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WHAT’S YOUR NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION? BROKEN IT YET? | MARCH 4 - 10, 2004

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A look at family and faith (Page 4)

ARTS

meredith monk

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MacArthur “Genius” Award-winner and composer Meredith Monk presents a solo concert showcasing her extraordinarily creative work, capturing the audience's attention with evocative sounds from her one-of-a-kind vocal instrument.

(Page 6)

3.10.04 7:30pm

MUSIC

Interview with The Walkmen

m e r cy

A new work by Meredith

(Page 9)

Monk and Ann Hamilton

Neil

Prospect

Galen

Filled with visual and sonic wonders, mercy offers a stunning meditation on the mystery, beauty, and sadness of life. Vocal pioneer Meredith Monk collaborates with artist Ann Hamilton, a fellow MacArthur "Genius" Award-winner whose work has been shown at Krannert Art Museum. Produced by The House Foundation for the Arts, Inc.

3.13.04 7:30pm

Carry Out

being matters.

CALENDAR

Brother Ali and Scratch at Canopy (Page 14)

FILM

Windsor

359-1994

Local actress takes director’s chair

217/333-6280 KrannertCenter.com

The Passion of the Christ review (Page 22)

Arts | Entertainment | Community


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JUST A SMALL TOWN GIRL, LIVIN’ IN HER LONELY WORLD | MARCH 4-10, 2004

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editor’snote BY MARISSA MONSON | EDITOR IN CHIEF

The Story

5 Q & A with director of Staerkel Planitarium

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upersize no more! That’s right, McDonald’s has decided to phase out the supersize option from its 13,000 restaurants nationwide. The phaseout comes after pressure from the public concerning the health value of the extra fries and cola. They have phased in yogurts, salads and fruit. I for one applaud McDonald’s for taking a step to fight obesity in this country. Well, sort of. I’m not sure the absence of the super-size will curb weight gain. The problem lies in the greasy burgers and fries, not the few extra fries the consumer receives when they heartily answer yes to the inevitable question, “Would you like that supersized?” How’s this for a slogan: “McDonald’s, home of the salad.” Doesn’t quite sound right, does it? According to an Associated Press article, McDonald’s spokesman Walt Riker said, “This core menu, which has been under development since 2002, simplifies our menu and restaurant operations and provides a balance of choices for our customers. A component of this overall simplification, menu and balanced lifestyle strategy is the

As both a professor at Parkland College and director of the Staerkel Planitarium, the second largest planetarium in Illinois...

Arts 8 The work of artist Derrick Holley Derrick Holley is a local artist whose work is currently on display at Highdive and ...

Music 10 Saying goodbye to an old friend, Record Service In November of 1969, with nothing more than a pad of paper, a pencil, and a catalogue, a student run...

Calendar 12 Hip-hop Awareness Week This Saturday is a big night for hiphop lovers as Melodic Scribes, d-lo, Spinnerty, Brother Ali and Scratch...

Film

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ongoing phase-out of the Super-size fries and Supersize drink options,” Riker said. I’m just wondering how the fast food pioneers thought their delectable french fries and Big Macs would affect the nation’s waistline. Granted, I never subscribe to the thinking behind the lawsuits that claim, “McDonald’s gave me health problems.” Yes, McDonald’s knows how much fat is in your burger and fries, but so should you, the consumer, just by looking at the greasesoaked bag your food comes in. It’s great that McDonald’s is taking the Supersized stuff off the menu, but come on, folks, who’s kidding who here? America’s obesity problem is no one’s fault but our own. Of course we want McDonald’s. Fat tastes good, no one will deny that. But, let’s take some initiative. America is the fat kid that always has Twinkies in our lunch box. As we huff and puff trailing behind France and England, we really have no one to blame but ourselves. We bought the Supersize, and we ate it. So it’s nice to see McDonald’s is being the bigger man here, so to speak. Say no to fries all together! There’s a campaign slogan for the ages.

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buzz MARCH 4 - 10, 2004 | I LOVE THIS WEATHER

There’s a great story about jazz in Champaign-Urbana. It holds chapters from the past. Sounds from the present. And ideas yet to be lived. Step into the groove of life in C-U Featuring Cecil Bridgewater March 1 - 7 • April 29 - May 2 Jazz Threads Underwriter

-M.M.

Creative Intersections Sponsor

24 Oscar wrap-up Some might say this year’s Oscars were actionpacked, and filled with suprising...

Corporate Platinum Sponsor

PHOTO | RODERICK GEDEY

BUZZ STAFF Volume 2, Number 9 COVER DESIGN | Jordan Herron

Editor in chief Marissa Monson Art Directors Meaghan Dee & Carol Mudra Copy Chief Chris Ryan Music Jacob Dittmer Art Katie Richardson Film Paul Wagner Community Emily Wahlheim Calendar Maggie Dunphy Photography Editor Christine Litas Calendar Coordinators Lauren Smith, Cassie Conner, Erin Scottberg Photography Christine Litas, Roderick Gedey Copy Editors Chris Ryan, Jen Hubert, Suzanne Sitrick, Erin Green Designers Adam Obendorf, Sue Janna Truscott, Jordan Herron, Glenn Cochon, Chris Depa Production Manager Theon Smith Sales Manager Jon Maly Marketing/Distribution Melissa Schleicher, Maria Erickson Publisher Mary Cory

Got an opinion? E-mail us at buzz@readbuzz.com or you can send us a letter at 1001 S. Wright St., Champaign, IL 61820. We reserve the right to edit submissions. Buzz will not publish a letter without the verbal consent of the writer prior to publication date. Free speech is an important part of the democratic process. Exercise your rights. All editorial questions or letters to the editor should be sent to buzz@readbuzz.com or 337-8317 or buzz, 57 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820. Buzz magazine is a student-run publication of Illini Media Company and does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students.

Copyright Illini Media Company 2004

Corporate Bronze Sponsor The Great Impasta

Patron Co-sponsors Fran and Marc Ansel Anonymous

Jazz Threads is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts; and by the Heartland Arts Fund, a program of Arts Midwest funded by the National Endowment for the Arts with additional contributions from General Mills Foundation, Land O'Lakes Foundation, Sprint Corporation, and the Illinois Arts Council.

Jazz Crawl and Jam Session

Cecil Bridgewater and guests in concert

A feast of local jazz musicians and venues, plus a chance to jam at the end of the evening; all are welcome to listen or jam

Clark Terry, trumpet Ron Bridgewater, saxophone and the U of I Concert Jazz Band

Thursday, March 4, 5pm to midnight 5pm: U of I Jazz Band II at the Iron Post, 120 S. Race, Urbana 6:30pm: U of I Lab Band at Krannert Center’s Tryon Festival Theatre, 500 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana 8pm: Susan Hofer and Friends at the Canopy Club 708 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana 9:30pm: Jeff Helgesen and Chip McNeill at Zorba’s 627 E. Green, Champaign 11pm: Jam Session with the LaMonte Parsons Experience at Cowboy Monkey, 6 Taylor St., Champaign

Sunday, March 7, 7:30pm Tryon Festival Theatre at Krannert Center $17 to $25 Talkback after the show, free

Afterglow with Chambana Casual night music at Krannert Center’s Interlude bar Sunday, March 7, about 9:30pm Lobby at Krannert Center Free Cash bar

Jazz Threads Celebration Concert Traffic Jam: Metta Quintet Rejuvenate after work with this Brooklyn quintet, leaders of New York’s JazzReach program Friday, March 5, 5pm Lobby at Krannert Center Free Cash bar

A powerful combination of community and music Sunday, May 2, 2pm Virginia Theatre Free

Java and Jazz Cecil Bridgewater with Chambana A free, family-friendly, informal concert, with coffee and bagels for sale in the lobby beginning at 9am—you can even take them into the theatre Saturday, March 6, 10am Tryon Festival Theatre at Krannert Center Free; tickets required

For information on all events 217/333-6280 800/KCPATIX KrannertCenter.com


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WHERE IS MY MIND? LALALALA | MARCH 4 - 10, 2004

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Do you ever feel an urge to kiss trees? Do animals sometimes talk to you? Can you predict the future by divining the way corn flakes float in the last puddle of milk in your bowl? Do you have a special fascination with chocolate roosters, statues of pro wrestlers, and conspiracy theories? Have you ever fantasized of being a transsexual spy? Are there patterns that resemble constellations on the soles of your feet? If you answered yes to two or more of these questions, you're most likely an extraterrestrial who has amnesia or is in disguise. The upcoming week will be fantastic because events will remind you of life on your home planet. If you answered no to four or more questions, you're probably not an alien, but for maximum comfort you should act like one this week. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The world's largest private bank, Citigroup, has agreed to stop financing projects that damage sensitive ecosystems. It has promised to invest more in projects that use renewable energy and to pursue policies that protect indigenous people. How did this impossible dream come to pass? The humble but dogged environmental group, Rainforest Action Network, creatively pestered Citigroup for years until the corporation gave into its demands. I see a comparable David over-Goliath victory in your future, Taurus, so keep plugging away at your quixotic quest. For inspiration, recall Margaret Mead's words: "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If you live in the Northern Hemisphere, the sun is rising about a minute earlier each morning and setting a minute later every evening. As a result, you're drinking in about 15 minutes more sunlight every week.The psychological effect of this steady influx has been slowly growing, and, in concert with certain astrological influences, will soon reach critical mass. As a result, you will become sun-like: a luminous beacon of warmth. Everything you shine upon will look brighter, and your own beauty will be highly visible, too. It will be a perfect time, therefore, to make a dramatic move that helps you pursue your dreams harder and smarter. QUANTUM FLUX (also known as CANCER) (June 21-July 22): Many people have come to feel that nature is boring, notes educator Thomas Poplawski. Writing in "Renewal" magazine, he fingers TV's hyperactive imagery as the cause. In becoming addicted to this alternative reality, the mass audience has become numb to the more slow-paced entertainment value of trees and mountains and streams and clouds. Have you been contaminated? Has your capacity for patient observation and reverent objectivity been damaged? If so, this is a perfect astrological moment to seek the cure. I urge you to wander out into the wild places and stay there until you see how interesting they are.

FIRST THING’S FIRST...

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If you eventually become a millionaire philanthropist at some later date, it will probably be because of the forces you set in motion during the next three weeks. If, in the 22nd century, there arises a religious cult that worships you as a sex god or love goddess, it will be because of a seed you germinate very soon. Finally, Leo, if you are ultimately destined to discover the key to eternal youth, it will have a lot to do with the spacious new question you begin to ask now. These are days of awe and mystery. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In order to live, you've got to be a demolisher.You take plants and animals that were once alive and rip them apart with your teeth, then disintegrate them in your digestive system. Your body is literally on fire inside, burning up oxygen you suck into your lungs. You didn't actually cut down the trees used to make your house and furniture, but you colluded with their demise. Then there's the psychological liquidation you've done: killing off old beliefs you've outgrown, for instance. I'm not trying to make you feel guilty, Virgo -- just pointing out that you have a lot of experience with positive expressions of destruction. Can you think of other forms this magic takes? It's your specialty these days. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): It's a perfect time to launch an uprising against God. Due to a favorable alignment of your sign, the "rebel goddess" asteroid Lilith, and Cruithne, Earth's "second moon," you have special leeway with the Supreme Being. It's almost certain that you won't be punished if you bitch and complain to Him about the injustices he has allowed to fester in your life. In fact, expressing your angry protest may even get things changed for the better. Sometimes the squeaky wheel really does get the grease, even in divine matters. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Some branches of Eastern religions teach the doctrine "Kill out desire." In their view, yearning for earthly pleasures is at the root of all human suffering. The Western religion of materialism takes the opposite tack, asserting that the meaning of life is to be found in enjoying earthly pleasures. Its message is "Feed your raw longings like a French foie gras farmer cramming eight pounds of maize down a goose's gullet every day." We here at Free Will Astrology walk a middle path. We believe there are many degrading desires that enslave you and a few sacred desires that liberate you.Your mission in the coming weeks, Scorpio, is to identify the sacred kind and pursue them with your wild heart unleashed. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Your power this week will come primarily from decisions not made, words not spoken, actions not taken, and spaces not filled. Everything you need will arrive if you have created enough emptiness.Everything you love will thrive if it has the freedom to do and be nothing. To ensure

that you never succumb to the pressure of Type A bullies who think every moment has to be filled with ambitious commotion, steal away often to stare dreamily out the window and listen to the sound of silence. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): It's time for a check-in, Capricorn. What progress have you been making in your work on this year's major assignments? As I suggested last December, you're most likely to attract good fortune in 2004 if you regularly break out of your comfort zone and go wandering in unfamiliar places. You'll discover fresh secrets about how to feel happy and healthy whenever you dip into an experimental mode and try things you've never tried before. Alas, I fear many of you have yet to make a whole-hearted commitment to this thrilling quest. But if you have been waffling, it's the perfect week to dive in. And if you did take the plunge a while ago, you'll harvest a big reward any day now. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Since 1994, Mexico's Zapatistas have evolved from a small guerrilla army fighting for the rights of indigenous people to an international cultural force whose battles are mostly waged with symbols and words. The Zapatista leader, who goes by the pseudonym Subcomandante Marcos, always appears in public wearing a mask. Periodically, his old mask wears out and he has to replace it with a fresh one. Rumor has it that he has gone through ten in ten years. I think this would be a good standard for all of us to live up to: to molt our persona, or social mask, once a year. It's about that time for you, Aquarius. Considering how much your inner world has transformed, it wouldn't make sense for you to keep your same old game face much longer. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Normally I endorse the proverb that says, "You can't cross a chasm in two short jumps." In your current state of grace, however, you just may be able to find a loophole in that cosmic law. The massive amounts of dumb luck that have been surging your way seem to be on the verge of mutating into out-and-out miracles. You could be the first anti-hero in your family line to turbo-charge a quantum leap of faith in mid-leap.

✍ HOMEWORK:

Rob Brezsny's Free Will ☎ Astrology beautyandtruth

I dare you to unleash the smart animal within you that has been restricted because of the actions of the dumb animal in you. www.freewillastrology.com.

@ f r e e w i l l a s t r o l o g y. c o m 415.459.7209(v)• 415.457.3769 http://www.freewillastrology. com P.O. Box 798 San Anselmo, CA 94979

CROSSWORD PUZZLE ACROSS 1 Like going in circles 12 Atlantic City, e.g. 14 Academy Award winner who said “I dream for a living” 16 Western bulrushes 17 Sch. that Roger Staubach played football for 18 Freshwater fish with bill-like jaws 19 Serving edge 20 “The Optimist’s Daughter” author 22 Viva ___ 23 Crisper 24 Chip flavoring 25 “Hotel de ___” (195960 TV western) 26 Camp seat 27 Moolah 28 Father ___, the leper priest of Molokai 29 Blue prints 31 Exotic stamp collectors, maybe 32 Keeps from 33 Gives the heave-ho 34 Org. with writing fellowships

35 Things seers see 36 Off one’s trolley 37 Year that Eric the Red

was born, traditionally Place to dry tobacco “Check it out!” Park opened in 1964 Former MGM rival Santa suit stuffing Defensive play It’s dangerous for you to fly by 48 Stiffs 49 Roadwork equipment 38 39 40 41 42 43 44

DOWN 1 Full of vinegar 2 Mystery writer’s award 3 Plays for a sap 4 It could be original 5 Stats on some backs 6 Put off 7 Longtime record label for Whitney Houston and Kenny G 8 Small 9 ___ Margarita, in the Caribbean 10 Head, slangily

11 They’re

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MARCH 4-10, 2004 | JUST KIDDING. JOURNEY SUCKS!

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always unac12 companied 12 2001’s 14 “Planet of the 17 16 Apes” and others 20 21 19 13 Selenium and zinc 24 23 14 Openings for 27 horse trainers 26 15 Healthful 31 29 30 dishes 20 W.W. II volun- 32 33 teers 36 21 “The Intimate 35 ___” (1990 39 38 jazz album) 22 “Hard 42 41 Hearted 44 45 46 Hannah” of song 48 24 Irving Berlin’s “Blue ___” 49 25 Velvety plant Puzzle by Mark Diehl 28 Packed 30 Affect in a 40 It can be icy subtle way 42 Laugh, in showbiz 31 Place of hard knocks? slang 33 Kind of battle 43 Showcase lead-in on “The Price 36 Procrastinator’s reply Is Right” 39 Misstep

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45 Your, in Roma 46 20-time Rose Bowl

winner: Abbr.

47 Sorority letter

Drinking and driving: Damned if you do, damned if you don’t BY MICHAEL COULTER | CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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ust as an example of how stupid people act when they drink, let’s look at a familiar piece of drinking logic. Two drunk folks are talking and one says, “Hey, you’re pretty sauced. I’ll follow you home in my car to make sure you’re OK.” Yes, that’s always a fine idea: Add yet another car to the fiasco. People are idiots when they drink. Basically, following a drunk person home does one of two things. It either satisfies one’s sick desire to see another person involved in a car accident, or enables one to be a witness to the possible accident. “Wow, dude, you really smacked the piss out of that parked car.” Either way, it’s just never an especially sound idea. It’s impossible to argue that drinking and driving is acceptable. Still, it’s also naive to believe it doesn’t happen every night of the week or that you’re ever going to stop it completely. Like I said, people do stupid things when they drink. There’s been talk lately of Illinois lowering its blood alcohol limit even further from its current level of .08. That means you could only have one or two drinks and still be able to drive, instead of two or three. The problem is, it probably won’t matter much. I would wager that 90 percent of people walking out of bars are well past the current legal limit. I’m one of them on a pretty regular basis. I try not to drink and drive anymore, but if I were to be honest, I’m positive I’ve done it within the last two months. I thought I was fine at the time, but in hindsight, I was very wrong about that, and it wasn’t because of just one extra beer. Lowering the limit might make law enforcement’s job much easier. Pull someone over for whatever violation and ask them if they’ve been drinking. If they say yes, hook them up to the machine. You know their ass is guilty. It only takes two beers, after all. I’m sure there are some folks out there who only have one beer when they go out, but I’ll be damned if I’ve ever seen one and I’ve never drunk with one. Considering the crowd I hang out with, you’d have a better chance of spotting a Yeti. Say what you will, but people lie their ass off—to others and to themselves—when they talk about drinking. I know I do. “I had

a couple of drinks after work” usually translates into “I had four or five drinks and ate some peanuts, so I’m going to say I’m fine.” That’s the problem: No one ever thinks they’re as drunk as they are. Let’s say we manage to convince all of these people who now drink and drive not to. What’s their best plan of attack? Let’s see, downtown Champaign is the place to go, have a few drinks and see some friends, so let’s say you go there. You park your car in a lot or on the street. Then a few hours later, you realize you shouldn’t be driving. What do you do? Most folks would take a cab. OK, that’s probably about $10 one way, another $10 the next day to pick up your car. That’s $20 right there. What about your car? Well, the city will slap a ticket on it for sure, which will cost at least $25. There’s also a good chance they’ll go ahead and tow it. That’s another $75 and a whole extra pain in the ass, the cost of which is priceless. Taking care of the previous night will take up your whole next morning and cost you at least $100 for doing the right thing. Well, it should be hard, right? The city doesn’t want you drinking to begin with. They always whine about what a problem it is, but if you’ve got a bottle of vodka, a bag of ice, seven Dixie cups and plenty of money, they’ll give you a liquor license. It makes them a lot of money. Well, that’s fine, but then they decide bars should also be open until 2 a.m. Yeah, adding an extra hour to the cocktailing is really helping. I bet there are a ton of people who go out at 1:30 a.m., have one beer and then head home for some shuteye. A later closing time basically means most of us are going to drink for an extra hour, and that once a year, Roger Ebert can have a beer after he shows his late movie. They make it seem as simple as finding a designated driver. Trust me, no sober person has any desire to hang around with a bunch of drunken monkeys all night long, and even less desire to pile them all in the car for a ride home afterward. I walk nearly every time I go out now, but I live a few blocks away from the places I frequent. If I were you other people, I’d be careful. They’ll get you one way or another.

Michael Coulter is a videographer at Parkland College. He writes a weekly e-mail column, “This Sporting Life” and has hosted several local comedy shows.

News of the weird THINNING THE HERD

BRIGHT IDEAS

A 46-year-old motorcyclist, speeding, yelling obscenities, and shaking his fist alongside an 18-wheeler that had made a left turn of questionable etiquette on a Corpus Christi, Texas, street, lost control of the cycle, fell off, and was fatally dragged underneath the truck (October). And in Tampa, Fla., a 20year-old man chased down another driver (both in pickups), finally jumping onto the first driver’s door so he could punch him through the window. The distracted driver continued on for two blocks but finally hit a tree, which caused the truck to roll over onto the man clinging to the door, and he died at the scene (October).

Albuquerque emergency room physician Sam Slishman is working to launch his Endorphin Power Co., which is a homeless shelter providing drug rehabilitation based on vigorous exercise at on-premises workout stations. However, Slishman also wants his center to help pay for itself by selling the electric power that could be harnessed by his downand-out population’s daily workouts (pedaling, lifting, working the treadmills). Endorphin Power, Slishman says, will be the city’s flagship for “social rehabilitation and renewable energy.”

DENTAL FOLLIES Dentist Mohamedraza Huss Bhimani (Orland Park, Ill.), whom police say fondled three female patients, was arrested in his office while he happened to be working on another patient, in mid-filling (October). (The patient had to rush to another dentist to finish the job.) And Dr. Leon Gombis (Oak Lawn, Ill.) had battery charges filed against him after he, wielding pliers, ripped a cap out of the mouth of a 58-year-old patient, believing (mistakenly) that she was behind on her payments (January).

MORE TO WORRY ABOUT The owners of FM 106.7 in York, Pa., having ended the station’s country-music format but not yet having introduced a new one, played “Pop Goes the Weasel” 24 hours a day during the interim (February). And a recently active methamphetamine lab (fuel, tubing, foil, coffee filters and a liquid compound) was discovered in a search of cells in the Pikeville, Tenn., county jail (December). And a Pacifica, Calif., father filed a $15,000 claim against the school district, saying officials have not stopped students from taunting his 12-year-old son, who is an internationally acclaimed ballroom dancer (September).

