. (John Loos) Now showing at Beverly

CABIN FEVER

no stars JORDAN LADD AND RIDER STRONG Nothing could have saved Cabin Fever from its own devouring illness. Not only did the number of plot flaws rival the body count, but even the overt sexual content and gore lost their appeal after awhile. (Daniel Nosek) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

COLD CREEK MANOR ★ SHARON STONE AND DENNIS QUAID Why on earth Sharon Stone thought this film would boost her floundering career is uncertain; perhaps she thought the pitch for Cold Creek Manor sounded better than the reality of it. The trailers did make it look to be an excellent start to the Halloween movie season. However, this film by Mike Figgis (Leaving Las Vegas and recent art house flops such as The Loss of Sexual Innocence and Timecode) just never becomes the thriller it wants to be. (Jason Cantone) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

DICKIE ROBERTS: FORMER CHILD STAR ★ DAVID SPADE AND JON LOVITZ During his stint as a cast member on Saturday Night Live and even in his supporting role on the television show Just Shoot Me, David Spade demonstrated glimpses of comedic spontaneity and charm.In his latest film, Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star, Spade portrays a childhood star who fades into obscurity. Although the underlying concept of the theme sounds promising and intriguing, Spade is ultimately the wrong comedian to successfully fill this role. (Daniel Nosek) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

THE FIGHTING TEMPTATIONS

CUBA GOODING JR. AND BEYONCE KNOWLES A New York advertising executive travels to a small Southern town to collect an inheritance but finds he must create a gospel choir and lead it to success before he can collect. If you would like to review this film, e-mail movies@readbuzz.com. (Jason Cantone) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

FREAKY FRIDAY ★★★ JAMIE LEE CURTIS AND LINDSAY LOHAN Freaky Friday’s family-friendly plot still includes a mother and daughter unsympathetic to one another’s problems because each is convinced her own life is more difficult than the other’s. After a mysterious fortune cookie puts a fateful spell on the pair, Anna, the daughter, and Tess, the mom, wake up in each other’s bodies. (Janelle Greenwood) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

FREDDY VS. JASON ★★ ROBERT ENGLUND AND MONICA KEENA After all is said and done, Freddy vs. Jason is certainly not the best in either series, but fans of the two super-killers will not be disappointed. While the setup might be long, the payoff has been two decades in the making and is well worth the wait. Bad acting aside, this film still does a lot of things right. (Aaron Leach) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

THE HARD WORD ★★★ GUY PEARCE AND RACHEL GRIFFITHS In terms of heist movies, The Hard Word succeeds in exciting

but fails in delighting.There are guns, gore and getaways, but a noticeable lack of ingenuity. And while it’s fun to watch what the characters are up to, it would have been more interesting to see what they did after the credits (John Loos) Now showing at Beverly

the film plays a little like Gangs of the Old West and anyone who’s even heard of classic Westerns like Shane or The Searchers can pretty much stay two steps ahead of Open Range at all times. (Matt Pais) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

JEEPERS CREEPERS 2 ★

PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: THE CURSE OF THE BLACK PEARL ★★★

RAY WISE AND JONATHAN BRECK When a horror film opens with a haunting message that something will come and eat you, despite all attempts to save one’s self,the immediate gut reaction takes the viewer to a terrifying place where boogie monsters are born. Unfortunately, the answers or motivations of the monster are never fully realized in this film. (Janelle Greenwood) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

SEABISCUIT ★★★★

NICOLAS CAGE AND SAM ROCKWELL No, this isn’t a film about pyromaniacs or arsonists invading a town. Instead, matchstick men are con artists, and here the cons go between friends and family members. When Cage’s character finds out he has a daughter, they meet and she wants to join in on the con.The story is fun and entertaining, but the book is much better and doesn’t have the slow, confusing moments that the movie does. (Jason Cantone) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

TOBEY MAGUIRE, JEFF BRIDGES AND CHRIS COOPER The Seabiscuit phenomenon was one of the most captivating in United States history and this film does it justice. Laura Hillenbrand reported that Seabiscuit took up more newspaper space than any other story in 1938, including Hitler and the spawning world war. (Andrew Crewell) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy.

ONCE UPON A TIME IN MEXICO

ROBERT DUVALL AND MICHAEL CAINE Two old men, who might have been successful bank robbers in the 1920s, take custody of their nephew. Melodramatic story, tears and laughter ensure and manipulate your emotions, but make you love every second. (Jason Cantone) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

★★★★

JOHNNY DEPP AND ANTONIO BANDERAS Once Upon a Time in Mexico is an action film that is every bit as intense as it is gorgeous. Fans of the trilogy will not be disappointed, and most audiences will be delighted with the fresh style of action as well as the intelligence present in the script. Paying homage to western campiness with memorable characters and a bit of goofball humor, this is the summer blockbuster that movie-goers should have received two months ago.(Aaron Leach) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

OPEN RANGE ★★ KEVIN COSTNER AND ROBERT DUVALL Open Range mixes slow-paced historical nostalgia with slower-paced Little House on the Prairie references, pitting free range herders against static, prejudiced ranchers. At times,