Copyright 2004 Chuck Shepard, distributed by Universal Press Syndicate


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MARCH 4-10, 2004

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Family and Faith

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ancy McNabb sets out the props for her Sunday morning lesson: a foot-tall hourglass made of blond wood and a paper plate of chocolate cookies. The hourglass will serve as a visual metaphor; the cookies are just cookies. “We’re big on refreshments,� she says. The “we� she refers to are Latter-day Saints, or Mormons, members of the growing Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints founded (or restored, as church members believe) in the United States in the 1820s. Members believe their church is the authentic Christian church, the one originally established by Christ. According to church members, because early adherents’ strayed from the truth after Christ’s death, he removed the church from the Earth until its restoration through Joseph Smith, the modern church’s first prophet. McNabb is one of about 1,100 members in the Champaign-Urbana area and almost 12 million worldwide. McNabb is preparing this lesson for the oldest girls in Nancy McNabb watches as her husband Paul helps their son Stewart move his game piece across the board of the game “Uncle Wiggly.� the Young Women youth group She was also attracted to the kind of people each subsequent generation, forging religious in the Champaign Second Ward. (A ward is a Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS). She grew up paths for their descendants. congregation.) Five 16- and 17-year-old girls in a nominally Protestant family, and had only Mormons were. McNabb finds benefits to being a first-gener“It was just so nice to find people who felt sit in a ragged semi-circle facing McNabb. attended church a few times while growing up. They are dressed in teenage versions of McNabb took the missionary discussions (a the same way I did, people who had the same ation LDS church member. “It’s nice to be able to be a convert and to be Sunday best—ski jackets over dresses, series of six lessons taught by LDS missionar- amount of seriousness, but were fun, people slouchy socks with high heels, a cotton T-shirt ies to potential converts) but thought they who had something that I felt that I wanted, able to know you made the decision yourself. who knew things I felt that I wanted to know,� You weren’t forced into anything, she said.� were “a bunch of baloney.� with a velvet skirt. But it can also be difficult, even lonely After high school graduation, McNabb began she said. McNabb shows the girls the hourglass and But, perhaps more importantly, by joining sometimes. Besides her husband (who is also a tells them it is like the course of a person’s to wonder about religion and whether there life—if she makes the right decisions. Right might really be anything beyond this life. She the church, McNabb found a spiritual family, convert) and her children, none of her relatives are Mormons. While no family members now, the girls are at the narrow point where took the discussions again as a freshman at the something she had never had before. “My parents raised us (McNabb and her two were ever hostile about her decision to join the they may feel constricted; only a small set of University of Illinois, and that time “they stuck.� She was attracted to the concept of the older sisters) to be moral; they raised us to be church, she is hesitant to share parts of her choices among all the possibilities open to them are appropriate. But if they choose nar- authority of God and the belief that men who honest; they didn’t raise us to be spiritual. The church life. For LDS families whose church membership rowly now, keeping Heavenly Father’s com- belong to the church’s priesthood (which is community that the church provides we didn’t goes back several generations, relatives—even mandments in mind, their lives and opportu- almost all male church members) can act for have,� McNabb said. Some church members can trace their LDS if they do not attend the same ward—and nities will expand like the wide base of the God. Instead of employing professional clergy, hourglass. It is a metaphor that might just as the LDS church is led entirely by the laity. lineage back to the original pioneers who set- church family would be part of the same reliMcNabb had never been comfortable with the tled the Salt Lake Valley in 1847, fleeing per- gious network. But for converts, the two are easily represent McNabb’s life. Thirty-one years ago, when she was 18, idea that graduating from seminary could give secution first in New York state, then in the separate, and the functions of family become Midwest. New converts have come out of compartmentalized. McNabb converted to the Church of Jesus someone the authority to act for God.

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★ BY DAN MALONEY | STAFF WRITER

S

ean Penn once said that “if you put three thoughts into a movie, then you’ve broken the law and no one will come.� However, when nary a single thought is put into a film, what happens then? Only a few films have the distinction of being labeled completely worthless. Twisted has now joined those ranks. The premise is so simplistic and so mindnumbing that those who actually attend this film will find no surprises. Ashley Judd plays Inspector Shepard of the San Francisco Police Department who has some life-shaping dark secrets: Her father was a serial killer who murdered her mother and then killed himself. She was raised by the now commissioner of police, played by an unusually calm Samuel L. Jackson. After being promoted to the homicide division and given a new partner—an unusually overactive Andy Garcia—Shepard finds out her past one-night stands are being killed one by one. The opening shots are the single redeeming quality of this film: a montage of a fogged-in San Francisco that slowly spirals into a warehouse with a woman’s sweat running down the side of her face. The camera pulls back to reveal a knife to the woman’s throat. The woman fights back, but not before uttering some stupid one-liner. After that, it all goes downhill. Sadly, those opening shots—the entire minute and a half they lasted—really brought a glimmer of hope to a film that already looked about as exciting as, well, name a cliche, any cliche. Ashley Judd plays her typical Morgan Freeman sidekick role, allowing Jackson to be a younger version of Freeman. But even Jackson and Garcia seem out of place. Jackson never yells once and Garcia does, and it’s obvious the roles are reversed. Director Philip Kaufman makes the film seem as if he just didn’t care. It’s sad to see such a talented director and cast waste their time. One thing is for certain about Twisted: its faults are magnified by the cast’s and crew’s fame. If this had been an independent film circulated through the Sunset or Toronto film festivals, the inevitable notoriety which it will gain for being “the worst film of the century� would certainly not be there.

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3!6/9 2OUTE"URWASH!VE

Exclusive HPS-4000 & SDDS/DTS/DD Presentations

Local Latter-day Saint Nancy McNabb’s religious journey BY HADLEY MOORE | STAFF WRITER

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MARCH 4-10, 2004 | COULD TWISTED REALLY BE AS BAD AS GIGLI?

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April 5th, 2004 April 5th, 2004 @ Foellinger @Auditorium Foellinger

Auditorium

STARSKY & HUTCH (PG–13) (2 SCREENS) Fri. & Sat. 12:20 12:40 2:40 3:00 5:00 5:20 7:20 7:40 9:40 10:00 12:10 Sun. - Thu. 12:20 12:40 2:40 3:00 5:00 5:20 7:20 7:40 9:40 10:00 HIDALGO (PG–13) (2 SCREENS) Fri. & Sat. 12:15 1:00 3:15 4:00 6:30 7:10 9:20 10:00 12:00 Sun. - Thu. 12:15 1:00 3:15 4:00 6:30 7:10 9:20 10:00 ◆ PASSION OF CHRIST (R) (2 SCREENS) Fri.

& Sat. 11:15 1:15 2:00 4:15 5:00 7:00 8:00 9:45 11:00 Sun. 11:15 1:15 2:00 4:15 5:00 7:00 8:00 9:45 Mon. - Thu. 1:15 2:00 4:15 5:00 7:00 8:00 9:45 50 FIRST DATES (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 12:40 3:00 5:10 7:20 9:30 11:40 Sun. - Thu. 12:40 3:00 5:10 7:20 9:30

DIRTY DANCING (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 1:10 3:20 5:30 7:40 9:50 12:00 Sun. - Thu. 1:10 3:20 5:30 7:40 9:50 EUROTRIP (R) Fri. & Sat. 12:50 3:10 5:20 7:40 9:50 12:10 Sun. - Thu. 12:50 3:10 5:20 7:40 9:50 RETURN OF THE KING (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 12:20 4:20 8:20 MIRACLE (PG) Fri. - Thu. 1:10 4:20 7:10 10:00 MONSTER (R) Fri. & Sat. 12:20 2:40 5:00 7:30 10:00 12:15 Sun. - Thu. 12:20 2:40 5:00 7:30 10:00 MYSTIC RIVER (R) Fri. - Thu. 12:50 4:00 7:00 9:50 TWISTED (R) Fri. & Sat. 12:40 3:00 5:20 7:40 10:00 12:20 Sun. - Thu. 12:40 3:00 5:20 7:40 10:00 WELCOME TO MOOSEPORT (PG–13) Fri. Thu. 12:30 2:50 7:20

CLUB DREAD (R) Fri. & Sat. 12:30 2:50 5:10 7:40 10:00 12:15 YOU GOT SERVED (PG–13) Sun. - Thu. 12:30 2:50 5:10 7:40 Fri. & Sat. 5:10 9:40 12:00 Sun. - Thu. 5:10 9:40 10:00

TICKETS ON SALE TOMORROW!!! Purchase TICKETS at Illini Union Ticket Central

TEEN DRAMA QUEEN (PG) Fri. & Sat. 12:30 2:50 5:10 7:20 CITY OF GOD (R) Fri. & Sat. 9:20 11:20 Sun. - Thu. 12:30 2:50 5:10 7:20 1:00 4:00 7:00 9:40 12:10 Sun. - Thu. 1:00 4:00 7:00 9:40 9:20 Showtimes for 3/5 thru 3/11


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PREDICTABLE OSCARS, UNPREDICTABLE COMMENTARY | MARCH 4-10, 2004

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A lord of a story to rule them all:

A journey through the precious Oscars and other witless Lord of the Rings puns BY JASON CANTONE | STAFF WRITER

S

ome might say this year’s Oscars were action-packed and filled with surprising, shocking moments. These people were probably drunk. With The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King sweeping the awards and tying Titanic and Ben-Hur for the most Oscars won, there were few interesting moments. Luckily, I had a group of friends out to spice up the most boring hours of television in my recent memory (Three hours and 41 minutes, to be exact). What follows is my Oscar journal, written from the moment Billy Bush stopped making inane comments until Billy Crystal thanked all of Long Island (probably because the entire p o p u l a t i o n o f N e w Z e a l a n d h a d already been thanked twice).

0:34 The hilarious Robin Williams falls flat with his accent jokes as he presents the Best Animated Film Oscar to Finding Nemo. I wonder if Michael Eisner is under a bed crying somewhere. Hopefully next year, Disney will offer more than Brother Bear. 0:50 Best Supporting Actress goes to Renee Zellwegger, possibly the least deserving of the five nominees. However, after losing for Bridget Jones’s Diary and Chicago, the politics of Oscar guaranteed her a win over Shohreh Aghdashloo, whose nomination alone made a powerful statement for women in Iran. 0:54 My friend Joe comments on Zellwegger’s speech, “Considering they’re actors and actresses, you’d assume they could put words together and speak better than they do.” You tell ‘em, Joe. 0:57 Bob Hope provides the night’s funniest jokes in a

montage. After the montage, he stands up and turns to the audience, smiling for all of the applause. “I THOUGHT HE WAS DEAD,” my friend Andy yells out. And if I didn’t know better, I would assume he was there as well tonight, because they stupidly cut from footage of people clapping for him to footage from tonight of people clapping for him in the same building. That’s just bad editing. 1:19 Me: “I don’t think Peter Jackson showered before the Oscars.” Joe: “I don’t think Peter Jackson showers ever.” 1:28 Will Smith announces, “I’m doing it with my wife; I’m just happy.” A little too much information, Big Willie. Oh, and LOTR won another Oscar. 1:37 Blake Edwards has the last laugh as he careens on stage in a wheelchair and leg cast, only to pick up his Oscar and slam through a plaster wall on the other side of the stage. If only this 20 seconds of fun could poke into the drab four hours of the ceremony. 1:54 Master and Commander wins its first of two technical Oscars, making sure it doesn’t pull a The Shawshank Redemption and win none of many nominations. Of course, both its wins were the two techie categories LOTR wasn’t nominated for.

0:07 Michael Moore gets stomped to death by an elephant. Simply hilarious.

2:09 Diane Lane’s supple breasts and John Cusack’s total awesomeness awake us all from a slumber. This could be the most boring Oscar ceremony in history.

0:15 Billy Crystal continues his occasionally funny but overlong opening montage by singing to Clint Eastwood and a skeleton-like woman sitting next to him—his mother?— who might have been alive during the original Passion of the Christ.

2:14 Errol Morris’s cocky acceptance speech for Best Documentary includes a shout-out to Mike Williams, my roommate’s name. Some say it’s just a common name, but I’d like to think it was meant for him. I can only hope Charlize Theron thanks a random Jason Cantone.

0:29 Before any of its nominations are heard, The Lord of the Rings is presented as a Best Picture nominee. With so much fuel behind it, LOTR could win anything tonight: director, picture ... hell, it could win the gold medal for ribbon dancing if it entered the competition. This is followed by LOTR’s first win of the night.

2:17 The president of the Academy might be a past Oscar winner, but it sure wasn’t for acting. His speech was the equivalent of George W. Bush with a

muzzle (yes—that awful.) 2:20 After the death list rolls, Andy asks, “Who’s going to win THIS ONE?” We all break down laughing, which is probably inappropriate considering we were supposed to be mourning for Robert Stack. 2:30 With LOTR’s sweep, Jake comments, “It must have sucked if someone rejected (being in) this trilogy because it was too nerdy.” I immediately think of Sean Connery, who rejected roles in The Matrix and LOTR to do The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. Is it too late to take his Oscar back? He already lost his dignity, although any woman in America over age 40—maybe any woman—would still leave her husband for him, I’m betting. 2:31 LOTR, a film whose ending seemed to involve no content editing whatsoever, wins for Best Editing. 2:35 Eugene Levy and Catherine O’Hara; the singers behind The Triplets of Belleville; Jack Black and Will Ferrell all try to breathe life into the ceremony, but like a dead horse, it ain’t coming back to life. Still, the Best Song Oscar goes to Annie “Mysteriously Unattractive” Lennox and Fran “I store wild animals in my crazy hair” Walsh for LOTR. 3:05 With her Best Original Screenplay win, Sofia Coppola redeems herself after her singlehanded destruction of one of the greatest trilogies of all time. 3:11 Tom Cruise presents Best Director and they don’t flash to Nicole Kidman. This means either the ceremony has become tasteful or she was in the bathroom. I’m going for the latter. 3:28 Sean Penn wins Best Actor. This category was more of a race before Jude Law told everyone to send their votes for him over to Penn. But, then again, Law probably got no more than five votes anyway. 3:41 In a shocking upset, LOTR wins best picture. Now, New Zealand officially has more Oscars than people. And the painfully boring Oscars are finally over. buzz

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community

MARCH 4-10, 2004

From the beginning, people at church provided the spiritual community McNabb had not had and which, once she found it, she realized she was missing. Now, it is as though she has two families. Stewart, McNabb’s youngest son, is 12 but looks about eight or nine. He is apple-cheeked with dusty blond hair like his mother. Stewart is autistic. He is not very verbal and rarely initiates speech. When he gets home from school one particular afternoon, McNabb meets him at the door. She asks about his day, repeating each of her questions times in a slow, clear voice. Sometimes he ignores her, and sometimes he gives single-word answers. Stewart comes into the living room with his mom and climbs into the recliner with her. The chair is only big enough for one person, but he snuggles up and she makes room for him. She turns to him. “You are…” she starts. He smiles at her. “Silly,” he finishes the sentence. Family is of utmost importance in LDS faith; there is nothing more valuable to do in this life than raise a loving and devout family. If a husband and wife are married in one of the church’s sacred temples, they are considered to be “sealed” for eternity, married on Earth and beyond. Such a couple’s children will also be automatically sealed to them so that entire families, going back innumerable generations, might be together forever. McNabb also believes her deceased relatives have had the opportunity to accept church membership posthumously, but she does not know whether they have chosen to—and she does not worry about it. “I know God is fair, and things will be the right way, whatever that is,” she says. So while she may see her mother or some other family members again, her focus now is on her own family. McNabb teaches piano lessons in her home, but her primary vocation is, and always has been, as a stay-at-home mother. The church encourages women to stay at home with their children, and men are encouraged to define themselves not by their careers, but by their roles as husbands and fathers and members of the priesthood. “I feel as if my husband and I are equally committed to each other and to our family, that we both recognize that our family’s the most important thing we’re going to do on this Earth, she said.” McNabb prays by herself in the morning, kneeling by her bedside. She prays that she will be able to listen to the spirit if there is someone she needs to help that day, and sometimes she makes personal requests, though she is uncomfortable asking for “special favors.” She prays for her deceased mother and for her extended family. And she always prays that Emma, her daughter who died more than 15 years ago, will know her family loves her. McNabb and her four kids were visiting friends in Kentucky a few months before Emma’s second birthday, when the little girl

came down with a cold and had a small seizure. Emma had had a few febrile seizures before, but McNabb had forgotten her daughter’s Phenobarbital, so that evening, the friend, who was a doctor, brought some home for her. Emma died in her sleep that night. Her death was officially determined to be the result of SIDS, but McNabb thinks she probably had another seizure. The family was devastated. But Nancy felt immediately that Emma had returned to her Heavenly Father. “When she died, here was this dead body, but it was like a shell. It was so obvious that it wasn’t her spirit there.” McNabb’s religious faith made it easier for her to cope with Emma’s death. Her belief that her whole family will be reunited reminded her that the loss was temporary. Though Emma’s death was painful and dealing with Stewart’s autism will be an enduring challenge, McNabb feels the trials her family has experienced have brought them closer together and made them stronger. McNabb plays the organ for her ward every fourth Sunday. She sings in the choir. She teaches lessons in church members’ homes.

Q & A

DavidLeake

As both a professor at Parkland College and director of the Staerkel Planetarium, the second largest planetarium in Illinois, David Leake juggles many activities. Leake considers himself lucky to be pursuing a career in astronomy, a field he has enjoyed since fifth grade. A graduate of the University of Illinois, Leake also helped start the local astronomy society through the Champaign Park District. Leake currently resides in Champaign with his wife and two children.

How did you get interested in astronomy? It started with my fifth grade teacher. We didn’t have a planetarium so he took black construction paper, cut holes in it, and put it on

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Nancy has been playing the organ at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for 15 years, while her husband, Paul, has been the church's bishop of the second ordinance for one and a half years.

PHOTO | CHRISTINE LITAS

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3/3/04

PHOTO | CHRISTINE LITAS

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She works at the church’s Family History Center. She works with the Young Women. Her husband is their ward’s current bishop, or leader, and some people have said that she is

therefore the “mother of the ward.” This sentiment illustrates her journey from religious indifference to not only having a spiritual family, but being, to some, its mother. buzz

a transparency. It was sort of like a planetarium works. He made us learn five constellations. From there, I raided the library and found out there was more. My sixth grade teacher gave me my first star chart which I still have at home. That was the start of things.

it’s keeping up with classes and keeping up with the work at the planetarium, doing the budget and the marketing here. I wish there were two or three of me. There are a lot of things to do and if all those things happen at once, I am likely to lose my hair.

How did you come to work at the planetarium? I had been doing some teaching in the area. I helped start the local astronomy society through the park district. They needed someone here who knew some backyard astronomy and to run the Friday night show so I took the job in January of 1989 part-time. The next fall, they needed someone full-time.

What is the best part of the ChampaignUrbana community? I am a University of Illinois grad and I think that’s neat. I still follow the football and basketball teams. It’s the best of both worlds here, somewhat rural and somewhat urban.

What does the planetarium offer? It is a big variety. (We) do everything from live background sky shows to canned shows where we don’t have to do the soundtrack or the artwork, though we still have to adapt them to the theater. The light show is very popular with the University students. We do the loud rock ‘n’ roll music shows and science lecture series. We also do programs for kids. About half of the almost 40,000 people that visit the planetarium each year are school children. What is the best part of your job? There are two things and I don’t know which is better. This is really cliché but the first is the people. We have great school groups that come in. I like the younger kids, with them it’s like, ‘Kids say the darndest things.’ Second, I get to do my hobby for a living. I get to take my job home with me and getting paid to do a hobby is a fun thing. What is the most challenging part of your job? Multi-tasking. I hate using that buzzword, but

What would you be doing if you weren’t directing the planetarium? I am not sure. Hopefully teaching somewhere and looking for another planetarium. I have thought about what it would be like if I gave up one or the other but I would miss both too much. I say that two-thirds of my time is spent teaching and the other two-thirds is spent at the planetarium. What is the best piece of advice you have been given? My high school physics teacher gave a lot of good advice. But the best came when I was working at a laboratory right after college. A teacher there told me that the difference between a good and a bad teacher is the ability to say ‘I don’t know.’ People will respect you if you say ‘I don’t know’ and then focus on how to find out. How would you describe yourself in one word? Dedicated. My second choice would be goofy. I try to put my heart into what I do but with so much to do it is sometimes hard.


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arts

"SON, WHEN YOU PARTICIPATE IN SPORTING EVENTS, IT'S NOT WHETHER YOU WIN OR LOSE; IT'S HOW DRUNK YOU GET." | MARCH 4-10, 2004

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Take one with Mindy Manolakes

Station Theatre favorite makes directorial debut in A Lie of the Mind

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s trains once rushed by The Station Theatre, a remodeled train depot from the early 1920s, Mindy Manolakes (pronounced man-uh-LAKE-us) quickly rushes through the front door. She’s carrying armfuls of scripts and fliers. The first-time director doesn’t sleep much. She fills her nights with anxieties over missing props and X-Files marathons. Surprisingly, there is still a glimpse of excitement in her eyes as she steps through the black curtain from the intermission space to look at the freshly painted floor of the stage. Outside, a long stretch of railroad ties extends east to west. The small wooden station was home to one of Urbana’s largest industries, the Big Four Railroad, until the birth of multi-lane highways pushed the passenger rail service out of business in 1956. Now, the Celebration Company owns and maintains The Station Theatre. With fewer than 70 chairs, a packed house is bursting. The Station Theatre is one of the only black-box theaters in ChampaignUrbana, and its moniker describes the small auditorium. The walls and ceiling are black. The lighting booth window

at the upper left-hand corner provides the only light as Manolakes enters the stage. Props sprinkle the far wall. A dead, stuffed goat has been suspended from the ceiling, since The Celebration Company’s last performance of The Goat or Who Is Sylvia? Black-box theaters are home to shows with low-tech arrangements and simple lighting. Loose chairs straddle the platforms. The audience is nearly on top of the stage. “It’s my favorite theater, where you can see a tear, “ Celebration Company actor Deb Duderstadt said. The Station Theatre’s 31-year history has fostered a community theater that allows individuals to try different roles in productions. Manolakes was an actor for her 20 years with The Celebration Company and on Feb. 19, she took the director’s chair for A Lie of the Mind’s three-week run. Manolakes looks nervous. “I have a really good crew. I don’t feel like things are going to fall apart,” she says with a giggle. “It’s hard to see what things look like until they’re done, like a puzzle.” Manolakes chose Sam Shepard’s A Lie of The Mind. When she discusses it, her eyes twinkle under black Buddy Holly style glasses. She saw the play at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts years ago and fell in love with it. A Lie of The Mind dissects the nature of human love and its limitations by alternating from the story of Jake and Beth’s abusive marriage to their families’ own struggles with love. The play moves back and forth between two scenes and two sets. This creates a challenge for Manolakes to make sure the audience stays with the action taking place on stage. The self-proclaimed drama queen professes a secret jealousy about sitting this one out. As her actors rehearse, she sits on the edge of her chair, following the script and stage like a spectator at a tennis match. Nearly every night

THE CONTROVERSY OF THE CHRIST

at rehearsal, the actors move her to tears. Manolakes’ love for the theater and acting experience carry through when she directs her actors. As she reviews Jake’s mother’s lines with lead actor Mike Prosise, her voice slips into a Southern accent, much like the characters’. “Some directors are more actor-friendly, and some have a very good balance, but that’s rare,” Prosise said. With the addition of nightly rehearsals lasting until the late hours, mornings with her kindergarten class at King School come early. In class, Manolakes commands the attention of her students. With prompts like, “Let’s take an imagination walk to opening night” to inspire her actors’ best work, it is clear that Manolakes uses her classroom skills in the theater. Surprisingly, the theater can be much more unpredictable than a classroom of children. “You have such control in the classroom,” Manolakes said. “Everything is so out of your control here. It’s very unsettling for me, but you just have to throw it all away and be flexible.” From the first week of rehearsals, Manolakes has learned to be flexible. Lead actors Annamarie Macleod and Jason McCain are involved in the production of Sylvia at the Parkland Theatre. One of the actors is away in Ireland and a major prop The Company was to borrow—the rear end of a deer—is missing from the Steppenwolf Theatre in Chicago. But, with a crew of seasoned veterans, Manolakes is only slightly concerned.