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SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

with her fellow cops and both men. sible entry points into the apartment complex. “You guys okay here?” she asks. In the distance, Staples can see two backup “Yep, we are,” a cop answers. police cars. As she walks toward the other offi“What do you have in your trunk anyways?” cers, the man emerges from the complex. a cop asks the men. “Get your arms in the air!” an officer “Just clothes and stuff,” one of them replies. screams. It takes the man a couple seconds but Nothing illegal is found, and the men are he raises his arms. An officer aims a rifle at him. eventually sent on their way. Worried about a possible gun, another cop “It’s frustrating when we come out with shines a flashlight on his hands. Staples pulls nothing, but that’s part of the job,” Staples out her 45-caliber pistol and also takes aim. says and heads back to the station, where she “Put your hands behind your head and lay soon receives another call about a possibly face down on the ground!” an officer yells. armed man. The man obeys. Seven officers help cuff him Staples tightens in apprehension. She has and five search his home for a gun. They find dealt with the man none. Staples and other before. He is 6 feet 4 officers transport the inches tall and 210 man to her car. She pounds. She believes reads him his rights as he is mentally unstashe takes him to jail. ble. This time, he has The man seems allegedly violated a depressed and says he restraining order that was fired from his job prohibits him from that day. Staples tries to Lisa Staples having contact with his calm him down by just daughter. He also has listening to his story. called the police department asking for places She escorts the man to booking where to get a gun. another officer stands him against the wall, “That’s why it’s so important to get him legs and arms spread, empties his pockets and without him knowing,” she says. “We don’t asks him to remove his belt and shoes so he know if he’s going to harm someone or possi- can’t use them as possible weapons. Staples’ bly even harm himself.” business here is done, and she says goodbye to Staples accelerates rapidly going westbound the man and leaves. down Hill Street. She shuts off her car lights “Becoming a cop was the best thing for and parks in a lot where she can’t be seen. me,” she says, as she heads back to close out Using her flashlight as a guide, she walks her shift on the streets. “It helped me get on through grass in the alleyway looking for pos- track. It helped me find my niche.” buzz

JOHNNY DEPP AND GEOFFREY RUSH All eyes are on Depp in his scene-stealing turn as Capt. Jack Sparrow in Pirates of the Caribbean. The characters are not all that developed and sometimes the action scenes are a bit long, but overall the film comes together as a good action flick. (Janelle Greenwood) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy

MATCHSTICK MEN ★★★

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SECONDHAND LIONS ★★★★

UNDERWORLD ★★ KATE BECKINSALE AND SCOTT SPEEDMAN Werewolves, vampires and humans, oh my! This Romeo and Juliet tale pits love against an eternal war between vampires and werewolves. Look for great action sequences and a dark tone similar to The Matrix. And then there’s also Kate Beckinsale in all leather to watch for. (Jason Cantone) Now showing at Beverly and Savoy.

OPENING THIS WEEKEND

When I got hired on to be a police officer, the confidence I built up carried over to my personal life as well

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★★★★

PAUL GIAMATTI AND HARVEY PEKAR Both delightfully intricate and amusingly simple, American Splendor is the opposite of this summer’s bloated adaptation of The Hulk. While Ang Lee attempted to transfer a comic book into real life, Berman and Pulcini render real life into a comic book and stretch it into a commentary on happiness, accomplishment and the disheartened lifestyle of Middle America. (Matt Pais) Opening at Beverly on Friday. Showing at Boardman’s tonight

DIRTY PRETTY THINGS

AUDREY TAUTOU AND BENEDICT WONG Stephen Frears serves up a dish of thrills and intrigue as an illegal Nigerian immigrant and Turkish chambermaid discover the unpalatable side of London life. (Jason Cantone) Opening at Boardman’s Art Theatre

Have you ever noticed how much more you can accomplish when you work together?

DUPLEX

DREW BARRYMORE AND BEN STILLER Director Danny DeVito took what worked (both films The Money Pit and Throw Momma From The Train) and turned it into this miserable looking mess. (Jason Cantone) Opening at Beverly and Savoy

At United Way of Champaign County, we bring together community partners to focus on what matters most... results. By giving to United Way, you’re helping not just one group, but our entire community. When you add your investment, to the investments of your family and friends, imagine the positive impact you can make on the people of Champaign County. That, after all, is what matters.

LUTHER

JOSEPH FIENNES AND ALFRED MOLINA Shakespeare in Love introduced Joseph Fiennes to American audiences, but then everything else he’s made has kept him from the mainstream that Jude Law quickly held onto.This is a small, independent film lacking in publicity and most likely won’t bring him back into the spotlight. And, yes, the Luther is Martin Luther. (Jason Cantone) Opening at Beverly

www.uwayhelps.org

THE RUNDOWN

THE ROCK AND SEANN WILLIAM SCOTT America needs a new action hero and this is The Rock’s chance to become that hero. Critically lauded thus far, this action flick should be fun and entertaining. (Jason Cantone) Opening at Beverly and Savoy

THE SCHOOL OF ROCK

JACK BLACK AND JOAN CUSACK Jack Black plays a rock star who bottoms out and becomes a teacher at a prep school. Add in some of the creative power behind High Fidelity and rock music and laughter will ensue. Sneak previews at Beverly this weekend

Lisa Staples searches through a garbage can while looking for evidence from an armed robbery in Champaign on Friday, Sept. 19, 2003. Staples described the evidence search through garbage cans and dumpsters as "all in a day's work."

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Working together matters.

AMERICAN SPLENDOR

PHOTO | KATY MULL

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She weaves through the two-lane traffic, flipping on the red and blue siren lights. She meets up with other officers who conduct a 10-minute search of a vehicle, a search that yields no drugs. But the officers do discover a case of domestic battery. “Women in this job can’t be real sensitive,” Staples says. “If a guy says something sexual, you can’t let it get to you. In fact, there have been times when I have made the guys blush from what I have said to them.” Being a woman cop has gotten easier for her. Staples recalls her father wondering when she first became a cop whether she would have to wear a skirt to work. She has had only minor conflicts. One time, however, she pulled over a man, and he screamed profanities at her just being a woman with control over him. “He didn’t like the idea that, as a woman, I had authority,” Staples says. Staples decided to be a cop when a sergeant wanted to see if a female could pass the physical agility test. The test consisted of climbing a 5-foot wall, running a quarter mile in zigzags, jumping over a 5-foot trench, dragging a 150pound dummy for 50 feet and picking up an unloaded gun and squeezing the trigger 29 times—all in three and half minutes. Staples did it in 2 minutes, 52 seconds. After that, everyone from the chief down told her to apply. She recalls feeling completely confident in herself for the first time in years. “It was like something clicked inside of me,” she says. “I remember I kept thinking that this was exactly what I should do.” Being a cop requires absolute self-control, and for Staples, that is precisely what she had been searching for in herself. As a cop, she has to be ready to deal with anything. As a cop, she must keep an edge over whomever

Q & A

WillieSummerville

SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

she is dealing with. Staples says the most important part of her job is being able to assert controlled force to calm angry or upset people. “As cops, we run into what everyone runs away from,” Staples says. “I love the sense of control I get by being able to go into somebody’s worst day and making sense of it.” Another call comes in—this one a domestic dispute between two apartment neighbors who keep slamming their doors at each other. Staples isn’t excited about the call. She has dealt with these guys before—many times. She gets out of the car, this time with a flashlight. She marches, arms at her side, up the stairs. She is backed by another female cop. A middle-aged man lets them in his apartment and starts complaining. He’s slurring his words. Inside, the stench of liquor, stale cigarettes and greasy food is sickening. A cigarette is lit, burning away in an ashtray on the table. It needs to be ashed, but has been forgotten. Empty Budweiser cans crowd the table and trash can. Staples listens to the man complain about his neighbor. She crosses her arms, keeps eye contact with him, and patiently listens to his story. The man cools off and they leave. “These are the types of people who call on a regular basis just to complain,” she says. Returning to the station, Staples begins working in the evidence room. She enters a room where chemicals are used to analyze evidence. Staples carefully places a letter on a work table to search it for fingerprints. The scent of oil and grain alcohol fills the air. Staples opens a refrigerator full of chemicals, taking out a bottle of ninhydrin, which reacts to oils in people’s fingers and is used to see fingerprints. She soaks the letter in the ninhydrin. The ink

W

illie Summerville has served the community as a music teacher in the Urbana School System for 34 years. His wife of 37 years, Val, is a counselor in the school system as well. Willie has three children and two grandsons. He was born in Sunshine, Arkansas in 1944 and moved to the Champaign-Urbana area in 1966. What is the first instrument you learned to play? How old were you? The flutophone. It’s what’s called a preband instrument. It is basically a plastic flute. That led to piano, tuba, organ and violin. I must have been 8 or 9 years old.

PHOTO | ADAM YOUNG

Why teaching? I was inspired by my first piano teacher, my high school band leader, and my father. He worked in a lumber mill and it was his labor work that earned me a $5,000 scholarship and a ticket to college. What is your favorite thing about the Champaign-Urbana area? The diversity. If you could change your name, what would you change it to? Moses. That was my father’s name and I am his only son. We have a wonderful relationship.

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SEPTEMBER 18-OCTOBER 1, 2003 | SOMETIME YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT YOU MAY FIND WHEN YOU UNPACK SELL IT HERE

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PHOTO | KATY MULL

4

9/24/03

Lisa Staples looks for a vehicle fitting the description of the suspects’ in a local armed robbery in Champaign on Friday, Sept. 19, 2003.

washes off the paper, and an outline of a purple fingerprint remains. She lays it flat, places a paper bag over the letter and irons it dry. Upon inspection, Staples’ eyes get wide and her mouth drops. “Look at those fingerprints,” Staples says. “We now have so much to work with.” Being a cop changed Staples’ life. “When I got hired on to be a police officer, the confidence I built up carried over to my personal life as well,” she says.

The job comes with a great deal of responsibility, and it took her about a year and a half on the job until she could feel confident about having authority over others. Another call comes in. A car driving from Chicago has been stopped at a gas station on Neil Street and is to be searched for possible illegal drugs. When she arrives, officers are already at the scene. The car from Chicago has its doors and trunk open and its two drivers are secured nearby. Staples joins the conversation

What is the last book you read? The Book of Isaiah. I am reading the Bible from front to back in one year.

What is the biggest problem facing our community? Apathy in politics.

What are you passionate about? The things of Christ.

I’m acting up in your class. How do you deal with me? First, I stare at you. Then everyone gets real quiet. I look at you long enough that, hopefully, you’ll solve your own problem. Then if you don’t, I will. They pay me to be (in) control of the class so that’s what I do.