The furniture has just been purchased for the set. Stage Manager Paul Kaiser and Set Director Ted Bailey carry the navy and tan furniture through the black curtain onto the stage. “It looks like Montana,” Manolakes said of the set. It’s a compliment to Kaiser and Bailey because that was the intent. After the furniture is placed, Manolakes sits down on the second riser and says, “It’s magic time.” Kaiser dims the lights and the actors know to rehearse the first scene. It’s an emotional scene, where Jake (Prosise) performs a touching monologue after beating his wife. As the scene closes, Manolakes tears up. There is discussion as to whether Prosise should stand or lie down at the end. Manolakes asks Prosise what he wants to do. He decides to stay on the couch. “Mindy’s an actor so she knows exactly what I go through. She let’s me develop the character,” Duderstadt said. “It’s another whole person you have to develop and get to know, it’s not just ‘acting.’ “ Manolakes is not the only veteran at The Station Theatre; many of the actors have been a part of the Company since its founding. The Celebration Company was established as a training ground for actors’ individual growth and experience. There is always room for volunteers, and experience is not necessary. “It was not intimidating at all the first time I came to an audition,” Kaiser said. “I felt very comfortable.”

moviereview

THE FOG OF WAR

BY ANDREW VECELAS | STAFF WRITER

★★★★

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BY SYD SLOBODNIK | STAFF WRITER

Jesus of Montreal (1989) — Denys Arcand directs this Canadian film about a theater group putting on a production of the Passion. They give it a modern twist and the actors in the play start living their roles in real life. An interesting take on the Jesus story that leads to the question: What would Jesus think if he was put in the midst of modern society? Probably best not to chew on that one for long.

The cast of A Lie of the Mind poses with their pet "Stumpy."

film

MARCH 4-10, 2004 | JESUS, WAR AND DANCING ... WHAT A PAGE

ith The Passion of the Christ hitting theaters and creating mounds of controversy (and ticket sales) along the way, it’s as good a time as any to look back at some past representations of Jesus onscreen that have led to contention among certain groups. In no particular order, here are four other films that each took a unique view of the story of Jesus and instigated a lot of debate in the process.

PHOTOS | RODERICK GEDEY

BY MARISSA MONSON | EDITOR IN CHIEF

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The Last Temptation of Christ (1988) — Until this year, this adaptation of Nikos Kazantzakis’ book stood as the ultimate controversial religious film. Willem Dafoe turns in a great performance (minus any sort of accent) in the title role. Jesus is shown as more human, tempted by thoughts of a worldly life at his moment of greatest despair on the cross. In the end, he still chooses to complete his sacrifice for the good of humanity over living a “normal” life. Christians protested the visions of Jesus and Mary Magdalene eloping, but overall, the film delivers a very powerful message. Jesus Christ Superstar (1973) — The adaptation of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s and Tim Rice’s rock opera shows the last week of Jesus’s life through the eyes of Judas. The movie has gone on to achieve some degree of cult popularity despite raising a few eyebrows for showing Judas in a more sympathetic light than people were used to, and implying a relationship between Mary Magdalene and Jesus. Pretty dated by today’s standards, but it still works as a conversation piece that has a little more depth than its musical roots would suggest. Monty Python’s Life of Brian (1979) — The Python boys take the gloves off here and target so many historical and religious figures with their offbeat humor that it’s hard to keep track. The movie follows Brian (played by the late Graham Chapman) who unwittingly becomes a Messiah figure at the same time as Jesus. The jokes can be pretty offensive, but they also have some depth to them and are utterly priceless—the whole crucifixion scene, complete with a musical number, is a gem. Possibly the troupe’s best all-around film. The Passion of the Christ is now showing at local theaters. The above-mentioned films can be found at your local video store.

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rrol Morris’s Oscar-wining documentary film The Fog of War is not only a fascinating historical profile of former Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, but a provocative analysis of some of the more dubious national policies which defined U.S. foreign policy for much of the 20th century. Morris’s not-so-subtle theme is that lessons of history are never outdated. In a famous 1966 book, on the eve of massive and escalating U.S. involvement in Vietnam, then Arkansas Senator J. William Fulbright coined the phrase “The Arrogance of Power,” describing the path of U.S. foreign policy decisions. Fulbright’s elaboration—”The presumption of the very strong, who confuse power with wisdom and set upon self-appointed missions to police the world, to defeat all tyrannies, to make their fellow men rich and happy and free”—clearly relates to Morris’s film. Morris’s profile of McNamara is certainly one of an “arrogant” Washington and corporate world insider. Former Harvard professor, former president of Ford Motor Company (who claims he insisted on the 1956 introduction of

moviereview

DIRTY DANCING: HAVANA NIGHTS ★ BY DAN NOSEK | STAFF WRITER

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efore Dirty Dancing, Patrick Swayze was just another attractive face among hundreds in the Hollywood spotlight. Today, all women remember him as the handsome heartthrob who captured the heart of one lucky girl during dance lessons. The mere notion of a nerdy teenager falling in love with her dance instructor soon became the lifelong dream of every single female. The original thus became an instant success and was hailed in many circles as the ultimate romantic love story. Although a sequel was never intended, the formulaic plot seemed to be very appealing to many directors. Seventeen years after the original gem hit theaters, Miramax now attempts to revive the passion and popularity of the first film by releasing Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights. This rendition almost parallels the original plot to perfection but changes its venue to a tropical location in Cuba.

the seat belt), secretary of defense from 1961-68, and head of the World Bank, McNamara, still a rather active 85, is interviewed extensively by Morris. Unlike the excessively flamboyant Oscar-winning Michael Moore, Morris’s most controversial moments are kept in the revelations of his interviews and not self-promoting grandstanding. McNamara’s history is a fascinating tale of clearly explained memories of the many key events of the ugly history of wars in the 20th century. Morris structures his interviews around what he calls “The 11 Lessons from the Life of Robert McNamara,” as McNamara vividly recalls the most chilling events of his life: remembering an armistice parade for soldiers at the end of World War I when he was two years old, to a fact-finding meeting with the former foreign minister of North Vietnam in 1995. In a bittersweet mix of pompous bravado and tearful reminiscence, McNamara tells how he helped determine a policy of firebombing Japan’s largest cities at the end of World War II and how he sought rational debate during the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962, when we came dangerously close to the brink of World War III and nuclear annihilation. Along with these discussions, McNamara’s maxims, “No. 5: Proportionality should be a guideline in war” and “No. 1: Empathize with your enemy” are given the most emphasis. At no time, though, does Morris ever present McNamara as either a glorified super-patriot or a demonized ex-administrator, who should be faulted for one of the darkest periods of U.S. history. Like his most successful films, Morris lets the interviewee’s answers speak for themselves and lets his viewers decide. In long dis-

Just as Jennifer Grey’s character was ripped from her suburban lifestyle to a forbidden paradise, a girl of similar qualities named Katy is transported from her home in St. Louis to the lovely island of Cuba. She arrives with her wealthy boyfriend, Phelps, the son of another princely family. Just the name Phelps should have been sufficient reason to dump him, but Katy manages to be seduced by a clumsy waiter named Javier who is close to her age. Her new tour guide leads her to all the famous hot spots and nightclubs in Cuba. The opportunity to join a dance contest presents itself, and the two cannot resist entering. Of course, as soon as Javier learns of Katy’s dancing dilemma, he offers to be her personal instructor. As their dance lessons grow longer, their passion for each other becomes more intense. Obviously, the ending comes as no surprise as their days of practice are finally rewarded, and their love for each other is consummated through their dancing. Despite the plots of both films being almost identical, Havana Nights attempts to incorporate a political message that is completely unnecessary and unclear. Amid Javier’s and Katy’s romantic exploits, a revolution led by Fidel Castro is brewing against the Bautista regime in Cuba. Scenes of violent uprisings and mass hysteria sweeping across Cuba could have provided additional depth to the plot if done properly. However, it seems as though they were just ran-

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THE FOG OF WAR | ROBERT MCNAMARA cussions of the morality of war and decisions directly related to Vietnam policies, McNamara admits “we were wrong.” Underscoring most of these interviews is an entertaining compilation of historical documentary footage, newsreels, television video and numerous still photos of many of the past events McNamara describes along with composer Phillip Glass’s hypnotic musical score. Later, in a chilling moment, McNamara recalls that nearly 25,000 Americans died in Vietnam under his watch at the Defense Department and Morris shows a phone booksized register of those names. Many times too, McNamara comes off as a strong self-critic, seeking some sort of reconciliation for his past decisions and “mistakes.” Whether The Fog of War is one elderly statesman’s attempt at redemption or Morris’s lesson for contemporary leaders of our superpower nation, it will teach many of the paradoxes of powerful decision makers’ actions.

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HAVANA NIGHTS | ROMOLA GARAI & DIEGO LUNA domly inserted to deviate from the love story from time to time. The political backdrop is neither relevant nor practical in the context of this film and belongs in a historical documentary rather than a sappy romance. To call Havana Nights an expected disappointment is almost an understatement. Diego Luna, who plays the dashing Javier, does not nearly have the onscreen magnetism of a Patrick Swayze to accurately portray his character. Although he was brilliant in Y Tu Mama Tambien as an energetic and free-spirited troublemaker, Luna simply falls short in charm and style as the dance instructor in Havana Nights. Romola Garai as Katy does not submit a very impressive performance here, but is wonderful in I Capture the Castle. Theese mediocre performances and a rehashed plot make a trip to Havana Nights a trip to forget.


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BY MATT PAIS | LEAD REVIEWER

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fter months of editing, endless controversy and an interview with Diane Sawyer, it turns out that Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ isn’t quite the legendary cinematic achievement that everyone would have you believe. It’s groundbreaking in the historical sense—an epic recreation of a shocking, 2,000-year-old tragedy—but beneath the pervasive media saturation, religious feuds and some truly gruesome violence, the film feels less like a whole story and more like the ending to a different, deeper movie. In chronicling the final 12 hours of Jesus’s (Jim Caviezel) life, Gibson fast-forwards right to the end, which doesn’t seem disjointed at the beginning of The Passion of the Christ. The film opens with Jesus praying alone in the forest as he waits to be found and persecuted by the Jews and Romans. Judas (Luca Lionello) has already betrayed him, and he has already

moviereview

BROKEN LIZARD’S CLUB DREAD ★★★

BY JASON CANTONE | STAFF WRITER

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ow do you make fun of a film genre that’s already a joke? That’s the question Broken Lizard, a group of five master thespians, must have asked themselves during the making of Club Dread. The “I’m a naked teenage bimbo running in the woods from a bad, bad man with a machete” genre of horror film might have ended decades ago, but like a song by Journey, it will never be forgotten. By itself, Club Dread is not a phenomenal movie. The acting is poor, the scriptwriting is shoddy and it seems like everyone in the film was high or drunk during filming. However, before judging this film, one must look at the slasher films it pokes fun at. Generally, they have poor acting, shoddy writing and gags so stupid you’d think the director was drunk if he thought they’d work. Definitely some subtle similarities, don’t you think?

It might seem that the Scary Movie trilogy closed the book on how to parody horror films, but every over-the-top and heavy-handed gag in that trilogy was stolen from other films. From the Scream mask to the overly drawn out 8 Mile parody in the third film, the trilogy reeked of repetition. While Club Dread obviously draws its inspiration from ‘70s slasher flicks, it rides the line between comedy and parody successfully and provides great entertainment value for the college crowd. Most of the film is blood and bodies and most of those bodies are straight from a Girls Gone Wild! video, but it isn’t the blatant sexuality that will keep viewers entertained—it’s also the nonstop fun. In the first scene alone, there’s a menage a trois, three brutal slayings and more laughable moments than your average, run-ofthe-mill teen comedy contains. All of the action takes place on Pleasure Island, an amalgamation of everything Spring Break. From a club staff ready to please the guests in every way possible, to a Jimmy Buffett-like honcho singing “Pina Colada Berg,” (which sounds oddly like “Margaritaville”), there’s just too much happiness for the island NOT to be hounded by a crazed serial killer. Paxton parodies Buffett successfully and the main actors do their best in their stereotypical roles. But it’s not the acting that keeps this boat afloat. Unlike their role models in Monty Python, none of the Broken Lizard troupe stands out as a particularly gifted comedic actor. Luckily, the jokes keep coming, as each

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THE PASSION OF THE CHRIST

prophesied Peter’s (Francesco De Vito) denial, and it’s not long before Jesus is beaten near death by merciless nonbelievers. The damage enacted upon his body, from countless public lashings to the ultimate affixation to the cross, is every bit as bloody and disturbing as advance word suggested. Try not to avert your eyes when the spiked whips clutch to Jesus’s back for a moment before jarring loose and spurting blood every which way. This is an appallingly brutal film, and Gibson doesn’t hesitate to make every drop of blood squish and splatter. His point is that Jesus’s pain is our pain, and The Passion of the Christ is indeed often extremely painful to watch. Yet, in focusing solely on the unthinkable pain Jesus endured, Gibson manages to hollow out one of humanity’s most widely known and emotive stories into a shell of repetitive religious grandstanding. Every second is meticulously crafted, with a harrowing adherence to Scripture and an unflinching determination to chronicle Jesus’s every step from conviction to crucifixion. But while fervently presenting Jesus’s extreme suffering, the film displays surprisingly little feeling toward its subject. This becomes apparent when, by the time Jesus’s head droops for the last time, his skin lacerated and limbs impaled by large nails, you weep for the ferocity of the violence but not for the suffering endured. Sure, The Passion of the Christ is more about what happened to Jesus than about Jesus himself, and the problem isn’t that it lacks sympathy. Rather, it treats its cen-

THE PASSION OF THE CHRIST | JIM CAVIEZEL tral figure solely as a biblical icon and never as a person; the movie prefers hovering on the surface of Jesus’ shredded skin to spending even a moment inside his head. Consequently, Gibson’s religious labor of cruelty succeeds only as an eye-opening picture of suffering rather than a presentation of the faith and sacrifice that led to such extraordinary pain. The film occasionally intersects the persecution with placid shots of Jesus spreading his peaceful message and random moments of his quietly pious life. These are few and far between, however, and a half-hearted effort by Gibson and co-writer Benedict Fitzgerald to break up the monotony of innumerable slowmotion collapses and redundant reaction shots of teary-eyed women. This is a monumental, historical accomplishment, made with intense passion, courage and brains, even if its mind focuses more on shallow malevolence than spiritual catharsis. What it needs is a heart.

Leading Actor: Sean Penn - Mystic River Supporting Actor: Tim Robbins - Mystic River Leading Actress: Charlize Theron - Monster Supporting Actress: Renée Zellweger - Cold Mountain Animated Feature Film: Finding Nemo Art Direction: The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King Cinematography: Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World Costume Design: LOTR: Return of the King Directing: Peter Jackson - LOTR Documentary Feature: The Fog of War Documentary Short Subject: Chernobyl Heart Film Editing: LOTR: Return of the King Foreign Language Film: The Barbarian Invasions Honorary Award: Blake Edwards Makeup: LOTR: Return of the King Music (Score): LOTR: Return of the King Music (Song): “Into the West” - Fran Walsh, Howard Shore and Annie Lennox Best Picture: LOTR: Return of the King Short FIlm (Animated): Harvie Krumpet Short Film (Live Action): Two Soldiers Sound Editing: Master and Commander Sound Mixing: LOTR: Return of the King Visual Effects: LOTR: Return of the King Writing (Adapted Screenplay): LOTR: Return of the King Writing (Original Screenplay): Sofia Coppola for Lost in Translation

C-UViews

Compiled by Roderick Gedey

The Passion of the Christ FOX STARLIGHT PICTURES

moviereview

A LIST OF THE MOST PREDICTABLE OSCAR WINNERS IN RECENT MEMORY | MARCH 4-10, 2004

CLUB DREAD | STOLHANSKE, DANIEL, SOTER death setup is more over-the-top than the last. Taking this film seriously would be a crime, and those who do are sure to hate it. With films such as Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ bringing suffering and torture to millions of people, a simple, dumb film like Club Dread should be in theaters to counter some of that anguish. Club Dread won’t make you more religious and it won’t make you a better person, but you also won’t have to suffer for some movie entertainment.

SCREEN REVIEW GUIDE

★★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★ no stars

Flawless Good Mediocre Bad Unwatchable

★★★★ Blake Wagahoff Raymond, IL

“It was violent, it got the point across ... it was moving.”

★★★★ Laura Zeigler Raymond, IL

“I don’t think it was (anti-Semitic). They had to portray it as it happened.”

★★★★ Donna Weaver Philo, IL

“Having two sons, I don’t know if I would have done what Mary did.”

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arts

MARCH 4-10, 2004 | "NOW, SON, YOU DON'T WANT TO DRINK BEER. THAT'S FOR DADDIES AND KIDS WITH FAKE IDS."

The Company works to produce quality productions and continues to renovate the building, but persists to let new people experience the theater. The community feel gives actors like Manolakes a chance to direct, but it also gives directors like McCain a chance to act. His role in A Lie of the Mind is his first acting gig with The Celebration Company. “Champaign-Urbana has got a nice supportive arts community,” McCain said. “I think that is why The Station Theatre has been able to exist for so long.” The actors support each other as well. Before rehearsal Duderstadt learned that she did not receive the role she wanted for the next Parkland Theatre performance. Actors rushed over to console her. “It’s not just a theatre in the community,” Bailey said of The Station Theatre. “There is a community here within the theater.” A week prior to the show, the empty black-box theater is transformed. The goat is no longer suspended from the ceiling and blocking tape makes the floor look like a backgammon board. Manolakes explains that later the tape will be painted. Her purple scarf floats as she scurries

back and forth, making sure props and her actors are in place. The tan and navy couch is now accompanied by a chair and a brown backdrop. The actors are more refined in their roles, the monologues more intense and the dialogue more natural. McCain goes through his lines with another company actor minutes before he is set to practice his scene. Manolakes sits at the far left corner of the audience to make sure everything looks right, even from the worst seats in the house. Lights dim, brighten and flicker on and off as Kaiser tries to memorize his cues. The deer’s behind has arrived and everything seems to be in place. “I love acting on the stage,” Manolakes said. “I am enjoying directing, but I don’t see myself doing it again.” Manolakes will continue to polish the performance until opening night when her job will be nearly over. She will add the score, composed by her best friend, Ian Shepard, and the introduction read by Richard Burton by means of a crackling LP. Manolakes calls for the lights to go dark and, right on cue, says, “It’s magic time.” buz z

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Mindy Manolakes directed the play A Lie of the Mind, which runs through March 6 at the Station Theater.

ARTIST’S CORNER BY KATIE RICHARDSON | ARTS EDITOR

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errick Holley is a local artist whose work is currently on display at Highdive and Boltini Lounge in Champaign. He mainly creates self-portraits, which examine the role of identity insofar as how he perceives himself, how others perceive him and how these two perceptions coexist and perhaps conflict. He was trained at Black Hawk College and the Art Institute of Chicago, receiving his MFA at the latter. He has a calm, cool demeanor, but he is not at all aloof or unthankful. On the contrary, he has a great deal of gratitude toward

those who appreciate his work, and said he is especially thankful toward Ed WiseKamp, Carlos Nieto, Tom Gillespie and many other patrons for being particularly supportive. When did you first start painting? When I was little boy, about five or six, I was sitting in a waiting room of some sort and I saw a magazine with a picture of a cowboy on it. I really wanted the picture on the magazine, but my mother said that it didn’t belong to me, it was the hospital’s, and I couldn’t have it. I studied the cowboy really, really closely, and memorized the picture, sticking it in my mind’s eye. I went home and was determined to draw it. I must have gone through 100 pieces of paper trying to replicate that Painter Derrick Holley (above) picture. Ever since then, I’ve known that painting was the art form by which I most strongly expressed myself. I think Where do you see yourself going as an artist? I feel as though I’m pretty settled as an artist right it’s crucial that each and every one of us find our “strongest voice,” whether it be painting, now. Every day for me is just a matter of becoming poetry, music, etc. By the way, I finally painted more alive and excited about my subject manner. I don’t have bad days anymore, just things I can paint the cowboy a couple of years ago. about. I’m also constantly fine-tuning my eye and Who were your earliest sources of influence becoming more and more adept at capturing the images that I envision in my head. I think a lot of my and inspiration? My earliest influence was Eddie Murphy. work improves when I spend a little time away from When he became famous, it was the first time it, just thinking about it rather than working on it. I that I got a solid sense that there was a place for think time spent thinking about your artwork is as me in society. I was in high school and people important as time spent in the studio. When I come said I looked like him, and there was this kind back to a painting I find that there are a lot of of acceptance of me because of his influence and improvements and corrections that I can make, which popularity, and that granted me the realization didn’t occur to me while I was originally working that I, too, could forge a name for myself. So far on it. as painters, when I first began school, I really loved Leonardo da Vinci and Rembrandt. The Why did you decide to come to Champaign-Urbana? I wanted to slow down a bit, do some work. In contemporary artists that I really came to admire are Jerome and Joel Witkin. Jerome is a Chicago, as well as other big cities, so many things painter, while Joel is a photographer who cap- can run you down. Champaign-Urbana isn’t an arts tures bizarre encounters between people and mecca, but it has served its purpose. It’s offered me a nice change of pace. also focuses a lot on identity in his work.

PHOTOS | RODERICK GEDEY

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"RAY, WHEN SOMEONE ASKS YOU IF YOU'RE A GOD, YOU SAY 'YEEESS!' " | MARCH 4-10, 2004

Stephen Adly Guirgis

BY SYD SLOBODNIK | CONTRIBUTING WRITER ur Lady of 121st Street, the Steppenwolf Theatre Company’s present production, is a wonderful actor ’s ensemble piece that will remind veteran Chicago theatergoers of the Steppenwolf’s best productions of two decades ago. An era when that group of young, recently college graduated North Siders began making a unique impact on Midwestern theater. Written by another young New York playwright, Stephen Adly Guirgis, and directed by Will Frears, Our Lady of 121st Street is a delightful mixture of the comedy and seriousness of urban life. Its short-ondetail plot contains a wealth of street-smart dialogue and a dozen or so authentic New York urban types, who have seen some of their best dreams and aspirations fade with the years. Guirgis’s narrative centers on a reunion, of sorts, of a group of neighborhood friends and acquaintances who are attending the wake of a Harlem parish’s most beloved nun, Sister Rose. Rose was an early guide and inspiration to many of the play’s now nearly middle-aged characters. In a series of humorous two- to four-person scenes, director Frears skillfully blends the humor and pathos of the play’s key personal conflicts of these once childhood/teen friends, uncovering deep character flaws and personality inadequacies. Some of the most interesting characters include Rooftop, the former Harlem resident, now a

CultureTalk: Steven Pinker with Nancy Cantor – Pinker and Cantor will talk about the evolving relationships between the arts and contemporary society. Colwell Playhouse. Tuesday, 7:30pm. Free.

well-known Los Angeles-based radio host, who is so spiritually lost he hasn’t been to confession is nearly 30 years; Inez, Rooftop’s ex-wife, who despite looking only years older, has had more than her share of rough times with men in her life; Balthazar, a tough New York City cop who is looking for a stolen body; Flip, an attractive black professional who returns to his ‘hood with a Caucasian gay lover; and Edwin and Pinky, two Latino brothers who seem stuck in their routine lives. Situated next door to the funeral home is the local Catholic parish where Sister Rose served, which is now run by an elderly handicapped priest who openly expresses his doubts in his faith. Scenes are mixed with intense feelings of past regrets over old responsibilities and bad intentions, as many of the characters carefully protect their fragile egos and deny faults that lead to their unfulfilled lives. The multi-ethnic cast of mostly younger, non-Steppenwolf ensemble members—with the exception of the always interesting and entertaining Robert Breuler—is as sparkling a group of performers as those of Steppenwolf’s heyday; productions that featured John Malkovich, Gary Sinise and Laurie Metcalf. Standouts in the Our Lady of 121st Street cast include E. Milton Wheeler as the explosive Rooftop, Shane Williams as Inez and Sammy A. Publes as the rather pathetic Edwin.