Who is your favorite musical artist? Dr. Ollie Watts Davis (Professor and Director of the University’s Black Chorus). What is one thing you’d like all your students to learn? Respect for each other and their differences. What is your greatest achievement? I have two. The first is having been honored by President Clinton as a Hometown Hero in Education along with my wife. The second is when our community helped the high school choir raise enough funds for a trip to visit and sing in the Vatican. What has been your biggest challenge as a teacher? To try and always be effective and relevant. To make a connection with the students. If you could relive one day of your life, which would it be? The day I got married. [Smiles] That was a good day. [Laughs]

What is your opinion of the University? The University makes a concerted effort to be personable, which is good. But it still needs more black faculty members. Johnny Cash recently passed away. As an avid music fan, your opinion of him? It was a sad time. I have great respect for how he handled himself throughout his career. He was a solid man with values. He didn’t give in to the pressures of the entertainment industry. He kept some good old, down home, American stuff alive. Do you have any final advice for your students to read in this interview? Maximize your learning efforts in every subject because no class is wasted time. Learn lots of information for you, not just to pass the test.

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26odds & end

WHY DO I ALWAYS GET INSPIRED AT 4 A.M.? | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

ARIES (March 21-April 19): This is a perfect astrological moment for you to become more receptive, Aries. That doesn't mean you should become a lazy do-nothing bereft of goals, waiting around passively for whatever happens to come along. The receptivity I'm advocating is ferocious. It's a robust readiness to be surprised and moved; a vigorous intention to be awake to truths you don't expect and can't control. When you're truly receptive, you have strong ideas and a powerful will and a passion for disseminating your unique blessings, but you're also inspired by a humble certainty that you have a lot to learn, knowing that new teaching might come from unimaginable sources.

gets most turned on by small, subtle secrets, this is a perfect moment to find out what you've been hiding from yourself.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): During my recent visit to the Burning Man festival, I faced a dicey dilemma: what to do with my eyes as I talked with the many women who wore no clothes above the waist? At first I steadfastly kept my gaze from dipping below their necks. Then I decided that was silly; if they were strongly opposed to me looking at their breasts, they wouldn't be naked. On the other hand, I didn't want to be sneaky, stealing furtive glances when they were momentarily distracted. Ultimately, I asked each woman for permission to indulge in a brief ogle. That way we could get the issue out of the way and conduct our conversations in peace. They all thought this was a sensible approach. I hope this tale will inspire you,Taurus, to deal expeditiously with the 900-pound gorilla in the corner of your world.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Here are tasks you should studiously avoid in the coming week: painting the bathroom, fixing the smoke alarm, changing the burned-out light in the hallway, getting an air freshener for the car, and buying new batteries for the TV remote control. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you should instead seek out the following kinds of experiences: Delight in your sudden access to spiritual resources that have been closed to you before; commune with beauty that does not depend on artifice; and capitalize on your new ability to change something about your life that you thought would remain stuck forever.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): I predict that in the coming week you will be invited to partake in a mythic feast. While a gourmet meal may be involved, the essence of the experience will be metaphorical food that nourishes your soul. This uncannily satisfying sustenance will, for all intents and purposes, be a gift from eternity -- a blessing that comes from outside of time. It will be intimately meaningful for the person you are now, but even more so for the person you are striving to become. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If you're fascinated by really big secrets, it will be a banner week for digging up suppressed evidence about the lies and deceptions your government is trying to get away with. If mid-sized secrets are more your style, it'll be a good time to uncover the inner workings of your social circle, place of employment, or local scene. And if you're the kind of person who

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY | SEPTEMBER 25 – OCTOBER 1 2003

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): "If I keep the green bough in my heart," says the Chinese proverb, "the singing bird will come." Have you been doing that, Gemini: cultivating the green bough in your heart? Even when the world around you has been a barren wasteland? If so, the singing bird will alight on your inviting perch very soon. If you haven't, get to work immediately and the singing bird may yet arrive by mid-October.

NECK PAIN RELIEF

buzz

Female officer comes full circle

of the curve. Then, suddenly, instead of surfing the waves, they scrambled for dry land. Each tried to conjure up stability and solidity through more and more monumental undertakings. They lost their former lightness and fluidity, becoming mired in pomposity." This is a worthy meditation for you, Capricorn. Every successful person, you and I included, has to periodically negotiate the turning point that Koons, Amis, and Combs seem to have failed to master.We're all tempted to cling to the winning formula that brought us so far. But this is a perfect time to release your attachment to and dependence on your past triumphs, and go off in quest of fresh magic.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Please remember that you are not competing in a sprint, Virgo. You are running a marathon. You should therefore be sure to pace yourself and not be overly concerned about the fast-starters who have sped ahead of you. I also advise you to clear your beautiful mind of envy and self-doubt, as well as the pushy expectations of people who don't know the intricacies of what you're doing. Now here's the most important thing: Use your fine mind to figure out how to be motivated by pleasure, not pressure.

BY DAN KURASH | STAFF WRITER

I

t is a Sunday afternoon, 4:15 p.m., and the gray clouds form a blanket over Champaign’s sky. A train is heading northbound past the Champaign Police Department, which lies just east of the tracks. Lisa Staples, 33, a six-year veteran of the force, walks to her car with a confident stride. She takes a deep breath and gets into her patrol car and starts the engine. “Make it 746 code 29 county,” she says into her radio, and takes off to patrol the streets. Lisa Staples is one of only 10 women officers out of 125 cops in the Champaign Police Department. But being a woman brings no privileges. Staples’ job is to patrol the northwest side of Champaign, the area north of University Avenue and west of Prospect Avenue. The car is cluttered with gadgets—a laptop to track leads and criminal records by license plate numbers and to e-mail dinner plans to other cops; four siren switches, each with a different pitch of intensity; and an eight-channel radio to listen in on state, local and University police chatter. Her car even has a camera to videotape her traffic stops. “This car is pretty loaded,” Staples says. For Staples, becoming a cop was more than

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It'll be a good week to do all of the following: play soccer in the kitchen with Barbie doll heads; wake up in the morning to salsa music and start dancing while you're still half-asleep; talk about your problems until you've talked them to death; get the equivalent of a first kiss or a last laugh; seek out a mystical sign from an enigmatic saint wearing black gloves and a wry smile; call yourself Mumso, Mutiny, or Goofmaster as you upgrade your graffiti-scrawling skills; join Charles M. Young's campaign to change the name of the Pentagon to the "Emma Goldman World Cathedral of Ecofeminist Goddess Worship;" and be a vivid embodiment of Deena Metzger's idea that "Beauty appears when something is completely and absolutely and openly itself."

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): On the eve of the American Revolution in 1775, Paul Revere rode his horse from Charlestown to Lexington, MA, warning the local population that an invasion force of British troops was on its way. Last night I dreamed you were like a modern Paul Revere, only instead of yelling "The British are coming!," you were shouting "The smiling agents of confusion are coming!" What do you think that means, Scorpio? Here's one conceivable dream interpretation: In your waking life, you should expose the dangers posed by fuzzy-brained catalysts, no matter how well-intentioned they might seem. Here's another possible interpretation: Be on the lookout for polite manipulators who use their sweet charm to get their selfish way.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Have you ever played the game of "Tell me the story of all your scars?" It's best to do it when you want to break through to a deeper level of intimacy with a friend or loved one. "How'd you get that blotch on your knee?" he or she begins, and you describe the time in childhood when you fell out of a tree onto the sidewalk.Then maybe he or she says, "Why do you always look so sad when you hear that song on the radio?" And you narrate the tale of how it was playing when an old flame broke your heart. The questions and answers continue until you unveil the entire history of your hurts, both physical and psychic. I suggest you treat yourself to this ritual in the coming week, Pisces. The astrological omens suggest you can achieve a miraculous healing in the presence of a good listener who is curious about your mysteries and skilled at helping you find redemption in your wounds.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): My friend Jane Heaven lives by a motto that would be a good tonic for you this week: "the ruthless truth, kindly told." In other words, it won't be smart or effective for you merely to expose the sticky subtexts that everyone's trying to avoid dealing with. You'll have to convey those unsettling revelations with all the tender compassion you can muster. Expressions of tough love will be half-assed unless the love is at least twice as big as the toughness.

✍ HOMEWORK:

Rob Brezsny's Free Will ☎ Astrology beautyandtruth

Comment on Nietzsche's belief that "One must have chaos within oneself if one is to be a dancing star." Testify at www.freewillastrology.com.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): "Artist Jeff Koons, author Martin Amis, and musician Sean 'Puffy' Combs once had a genius for knowing how the times were changing," wrote Nicholas Blincoe in "Black Book" magazine. "They always managed to stay ahead

@ f r e e w i l l a s t r o l o g y. c o m 415.459.7209(v)• 415.457.3769 http://www.freewillastrology. com P.O. Box 798 San Anselmo, CA 94979

just a way to make ends meet—the job saved drivers are careful to make full stops behind her from feeling inadequate and hopeless. It the white lines. filled a void in her life and allowed her to redeStaples, 5 feet 8 inches tall and 145 pounds, fine herself as a strong, assertive woman. is a tan, broad-shouldered woman with large, “I never thought I would become a cop until powerful hands. Two of her nine tattoos—one I actually gave it a shot,” Staples says. of a spider resting on a web and the other a After graduating from college and getting fancy “X” pattern—are on the upper portion of out of a disastrous relationship with the man her hands between her thumb and first finger. she was dating at the time, she was fearful of Her swept-back ponytail reveals the roundsettling into another serious commitment. ness of her face and the brown eyes tucked “The relationship wore me down to the point behind black frame glasses. She has the look of where I completely a woman who is not to lacked confidence,” she be messed with. She also says. “I needed to find has long, manicured myself.” nails done with burFor about four years gundy polish. after college, Staples In uniform, Staples worked at a local lawn weighs 25 pounds more care service company and due to her bulletproof Lisa Staples hobby shop. It wasn’t vest and extras: a .45 caluntil Staples’ mother got iber pistol; two magaher a volunteer job in the police evidence room zines of bullets, each holding 14 copper hollowthat she thought about being a cop. point bullets; a can of pepper spray; a flashlight; “It looks like today is going to be pretty a retractable baton capable of extending 24 busy,” Staples says as she crosses Neil Street inches; a glove pouch with latex gloves; the and heads west. base for her radio, which she has mounted on A car in front of her is traveling the speed her left shoulder; a double cuff case; and keys. limit. Cars are extra cautious when cops are “Police work is not like normal work—you present, she says. At a four-way stop sign, just never know what’s going to happen,”

[

Police work is not like normal work—you just never know what’s going to happen.