“Share a Meal with Community Shares” – This fundraiser helps local non-profits. Thirty percent of your meal at Silvercreek restaurant goes to one of these charities. Call 328-3402 for info. “Soft Materials and Nanopatterning Techniques for Electronics” – part of the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology Seminar Series. John Rogers, Prof of Materials Science and Engineering at the University will speak. Coordinated Science Laboratory Auditorium. Wed, 4pm. Brown Sisters of Topeka, Kansas Lecture – The lecture will consist of reflections by Linda Brown Thompson and Cheryl Brown Henderson on the impact, legacy and significance of struggles to achieve the promise that the Brown vs. Board of Education case represented. Foellinger Auditorium. Mar 11, 4pm. Free.

Department of Theatre

MEETINGS & WORKSHOPS Community Workshop on SSI – SSI Project to explain basics of Supplemental Security Income and help qualified residents apply for benefits. Illinois Disciples Foundation. Saturday, 10:30am12pm. For information, call 352-6533. 2004 Art Exhibition Series Call for Artists – The Champaign Park District is seeking local visual artists to apply for this exciting new venue at the Springer Cultural Center. Exhibits strive to present artistic and ethnic diversity of Champaign Urbana and surrounding area artists. Now-Mar 19. For more information, call 398-2376.

LIVE JAZZ at

Our Lady of 121st Street, a contemporary drama about urban realities, runs through March 28 at Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre at 1650 N. Halsted.

By Lorraine Hansberry

PHOTOS COURTESY OF STEPPENWOLF THEATRE

Directed by Shirley Basfield Dunlap With guest artist Cheryl Lynn Bruce

(Above, Right) Marisabel Suarez (Norca) and Shane Williams (Inez) in Our Lady of 121st Street by Stephen Adly Guirgis, directed by Will Frears. Our Lady of 121st Street opens in the Steppen wolf Downstairs thetre, 1650 N. Halsted, Sunday , Februarty 15, 2004. For tickets call (312) 335-1650 or visit www.steppenwolf.org. Credit: Micchael Brosilow.

Mar 4-14

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Champaign County Audubon Society early morning bird walks – Busey Woods every Sunday morning starting this Sunday at 7:30am. Meet at Anita Purves Nature Center parking lot. 344-6803.

Our Lady of 121st Street

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Champaign County Audubon Society – Mike Ward, a Ph.D. candidate in the animal biology department from the University will talk about Studying the Behavior of Endangered Blackcapped Vireos in Texas and Terns in Northern Illinois for Population Management. Meet in Room 242, Bevier Hall. Thur, 7:30pm. Call Arlo, 443-2499. Foundation of Teamwork – Competition demands that organizations do more, in a shorter response time, with fewer resources. Participants will identify their communication style and develop plans to build better working relationships with other team members. Class meets Thursday from 8:30am-12:30pm at 1315 N Mattis Ave, Champaign. Course fee is $110. To register, call 351-2235.

MIND BODY SPIRIT Life Map Workshop – A life map is a collection of visual images, a method of connecting with your intuition, a tool for visualizing your dreams or goals. Come explore life mapping--approaches, uses, and the opportunity to create your own life map. McKinley Foundation, C. Mar 13, 9:15am-1pm. To register or for information, contact Jo Pauly at 337-7823 or jopauly@prairienet.org. Simplicity Discussion Group – Ideas to simplify & bring meaning to life. The group will discuss the book Repacking Your Bags by Richard Leider & David Shapiro. Borders Bookstore. Thursday, 7pm. 351-9011. Sunday Zen Meditation Meeting - Introduction to Zen Sitting, 10am. Full Schedule: service at 9am followed by sitting, Dharma Talk at 11am followed be tea until 12pm. Can arrive at any of above times, open to all, no experience needed, no cost. Prairie Zen Center. For information, call 355-8835 or go to www.prairiezen.org. Mystery Discussion Group – At this group meeting, the group will discuss the book A Drink Before the War by Dennis Lehane. Borders Bookstore. Monday, 6pm. 351-9011.

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Associated lecture: "The Impact of Race on Theatre and Culture" by Woodie King, Jr., Producing Director, New Federal Theatre, New York. Mar 3, 5pm Levis Center, 919 W Illinois, Urbana

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Supported, in part, by the Frances P. Rohlen Visiting Artists Fund/College of Fine and Applied Arts and the Chancellor’s Brown v. Board of Education Jubilee Commemorative Committee.

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Employment 000 HELP WANTED | Full Time Express Personnel Services 217.355.8500 101 Devonshire Dr., Champaign Software Engineers: Innovative Security Systems is looking for 3 software engineers to help develop and test the PitBull product line. Unix/Linux experience preferred, but not necessary. Email resume to jobs@argus-systems.com.

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Courtyard Apartments 713 S. Randolph, Champaign Renting for Fall/2 & 3 Bedrooms. Furnished & Unfurnished From $608/mo. Includes cable, parking, water. Has laundry facility and seasonal pool. Near campus and downtown Champaign. 352-8540, 355-4608 pm. www.faronproperties.com CAMPUS APARTMENTS Furnished JOHN SMITH PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.johnsmithproperties.com (217)384-6930 “believe the hype”

CAMPUS APARTMENTS Unurnished 309 W. Springfield, C. Spacious 2 BR townhouse now available. $550/mo. Flexible lease. 352-8540. PM 355-4608. www.faronproperties.com

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WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com | MARCH 4-10, 2004

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MARCH 4-10, 2004 | REMEMBER PREDATOR? THAT MOVIE IS AMAZING.

What’s in it for The Walkmen

illio Shout out to:

9

music THE WALKMEN Bows and Arrows Record Collection

★★★★ BY LOGAN MOORE

C

From: Email: Shoutout: (75 words or less)

* GotSomething Something ToTo Say? Got Say? Place Yours Yours Today! Place Today! $5 for 75 words $5 for 75 words *

Deadline is March 15

Illio office at the Y or e-mail: illiomarketing@illinimedia.com * Illio reserves the right to deny inappropriate messages with a full refund

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Cash Visa Mastercard

Card #: Exp. Date:

all it human nature or that record-collecting mentality peculiar to rock geeks, but it seems that the holy grail of music journalism is “the scene.” The irrational hope that some young talented cadre of bands and musicians have concocted a glorious alternative to the mainstream, their creativity unchecked by the spotlight of the world’s prying eyes, has driven rock reporters to the extremes of hyperbole for decades. So overwhelming is the desire to play Marco Polo to those scarce pockets of creativity in America’s homogenous landscape that this year music journalists apparently decided to make up their own scene; the Big Apple was everywhere in 2003 and Lord help any band from New York. Neatly returning us to the bowery circa 1975, Pitchfork.com staffers and Mojo magazine writers shouted ecstatically from the rooftops and mountains, “The Strokes are the new Ramones! The Rapture are the new Talking Heads! Dance, you fools. Dance and be mesmerized by their stylish retro fashion sense and delicately mussed white afros!” But, what about the Walkmen? Not a band overtly influenced by garage or post-punk, not a band particularly interested in good fashion sense, but simply an excellent band. Well, they’ve sort of gotten tossed around a bit on the high seas of encapsulated reviews and one-paragraph band bios by virtue of being from New York. The Walkmen are a band of subtleties. Just listen to their sophomore effort Bows and Arrows. It opens with “What’s In It For Me?,” a guitar ascends, ringing, echoing, not so much pummeling the silence as slicing through it like a surgeon’s scalpel through his patient’s flesh. Lead singer Hamilton Leithauser drags his casual, romantic conversational prose through a sea of organ washes and feedback enveloping the listener. The second track “The Rat” kicks in, the rhythm section driving the song through a series of acrobatic crescendos, Leithauser hoarsely screaming a laundry list of accusations. The drummer can actually drum; there’s a novelty. The song is earnest and melodic. It’s like bassist Pete Bauer said when questioned on The Walkmen’s relationship to New York’s nascent garage revival: “I definitely feel that we were trying to get away from that whole sound. At the time, it was probably the most uncool thing you could do.” That about sums it up. Still, for all their uniqueness they are a band that tends to get pigeonholed, due largely to their history. Three-fifths of The Walkmen started off in the almost famous Jonathan Fire*Eater, a critic’s darling dark garage group from New York way back in the mid-1990s. Snapped up by Dreamworks, they were subsequently dropped

after their sole major label album, Wolf Songs for things in a live setting.” Thus, the focus was Lambs, was not the radio-ready money machine shifted a bit and the band seems all the better the higher-ups had hoped for. Friends since for it; more cohesive as a group and much their childhood together in Washington, D.C., more demanding of attention. Still, the album does retain the signature the band tragically disintegrated shortly afterward. It’s the sort of indie band on a major label sound of The Walkmen, one that distinguishes turmoil that tends to steal the spotlight when them from their New York contemporaries. Whereas garage tends to derive its appeal from discussing the band. It shouldn’t, though. Following their defection from the ranks of poorly recorded teenage angst and testosteroneDreamworks, the remaining members valiant- driven hooks, on Bows and Arrows, The ly took their advance money and forged ahead, Walkmen reveal themselves as a band much building a 900-square foot rehearsal space and more interested in the intricacies of sound. To get the delicate, resonating drum sound 24-track recording studio in Harlem, dubbed Marcata Studios. Says Pete Bauer, “It’s part of a that opens up “Hang On, Siobahn,” the band car factory that was converted into industrial fostered an environment of complete silence in offices ... you could record in the hallway and the studio. The result is so slight; one can barely get great reverb.” Picking up a few members hear the sticks tapping the kit, only the sound of from the defunct combo The Recoys and the skins reverberating. Attention to the delicate renaming themselves The Walkmen, our details of an album such as these ensure the heroes crafted their debut Everyone Who band’s appeal will extend beyond the derivaPretended To Like Me Is Gone to general acclaim tive, retro-obsessed veneer of the current musiin 2002. The album seemed to be part and par- cal landscape into the realm of the thoughtful cel to their new recording space, the depth of listener. They may never date Gwyneth or Drew the album drawing attention to each individ- or Winona, but if they continue to craft music of ual sound, every instrument reverberating such timelessness and honesty, The Walkmen from the echo chambers of the heart, pianos will be a band with a shelf life, and that is of tinkling from loft windows, resonating utmost importance. buzz through the city streets at night. Their new platter utilizes the studio in a somewhat opposite direction, using instrumentation The Walkman will perform at Highdive Wednesday, March to wrap the album in a none-too-subtle blanket 10. Orphans and French Kicks will open. Tickets are $8 and of sound; every corner of the album is brimming the show starts at 10 p.m. with subtle organ and guitar textures. Bauer says, “We recorded and mixed a lot of the album at other studios, like in EasleyMcCain in Memphis. It’s a great studio ... but the album didn’t really come together until we finished it at Marcata, so we’ll probably be recording there more.” The intoxicated late-night balladeering of Everyone is also subsumed in favor of tighter songs with a more visceral, upbeat flavor. “We wrote songs a lot more with the live show in mind,” says Bauer, “so some of the songs are a little more rocking.” Bauer admits they started off a little shaky in the live arena. “It was hard to play the spacy slow The Walkmen will be performing at the Highdive on March 10th.

Bows and Arrows is the sound of a band casually establishing themselves as artists to watch. It may not be apparent from the outset.The album starts off in the sort of dreamy, half-awake territory that they explored on their debut, Everyone Who Pretended To Like Me Is Gone, but by the time the band has ripped their way through tracks like “The Rat” and “Little House of Savages,” it is apparent that a diametric shift has occurred. It’s a very good one, folks. The Walkmen officially tear it the fuck up. Whereas the debut tended to meander occasionally, songs drifting into and apart from one another,Bows and Arrows seems to show off a band that has gotten its legs, much more willing to explore varied sonic territory without losing the thread of the album or the listener’s attention. Nowhere is this demonstrated better on the album than “The Rat.”As Paul Maroon hammers out an arching, descending guitar line, drums thunder, and lead singer Hamilton Leithauser yowls like a rabid Rod Stewart, “Can’t you hear me / I’m calling out your name / Can’t you see me / I’m pounding on your door.” One can almost envision the terrified young girl on the other side of that door. It’s thrilling. They come pretty close to topping this elsewhere on the album. “Little House of Savages” is a portrait of paranoid escape roughly crooned over looping drums and a robotically beaten guitar with the supreme melodic breakdown of the album. “New Year’s Eve” is a piano-driven, Kinks-derived pop rocker replete with samba beats and humorous lyrics like,“ The music’s loud in your room / Turn it down / There’s a neighbor who can’t take it anymore.” And though, much like the Lee Majors, The Walkmen have become better, stronger, faster, and they haven’t given up the attention to sonic detail or the ice sculpture delicate ballads that distinguished Everyone. Partially due to the uniqueness of their self-built Marcata studios, the guitars on Bows and Arrows still chime, organs still churn and blur, drums still crack and reverberate. The whole album seems ready to ricochet off the precipice into the abyss at any moment, just like intelligently composed rock should. Keep an eye on The Walkmen.

PHOTO COURTESY OF BIG HASSLE MEDIA

BY LOGAN MOORE | STAFF WRITER


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CARL WEATHERS AND ARNOLD . . . TOGETHER AT LAST | MARCH 4-10, 2004

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The end of an era

“Picturing Performance: Japanese Theater Prints of the Utagawa School, 1790–1868” – The focus of artistic production in 18th and 19th century Japan (Edo period) was the world of entertainment. This exhibit captures a views of this world of illusion and fantasy (Ukiyo) through richly-colored and compositionally provocative woodblock prints know as Ukiyo-e. The exhibition is on view through Mar 21. 500 E Peabody in Urbana. Tue, Thu-Sat 9am-5pm, Wed 9am-8pm, Sun 2-5pm. Suggested donation $3. 333-1860.

A familiar face for Campustown closes one last time on Friday

I

n November of 1969, with nothing more than a pad of paper, a pencil and a catalog, a student run organization in the Illini Union placed an order for an album. From those humble beginnings grew the Champaign institution known as Record Service. This Friday, almost 35 years later, Record Service will sell its last album. Due to financial difficulties that have plagued the store for years, Record Service will close March 5. During its lifetime, the store has seen its share of successes and great hardships. The closing of Record Service not only signals the end of Champaign-Urbana’s longest running independent record store, but it also typifies the uphill battles that are being lost by independent record stores around the country.

The store that hippies built Record Service began as a mail order store in the Illini Union in the fall of 1969. Current owner and co-founder Phil Strang was only 19 years old when Record Service started. Strang, who was programming director at WPGU, was asked by friends in student government to use his musical knowledge to help start the mail order service. The first day it was open, the new mail order service took orders for 10 albums. By the second day, that number was 20. Within a few weeks, Record Service decided to stock a few albums in the union instead of just taking mail orders. The first album they had in stock was Jefferson Airplane’s Volunteers. There were 25 copies and they flew out of the store. “We sold all 25 copies within an hour,” Strang said. “Next time, we had 50 copies of Jefferson Airplane and 25 copies of Strange Days by the Doors. Little did we know that those two titles would probably describe the store better than anything.” By Easter 1970, Record Service moved out of the Union to the basement of the

University YMCA on Wright Street. It would not be Record Service’s last move before moving to its current location at 621 E. Green St. in Campustown in December 1981. In the 11 years between its time at the YMCA and the current location, Record Service was housed at four other locations and also operated stores in Normal, Ill., a second store in Lincoln Square Mall and the classical store Figaro’s in its own space. No matter where the store was, though, Record Service operated under the same philosophy it always had from the time it became incorporated. “We decided that everyone that works at the store would be co-owners. Nobody that worked there wanted to be boss and no wanted to be bossed,” Strang said. “This was our revolutionary idea. If we were all equal partners, we would all share the responsibilities. It was incredibly idealistic, but we made it work on that level for seven years.” Strang said the 14 owners that ran Record Service in those seven years made about $1.50 an hour. The $30 Strang brought home at the end of the week easily covered the $37 in rent he paid each month. Strang said that the 14 owners were never in it to make money, though. Instead, Record Service often reached out to the community. “We considered ourselves a political collec-

tive as much as a record store,” Strang said. “We were very actively involved in local politics such as anti-war demonstrations. We helped collect money for the legal defense of people who got arrested for political actions or drug arrests.” Record Service would also collect a nickel on every sale for a “community tax.” The nickels were then gathered up and went to help start other alternative businesses like a restaurant, bicycle shop, gas station and even a grocery store. Strang estimated that there were 75 alternative businesses at one time in Champaign-Urbana. That alternative spirit was shared by all the owners of Record Service. “We were all just a bunch of hippies, but we learned how to do business,” Strang said. “We started because we loved music but we learned the business as we went. We learned how to run a business just by doing it.” Seven years after incorporation, seven coowners had moved on or graduated. By the time the store moved to its current location, there were only three owners: Strang, Tom McCoy and Michael Pollack. In 2000, Pollack was the last partner to leave. Strang was in complete control of a ship that by his own admission had been sinking for several years.

“Bon Coiffure: Hair Signs from West Africa” – This exhibition offers viewers a glimpse into the art of African hair styling, African hair sign painting and African hairstyles in traditional masks and sculpture. Hairdressers also hire artists to hand paint signs to advertise their skills and represent their repertoire of coiffures. Bon Coiffure is on view through Mar 21. 500 E Peabody in Urbana. Tue, Thu-Sat 9am-5pm, Wed 9am-8pm, Sun 2-5pm. Suggested donation $3. 333-1860. “Beyond East and West: Seven Transnational Artists” – The Krannert Museum has put together a traveling exhibition bringing together the work of seven major contemporary artists who share a connection to both worlds. 500 E Peabody in Urbana. Tue, Thu-Sat 9am-5pm, Wed 9am-8pm, Sun 2-5pm. Suggested donation $3. 333-1860. “Whistler and Japonisme: Selections from the Permanent Collection” – This anniversary marks the 100th anniversary of James McNeill Whistler’s death, highlighting his works on paper and examines the influence that Japanese woodcuts had on his artistic technique. On display at Krannert Art Museum through Mar 28. 500 E Peabody in Urbana. Tue, Thu-Sat 9am-5pm, Wed 9am-8pm, Sun 2-5pm. Suggested donation $3. 333-1860. “Water & Wood” – The Hays Center is hosting this exhibit featuring paintings by Beverley Sanderson and sculpture by the Illini Carvers. Opens Friday, runs through Mar 26. The Hays Center, 1311 W Church St, C. 398-2580. Hours: Mon-Fri 8:30am4pm.

ON STAGE “Bring Me an Ice Bucket – Scenes of Hotel Hysteria” – This evening of dance performance follows four women through the rooms of the establishment and their subsequent quest to explore the meaning of feminine and social etiquette in the early twentieth century. Armory Free Theatre. Fri 8pm & midnight. Sat 7pm. Elysium on the Prairie, Live Action Roleplaying – Vampires stalk the city streets and struggle for dominance in a world of gothic horror. Create your own character and mingle with dozens of players who portray their own undead alter egos. Each session is another chapter in an ongoing story of triumph, tragedy and betrayal. Fridays,“Vampire: The Masquerade.” For more information, visit www2.uiuc.edu/ro/elysium/intro.html. Check site for location, 7pm.

Club Fred: Character Count – Presenters from University of Illinois Extension discuss the six pillars of good character. No registration. Douglass Branch Library. Sunday, 4-5pm. Information: 4032090. Captain Underpants Party – School-age children can dress as a favorite character from the Captain Underpants book series to win a prize at this kidcontagious party. Champaign Public Library. Saturday, 2-2:45pm. No registration. Family Resource Fair – Activities, food and information on community services and organizations that serve families and children in the Champaign Urbana area will be available. Wisegarver Hall, Illinois Disciples Building. Mar 14, 12-4pm. For more information, call 344-5459. Family Fun Day Sunday in the Square – Enjoy interactive rides this Sunday. There will also be food, shopping, games, miniature golf and more. Lincoln Square Mall. Sun, 1-5pm. For more info, call the Urbana Business Association at 344-3872.

this week Th Mar 4 Wine Tasting 5pm, free Jazz Crawl and Jam Session 5pm, Iron Post 6:30pm, Krannert Center 8pm, Canopy Club 9:30pm, Zorba's 11pm, Cowboy Monkey Liszt Symposium: Works for Piano and Orchestra 7:30pm, $10-$17 A Raisin in the Sun 7:30pm, $6-$13

Fr Mar 5

Top: The Kate Hathaway band plays an in-store performance at Record Service. Left: After 34 years of business, Record Service will close its doors for the last time on Friday, March 5th. Owner and co-founder Phil Strang said, “I don’t want it to be like a funeral, I want it to go out on an upbeat because that’s how we’ve always been.”

Girls, Girls, Girls! – Games, crafts, and reading time for girls in grades 1-4. Douglass Branch Library. Fri, 4-5pm. No registration. KnowZone – Homework help for school-aged children. Tue 4-5pm. Douglass Branch Library. No registration required. Rookie Cooks – Hands-on cooking class for elementary school students, presented by U of I Extension. Douglass Branch Library. Mar 1, 4-5pm. Registration: 403-2090.

krannert center

Sa Mar 6

We Mar 10

Java and Jazz: Cecil Bridgewater 10am, free Sponsor: Fran and Marc Ansel Anonymous

Meredith Monk 7:30pm, $14-$25 Talkback: after the show, free

Liszt Symposium: Works for Piano and Orchestra 7:30pm, $10-$17 A Raisin in the Sun 7:30pm, $6-$13

Cecil Bridgewater and Clark Terry 7:30pm, $17-$25 Talkback: after the show, free

Patron Season Sponsors

CAROLE AND JERRY RINGER

brought to you by

Boardman’s Art Theatre and buzz will be hosting special midnight screenings several times a month. This weekend, come check out:

UI Wind Symphony and UI Symphonic Band I 7:30pm, $2-$5 A Raisin in the Sun 7:30pm, $6-$13 Studiodance I 7:30pm $7-$14

Afterglow: Chambana 9:30pm, free

Tu Mar 9

Some Krannert Center programs are supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Illinois Arts Council, and patron and corporate contributions.

A Raisin in the Sun is supported in part by the Frances P. Rohlen Visiting Artists Fund/College of Fine and Applied Arts and by the Chancellor's Brown v. Board of Education Jubilee Commemorative Committee. The Jazz Threads project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts Challenge America—Access to the Arts Program.

KrannertCenter.com

Coporate Season Underwriters

SERIE S

Th Mar 11

Cecil Bridgewater’s presentations are supported by the Heartland Arts Fund, a program of Arts Midwest funded by the National Endowment for the Arts with additional contributions from General Mills Foundation, Land O'Lakes Foundation, Sprint Corporation, and the Illinois Arts Council.

Season Sponsors

Midnight Movie SERIE S

Concerto Urbano 7:30pm, $2-$5

CultureTalk: Steven Pinker and Nancy Cantor 7:30pm, free, tickets required

KIDS & FAMILY

Introducing...

Wine Tasting 5pm, free

A Raisin in the Sun Dessert and Conversation 6:30pm, $5.50 Creative Intersections Sponsor:

A Raisin in the Sun 7:30pm, $6-$13

19

Boardman’s Art Theatre & buzz

Su Mar 7

Engelbert Humperdinck Concert Cancelled – The Champaign Park District regrets to announce that the Engelbert Humperdinck concert scheduled for this Sunday at the Virginia Theatre has been cancelled. If you have purchased tickets for this event, stop by the Virginia Theatre for a full ticket refund. If you have any questions, please contact the box office at 356-9063.

Gardening Weekend Wizard w/ Sandy Mason – Children will get to take part in activities such as Worm Zoo and Garbage Gardens, Paper Towel Gardening, Flower Arranging, Seed ID, What Part of the Plant Are You Eating?, and Chew on This Like an Insect. Sandy will be assisted by master gardeners and students from Volunteer Illini Projects. Orpheum Children’s Museum. Saturday, 1-4pm. $3, child $2. For more information, call 352-5895.

@

My Preschool Genius – A book-centered program focusing on language. Preschoolers can listen to dynamic picture book presentations and explore the art of picture book illustration. Champaign Public Library. Tue, 9:30-10am. Registration required. Call 403-2030.

Traffic Jam: Metta Quintet 5pm, free

CANCELLATION NOTICE

PHOTOS | CHRISTINE LITIS

BY BRIAN MERTZ | STAFF WRITER

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MARCH 4-10, 2004 | WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com

217/333-6280 or 800/KCPATIX 217/333-9714 (TTY) 217/244-SHOW (Fax) 217/244-0549 (Groups) kran-tix@uiuc.edu Ticket Office Open 10am to 6pm daily; on days of performances open 10am through intermission.

The 1996 re-release in Dolby Digital and restored color of Martin Scorsese’s 1976 film starring Robert DeNiro, Cybill Shepherd, Jodie Foster, and Harvey Keitel

March 5th & 6th at Boardman’s Art Theatre 126 W. Church St., Champaign 1-800-BEST-PLACE or 355-0068 tickets are $6


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WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com | MARCH 4-10, 2004

The Station Theatre 223 N Broadway, Urbana, 384-4000 Strawberry Fields Cafe 306 W Springfield, Urbana, 328-1655 Sweet Betsy's 805 S Philo Rd, Urbana Ten Thousand Villages 105 N Walnut, Champaign, 352-8938 TK Wendl’s 1901 S Highcross Rd, Urbana, 255-5328 Tommy G’s 123 S Mattis Ave, Country Fair Shopping Center, 359-2177 Tonic 619 S Wright, Champaign, 356-6768 Two Main 2 Main, Champaign, 359-3148 University YMCA 1001 S Wright, Champaign, 344-0721 Verde/Verdant 17 E Taylor St, Champaign, 366-3204 Virginia Theatre 203 W Park Ave, Champaign, 356-9053 White Horse Inn 112 1/2 E Green, Champaign, 352-5945 Zorba’s 627 E Green, Champaign

CHICAGOSHOWS MARCH 3/4 Jazzanova @ Smart Bar 3/4 Kraig Jarret Johnson & The Program @ Schubas 3/4-5 Neil Young & Crazy Horse @ Rosemont Theatre 3/5 Clarence Clemons & The Temple of Soul @ Joe’s 3/5 Faun Fables @ Schubas 3/5 British Sea Power @ Empty Bottle 3/5 Richard Buckner @ Schubas 3/5 Chieftans @ Symphony Center 3/5 Bob Dylan @ Aragon Ballroom 3/5 Forty Piece Choir @ Metro, 18+ 3/5 Galactic @ Vic, 18+ 3/5 Luomo @ Abbey Pub, 18+ 3/5 Edwin McCain @ House of Blues, 18+ 3/6 Liftpoint @ Metro 3/6 Crossing @ Old Town School of Folk Music 3/7 Get Up Kids @ Metro 3/7 Rhonda Vincent @ Old Town School of Folk Music 3/10 Tara Jane O’Neil @ Gunther Murphy’s 3/11 Keb’ Mo’ @ House of Blues, 18+ 3/11 Walkmen @ Metro, 18+ 3/12 DJ SS, Grooverider, Shy FX, Twisted Individual @ Metro, 18+ 3/12 Church @ House of Blues 3/12 Antigone Rising @ Schubas 3/12 Futureman & The Isiah Williams Project @ Old Town School of Folk Music 3/12 Kid Rock @ Allstate Arena 3/12 Michael Mayer, Superpitcher @ Smart Bar 3/12 Liz Phair @ Vic 3/12 Von Bondies @ Double Door 3/13 Paul Kelly @ Double Door 3/13 Sage Francis, Joe Beats, Grand Buffet @ Logan Square Auditorium 3/13 Mavericks @ Park West 3/13 Grant Lee Phillips @ Abbey Pub 3/13 Saw Doctors @ Vic 3/13 Shipping News @ Subterranean 3/14 Liz Phair @ Vic 3/15 Cooper Temple Clause @ Double Door 3/17 Jerry Joseph & The Jackmormons @ Schubas 3/17 Bogdan Raczynski @ Empty Bottle 3/18-19 Melissa Etheridge @ House of Blues 3/19 Johnny Dowd @ Subterranean 3/19 Dream Theater @ Riviera 3/19 Britney Spears, Kelis @ Allstate Arena 3/19 Starlight Mints @ Abbey Pub 3/20 Jewel @ Star Plaza 3/20 Liars, Young People @ Logan Square Auditorium 3/20 Macabre @ Oasis 160 3/21 Amon Tobin, Kid Koala @ Metro, 18+ 3/22 Clay Aiken, Kelly Clarkson @ United Center 3/23 Ted Leo/Pharmacists @ Logan Square Auditorium 3/23 Three Days Grace @ Metro 3/24 12 Stones, Skillet, Pillar, Grits, Big Dismal @ House of Blues 3/26 Newsboys, Rebecca St. James @ UIC Pavilion 3/26 American Music Club @ Old Town School of Folk Music 3/26 Dolly Varden @ Subterranean 3/26 Al Green @ House of Blues 3/26 Great Big Sea @ Metro, 18+ 3/26 Franz Ferdinand @ Empty Bottle 3/26 Proclaimers @ Abbey Pub 3/26 Slip @ Double Door 3/26 Southern Culture on the Skids @ FitzGerald’s 3/26 TV On the Radio @ Empty Bottle 3/27 Campbell Brothers, Calvin Cooke @ Old Town School of Folk Music

CHICAGOVENUES Abbey Pub 3420 W Grace, Chicago, (773) 478-4408 Allstate Arena 6920 N Mannheim Rd, Rosemont, (847) 635-6601 Aragon 1106 W Lawrence, Chicago, (773) 561-9500 Arie Crown Theater 2301 S Lake Shore Dr, Chicago, (312) 791-6190 Bottom Lounge 3206 N Wilton, Chicago, (773) 975-0505 Chicago Theatre 175 N State St, Chicago, (312) 443-1130 Congress Theatre 2135 N Milwaukee, Chicago, (312) 923-2000 Double Door 1572 N Milwaukee Ave, Chicago, (773) 489-3160 Elbo Room 2871 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago, (773) 549-5549 Empty Bottle 1035 N Western Ave, Chicago, (773) 276-3600 Fireside Bowl 2648 W Fullerton Ave, Chicago, (773) 486-2700 House of Blues 329 N Dearborn, Chicago, (312) 923-2000 Martyrs' 3855 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago, (773) 404-9494 Metro/Smart Bar 3730 N Clark St, Chicago, (773) 549-0203 Old Town School of Folk Music 4544 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago, (773) 728-6000 Park West 322 W Armitage, Chicago, (773) 929-5959 Riviera Theatre 4746 N Racine, Chicago, (773) 275-6800 Rosemont Theatre 5400 N River Rd, Rosemont, (847) 671-5100 Schubas 3159 N Southport, Chicago, (773) 525-2508 UIC Pavilion 525 S Racine, Chicago, (312) 413-5700 Vic Theatre 3145 N Sheffield, Chicago, (773) 472-0449

ART NOTICES Creation Art Studios: Art Classes for Children and Adults – All classes use the spontaneous art process to demonstrate technical instruction and the exploration of materials. CPDU's offered. Creation Art Studios, 1102 E Washington in Urbana. Call Jeannine Bestoso at 344-6955 or go to www.creationartstudios.com for information. Join Artists and Workshops at Gallery Virtu – The artist-owned cooperative Gallery Virtu invites applications from area artists. The gallery offers workshops for adults, teens and children and original works by the members. Gallery Virtu, 220 W Washington in Monticello. Thu 12-4pm, Fri 12-8pm, Sat 10am-6pm. For more information, call 7627790, visit www.galleryvirtu.org or e-mail workshops@galleryvirtu.org. Collage for the Soul – Learn the many aspects of collage techniques while engaging your creativity and exploring your mind and heart. Sandra Ahten will teach the class, in which all materials will be provided. High Cross Studio, 1101 N High Cross Rd in Urbana. Feb 17- Mar 16, Tue 7-9pm. Other drawing and painting classes are also offered. For more information, call 367-6345 or go to www.spiritofsandra.com.

ART GALLERIES Boneyard Pottery – Ceramic Art by Michael Schwegmann and others. 403 Water St in Champaign. Tue-Sat 11am-5pm. 355-5610. Broken Oak Gallery – Local and national artists, original art including photography, watercolors, pottery, oil paintings, colored pencil, and woodturning. Refreshments served by the garden all day Saturday. 1865 N 1225 E Rd in White Heath. Thu-Sat 10am-4pm. 762-4907. Café Kopi – “Digital Evolutions,” photographs by John Sfondilias on display through February. 109 N Walnut in Champaign. Mon-Thu 7am-11pm, Fri-Sat 7am-12pm, Sun 11am-8pm. 359-4266. Creation Art Studios – Featuring original art by students and members of the studio. 1102 E Washington St in Urbana. Mon-Fri 3-5:30pm, Sat 14pm and other scheduled studio times. For more information, call Jeannine Bestoso at 344-6955. Country in the City – Antiques, Architectural, Gardening and Home Accessories. Custom designing available. 1104 E Washington St in Urbana. ThuSat 10am-5pm. 367-2367. Framer's Market – Frame designers since 1981. Ongoing work from local artists on display. 807 W Springfield Ave in Champaign. Tue-Fri 9:30am5:30pm, Sat 10am-4pm. 351-7020. Furniture Lounge – Specializing in mid-century modern furniture from the 1920s to the 1980s – retro, Danish modern, lighting, vintage stereo equipment and vinyl records. 9 E University in Champaign. Sun-Tues 12-4:30pm, Wed-Sat 115:30pm. 352-5150.

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Glass FX – New and Antique Stained Glass Windows, Lamps and unique glass gifts. Gallery is free and open to the public. Interested in learning the art of Stained Glass? Beginning, intermediate and advanced stained glass classes offered. 202 S First St in Champaign. Mon-Thu 10am-5:30pm, Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 9am-4pm. www.glassfx.com. 359-0048. Griggs Street Potters – Handmade functional and decorative pottery. 305 W Grigg St in Urbana. MonFri 11am-4pm, or call for appointment. 344-8546. Hill Street Gallery Inc. – Oil and watercolor paintings, hand painted T-shirts, handmade jewelry. 703 W Hill in Champaign. Sat 12-5pm or by appointment during the week. 359-0675. Larry Kanfer Gallery – European Collection featured in the gallery. Both limited and open edition prints by Larry Kanfer, nationally acclaimed photographer. 2503 S Neil in Champaign. Free and Open to the Public. Mon-Sat 10am-5:30pm. 3982000. www.kanfer.com. LaPayne Photography – Specializes in panoramic photography up to 6 feet long of different subjects including sporting events, city skylines, national parks and University of Illinois scenes. 816 Dennison Dr in Champaign. Mon-Fri 9am-4pm and by appointment. 356-8994. Old Vic Art Gallery – Fine and original art, hand signed, limited edition prints, works by local artists, art restoration, custom framing, and periodic shows by local artists. 11 E University in Champaign. Mon-Thu 11am-5:30pm, Sat 11am4:30pm. 355-8338. Prairie Boatworks Gallery – Beautifully hand-crafted gift items and unique Valentine’s Day cards. Also, over 35 regional artist to choose from. 407 E Main St in Mahomet. Tue, Fri, Sat 10am-5pm, Sun 12-4pm. 586-6776. For more information, contact Mary at 356-8228 or tangoradesigns@aol.com. Steeple Gallery – Vintage botanical and bird prints, antiques and framed limited edition prints. 102 E Lafayette St in Monticello. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat 10am-4pm. www.steeplegallery.com. 762-2924. Verde Gallery – The work of local artist Sylvia Arnstein will be on display in the halls and café. 17 E Taylor St in Champaign. Cafe: Mon-Sat 7am-10 pm. Gallery: Tue-Sat 10am-10pm. 366-3204. Ziemer Gallery – Original paintings and limited edition prints by Larry Ziemer. Pottery, weavings, wood turning and glass works by other artists. Gallery visitors are welcome to sit, relax, listen to the music and just enjoy being surrounded by art. 210 W Washington in Monticello. Tue 10am-8pm, Wed-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 10am-4pm. www.ziemergallery.com. 762-9786.

ART EXHIBITS Creation Art Studios – Artwork by instructors Jeannine Bestoso, Amy Richardson, and Shoshanna Bauer, and the studio’s friends and family. 1102 E Washington St in Urbana. Hours: Mon-Fri 35:30pm, Sat 1-4pm and other scheduled studio times. For more information, call Jeannine Bestoso at 344-6955. “Distant Voices Nearer: A Celebration of American Indian Art” – Featuring paintings by DeHaven Solimon Chaffins, jewelry by Ben Yellowhorse, ceramic sculptures by Lynn Hone, ceramics by Laguna Potter and Michael Kanteena, pottery from Acoma and Mata Ortiz. On display at Verde Gallery through Mar 20. Opening reception for Chaffins and Yellowhouse Thur at 7pm. 17 E Taylor St in Champaign. Cafe: Mon-Sat 7am-10 pm. Gallery: Tue-Sat 10am-10pm. 366-3204. “Transitions” – Work from Nicole Cisne on display at Aroma Café through Mar 21. Artist statement: “The vehicle for my artwork is the female nude... Society and the fashion industry of today are the primary causes of an epidemic of eating disorders and false body images in many young women.” 118 N Neil in Champaign. Open 7 days a week, 7am-Midnight. For more information, contact Amanda Bickle at 356-3200 or art4aroma@yahoo.com.

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MARCH 4-10, 2004 | GET TO THE CHOPPA!

“The last seven years, it really has just been a matter of survival,” Strang said. “The last three years, it has just been a matter of winding it down, looking for a plateau and thinking maybe it’ll stop dropping. And if it levels it off, we’ll make it survive.” But despite cutting payroll and decreasing inventory, Strang could not find a way to make Record Service survive.

Insurmountable odds Throughout the late 1990s, independent record stores across the country shut down. But even as Record Service closes in 2004, there is no one definitive answer as to why. “People think its just one thing, but its not just one thing,” said Troy Michael, store manager at Record Service. “It’s CD burning. It’s Wal-Mart. It’s Target. It’s the music industry in general. It’s the economy. It’s that dumbass in Washington D.C.” Strang cites not only the presence of big chain stores like Best Buy for Record Service’s decline, but also a general decline in Campustown business and the biggest factor of all, in his eyes: illegal downloading and burning of CDs. “Five years ago, we might have sold 1,000 copies of a new Dave Matthews Band CD because 30 guys from the same frat would all buy it,” Strang said. “Now, one or two guys buy it and they burn them for everyone else.” “The record companies will eventually make downloads work for them,” Strang said. “But brick and mortar is just going to just about disappear. There will still be some places for purists but not as many as before.” Whatever the exact cause, Record Service has faced economic woes for years. Strang estimates that at the store’s peak, Record Service moved about $2.5 million in volume. “Last year we did maybe $200,000,” Strang said. “If you think about $200,000 at a 30% markup which would be optimal, you have $600,000 to pay your expenses.” But those expenses quickly added up for Record Service. Strang said that rent is $5,000 a month at their current location. The power bill ran at an average of about $1,000 a month.

TopFive

Payroll at Record Service used to be somewhere between $3,000 and $4,000 a month. The store has trimmed that down so that it can still operate with a payroll of about $1,000 a month. But even after these cuts, Strang realized around Thanksgiving of last year that the store could not remain open through 2004. “I kept looking for signs. I thought if we could do $1,000 a day, I could keep expenses low enough that we could survive,” Strang said. Strang estimates that the store only hit $1,000 in sales in one day twice in the past year. Michael feels that certain changes could have been made to help the store last. “Moving even a block either way would have saved a couple hundred bucks a month on rent. And it could have been (a) better location. Downtown Champaign is booming right now and that’s where we could have went,” Michael said. “We could have been more in touch with the consumer product. We didn’t stock to where we potentially could have. (Co-Manager) Tim Williams could have blown out the vinyl. With my connections, we could have brought in the indie stuff. The store could have been smaller.” Strang still feels that the closing of the store was inevitable. “Even if I worked for free, which I couldn’t do, and we didn’t have to pay rent, we still couldn’t do it,” Strang said. “There is not enough response. There is not enough need for us to survive.” Record Service owed money to the record companies that provided CDs, and those companies eventually threatened to withhold shipment on new titles. “We couldn’t get in the new products and new releases to sell,” Strang said. “If we can’t get new releases, we can’t stay in business.” Past due bills caused Illinois Power to request a $1,500 deposit on March 15. Strang knew that he could not make that deposit and so March 5 became the closing date, leaving the store a final week to clean and sell off equipment in an estate sale. “I think the bottom line is that

the power company overpowered us,” Strang said. “Those are the expenses you cannot ignore.” This past summer, Strang made sure his employees were paid by not cashing his own paychecks until they cleared. It was a decision that perhaps could have worked when the store opened, but cannot work now. “Part of me is still the hippie that likes music,” Strang said. “But, I’m also a single dad with two kids and a nice house. I want my kids to understand my values, but they need to have clothes and go to college sometime. So you get to the point where there is no choice left.” In spite of the decision made out of economic necessity, closing Record Service was not a simple decision. “I would do this the rest of my life if I could,” Strang said. “It’s very hard to give it up. One way I look at it, and try to get away from looking at it this way because it makes me sad, but Record Service is my oldest child. This was my whole life for a long time. So it is hard just to say I want to walk away from it.” It will also be hard for the local music community, and Campustown in particular, to face the prospect of losing Record Service. “Outside of Borders, there is nowhere a local band can take their CDs to sell.

Popular bands that suck

1. The Eagles

The sort of piss-mellow lite-rock that comes from a bunch of smug, self-satisfied yuppies deciding to blow their colons all over the radio. “Take It Easy” is the crap your parents listen to when they find an old joint amongst their vinyl collection and decide to “go crazy for a night” and smoke up in the bathroom while you are out listening to good music. They were neither country nor rock and Merle Haggard should shove a banjo up each of their asses based on their appalling solo careers alone.This band holds the title of having sold the most copies of any album ever (their greatest hits at 28 million copies sold). There is a reason The Dude hates them ... they suck.

2. Creed

Every sentence beginning with the word Creed (in reference to the band) should end with “fellates goats.” Scott Stapp is a giant, walking ego that takes haircare tips from the cast of Friends. He is not a frontman. Some of the shittiest guitar chords ever strummed come from this atrocity of a band. Couple this with Scott Stapp’s I-wish-I-was-Eddie-Vedder voice and you’ve got a recipe for complete crap. These guys should have never “cleaned up” and stayed in a downward spiral to death in a bathtub. If the son of God ever does get around to returning, you can bet his first act will be to temporarily renounce pacifism, grab a sack full of doorknobs, and beat the living shit out of him. Right on, Jesus.

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And that is really bad for the local scene,” Michael said. “Bands can obviously sell their stuff at shows and online, but for the average person to go out to a store and get a local CD, that’s going to be hard.” While the local scene adjusts to losing this institution, Strang, who is 54 years old, must now adjust to being part of the job-seeking market for the first time. “I put together a resume for the first time in my life,” Strang said. “It is exciting on one hand and scary on the other. I graduated college and it wasn’t like, ‘What am I going to do?’ I’m already doing something. I didn’t have to make that decision of what I’m going to do when I grow up. I get to make that decision now.” When Record Service closes its doors to the public Friday evening, Strang will have no bad feelings about his 35year journey with this true Champaign institution. “It’s been a great ride,” Strang said. “The fact that it was an accident to begin with and lasted this long, I really have no complaints. Reality has turned out that this no longer works. But I had a really great time doing it.” buzz

Next week: Top five album names What’s yours? e-mail us at music@readbuzz.com

3. Journey

Chances are, when you go to hell, the lifeless husk of Neil Schon will be there to greet you playing every solo in death just as he did in life; like every talentless, creatively devoid jackoff who just learned how to climb up the fretboard. Steve Perry will be there wailing the chorus to “Don’t Stop Believin’” like he has his balls in a vice. The next time you hear Journey on some “classic” rock station, do yourself a favor and change it.

4. Dashboard Confessional

The soundtrack to post-adolescent bed-wetting. If there were any justice in this universe, the moment this dwarven, self-indulgent, crybaby decided to put down his Acoustic Guitar for Dummies and inflict his

sixth-grade journal entries on a nation of comb-over loving creamo kids, he would have accidently tripped into a pile of moose crap and suffocated to death.

5. Bon Jovi

Jon Bon Jovi makes John Cougar Mellencamp look like friggin’ genius. If this whole ‘80s revival thing keeps up, the end result will be a re-evaluation of Bon Jovi. Richie Sambora will drag his ass off a lawn chair somewhere in South Beach to “get together with the band” and North Korea will drop the A-bomb because they can’t stand the thought of The Ataris covering “Livin’ On A Prayer.”


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I AIN’T GOT TIME TO BLEED. | MARCH 4-10, 2004

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Free music? Legal downloads? What’s wrong with this picture? MENDOZA MUSIC LINE BY LIZ MOZZOCCO | STAFF WRITER

I

’ve got a confession to make. I love free stuff. This probably doesn’t sound too shocking because most people like it when they don’t have to pay for things. But I love free stuff. I’m even willing to go digging through other people’s trash if I think I’ll find something good. It’s all pretty innocent (and pretty disgusting), but sometimes the quest for free stuff slips just over the line, into what some people would call “stealing.” For example, my love of free stuff has led to a preoccupation with stealing cable. But my many wily attempts on the cable box have been unsuccessful. A few weeks ago, I was wrestling with the TV antenna in defeat, when the warped image of a young girl came across the screen. I stopped cursing at the monitor when I heard her say that she was one of millions of individuals who were “prosecuted” (they were never actually charged with anything, since the cases were settled out of court) by the RIAA for downloading music for free off the Internet. She proceeded to say that she still down-

loads music, and right as I started thinking about how fucking punk rock that was, it became clear who was sponsoring her pity party monologue. It was a Pepsi ad. In case you haven’t noticed, there have been a lot of fools hanging around the Walgreens cooler recently, trying to peer inside all the Pepsi bottles on the shelf. It’s not just because they smoked that much weed; Pepsi has hooked up with Apple Computers to give away codes in the bottle caps so people can download free songs from iTunes. Before you jump off the couch you found on someone’s curb, eager to (legally!) download the new Nelly/Justin Timberlake remix, I recommend treating this new corporate promotion with some skepticism. I once read a Rolling Stone article about iTunes where Apple CEO Steve Jobs said “it is corrosive to one’s character to steal music.” Some might say that it is corrosive to one’s character to work for Apple. It’s undeniable that drinking Pepsi is corrosive to one’s stomach lining. But both Pepsi and Apple want you to think that they’ve got the remedy for your dirty “music stealing” habit. An iPod-toting friend tells me that he downloads songs from iTunes because he knows he isn’t ripping off the musician. It only costs a dollar! And now you can even get some songs for free! After buying something from Pepsi, of course.