[

CROSSWORD PUZZLE (ANSWERS ON PAGE 19) ACROSS 1 Do-over command 11 Station along Route 66 15 “My treat next time!” 16 One taking driver’s ed, perhaps 17 Lab protector 18 Cost of living? 19 Poetic dusk 20 Paper piece 21 Doctor’s order 22 One who fought Uitlanders 23 Labor day? 25 Scrap 28 Young traveler, maybe 29 Casts 30 Business section 31 The Diamondbacks, on scoreboards 32 Reword 33 Picks and chooses 34 It’s a guy thing 35 Flipper 36 Pens 37 Bloodsucker 38 Means in all 40 Shrouded 41 Mold over

42 Kind of moss 43 “Ad hominem” source 44 Stick with the herd? 45 Comments around

babies 48 Southern college 49 Is suspicious 52 Ward 53 Stop fighting 54 Certain domino 55 Reaches a crisis point DOWN 1 Marching band instrument 2 Lady Macbeth, e.g. 3 Pulitzer-winning playwright ___ Davis 4 Start of an apology 5 Moguls 6 Like some earrings 7 Author of “Introduction to Algebra” 8 Was a blabbermouth 9 ___ dare 10 Singly 11 Modern buying and selling 12 “S’long!”

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affair 15 14 Dangerous way to pass 17 21 Social 20 19 groups 22 Important 22 23 highway 28 25 26 27 23 Numismatist : coins :: 30 29 plangonologist : ___ 33 32 24 Makes work 36 35 25 Radical group 38 39 26 Foxes used 42 41 to be seen here 43 44 27 Nose’s place? 49 50 48 28 Greeting in 53 52 “Winnie the Pooh” 55 54 30 Hotel offering Puzzle by Manny Nosowsky 33 Andy in the newspapers 40 Aquanaut’s workplace 34 Nazarenes, once 42 Matters of opinion 36 Spanish explorer ___ Bautista de Anza 44 Hanukkah gift 37 Results in 45 Stuck, after “in” 39 Rumpus 46 Chisholm Trail town

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community

SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

PHOTO | KATY MULL

092503buzz0326

Lisa Staples climbs down a fire truck ladder while searching rooftops for evidence from a local armed robbery in Champaign on Friday, Sept. 19, 2003.

Staples says. “It’s kind of annoying when I always have to meet my friends out after work. They just don’t seem to understand that I have definite hours.” Lisa grew up a rebellious punk-rock teen with an orange and fuchsia Mohawk. In college, her boyfriend bullied her under his thumb, something that’s hard to believe when you look at her today. She tried to leave him. He would call her at work, numerous times a day, badgering her to take him back. “It just got to the point where it was easier to be with him than without him,” she says. It took years to dump him, but she finally did. After graduation, Lisa moved back to Champaign with her mother. “I was sick of walking on eggshells,” Staples says. “I just had to trudge forward and get away from that situation.” Staples rolls through the Burch Village housing projects, all one-floor homes with small patches of grass for front yards. At a slow place, riding the brake, she looks left, then right, sees nothing happening and drives on. The droning static on the radio is interrupted by the dispatcher reporting a car possibly carrying illegal drugs. “10-4,” Staples says as slams down on the gas so hard it pushes her back in her seat.


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WHAT IF IT’S SILK, WHAT IF IT’S A THONG | SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1 2003 buzz

insidebuzz 4

COMMUNIT Y

Q & A with Urbana High teacher

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ARTS

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MUSIC

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Shakespeare meets the 1900s Triple Whip hits a slap shot CALENDAR

Mystikal shakes his ass, watch yourself FILM & TV

Cold Creek Manor ODDS & END

Real life heroes

Volume 1, Number 29 COVER DESIGN | Andy Getz

editor’snote

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hen will America finally have a president worthy of leading this great country? I, for one, am tired of George Bush’s empty-headed policies that are taking the United States and the world down a dangerous road. Similarly, like deja vu, I’m sick of Bill Clinton all over, as he parades the nation in search of personal adulation, pointing out the current crop of “star” Democrats (all two of them). Am I being too picky, or do Americans deserve much better? Clinton and Bush, though different in style, are still predictable politicians in nice suits, with words of little substance or credibility. One man is incredibly slick-talking and the other couldn’t talk his way out of a parking ticket if it weren’t for his heritage, but you get my point: I want a president who inspires with his actions more than with his words, someone who levels with the American people, someone who doesn’t lie, someone who doesn’t have scandal tainting his tenure, and, most importantly, someone willing to lead outside the scripted bounds Washington D.C. has artificially placed. Going back to Richard Nixon, every single president has had a scandal rock his administration, save Jimmy Carter, whose presidency was, from what I’ve read, one big flaw in itself. When will Americans get a leader they can be proud of, and why does big money put up these flawed, dishonest men? Sal Nudo Champaign

BUZZ STAFF

Editor-in-chief Tom Rybarczyk Art Director Meaghan Dee Copy Chief Erin Green Arts Katie Richardson Music Brian Mertz Entertainment Jason Cantone Calendar Marissa Monson Assistant Music Editor Jacob Dittmer Calendar Coordinators Lauren Smith, Cassie Conner, Erin Scottberg Illustrations David Chen Photography Adam Young, Katy Mull, Suzanne Sitrick Copy Editors Jessica Jacko, Elizabeth Zeman Designers Adam Obendorf, Carol Mudra Jason Cantone Production Manager Theon Smith Editorial Adviser Elliot Kolkovich Sales Manager Lindsey Benton Marketing/Distribution Melissa Schleicher, Willis Welch Publisher Mary Cory All editorial questions or letters to the editor should be sent to buzz@readbuzz.com or 2449898 or buzz, 1001 S. Wright St., Champaign, Ill., 61820. Buzz magazine is a student-run publication of Illini Media Company and does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University

EAT IN . TAKE OUT . DRIVE THRU

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SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003 | YOU KNOW YOU WANT TO TALK DIRTY TO ME

AND ANOTHER THING...

Who needs Superman? We have real-life heroes BY MICHAEL COULTER | CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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got a nice present the other day, a pair of UnderDog boxer shorts. I like them quite a bit and everything, but the gift giver had no idea the can of worms the shorts opened up in my mind. See, when I was a child, I had a bit of an UnderDog problem. I was an only child and grew up in the country, so I pretended a lot. I was hoping the underwear didn’t send me on some sort of weird flashback. I became enraptured around age 4 with the cartoon UnderDog and began to dress like him and fight crime around our house. Whether it be a cat who was jaywalking, a dog who wouldn’t obey orders or a pretend monster who was trying to take over my room, I would defeat them all. When I say I used to dress like him, it wasn’t exactly like him. I had a “U” on my shirt just like him, but mine was put on with Magic Marker. Instead of a cape, I had the arms of a bathrobe tied around my neck. Rather than cool red crime-fighting boots, I had a pair of my mom’s go go boots, but besides all of those things, I was pretty much just like him—except I wasn’t a dog. Let’s face it though, I wasn’t really a superhero, but I think I’ve found someone who is. He’s called Angle Grinder Man and he resides in Britain. Sure, his name isn’t catchy like The Green Lantern or Daredevil. He doesn’t have spidery-sense or the ability to breathe under water, but who needs those things anyway. He cuts through the wheel clamps, or boots, placed on the cars of parking violators. I know, it sounds like an urban legend, but the story was on Reuters News Service last week. He wears a blue spandex jumpsuit, gold gloves, a cape, and most importantly, goggles. Safety first and make it last. Try to follow the progression: the boot is the most effective tool to disable a car, the angle grinder is the best tool to use for getting a car clamp off and the best tool to run the angle grinder is, of course, Angle Grinder Man. There’s no Bat Signal or anything. You just have to call the Angle Grinder Man hotline and he will come out and unboot your vehicle. He insists this is a form of protest against a corrupt government, but whatever, I just like to think of him as someone “who helps people.” I mean, forget the big stuff like Superman changing the rotation of the earth to bring Lois

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Lane back to life or Spiderman fighting Sandman to save Gwen. Those are just the yearnings of the readers of the comics who’ve never kissed a girl. I need a real hero. For a guy like me, the hero just needs to help with the little stuff like parking. Overall, I’d be a much happier man. Scotland Yard doesn’t find it so amusing and they’re already looking for his ass. Really, it shouldn’t be that hard to catch him. Just call the hotline and wait. Then all you have to do is arrest the first guy in blue spandex and a cape who’s carrying a big-assed angle grinder. Wow, my first case and I’ve already almost solved it. It’ll be too bad when they catch him because he’s probably more respected than Tony Blair. He’s real and he gets something done, even if it is sort of illegal. That’s the problem with Superheroes—it’s mostly fantasy. With the coming of Angle Grinder Man, that could all change. We should be inspired and take his cue. Someone could be a superhero who runs people off the road who are talking on cell phones. This person’s name would be The Cell Phone Eliminator. Someone could turn down stereos that are too loud at stop signs—The Too Much Bass Rectifier. Someone could find dates for the romantically challenged. They could call him The Guy Who Helps My Friend Eddie. I’m just saying, there’s lots of ways to help. One other way is to maybe do some volunteer stuff around the community or just be pleasant to people. You may not get a catchy nickname, but people might look at you differently. You may not be a superhero, but you’ll at least be a hero. That’s probably better anyway. So few people look good wearing capes. buzz

I became enraptured around age 4 with the cartoon UnderDog and began to dress like him and fight crime around our house.

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Michael Coulter is a videographer at Parkland College and a bartender at Two Main. He writes a weekly e-mail column, “This Sporting Life” and has hosted several local comedy shows. He can be reached at coulter@readbuzz.com.

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DirtyTalk

Amy - It’s not the same around here without you. And where can I sleep when my bed’s broken? -A, B, C, D

Kate - I always thought the number 13 was unlucky. I take that back, 13 is now my favorite number. Keep smiling, it's a beautiful thing. -Keir Kasey - No matter how much showering you do with us, there is just some dirty that wont come off Carol - remember how hawt you looked when all you wore was rotis sans and the dante question mark? this time, forgot the indesign and come raw and unformatted -kaiser Carly - You sure can work it, girl. Can't wait to see you climb over that easel tuesday. Til then...

Lauren - You, me, some baskin robbins chocolate chip cookie dough ice cream and coffee poured all over each other as we lick it off... Betsy - I’m on to you! I caught you taking photographs of my breasts (however small) and ass (I don’t know if the whole thing could fit in the window) -Deeznuts Jamie - vroom vroom Stensland - You leave the country and when you return you’re too good for me. You, me and Mary and Supriya (whose name I can never spell) need to get together for some Sex in Urbana. -Wachova

To my favorite RA - blindfolds were hot, but next time let's try handcuffs! -your enginerd lover

Bradley - Want ya badly.

Tom - Want to check out my spreads?

Chad - Your handwriting makes me horney.

Mertz - “Lets get it on”

Aneel - I’d kneel for you.

Cantonio Banderez - Wanna be my zorro?

Rob - Want some slob on your knob?

Jacob - You still haven’t seen my Dits

Christian - I’d like to do some things to you that most organized religions wouldn’t approve of.