So we can all feel relieved because we’re not stealing any of Sheryl Crow’s income for the sake of our own convenience. The trouble is, you don’t really know what happens to your dollar after you’ve spent it. It’s not like Enrique Iglesias is sitting around, eating Doritos and contemplating the loss of his mole, when an envelope shows up with your dollar in it. If it did, that would be kind of cool—then you could send Enrique another dollar, and he could use it to buy another bag of Doritos. Isn’t capitalism great? But the fact is that most of the money you spend on music—on CDs, concert tickets, merch, whatever—never makes it into the hands of the musician. The biggest cuts go to the record companies and various middlemen. It’s no different with iTunes. The RIAA is exposed online at www.downhillbattle.org, which estimates that the artist only gets eight to 14 cents of that dollar you’re spending. At least 35 percent is going toward Steve Jobs’s purchase of a new name. The rest of it goes directly to all the little people who work so hard bribing commercial radio stations to play shitty music no one cares about. God knows they deserve it, because using shady methods to benefit from other people’s art is wrong. You might even call it stealing. It seems to me that when someone suggests that you’re doing something bad, like stealing music, it’s because they want you to feel

guilty enough to stop doing it. So how come we’re not investigating the people who are accusing us of being thieves? The people who take huge cuts out of profits, all the while implying that the money is going directly to the artist? The ones who tack on absurd “service charges” for concert tickets you bought by clicking on a fucking link over the Internet? Companies involved in payola? Price fixing? Attempting to sue a 12-year-old girl as a scare tactic? All of that seems pretty damn wrong to me. It’s insanely difficult to track where the money you spend every day ends up. Everything you own, wear or put in your body—you just don’t know what kinds of bad business practices happened involving those products before they made their way to you. It seems to me that any purchase involving major labels and corporate giants in the music industry is tainted in ways that aren’t printed on the packaging. Someone is always getting a raw deal, and most of the time it’s either you or the band, or both. You may think that taking stuff out of the Dumpster is really gross, but it’s inexpensive and you can plainly see all of the dirt that it comes in. That’s more than can be said for what the RIAA, Pepsi or iTunes are trying to sell. buzz Liz Mozzocco is a senior at the University of Illinois. She is also an on-air personality at WPGU, 107.1 The Planet.

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MARCH 4-10, 2004 | WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com

MondayMarch8

DJ

Open Mic, hosted by Martin Page – Za's, 7pm, free Jazz Jam hosted by ParaDocs – The Iron Post, 7:30pm, TBA Puddle of Mudd – Canopy Club, 8pm, $20 Open Mic Night hosted by Mike Ingram – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $2

DJ Chef Ra – Barfly, 9pm, free La Femme Confident – DJ Aquanet, Queen Betsy – Nargile, 9:30pm, TBA D-Lo & Spinnerty – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, free DJ Boardwalk – Mike 'n Molly's, 10pm, $1 Northstar Lounge hostedby Czar Absolute – slam poetry and hip hop DJ's – Nargile, 10pm, $1 Dream Sequence – Caffe Paradiso, 10pm, free

DJ

MUSIC PERFORMANCE

LIVE MUSIC

2ON2OUT – indie rock – Barfly, 9pm, free Chill in the Grill – hip hop – Canopy Club, 10pm, free DJ Betty Rocker – Mike 'n Molly's, 10pm, free Case of the Mondays – house – Nargile, 10pm, free

MUSIC PERFORMANCE Community Drum Circle – Ten Thousand Villages, 7-9pm, free "G" Force Karaoke – Kam's, 10pm-2am

COMEDY DeBono – improv comedy – Courtyard Cafe, 910pm, free

TuesdayMarch9 LIVE MUSIC Open Bluegrass Jam Session – Verde Gallery, 7pm, free Open Jam/Open Mic hosted by Openingbands.com – Canopy Club, 10pm, $2 Juan Turros, For If The Flies – The Iron Post, 10pm, TBA Acoustic Night: Adam Wolfe, Jess Greenlee – Tommy G's, 10pm Shipwreck, LP – Nargile, 11pm, $3 Crystal River – Rose Bowl Tavern, 9pm, free

DJ DJ Resonate - hip hop - Barfly, 9pm, free DJ Brom – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, free NOX: DJ ZoZo, DJ Kannibal, DJ Rickbats – Highdive, 10pm, $2

COMEDY Spicy Clamato – improv comedy – Courtyard Cafe, 9-10pm, free

WednesdayMarch10 LIVE MUSIC Darrin Drda's Theory of Everything – The Iron Post, 9pm, TBA Kilborn Alley – blues – Tommy G's, 9pm, free Openingbands.com Showcase: Cash Gal, Buddha's Belly, FCAB, Shatered Angel – Canopy Club, 10pm, $3 The Walkmen, French Kicks, Orphans of Absinthe Blind – Highdive, 10pm, $8 Irish Traditional Music Session – Bentley's Pub, free Hard Poor Korn – Rose Bowl Tavern, 9pm, free Meredith Monk – Tryon Festival Theatre, 7:30pm, $14-$25

"G" Force Karaoke – Elmers Club 45, 7-11pm

C-UVENUES Assembly Hall First & Florida, Champaign, 333-5000 American Legion Post 24 705 W Bloomington Rd, Champaign, 356-5144 American Legion Post 71 107 N Broadway, Urbana, 367-3121 Barfly 120 N Neil, Champaign,352-9756 Barnes and Noble 51 E Marketview, Champaign, 355-2045 Boltini Lounge 211 N Neil, Champaign, 378-8001 Borders Books & Music 802 W Town Ctr, Champaign, 3519011 The Brass Rail 15 E University, Champaign, 352-7512 Canopy Club (Garden Grill) 708 S Goodwin, Urbana, 367-3140 Channing-Murray Foundation 1209 W Oregon, Urbana C.O. Daniels 608 E Daniel, Champaign, 337-7411 Cosmopolitan Club 307 E John, Champaign, 367-3079 Courtyard Cafe Illini Union, 1401 W Green, Urbana, 333-4666 Cowboy Monkey 6 Taylor St, Champaign, 398-2688 Clybourne 706 S Sixth, Champaign, 383-1008 Curtis Orchard 3902 S Duncan Rd, Champaign, 359-5565 D.R. Diggers 604 S Country Fair Dr, Champaign, 356-0888 Elmer’s Club 45 3525 N Cunningham, Urbana, 344-3101 Embassy Tavern & Grill 114 S Race, Urbana, 384-9526 Esquire Lounge 106 N Walnut, Champaign, 398-5858 Fallon’s Ice House 703 N Prospect, Champaign, 398-5760 Fat City Saloon 505 S Chestnut, Champaign, 356-7100 The Great Impasta 114 W Church, Champaign, 359-7377 G.T.’s Western Bowl Francis Dr, Champaign, 359-1678 Highdive 51 Main, Champaign, 359-4444 Huber’s 1312 W Church, Champaign, 352-0606 Illinois Disciples Foundation 610 E Springfield, Champaign, 352-8721 Independent Media Center 218 W Main St, Urbana, 344-8820 The Iron Post 120 S Race, Urbana, 337-7678 Joe’s Brewery 706 S Fifth, Champaign, 384-1790 Kam’s 618 E Daniel, Champaign, 328-1605 Krannert Art Museum 500 E Peabody, Champaign, 333-1861 Krannert Center for the Performing Arts 500 S Goodwin, Urbana,Tickets: 333-6280, 800-KCPATIX La Casa Cultural Latina 1203 W Nevada, Urbana, 333-4950 Lava 1906 W Bradley, Champaign, 352-8714 Legends Bar & Grill 522 E Green, Champaign, 355-7674 Les’s Lounge 403 N Coler, Urbana, 328-4000 Lincoln Castle 209 S Broadway, Urbana, 344-7720 Lowe’s Big Barrel & Summer Club 14 N Hazel, Danville, 442-8090 Malibu Bay Lounge North Route 45, Urbana, 328-7415 Mike n’ Molly’s 105 N Market, Champaign, 355-1236 Mulligan’s 604 N Cunningham, Urbana, 367-5888 Murphy’s 604 E Green, Champaign, 352-7275 Nargile 207 W Clark St, Champaign Neil Street Pub 1505 N Neil, Champaign, 359-1601 Boardman’s Art Theater 126 W Church, Champaign, 351-0068 The Office 214 W Main, Urbana, 344-7608 Parkland College 2400 W Bradley, Champaign, 351-2528 Phoenix 215 S Neil, Champaign, 355-7866 Pia’s of Rantoul Route 136 E, Rantoul, 893-8244 Pink House Routes 49 & 150, Ogden, 582-9997 The Rainbow Coffeehouse 1203 W Green, Urbana, 766-9500 Red Herring/Channing-Murray Foundation 1209 W Oregon, Urbana, 344-1176 Rose Bowl Tavern 106 N Race, Urbana, 367-7031 Springer Cultural Center 301 N Randolph, Champaign, 355-1406 Spurlock Museum 600 S Gregory, Urbana, 333-2360

217-469-9585 Punch Downs-Telephone Outlets Installed - Repairs - Prewiring Quality Workmanship & Materials Illinois Bell Trained Technician - Guaranteed & Insured

Need a hand? Are you a not for profit organization in Champaign County that dreams about having a project completed but you lack the manpower to do it? Operation Helping Hand is April 17-24 and it’s the perfect chance to make your dream a reality. Think big! You provide us with a short term project, supervision and the materials to complete it and we’ll provide you with the most important resource of all...volunteers! Don’t miss out on this great opportunity! Attend our Kick-off Celebration on Thursday, March 18 from 11:30 am-1:30 pm at the Urbana Civic Center. For more information or to RSVP for the Kick-off Celebration please call Kathy at the Office of Volunteer Programs 244-7675 or Teri at United Way 352-5151.

OPERATION HELPING HAND is sponsored by:

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ThursdayMarch4 LIVE MUSIC Jazz Threads Pub Crawl Stop #1: U of I Jazz Band II – The Iron Post, 5pm, free Jazz Threads Pub Crawl Stop #2: U of I Lab Jazz Band, Metta Quintet – Krannert Center, 6:30pm, free In Your Ear Big Band – jazz – The Iron Post, 7-9pm, TBA Acoustic Music Series: Darrin Drda – Aroma, 8pm, free Jazz Threads Pub Crawl Stop #3: Susan Hofer and Friends – Canopy Club, 8pm, free Jazz Threads Pub Crawl Stop #4: Jeff Helgesen Jazz Quintet – Zorba's, 9:30pm, free Addison Groove Project, Apollo Project – Canopy Club, 10pm, $5 Jazz Threads Pub Crawl Stop #5: LaMonte Parsons Experience, Cecil Bridgewater – Cowboy Monkey, 11pm, fre Country Connection – Rose Bowl Tavern, 9pm, free Darrin Drda – acoustic – Aroma, 8-10pm FABULOUS!!! – electro-clash/dance-punk party hosted by The HotWatt – Nargile, 10pm, $5

WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com | MARCH 4-10, 2004

DANCING

LIVE MUSIC

DJ J-Phlip – house – Barfly, 9pm, free DJ Delayney – Nargile, 10pm, $5 5th Platoon – Highdive, 10pm, $5 A Night in the Tropics – live DJ TBA – Courtyard Cafe, 9pm, $2

Green St. Records Presents: The Album Teaser Show: Kate Hathaway Band, Bullet Called Life, The Ending, Fredology – Courtyard Cafe, 8:30pm, $5 Gabe Rosen – Embassy Taven, 8:30pm, TBA Middletown – The Iron Post, 9pm, TBA American Minor, Apollo Project, Jason Finkelman's NU-Orbit Ensemble – Nargile, 9pm, $5 Bruiser and the Virtues – Embassy Tavern, 9:30pm, free Brother Ali, Scratch, Melodic Scribes, dLo and Spinnerty – Canopy Club, 10pm, $10 Poster Children, ifihadahifi, Acevot – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $6 The Crystal River Band – Tommy G's, 10pm, cover Country Connection – Rose Bowl Tavern, 9pm, cover The Brat Pack – ‘80s – Fat City Saloon, 8:30pm Trouble IS – Lowe’s Big Barrel & Summer Club in Danville, 9pm Kilborn Alley – blues – The Phoenix, TBA Prairie Dogs – Hubers, 8pm

MUSIC PERFORMANCE

DJ

"G" Force Karaoke – Pia's in Rantoul, 9pm-1am Liszt Symposium: Works for Piano and Orchestra – Foellinger Great Hall, 7:30pm, $17, sc $15, stu $10

DJ Sophisto – house – Barfly, 9pm, free DJ Mertz – house – Nargile, 10pm, $5 DJ Tim Williams – dance – Highdive, 10pm, $5

ON STAGE

MUSIC PERFORMANCE

DJ

A Raisin in the Sun – Colwell Playhouse, 7:30pm. Flex tickets: $12, sc, stu $11, UI, yth $6. Single tickets: $13, sc, stu $12, UI, yth $7. THE Shakespeare PROJECT – The University of Illinois and Parkland College theatre departments put a new twist on Shakespeare. Parkland Theatre, 8pm, $5-8.

"G" Force Karaoke – Historic Lincoln Castle Hotel Alumni Tap Bar, 9pm-1am Java and Jazz: Cecil Bridgewater – Tryon Festival Theatre, 10am, free Liszt Symposium: Works for Piano and Orchestra – Foellinger Great Hall, 7:30pm, $17, sc $15, stu $10

AROUND TOWN

A Raisin in the Sun – Colwell Playhouse, 7:30pm. Flex tickets: $12, sc, stu $11, UI, yth $6. Single tickets: $13, sc, stu $12, UI, yth $7. THE Shakespeare PROJECT – The University of Illinois and Parkland College theatre departments put a new twist on Shakespeare. Parkland Theatre, 8pm, $5-8.

Wine Tasting – Sample wine, learn about the different kinds and buy full glasses for $3.50 per glass. Krannert Center lobby, 5pm, free.

FridayMarch5 LIVE MUSIC Desafinado – Latin, jazz, Bossanova – Cowboy Monkey, 5pm, $2 The Prairie Dogs – The Iron Post, 5pm, TBA Happy Hour: Al Lerardi – blues – Tommy G's, 57pm, free Larry Gates, Mike Ingram, Cary Judd – Caffe Paradiso, 7pm, free Gabe Rosen – Embassy Tavern, 8:30pm, free Painkillers – blues – The Iron Post, 8:30pm, TBA Cougars, Just a Fire, The Drapes, The Violents – Nargile, 9pm, $5 Too White Crew – Canopy Club, 10pm, $5 Hello Dave, Synesthesia – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $8 Mad Cats – Tommy G's, 10pm, cover Country Connection – Rose Bowl Tavern, 9pm, cover Traffic Jam: Metta Quintet – Krannert Center lobby, 5pm, free Delta Kings – The Phoenix, 9pm-1am Trouble IS – Lava, 9:30pm Deadbeats – Hubers, 8pm

DJ DJ Bozak – Barfly, 9pm, free DJ ImpacT – house – Nargile, 10pm, $5 DJ Tim Williams – dance – Highdive, 10pm, $5

ON STAGE A Raisin in the Sun – Colwell Playhouse, 7:30pm. Flex tickets: $12, sc, stu $11, UI, yth $6. Single tickets: $13, sc, stu $12, UI, yth $7. THE Shakespeare PROJECT – The University of Illinois and Parkland College theatre departments put a new twist on Shakespeare. Parkland Theatre, 8pm, $5-8.

ON STAGE

SundayMarch7 LIVE MUSIC Stuart Davis – Espresso Royale Caffe, 8pm, $5 Jay Scott Franklin – The Iron Post, 9pm, TBA Crystal River – Rose Bowl Tavern, 8:30pm, free Chambana – jazz – Krannert Center lobby, 9:30pm, free Cecil Bridgewater – jazz – Tryon Festival Theatre, 7:30pm, $17-25

DJ Fresh Face DJ – Barfly, 9pm, free Spundays w/ DJ Delayney – Boltini, 10pm, free Bends by Otter – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, free Reel to Reel and the Wheels of Steel: Spicerack Movies with soundtrack provided by DJ Spinnerty and DJ Bozak – Mike 'n Molly's, 10pm, $1 Downtempo Lounge Night: DJ Fritz – Nargile, 10pm

MUSIC PERFORMANCE The Parkland Wind Ensemble and the Parkland Community Orchestra – First Baptist Church of Champaign in Savoy, 3pm

ON STAGE THE Shakespeare PROJECT – The University of Illinois and Parkland College theatre departments put a new twist on Shakespeare. Parkland Theatre, 3pm, $5-8.

buzz

H A I R S A L ON

GREAT WALL CHINESE RESTAURANT EAT IN • TAKE OUT • DRIVE THRU

Phone 351-8808

KANYE WEST The College Dropout Rocafella Records

★★★ BY BRIAN MERTZ

4

$

99

Quality and Quantity... We are Always the Best! Lunch and House Specials Served Everyday, Anytime Hot Tea On the House. Smiles Are Free, Too! 1209 N. Prospect Ave • Fax 351-9878 Hours: Mon-Sat. 10:30am-11pm Sun. 10:30am-10:30pm

No Personal Checks

music

MARCH 4-10, 2004 | TWO GOVERNORS IN THE SAME FILM. COINCIDENCE? I THINK NOT.

Free Delivery for orders over $12 $1 Delivery Charge for orders between $8-$12

ILbreaks – break dancing/2-on-2 competition – Courtyard Cafe, 6pm-12am, $5, stu $3

SaturdayMarch6

buzz

CDReviews

030404buzz1316

No one loves a smartaleck. That comes with the territory because a true smart-aleck not only has a wealth of sarcastic remarks to make, but if he or she lives up to the “smart” part, those sarcastic remarks often contain a lot of truth.That’s what makes a smartaleck so annoying. It is also what makes Chicagoan Kanye West so engaging on his debut release, The College Dropout. Demand for West as a producer is starting to get to Neptunes-like levels in the hip-hop community. Kanye created the beats for Jay Z’s “Izzo (HOVA),”Talib Kweli’s “Get By”and Alisha Keys’new single “You Don’t Know My Name.” In addition, two singles off The College Dropout have burned up the charts. West’s first single, “Through The Wire,” tells the tale of getting in a car accident that nearly ended his life. It also exemplifies Kanye’s sound—head-bobbing beats that are driven by classic vocal hooks that West filters up to Alvin & The Chipmunks levels. “Slow Jamz” (which features Chicago speed-rapper Twista and comedian-turnedsinger Jamie Foxx) is inescapable on the airwaves. But if this is where the mainstream hip-hop production machine is going to take us, then I say bring it on. Except for the poor sound quality of “Two Words” and the unfocused (but still hilarious) “The New Workout Plan,” the beats and production quality on College Dropout is fantastic. Kanye knows how to find a great vocal hook, and he somehow manages to combine pop and street with his beats. The song “All Falls Down” features an interpolation of Lauryn Hill’s “Mystery of Inquity” and sees West at his strongest. The track is catchy, intelligent and still a

OnTheSpotReview CHALEE TENNISON Parading in the Rain Dreamworks BY LIZ MOZZOCCO

Before Listening Oh, Chalee Tennison, I don’t think this is going to go very well. I should begin by mentioning that the “i” in this woman’s name is dotted with a heart. If that and the rest of the CD booklet are any indication, this music is going to be super-poppy and more nauseatingly saccharine than the artificial sweeteners at Grandma’s house. A closer look at the album reveals that Ms. Tennison is making music in Nashville and shares a record label with Toby Keith. The verdict? Overproduced country-pop imitating the Dixie Chicks or Shania Twain. There are 11 songs here, including two with the word “road” in them (“Lonesome Road” and “Cheater’s Road,” if you were having trouble inserting a stereotypical country song word before “road”) and one entitled “I Am Pretty.” There’s no doubt about that, since the CD

gem after 10 consecutive listens. To Kanye’s credit, the guy can rap. And like his beats, Kanye’s messages somehow manage to be palatable to people who glorify the bling-bling aspects of commercial hip hop while still criticizing the shortcomings of that lifestyle. Turning out lines like: “Now niggas can’t make it ballots to choose leadership / But we can make it Jacob and to the dealership / That’s why I hear new music and I just don’t be feelin it / Racism still alive they just be concealin it.” Sentiments like that not only allow Kanye to rap about cars and consciousness, but allows him to have guest spots from “conscious rappers” (a terrible record label marketing term) like Talib Kweli and Mos Def, but also feature guest rhymes from Jay Z and Ludacris. Kanye is a proud college dropout (as evidenced by several songs and skits deflating the importance of a college education). He’s obviously bright—College Dropout feels unnecessarily limited by its surroundings. There is a sense that Kanye is holding back with his thoughts. Maybe it’s being signed to Roc-a-fella and hanging out all the time with Damon Dash and Jay Z, but something is keeping Kanye from using his full smart-aleck skills. And that makes College Dropout not even half the album it could have been. If he had the courage to fully speak his mind like Eminem does, with the accessibility and street cred that he still has, Kanye could have made an album with the political resonance and widespread acceptance that we have not seen since Public Enemy at the height of their popularity. College Dropout sounds more like the kid in the back of the class who complained about everything than the kid who people listened to and followed because of his charisma. College Dropout is a great listen worth owning, but Kanye West doesn’t deliver on his full lyrical potential.

NORAH JONES Feels Like Home Blue Note

★★ BY SHADIE ELNASHAI

No one can question the quality of Norah Jones’s voice.Within the contemporary realm, she has a unique ability that is both instantly recognizable and holds up under close inspection. Yet, it seems tragically appropriate that Norah Jones is the illegitimate daughter of the legendary sitar player Ravi leaflet features Faith Hill-style glamour shots of Chalee on each page. At this point, I am too grossed out to read the lyrics, but there is an interesting thank-you note at the end from the singer. In it, she thanks God and the 500-some people who do public relations at the record company. It’s actually quite revealing. Chalee Tennison refers to herself as a “hillbilly” and sends this shout-out to her “Glam Squad”: “Can anyone say the shat!!” Direct quote. And no, I cannot say the shat. I think the word you’re looking for is “shit.”

After Listening This actually isn’t that bad. It’s definitely typical top-40 country fare, but I was expecting worse. Chalee Tennison might not have been lying when she called herself a hillbilly (at least if any of these songs are biographical), and for some reason that gives her more credibility. She sings about a woman escaping from an abusive relationship on “I Am Pretty,” and the fourth track, “Easy Lovin’ You,” talks of teenage pregnancy. Lyrically, the album is much like its mainstream country peers: mostly cheesy and sometimes embarrassingly frank. However, considering the level of disgust I predicted from looking at the album art, Chalee makes out pretty well. She’s a talented singer, though the songs themselves aren’t much out of the ordinary for their genre. I’m just hoping we don’t have another Faith Hill on our hands. God help us.