Tabitha - How’d you like the big apple and do you want to see mine? Dugan - text me. -Anne Lauren - The last time we hung out it was pouring down rain and you were drenched-- is there any other way I can get you that wet again? Kathleen - You’re hot. Tami - Is there any way I can get in those jeans? Jen - It was fun spending time with ya, I’m glad I’m getting to know you better and I know one way to get to really know you. ;-)

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Burton - When I’m around you it’s hard to keep my skirt on. Richardson - You’re too cool for school--well, or at least you’re too hot for it. -MAD Doctor SWEET “DIRTY” TALKS ARE FREE. To submit your message go to www.readbuzz.com and click on the Sweet Talk link. Please make your message personal, fun, flirty and entertaining. Leave out last names and phone numbers because we (and probably you!) could get in big fat trouble for printing them. We reserve the right to edit your messages. Sorry, no announcements about events or organizations. (Enter those at cucalendar.com)

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Marlon - You’re fun.

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ason Butler and Mark Peaslee of B r a i n s m a r t Productions, the film company featured in this week’s Film & TV section, exhibit what two aspiring filmmakers can do with $1,000. Unfortunately, they show you cannot do that much. I am not saying they possess no talent. Rather, these two local horror moviemakers exhibit a serious problem affecting our community and other communities across the country—a lack of funding for the arts. Since the economic downturn a few years back, local and state governments have slashed arts spending, in favor of more important social services like education, health care and police services. But have they slashed it too much? Arts funding for film companies like Brainsmart and theater groups directly affect a community’s economy. The more active the arts community, the more money the community makes in the form of taxes from the restaurants, bars and other shops that surround these performance areas. More importantly, art-rich communities have less crime, more civicminded citizens and just an overall better place to live. Yes, it seems to difficult to believe that a company like Brainsmart Productions can bring this to Champaign-Urbana if given more tax dollars, especially when they say the $1,000 they did have, they spent on videotape and beer. But imagine how much a typical movie

production company spends on beer and videotape (and illegal substances)—probably much more than a measly $1,000. Still, why should someone want to support a production like Thoraxx II? First, people should be proud of work produced in their community. ChampaignUrbana supports the Illini football and basketball teams every year, showing their hometown pride; this pride may be one reason why both the football and basketball program have consistently good years. Imagine how much better Thoraxx II could have been if they were given the same support from the community. If more people encourage endeavors like Brainsmart Productions, then the world will have better filmmakers, more courageous filmmakers, filmmakers who make a difference. And if they do not make a difference, they will make people laugh, and sometimes, we all need to step back and laugh. Maybe Brainsmart Productions will never have a profound effect on the world, but other budding filmmakers may be stuck in the rough landscape of Champaign-Urbana, scared to come out and show their talents to the world because there is no chance for a living. Who knows, the next Quentin Tarantino or Martin Scorsese may come out of ChampaignUrbana. We may never know if the community does not come out and support artistic endeavors like this.

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Dirty Pretty Things R, runs 107 minutes, flat, presented in HPS-4000/DD. Daily at 4:30PM 7:00PM & 9:30PM. Early matinees on Sat/Sun at 2:00PM. • Featuring hot pizza and stuffed pretzels, cookies and brownies, and fresh brewed coffee and tea •

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odds&end

SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 1, 2003

There’s a great story about jazz in Champaign-Urbana. It holds chapters from the past. Sounds from the present. And ideas yet to be lived. Step into the groove of life in C-U.

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z buz Sept. 25-Oct. 1, 2003 Arts | Entertainment | Community

Featuring Cecil Bridgewater September 22-27 December 1-6 March 1-7 April 29-May 2 Arts for Kids Jazz talk and sounds for grades 1 to 4 Saturday, September 27, 1pm Krannert Center Free; tickets required

Jazz Threads Underwriter

Creative Intersections Sponsor

Cecil Bridgewater and guests in Concert at Krannert Center Carl Allen, drums Ron Bridgewater, saxophone Kenny Davis, bass Mulgrew Miller, piano Saturday, September 27, 7:30pm Krannert Center $17 to $23

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Other Cecil Bridgewater Concerts at Krannert Center Saturday, December 6, 7:30pm With Dee Dee Bridgewater, vocals U of I Concert Jazz Band Saturday, March 6, 10am Java and Jazz, a casual morning concert Coffee and bagels on sale at 9am Sunday, March 7, 7:30pm With Clark Terry, trumpet

Corporate Silver Sponsors

ARTS

It’s not a robe, it’s a Kimono MUSIC

Afterglow with Jeff Helgesen and Rachael Lee Casual night music at Krannert Center’s Interlude bar Saturday, September 27, about 9:30pm Krannert Center Free

Mates of State: touring warriors (page 10)

Jazz Vespers The House of Cool meets the House of Prayer Sunday, October 12, 5:30pm Patron Sponsors University Place Christian Church Margaret and Larry Neal 403 S. Wright St., Champaign Free Patron Co-sponsors

Corporate Bronze Sponsors The Great Impasta Shouting Ground Technologies

(page 3)

(page 6)

Talkback after the show, free Corporate Platinum Sponsor

Working the beat with a city cop

Frances and Marc Ansel Sam Gove Anonymous

Jazz Threads is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts; and by the Heartland Arts Fund, a program of Arts Midwest funded by the National Endowment for the Arts with additional contributions from General Mills Foundation, Land O’Lakes Foundation, Sprint Corporation, and the Illinois Arts Council.

For information on all events 217/333-6280 800/KCPATIX KrannertCenter.com

CALENDAR

Digital Underground do what they like (page 14)

FILM & TV

Underworld reaches new lows (page 21)


Buzz Magazine: Sept. 25, 2003