Shankar. Jones may have sold 18 milllion copies of her debut Come Away With Me, and picked up eight Grammys, but truth be told, as a musician she is neither in the same league as her father nor as his daughter Anoushka Shankar. It is her failings as a musician that make Feels Like Home pleasant but not much more. Overall, this album is a fairly synonymous but more confident version of her previous offering, with more of a focus on the jaunty, cowboy influences that she hinted at earlier. The opener, “Sunrise”, is effectively catchy, and it succeeds where few of the remaining tracks do. In many of the album’s fillers, the attempted delicate prettiness is not supported by sufficient substance. Songs that should be full-bodied are often feeble. Track two,“What Am I To Do?” is Jones’s only entirely self-penned song. On the surface, it appears to be one of the better tracks, but when stripped of its jazzed-up instrumentation, the song has an incredibly run-of-the-mill pop melody. In addition, there is a certain hypocrisy that emanates from anyone who markets herself as a solo artist, only to sing other people’s songs. It seems that her backing group, The Handsome Band, deserves far more credit than they receive. The bassist, Lee Alexander, has a hand in writing just as many songs as Jones, and his song “Creepin’ In”, Jones’s duet with Dolly Parton, is easily the most intriguing track on the CD. Simplicity also extends to the lyrics, whose unimaginative themes get about as complex as “Funny how my favorite shirt / Smells more like you than me / Bitter traces left behind / Stains no one can see” (from “In The Morning”). It is no coincidence that the album is named Feels Like Home, for Jones is playing it safe by delivering a conservative and familiar album that placates rather than challenges her previously acquired fans. Yet, despite everything, Norah Jones’s voice makes this album perfectly listenable. The sultry vocalist never falters and seems to have increased the repertoire that is within her range, which is aptly demonstrated 13 times over. But her vocals are not enough, and the final product is devoid of the emotion that it should incite. On a basic level, it doesn’t mean anything. It succeeds mostly in sounding redundant and is far from memorable.

MUSIC REVIEW GUIDE

★★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★ No stars

Flawless Good Mediocre Bad Unlistenable CHARTS

PARASOL RECORDS’ TOP 10 SELLERS 1. The Comsat Angels - It's History (Nano) 2. The Decemberists - The Tain (Acuarela) 3. Belle And Sebastian - I'm a Cuckoo (Rough Trdae) 4. Sweet, Matthew - Kimi Ga Suki Life (Superdeformed) 5. Moonbabies - The Orange Billboard (Hidden Agenda) 6. Xiu Xiu - Fabulous Muscles (5 Rue Christine) 7. All Night Radio - Spirit Stereo Frequency (Sub Pop) 8. Camera Obscura - Underachievers Please Try Hard (Merge) 9. Poster Children - No More Songs About Sleep and Fire (Hidden Agenda) 10. Lanterna - Highways (Badman)

13

Open Mic Night

at the Canopy Club Sponsored by buzz

Tuesday, March 9 starting at 10PM Both stages open to accommodate anything from a solo poetry reading to an 8-piece heavy metal band. Come showcase your talent whatever it may be! GET FAMOUS! The 2nd Tuesday of each month, buzz will host a special Open Mic Night competition. Members of the audience will vote for their favorite performer of the night. The winner will be featured on the buzz website, which will include a videoclip of their performance.

$2 cover after 10PM $2 Long Islands $2.50 Jaeger Bombs The Canopy Club 708 S. Goodwin, Urbana 217-344-2263


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4:26 PM

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buzzpicks

Jazz revelers come out to play

M

A night of hip hop at Canopy

ake Thursday your night of jazz. From UI jazz bands to LaMonte Parsons, the Jazz Threads’ Jazz Crawl and Jam Session is a bar crawl at its finest, centered around the music. Start the night with UI Jazz Band II and In Your Ear Band at Iron Post at 5 p.m., then head to Krannert Center at 6:30 p.m. to hear UI Lab Band. From there, you can walk to Canopy Club for Susan Hofer and Friends’ 8 p.m. performance, followed by Jeff Helgesen and Chip McNeill at Zorba’s at 9:30 p.m. And finally, end the night with jazz guitarist LaMonte Parsons at Cowboy Monkey as he hosts a jazz jam session. Keep your ears perked for the sounds of Cecil Bridgewater, who is scheduled to join in the ending session.

The Walkmen &

The French Kicks at The Highdive on March 10 FREE PARTY!

Poster Children are all grown up, ready to rock

T

his Saturday is a big night for hip-hop lovers as Melodic Scribes, Brother Ali, dLo, Spinnerty and The Roots’ beat boxer Scratch come together on one stage. ocal act Melodic Scribes always get the crowd going with their high energy and innovative lyrics. Hailing from Minneapolis, Brother Ali is a masterful lyricist who brings social consciousness to the stage. And The Roots’ Scratch mesmerizes crowds with his human beat boxing. He recently released a solo album highlighting this talent. No electronics, no drums, no bass—just himself. Brother Ali, dLo and Spinnerty will round out the night. Catch the show this Saturday at Canopy Club. The show starts at 10 p.m. and has a $10 cover.

L

L

ocal indie rockers Poster Children have been active in the underground and mainstream music scenes for the past 16 years, and they’re back with a new album, their first in four years. The band will head to Cowboy Monkey Saturday to promote No More Songs About Sleep and Fire, an album of varied songs with one thing in common—a fresh energy and original, honest lyrics to match. The band uses distinct bass and drum sounds throughout the album to create catchy riffs and memorable tempos. The band has been around long enough to know how to please a crowd, and the members have only become more energized through the years. Back at home and with a new album to promote, Poster Children will undoubtedly be ready to cut loose and have fun this weekend. Check them out along with Acevot and ifihadahifi this Saturday at Cowboy Monkey. The show starts at 10 p.m. with a $6 cover.

WIN TICKETS!

Want to

WIN TICKETS to the show?

Come to a special CD listening party hosted by buzz Friday, March 5 9-10pm at The Highdive 51 Main Street, Champaign 217-359-4444 Come listen to the brand new album by The Walkmen, Bows + Arrows. Enter the raffle to win tickets to the show and other great giveaways. Present this ad at the door & pay no cover.

19 to enter, 21 to drink. Must be present to enter raffle.

15


030404buzz1415

3/3/04

4:26 PM

14

calendar

Page 1

calendar

buzzpicks

Jazz revelers come out to play

M

A night of hip hop at Canopy

ake Thursday your night of jazz. From UI jazz bands to LaMonte Parsons, the Jazz Threads’ Jazz Crawl and Jam Session is a bar crawl at its finest, centered around the music. Start the night with UI Jazz Band II and In Your Ear Band at Iron Post at 5 p.m., then head to Krannert Center at 6:30 p.m. to hear UI Lab Band. From there, you can walk to Canopy Club for Susan Hofer and Friends’ 8 p.m. performance, followed by Jeff Helgesen and Chip McNeill at Zorba’s at 9:30 p.m. And finally, end the night with jazz guitarist LaMonte Parsons at Cowboy Monkey as he hosts a jazz jam session. Keep your ears perked for the sounds of Cecil Bridgewater, who is scheduled to join in the ending session.

The Walkmen &

The French Kicks at The Highdive on March 10 FREE PARTY!

Poster Children are all grown up, ready to rock

T

his Saturday is a big night for hip-hop lovers as Melodic Scribes, Brother Ali, dLo, Spinnerty and The Roots’ beat boxer Scratch come together on one stage. ocal act Melodic Scribes always get the crowd going with their high energy and innovative lyrics. Hailing from Minneapolis, Brother Ali is a masterful lyricist who brings social consciousness to the stage. And The Roots’ Scratch mesmerizes crowds with his human beat boxing. He recently released a solo album highlighting this talent. No electronics, no drums, no bass—just himself. Brother Ali, dLo and Spinnerty will round out the night. Catch the show this Saturday at Canopy Club. The show starts at 10 p.m. and has a $10 cover.

L

L

ocal indie rockers Poster Children have been active in the underground and mainstream music scenes for the past 16 years, and they’re back with a new album, their first in four years. The band will head to Cowboy Monkey Saturday to promote No More Songs About Sleep and Fire, an album of varied songs with one thing in common—a fresh energy and original, honest lyrics to match. The band uses distinct bass and drum sounds throughout the album to create catchy riffs and memorable tempos. The band has been around long enough to know how to please a crowd, and the members have only become more energized through the years. Back at home and with a new album to promote, Poster Children will undoubtedly be ready to cut loose and have fun this weekend. Check them out along with Acevot and ifihadahifi this Saturday at Cowboy Monkey. The show starts at 10 p.m. with a $6 cover.

WIN TICKETS!

Want to

WIN TICKETS to the show?

Come to a special CD listening party hosted by buzz Friday, March 5 9-10pm at The Highdive 51 Main Street, Champaign 217-359-4444 Come listen to the brand new album by The Walkmen, Bows + Arrows. Enter the raffle to win tickets to the show and other great giveaways. Present this ad at the door & pay no cover.

19 to enter, 21 to drink. Must be present to enter raffle.

15


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4:27 PM

Page 1

calendar

ThursdayMarch4 LIVE MUSIC Jazz Threads Pub Crawl Stop #1: U of I Jazz Band II – The Iron Post, 5pm, free Jazz Threads Pub Crawl Stop #2: U of I Lab Jazz Band, Metta Quintet – Krannert Center, 6:30pm, free In Your Ear Big Band – jazz – The Iron Post, 7-9pm, TBA Acoustic Music Series: Darrin Drda – Aroma, 8pm, free Jazz Threads Pub Crawl Stop #3: Susan Hofer and Friends – Canopy Club, 8pm, free Jazz Threads Pub Crawl Stop #4: Jeff Helgesen Jazz Quintet – Zorba's, 9:30pm, free Addison Groove Project, Apollo Project – Canopy Club, 10pm, $5 Jazz Threads Pub Crawl Stop #5: LaMonte Parsons Experience, Cecil Bridgewater – Cowboy Monkey, 11pm, fre Country Connection – Rose Bowl Tavern, 9pm, free Darrin Drda – acoustic – Aroma, 8-10pm FABULOUS!!! – electro-clash/dance-punk party hosted by The HotWatt – Nargile, 10pm, $5

WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com | MARCH 4-10, 2004

DANCING

LIVE MUSIC

DJ J-Phlip – house – Barfly, 9pm, free DJ Delayney – Nargile, 10pm, $5 5th Platoon – Highdive, 10pm, $5 A Night in the Tropics – live DJ TBA – Courtyard Cafe, 9pm, $2

Green St. Records Presents: The Album Teaser Show: Kate Hathaway Band, Bullet Called Life, The Ending, Fredology – Courtyard Cafe, 8:30pm, $5 Gabe Rosen – Embassy Taven, 8:30pm, TBA Middletown – The Iron Post, 9pm, TBA American Minor, Apollo Project, Jason Finkelman's NU-Orbit Ensemble – Nargile, 9pm, $5 Bruiser and the Virtues – Embassy Tavern, 9:30pm, free Brother Ali, Scratch, Melodic Scribes, dLo and Spinnerty – Canopy Club, 10pm, $10 Poster Children, ifihadahifi, Acevot – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $6 The Crystal River Band – Tommy G's, 10pm, cover Country Connection – Rose Bowl Tavern, 9pm, cover The Brat Pack – ‘80s – Fat City Saloon, 8:30pm Trouble IS – Lowe’s Big Barrel & Summer Club in Danville, 9pm Kilborn Alley – blues – The Phoenix, TBA Prairie Dogs – Hubers, 8pm

MUSIC PERFORMANCE

DJ

"G" Force Karaoke – Pia's in Rantoul, 9pm-1am Liszt Symposium: Works for Piano and Orchestra – Foellinger Great Hall, 7:30pm, $17, sc $15, stu $10

DJ Sophisto – house – Barfly, 9pm, free DJ Mertz – house – Nargile, 10pm, $5 DJ Tim Williams – dance – Highdive, 10pm, $5

ON STAGE

MUSIC PERFORMANCE

DJ

A Raisin in the Sun – Colwell Playhouse, 7:30pm. Flex tickets: $12, sc, stu $11, UI, yth $6. Single tickets: $13, sc, stu $12, UI, yth $7. THE Shakespeare PROJECT – The University of Illinois and Parkland College theatre departments put a new twist on Shakespeare. Parkland Theatre, 8pm, $5-8.

"G" Force Karaoke – Historic Lincoln Castle Hotel Alumni Tap Bar, 9pm-1am Java and Jazz: Cecil Bridgewater – Tryon Festival Theatre, 10am, free Liszt Symposium: Works for Piano and Orchestra – Foellinger Great Hall, 7:30pm, $17, sc $15, stu $10

AROUND TOWN

A Raisin in the Sun – Colwell Playhouse, 7:30pm. Flex tickets: $12, sc, stu $11, UI, yth $6. Single tickets: $13, sc, stu $12, UI, yth $7. THE Shakespeare PROJECT – The University of Illinois and Parkland College theatre departments put a new twist on Shakespeare. Parkland Theatre, 8pm, $5-8.

Wine Tasting – Sample wine, learn about the different kinds and buy full glasses for $3.50 per glass. Krannert Center lobby, 5pm, free.

FridayMarch5 LIVE MUSIC Desafinado – Latin, jazz, Bossanova – Cowboy Monkey, 5pm, $2 The Prairie Dogs – The Iron Post, 5pm, TBA Happy Hour: Al Lerardi – blues – Tommy G's, 57pm, free Larry Gates, Mike Ingram, Cary Judd – Caffe Paradiso, 7pm, free Gabe Rosen – Embassy Tavern, 8:30pm, free Painkillers – blues – The Iron Post, 8:30pm, TBA Cougars, Just a Fire, The Drapes, The Violents – Nargile, 9pm, $5 Too White Crew – Canopy Club, 10pm, $5 Hello Dave, Synesthesia – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $8 Mad Cats – Tommy G's, 10pm, cover Country Connection – Rose Bowl Tavern, 9pm, cover Traffic Jam: Metta Quintet – Krannert Center lobby, 5pm, free Delta Kings – The Phoenix, 9pm-1am Trouble IS – Lava, 9:30pm Deadbeats – Hubers, 8pm

DJ DJ Bozak – Barfly, 9pm, free DJ ImpacT – house – Nargile, 10pm, $5 DJ Tim Williams – dance – Highdive, 10pm, $5

ON STAGE A Raisin in the Sun – Colwell Playhouse, 7:30pm. Flex tickets: $12, sc, stu $11, UI, yth $6. Single tickets: $13, sc, stu $12, UI, yth $7. THE Shakespeare PROJECT – The University of Illinois and Parkland College theatre departments put a new twist on Shakespeare. Parkland Theatre, 8pm, $5-8.

ON STAGE

SundayMarch7 LIVE MUSIC Stuart Davis – Espresso Royale Caffe, 8pm, $5 Jay Scott Franklin – The Iron Post, 9pm, TBA Crystal River – Rose Bowl Tavern, 8:30pm, free Chambana – jazz – Krannert Center lobby, 9:30pm, free Cecil Bridgewater – jazz – Tryon Festival Theatre, 7:30pm, $17-25

DJ Fresh Face DJ – Barfly, 9pm, free Spundays w/ DJ Delayney – Boltini, 10pm, free Bends by Otter – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, free Reel to Reel and the Wheels of Steel: Spicerack Movies with soundtrack provided by DJ Spinnerty and DJ Bozak – Mike 'n Molly's, 10pm, $1 Downtempo Lounge Night: DJ Fritz – Nargile, 10pm

MUSIC PERFORMANCE The Parkland Wind Ensemble and the Parkland Community Orchestra – First Baptist Church of Champaign in Savoy, 3pm

ON STAGE THE Shakespeare PROJECT – The University of Illinois and Parkland College theatre departments put a new twist on Shakespeare. Parkland Theatre, 3pm, $5-8.

buzz

H A I R S A L ON

GREAT WALL CHINESE RESTAURANT EAT IN • TAKE OUT • DRIVE THRU

Phone 351-8808

KANYE WEST The College Dropout Rocafella Records

★★★ BY BRIAN MERTZ

4

$

99

Quality and Quantity... We are Always the Best! Lunch and House Specials Served Everyday, Anytime Hot Tea On the House. Smiles Are Free, Too! 1209 N. Prospect Ave • Fax 351-9878 Hours: Mon-Sat. 10:30am-11pm Sun. 10:30am-10:30pm

No Personal Checks

music

MARCH 4-10, 2004 | TWO GOVERNORS IN THE SAME FILM. COINCIDENCE? I THINK NOT.

Free Delivery for orders over $12 $1 Delivery Charge for orders between $8-$12

ILbreaks – break dancing/2-on-2 competition – Courtyard Cafe, 6pm-12am, $5, stu $3

SaturdayMarch6

buzz

CDReviews

030404buzz1316

No one loves a smartaleck. That comes with the territory because a true smart-aleck not only has a wealth of sarcastic remarks to make, but if he or she lives up to the “smart” part, those sarcastic remarks often contain a lot of truth.That’s what makes a smartaleck so annoying. It is also what makes Chicagoan Kanye West so engaging on his debut release, The College Dropout. Demand for West as a producer is starting to get to Neptunes-like levels in the hip-hop community. Kanye created the beats for Jay Z’s “Izzo (HOVA),”Talib Kweli’s “Get By”and Alisha Keys’new single “You Don’t Know My Name.” In addition, two singles off The College Dropout have burned up the charts. West’s first single, “Through The Wire,” tells the tale of getting in a car accident that nearly ended his life. It also exemplifies Kanye’s sound—head-bobbing beats that are driven by classic vocal hooks that West filters up to Alvin & The Chipmunks levels. “Slow Jamz” (which features Chicago speed-rapper Twista and comedian-turnedsinger Jamie Foxx) is inescapable on the airwaves. But if this is where the mainstream hip-hop production machine is going to take us, then I say bring it on. Except for the poor sound quality of “Two Words” and the unfocused (but still hilarious) “The New Workout Plan,” the beats and production quality on College Dropout is fantastic. Kanye knows how to find a great vocal hook, and he somehow manages to combine pop and street with his beats. The song “All Falls Down” features an interpolation of Lauryn Hill’s “Mystery of Inquity” and sees West at his strongest. The track is catchy, intelligent and still a

OnTheSpotReview CHALEE TENNISON Parading in the Rain Dreamworks BY LIZ MOZZOCCO

Before Listening Oh, Chalee Tennison, I don’t think this is going to go very well. I should begin by mentioning that the “i” in this woman’s name is dotted with a heart. If that and the rest of the CD booklet are any indication, this music is going to be super-poppy and more nauseatingly saccharine than the artificial sweeteners at Grandma’s house. A closer look at the album reveals that Ms. Tennison is making music in Nashville and shares a record label with Toby Keith. The verdict? Overproduced country-pop imitating the Dixie Chicks or Shania Twain. There are 11 songs here, including two with the word “road” in them (“Lonesome Road” and “Cheater’s Road,” if you were having trouble inserting a stereotypical country song word before “road”) and one entitled “I Am Pretty.” There’s no doubt about that, since the CD

gem after 10 consecutive listens. To Kanye’s credit, the guy can rap. And like his beats, Kanye’s messages somehow manage to be palatable to people who glorify the bling-bling aspects of commercial hip hop while still criticizing the shortcomings of that lifestyle. Turning out lines like: “Now niggas can’t make it ballots to choose leadership / But we can make it Jacob and to the dealership / That’s why I hear new music and I just don’t be feelin it / Racism still alive they just be concealin it.” Sentiments like that not only allow Kanye to rap about cars and consciousness, but allows him to have guest spots from “conscious rappers” (a terrible record label marketing term) like Talib Kweli and Mos Def, but also feature guest rhymes from Jay Z and Ludacris. Kanye is a proud college dropout (as evidenced by several songs and skits deflating the importance of a college education). He’s obviously bright—College Dropout feels unnecessarily limited by its surroundings. There is a sense that Kanye is holding back with his thoughts. Maybe it’s being signed to Roc-a-fella and hanging out all the time with Damon Dash and Jay Z, but something is keeping Kanye from using his full smart-aleck skills. And that makes College Dropout not even half the album it could have been. If he had the courage to fully speak his mind like Eminem does, with the accessibility and street cred that he still has, Kanye could have made an album with the political resonance and widespread acceptance that we have not seen since Public Enemy at the height of their popularity. College Dropout sounds more like the kid in the back of the class who complained about everything than the kid who people listened to and followed because of his charisma. College Dropout is a great listen worth owning, but Kanye West doesn’t deliver on his full lyrical potential.

NORAH JONES Feels Like Home Blue Note

★★ BY SHADIE ELNASHAI

No one can question the quality of Norah Jones’s voice.Within the contemporary realm, she has a unique ability that is both instantly recognizable and holds up under close inspection. Yet, it seems tragically appropriate that Norah Jones is the illegitimate daughter of the legendary sitar player Ravi leaflet features Faith Hill-style glamour shots of Chalee on each page. At this point, I am too grossed out to read the lyrics, but there is an interesting thank-you note at the end from the singer. In it, she thanks God and the 500-some people who do public relations at the record company. It’s actually quite revealing. Chalee Tennison refers to herself as a “hillbilly” and sends this shout-out to her “Glam Squad”: “Can anyone say the shat!!” Direct quote. And no, I cannot say the shat. I think the word you’re looking for is “shit.”

After Listening This actually isn’t that bad. It’s definitely typical top-40 country fare, but I was expecting worse. Chalee Tennison might not have been lying when she called herself a hillbilly (at least if any of these songs are biographical), and for some reason that gives her more credibility. She sings about a woman escaping from an abusive relationship on “I Am Pretty,” and the fourth track, “Easy Lovin’ You,” talks of teenage pregnancy. Lyrically, the album is much like its mainstream country peers: mostly cheesy and sometimes embarrassingly frank. However, considering the level of disgust I predicted from looking at the album art, Chalee makes out pretty well. She’s a talented singer, though the songs themselves aren’t much out of the ordinary for their genre. I’m just hoping we don’t have another Faith Hill on our hands. God help us.

Shankar. Jones may have sold 18 milllion copies of her debut Come Away With Me, and picked up eight Grammys, but truth be told, as a musician she is neither in the same league as her father nor as his daughter Anoushka Shankar. It is her failings as a musician that make Feels Like Home pleasant but not much more. Overall, this album is a fairly synonymous but more confident version of her previous offering, with more of a focus on the jaunty, cowboy influences that she hinted at earlier. The opener, “Sunrise”, is effectively catchy, and it succeeds where few of the remaining tracks do. In many of the album’s fillers, the attempted delicate prettiness is not supported by sufficient substance. Songs that should be full-bodied are often feeble. Track two,“What Am I To Do?” is Jones’s only entirely self-penned song. On the surface, it appears to be one of the better tracks, but when stripped of its jazzed-up instrumentation, the song has an incredibly run-of-the-mill pop melody. In addition, there is a certain hypocrisy that emanates from anyone who markets herself as a solo artist, only to sing other people’s songs. It seems that her backing group, The Handsome Band, deserves far more credit than they receive. The bassist, Lee Alexander, has a hand in writing just as many songs as Jones, and his song “Creepin’ In”, Jones’s duet with Dolly Parton, is easily the most intriguing track on the CD. Simplicity also extends to the lyrics, whose unimaginative themes get about as complex as “Funny how my favorite shirt / Smells more like you than me / Bitter traces left behind / Stains no one can see” (from “In The Morning”). It is no coincidence that the album is named Feels Like Home, for Jones is playing it safe by delivering a conservative and familiar album that placates rather than challenges her previously acquired fans. Yet, despite everything, Norah Jones’s voice makes this album perfectly listenable. The sultry vocalist never falters and seems to have increased the repertoire that is within her range, which is aptly demonstrated 13 times over. But her vocals are not enough, and the final product is devoid of the emotion that it should incite. On a basic level, it doesn’t mean anything. It succeeds mostly in sounding redundant and is far from memorable.

MUSIC REVIEW GUIDE

★★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★ No stars

Flawless Good Mediocre Bad Unlistenable CHARTS

PARASOL RECORDS’ TOP 10 SELLERS 1. The Comsat Angels - It's History (Nano) 2. The Decemberists - The Tain (Acuarela) 3. Belle And Sebastian - I'm a Cuckoo (Rough Trdae) 4. Sweet, Matthew - Kimi Ga Suki Life (Superdeformed) 5. Moonbabies - The Orange Billboard (Hidden Agenda) 6. Xiu Xiu - Fabulous Muscles (5 Rue Christine) 7. All Night Radio - Spirit Stereo Frequency (Sub Pop) 8. Camera Obscura - Underachievers Please Try Hard (Merge) 9. Poster Children - No More Songs About Sleep and Fire (Hidden Agenda) 10. Lanterna - Highways (Badman)

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Open Mic Night

at the Canopy Club Sponsored by buzz

Tuesday, March 9 starting at 10PM Both stages open to accommodate anything from a solo poetry reading to an 8-piece heavy metal band. Come showcase your talent whatever it may be! GET FAMOUS! The 2nd Tuesday of each month, buzz will host a special Open Mic Night competition. Members of the audience will vote for their favorite performer of the night. The winner will be featured on the buzz website, which will include a videoclip of their performance.

$2 cover after 10PM $2 Long Islands $2.50 Jaeger Bombs The Canopy Club 708 S. Goodwin, Urbana 217-344-2263


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I AIN’T GOT TIME TO BLEED. | MARCH 4-10, 2004

buzz

Free music? Legal downloads? What’s wrong with this picture? MENDOZA MUSIC LINE BY LIZ MOZZOCCO | STAFF WRITER

I

’ve got a confession to make. I love free stuff. This probably doesn’t sound too shocking because most people like it when they don’t have to pay for things. But I love free stuff. I’m even willing to go digging through other people’s trash if I think I’ll find something good. It’s all pretty innocent (and pretty disgusting), but sometimes the quest for free stuff slips just over the line, into what some people would call “stealing.” For example, my love of free stuff has led to a preoccupation with stealing cable. But my many wily attempts on the cable box have been unsuccessful. A few weeks ago, I was wrestling with the TV antenna in defeat, when the warped image of a young girl came across the screen. I stopped cursing at the monitor when I heard her say that she was one of millions of individuals who were “prosecuted” (they were never actually charged with anything, since the cases were settled out of court) by the RIAA for downloading music for free off the Internet. She proceeded to say that she still down-

loads music, and right as I started thinking about how fucking punk rock that was, it became clear who was sponsoring her pity party monologue. It was a Pepsi ad. In case you haven’t noticed, there have been a lot of fools hanging around the Walgreens cooler recently, trying to peer inside all the Pepsi bottles on the shelf. It’s not just because they smoked that much weed; Pepsi has hooked up with Apple Computers to give away codes in the bottle caps so people can download free songs from iTunes. Before you jump off the couch you found on someone’s curb, eager to (legally!) download the new Nelly/Justin Timberlake remix, I recommend treating this new corporate promotion with some skepticism. I once read a Rolling Stone article about iTunes where Apple CEO Steve Jobs said “it is corrosive to one’s character to steal music.” Some might say that it is corrosive to one’s character to work for Apple. It’s undeniable that drinking Pepsi is corrosive to one’s stomach lining. But both Pepsi and Apple want you to think that they’ve got the remedy for your dirty “music stealing” habit. An iPod-toting friend tells me that he downloads songs from iTunes because he knows he isn’t ripping off the musician. It only costs a dollar! And now you can even get some songs for free! After buying something from Pepsi, of course.

So we can all feel relieved because we’re not stealing any of Sheryl Crow’s income for the sake of our own convenience. The trouble is, you don’t really know what happens to your dollar after you’ve spent it. It’s not like Enrique Iglesias is sitting around, eating Doritos and contemplating the loss of his mole, when an envelope shows up with your dollar in it. If it did, that would be kind of cool—then you could send Enrique another dollar, and he could use it to buy another bag of Doritos. Isn’t capitalism great? But the fact is that most of the money you spend on music—on CDs, concert tickets, merch, whatever—never makes it into the hands of the musician. The biggest cuts go to the record companies and various middlemen. It’s no different with iTunes. The RIAA is exposed online at www.downhillbattle.org, which estimates that the artist only gets eight to 14 cents of that dollar you’re spending. At least 35 percent is going toward Steve Jobs’s purchase of a new name. The rest of it goes directly to all the little people who work so hard bribing commercial radio stations to play shitty music no one cares about. God knows they deserve it, because using shady methods to benefit from other people’s art is wrong. You might even call it stealing. It seems to me that when someone suggests that you’re doing something bad, like stealing music, it’s because they want you to feel

guilty enough to stop doing it. So how come we’re not investigating the people who are accusing us of being thieves? The people who take huge cuts out of profits, all the while implying that the money is going directly to the artist? The ones who tack on absurd “service charges” for concert tickets you bought by clicking on a fucking link over the Internet? Companies involved in payola? Price fixing? Attempting to sue a 12-year-old girl as a scare tactic? All of that seems pretty damn wrong to me. It’s insanely difficult to track where the money you spend every day ends up. Everything you own, wear or put in your body—you just don’t know what kinds of bad business practices happened involving those products before they made their way to you. It seems to me that any purchase involving major labels and corporate giants in the music industry is tainted in ways that aren’t printed on the packaging. Someone is always getting a raw deal, and most of the time it’s either you or the band, or both. You may think that taking stuff out of the Dumpster is really gross, but it’s inexpensive and you can plainly see all of the dirt that it comes in. That’s more than can be said for what the RIAA, Pepsi or iTunes are trying to sell. buzz Liz Mozzocco is a senior at the University of Illinois. She is also an on-air personality at WPGU, 107.1 The Planet.

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calendar

MARCH 4-10, 2004 | WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com

MondayMarch8

DJ

Open Mic, hosted by Martin Page – Za's, 7pm, free Jazz Jam hosted by ParaDocs – The Iron Post, 7:30pm, TBA Puddle of Mudd – Canopy Club, 8pm, $20 Open Mic Night hosted by Mike Ingram – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, $2

DJ Chef Ra – Barfly, 9pm, free La Femme Confident – DJ Aquanet, Queen Betsy – Nargile, 9:30pm, TBA D-Lo & Spinnerty – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, free DJ Boardwalk – Mike 'n Molly's, 10pm, $1 Northstar Lounge hostedby Czar Absolute – slam poetry and hip hop DJ's – Nargile, 10pm, $1 Dream Sequence – Caffe Paradiso, 10pm, free

DJ

MUSIC PERFORMANCE

LIVE MUSIC

2ON2OUT – indie rock – Barfly, 9pm, free Chill in the Grill – hip hop – Canopy Club, 10pm, free DJ Betty Rocker – Mike 'n Molly's, 10pm, free Case of the Mondays – house – Nargile, 10pm, free

MUSIC PERFORMANCE Community Drum Circle – Ten Thousand Villages, 7-9pm, free "G" Force Karaoke – Kam's, 10pm-2am

COMEDY DeBono – improv comedy – Courtyard Cafe, 910pm, free

TuesdayMarch9 LIVE MUSIC Open Bluegrass Jam Session – Verde Gallery, 7pm, free Open Jam/Open Mic hosted by Openingbands.com – Canopy Club, 10pm, $2 Juan Turros, For If The Flies – The Iron Post, 10pm, TBA Acoustic Night: Adam Wolfe, Jess Greenlee – Tommy G's, 10pm Shipwreck, LP – Nargile, 11pm, $3 Crystal River – Rose Bowl Tavern, 9pm, free

DJ DJ Resonate - hip hop - Barfly, 9pm, free DJ Brom – Cowboy Monkey, 10pm, free NOX: DJ ZoZo, DJ Kannibal, DJ Rickbats – Highdive, 10pm, $2

COMEDY Spicy Clamato – improv comedy – Courtyard Cafe, 9-10pm, free

WednesdayMarch10 LIVE MUSIC Darrin Drda's Theory of Everything – The Iron Post, 9pm, TBA Kilborn Alley – blues – Tommy G's, 9pm, free Openingbands.com Showcase: Cash Gal, Buddha's Belly, FCAB, Shatered Angel – Canopy Club, 10pm, $3 The Walkmen, French Kicks, Orphans of Absinthe Blind – Highdive, 10pm, $8 Irish Traditional Music Session – Bentley's Pub, free Hard Poor Korn – Rose Bowl Tavern, 9pm, free Meredith Monk – Tryon Festival Theatre, 7:30pm, $14-$25

"G" Force Karaoke – Elmers Club 45, 7-11pm

C-UVENUES Assembly Hall First & Florida, Champaign, 333-5000 American Legion Post 24 705 W Bloomington Rd, Champaign, 356-5144 American Legion Post 71 107 N Broadway, Urbana, 367-3121 Barfly 120 N Neil, Champaign,352-9756 Barnes and Noble 51 E Marketview, Champaign, 355-2045 Boltini Lounge 211 N Neil, Champaign, 378-8001 Borders Books & Music 802 W Town Ctr, Champaign, 3519011 The Brass Rail 15 E University, Champaign, 352-7512 Canopy Club (Garden Grill) 708 S Goodwin, Urbana, 367-3140 Channing-Murray Foundation 1209 W Oregon, Urbana C.O. Daniels 608 E Daniel, Champaign, 337-7411 Cosmopolitan Club 307 E John, Champaign, 367-3079 Courtyard Cafe Illini Union, 1401 W Green, Urbana, 333-4666 Cowboy Monkey 6 Taylor St, Champaign, 398-2688 Clybourne 706 S Sixth, Champaign, 383-1008 Curtis Orchard 3902 S Duncan Rd, Champaign, 359-5565 D.R. Diggers 604 S Country Fair Dr, Champaign, 356-0888 Elmer’s Club 45 3525 N Cunningham, Urbana, 344-3101 Embassy Tavern & Grill 114 S Race, Urbana, 384-9526 Esquire Lounge 106 N Walnut, Champaign, 398-5858 Fallon’s Ice House 703 N Prospect, Champaign, 398-5760 Fat City Saloon 505 S Chestnut, Champaign, 356-7100 The Great Impasta 114 W Church, Champaign, 359-7377 G.T.’s Western Bowl Francis Dr, Champaign, 359-1678 Highdive 51 Main, Champaign, 359-4444 Huber’s 1312 W Church, Champaign, 352-0606 Illinois Disciples Foundation 610 E Springfield, Champaign, 352-8721 Independent Media Center 218 W Main St, Urbana, 344-8820 The Iron Post 120 S Race, Urbana, 337-7678 Joe’s Brewery 706 S Fifth, Champaign, 384-1790 Kam’s 618 E Daniel, Champaign, 328-1605 Krannert Art Museum 500 E Peabody, Champaign, 333-1861 Krannert Center for the Performing Arts 500 S Goodwin, Urbana,Tickets: 333-6280, 800-KCPATIX La Casa Cultural Latina 1203 W Nevada, Urbana, 333-4950 Lava 1906 W Bradley, Champaign, 352-8714 Legends Bar & Grill 522 E Green, Champaign, 355-7674 Les’s Lounge 403 N Coler, Urbana, 328-4000 Lincoln Castle 209 S Broadway, Urbana, 344-7720 Lowe’s Big Barrel & Summer Club 14 N Hazel, Danville, 442-8090 Malibu Bay Lounge North Route 45, Urbana, 328-7415 Mike n’ Molly’s 105 N Market, Champaign, 355-1236 Mulligan’s 604 N Cunningham, Urbana, 367-5888 Murphy’s 604 E Green, Champaign, 352-7275 Nargile 207 W Clark St, Champaign Neil Street Pub 1505 N Neil, Champaign, 359-1601 Boardman’s Art Theater 126 W Church, Champaign, 351-0068 The Office 214 W Main, Urbana, 344-7608 Parkland College 2400 W Bradley, Champaign, 351-2528 Phoenix 215 S Neil, Champaign, 355-7866 Pia’s of Rantoul Route 136 E, Rantoul, 893-8244 Pink House Routes 49 & 150, Ogden, 582-9997 The Rainbow Coffeehouse 1203 W Green, Urbana, 766-9500 Red Herring/Channing-Murray Foundation 1209 W Oregon, Urbana, 344-1176 Rose Bowl Tavern 106 N Race, Urbana, 367-7031 Springer Cultural Center 301 N Randolph, Champaign, 355-1406 Spurlock Museum 600 S Gregory, Urbana, 333-2360

217-469-9585 Punch Downs-Telephone Outlets Installed - Repairs - Prewiring Quality Workmanship & Materials Illinois Bell Trained Technician - Guaranteed & Insured

Need a hand? Are you a not for profit organization in Champaign County that dreams about having a project completed but you lack the manpower to do it? Operation Helping Hand is April 17-24 and it’s the perfect chance to make your dream a reality. Think big! You provide us with a short term project, supervision and the materials to complete it and we’ll provide you with the most important resource of all...volunteers! Don’t miss out on this great opportunity! Attend our Kick-off Celebration on Thursday, March 18 from 11:30 am-1:30 pm at the Urbana Civic Center. For more information or to RSVP for the Kick-off Celebration please call Kathy at the Office of Volunteer Programs 244-7675 or Teri at United Way 352-5151.

OPERATION HELPING HAND is sponsored by:

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WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com | MARCH 4-10, 2004

The Station Theatre 223 N Broadway, Urbana, 384-4000 Strawberry Fields Cafe 306 W Springfield, Urbana, 328-1655 Sweet Betsy's 805 S Philo Rd, Urbana Ten Thousand Villages 105 N Walnut, Champaign, 352-8938 TK Wendl’s 1901 S Highcross Rd, Urbana, 255-5328 Tommy G’s 123 S Mattis Ave, Country Fair Shopping Center, 359-2177 Tonic 619 S Wright, Champaign, 356-6768 Two Main 2 Main, Champaign, 359-3148 University YMCA 1001 S Wright, Champaign, 344-0721 Verde/Verdant 17 E Taylor St, Champaign, 366-3204 Virginia Theatre 203 W Park Ave, Champaign, 356-9053 White Horse Inn 112 1/2 E Green, Champaign, 352-5945 Zorba’s 627 E Green, Champaign

CHICAGOSHOWS MARCH 3/4 Jazzanova @ Smart Bar 3/4 Kraig Jarret Johnson & The Program @ Schubas 3/4-5 Neil Young & Crazy Horse @ Rosemont Theatre 3/5 Clarence Clemons & The Temple of Soul @ Joe’s 3/5 Faun Fables @ Schubas 3/5 British Sea Power @ Empty Bottle 3/5 Richard Buckner @ Schubas 3/5 Chieftans @ Symphony Center 3/5 Bob Dylan @ Aragon Ballroom 3/5 Forty Piece Choir @ Metro, 18+ 3/5 Galactic @ Vic, 18+ 3/5 Luomo @ Abbey Pub, 18+ 3/5 Edwin McCain @ House of Blues, 18+ 3/6 Liftpoint @ Metro 3/6 Crossing @ Old Town School of Folk Music 3/7 Get Up Kids @ Metro 3/7 Rhonda Vincent @ Old Town School of Folk Music 3/10 Tara Jane O’Neil @ Gunther Murphy’s 3/11 Keb’ Mo’ @ House of Blues, 18+ 3/11 Walkmen @ Metro, 18+ 3/12 DJ SS, Grooverider, Shy FX, Twisted Individual @ Metro, 18+ 3/12 Church @ House of Blues 3/12 Antigone Rising @ Schubas 3/12 Futureman & The Isiah Williams Project @ Old Town School of Folk Music 3/12 Kid Rock @ Allstate Arena 3/12 Michael Mayer, Superpitcher @ Smart Bar 3/12 Liz Phair @ Vic 3/12 Von Bondies @ Double Door 3/13 Paul Kelly @ Double Door 3/13 Sage Francis, Joe Beats, Grand Buffet @ Logan Square Auditorium 3/13 Mavericks @ Park West 3/13 Grant Lee Phillips @ Abbey Pub 3/13 Saw Doctors @ Vic 3/13 Shipping News @ Subterranean 3/14 Liz Phair @ Vic 3/15 Cooper Temple Clause @ Double Door 3/17 Jerry Joseph & The Jackmormons @ Schubas 3/17 Bogdan Raczynski @ Empty Bottle 3/18-19 Melissa Etheridge @ House of Blues 3/19 Johnny Dowd @ Subterranean 3/19 Dream Theater @ Riviera 3/19 Britney Spears, Kelis @ Allstate Arena 3/19 Starlight Mints @ Abbey Pub 3/20 Jewel @ Star Plaza 3/20 Liars, Young People @ Logan Square Auditorium 3/20 Macabre @ Oasis 160 3/21 Amon Tobin, Kid Koala @ Metro, 18+ 3/22 Clay Aiken, Kelly Clarkson @ United Center 3/23 Ted Leo/Pharmacists @ Logan Square Auditorium 3/23 Three Days Grace @ Metro 3/24 12 Stones, Skillet, Pillar, Grits, Big Dismal @ House of Blues 3/26 Newsboys, Rebecca St. James @ UIC Pavilion 3/26 American Music Club @ Old Town School of Folk Music 3/26 Dolly Varden @ Subterranean 3/26 Al Green @ House of Blues 3/26 Great Big Sea @ Metro, 18+ 3/26 Franz Ferdinand @ Empty Bottle 3/26 Proclaimers @ Abbey Pub 3/26 Slip @ Double Door 3/26 Southern Culture on the Skids @ FitzGerald’s 3/26 TV On the Radio @ Empty Bottle 3/27 Campbell Brothers, Calvin Cooke @ Old Town School of Folk Music

CHICAGOVENUES Abbey Pub 3420 W Grace, Chicago, (773) 478-4408 Allstate Arena 6920 N Mannheim Rd, Rosemont, (847) 635-6601 Aragon 1106 W Lawrence, Chicago, (773) 561-9500 Arie Crown Theater 2301 S Lake Shore Dr, Chicago, (312) 791-6190 Bottom Lounge 3206 N Wilton, Chicago, (773) 975-0505 Chicago Theatre 175 N State St, Chicago, (312) 443-1130 Congress Theatre 2135 N Milwaukee, Chicago, (312) 923-2000 Double Door 1572 N Milwaukee Ave, Chicago, (773) 489-3160 Elbo Room 2871 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago, (773) 549-5549 Empty Bottle 1035 N Western Ave, Chicago, (773) 276-3600 Fireside Bowl 2648 W Fullerton Ave, Chicago, (773) 486-2700 House of Blues 329 N Dearborn, Chicago, (312) 923-2000 Martyrs' 3855 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago, (773) 404-9494 Metro/Smart Bar 3730 N Clark St, Chicago, (773) 549-0203 Old Town School of Folk Music 4544 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago, (773) 728-6000 Park West 322 W Armitage, Chicago, (773) 929-5959 Riviera Theatre 4746 N Racine, Chicago, (773) 275-6800 Rosemont Theatre 5400 N River Rd, Rosemont, (847) 671-5100 Schubas 3159 N Southport, Chicago, (773) 525-2508 UIC Pavilion 525 S Racine, Chicago, (312) 413-5700 Vic Theatre 3145 N Sheffield, Chicago, (773) 472-0449

ART NOTICES Creation Art Studios: Art Classes for Children and Adults – All classes use the spontaneous art process to demonstrate technical instruction and the exploration of materials. CPDU's offered. Creation Art Studios, 1102 E Washington in Urbana. Call Jeannine Bestoso at 344-6955 or go to www.creationartstudios.com for information. Join Artists and Workshops at Gallery Virtu – The artist-owned cooperative Gallery Virtu invites applications from area artists. The gallery offers workshops for adults, teens and children and original works by the members. Gallery Virtu, 220 W Washington in Monticello. Thu 12-4pm, Fri 12-8pm, Sat 10am-6pm. For more information, call 7627790, visit www.galleryvirtu.org or e-mail workshops@galleryvirtu.org. Collage for the Soul – Learn the many aspects of collage techniques while engaging your creativity and exploring your mind and heart. Sandra Ahten will teach the class, in which all materials will be provided. High Cross Studio, 1101 N High Cross Rd in Urbana. Feb 17- Mar 16, Tue 7-9pm. Other drawing and painting classes are also offered. For more information, call 367-6345 or go to www.spiritofsandra.com.

ART GALLERIES Boneyard Pottery – Ceramic Art by Michael Schwegmann and others. 403 Water St in Champaign. Tue-Sat 11am-5pm. 355-5610. Broken Oak Gallery – Local and national artists, original art including photography, watercolors, pottery, oil paintings, colored pencil, and woodturning. Refreshments served by the garden all day Saturday. 1865 N 1225 E Rd in White Heath. Thu-Sat 10am-4pm. 762-4907. Café Kopi – “Digital Evolutions,” photographs by John Sfondilias on display through February. 109 N Walnut in Champaign. Mon-Thu 7am-11pm, Fri-Sat 7am-12pm, Sun 11am-8pm. 359-4266. Creation Art Studios – Featuring original art by students and members of the studio. 1102 E Washington St in Urbana. Mon-Fri 3-5:30pm, Sat 14pm and other scheduled studio times. For more information, call Jeannine Bestoso at 344-6955. Country in the City – Antiques, Architectural, Gardening and Home Accessories. Custom designing available. 1104 E Washington St in Urbana. ThuSat 10am-5pm. 367-2367. Framer's Market – Frame designers since 1981. Ongoing work from local artists on display. 807 W Springfield Ave in Champaign. Tue-Fri 9:30am5:30pm, Sat 10am-4pm. 351-7020. Furniture Lounge – Specializing in mid-century modern furniture from the 1920s to the 1980s – retro, Danish modern, lighting, vintage stereo equipment and vinyl records. 9 E University in Champaign. Sun-Tues 12-4:30pm, Wed-Sat 115:30pm. 352-5150.

buzz

Glass FX – New and Antique Stained Glass Windows, Lamps and unique glass gifts. Gallery is free and open to the public. Interested in learning the art of Stained Glass? Beginning, intermediate and advanced stained glass classes offered. 202 S First St in Champaign. Mon-Thu 10am-5:30pm, Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 9am-4pm. www.glassfx.com. 359-0048. Griggs Street Potters – Handmade functional and decorative pottery. 305 W Grigg St in Urbana. MonFri 11am-4pm, or call for appointment. 344-8546. Hill Street Gallery Inc. – Oil and watercolor paintings, hand painted T-shirts, handmade jewelry. 703 W Hill in Champaign. Sat 12-5pm or by appointment during the week. 359-0675. Larry Kanfer Gallery – European Collection featured in the gallery. Both limited and open edition prints by Larry Kanfer, nationally acclaimed photographer. 2503 S Neil in Champaign. Free and Open to the Public. Mon-Sat 10am-5:30pm. 3982000. www.kanfer.com. LaPayne Photography – Specializes in panoramic photography up to 6 feet long of different subjects including sporting events, city skylines, national parks and University of Illinois scenes. 816 Dennison Dr in Champaign. Mon-Fri 9am-4pm and by appointment. 356-8994. Old Vic Art Gallery – Fine and original art, hand signed, limited edition prints, works by local artists, art restoration, custom framing, and periodic shows by local artists. 11 E University in Champaign. Mon-Thu 11am-5:30pm, Sat 11am4:30pm. 355-8338. Prairie Boatworks Gallery – Beautifully hand-crafted gift items and unique Valentine’s Day cards. Also, over 35 regional artist to choose from. 407 E Main St in Mahomet. Tue, Fri, Sat 10am-5pm, Sun 12-4pm. 586-6776. For more information, contact Mary at 356-8228 or tangoradesigns@aol.com. Steeple Gallery – Vintage botanical and bird prints, antiques and framed limited edition prints. 102 E Lafayette St in Monticello. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat 10am-4pm. www.steeplegallery.com. 762-2924. Verde Gallery – The work of local artist Sylvia Arnstein will be on display in the halls and café. 17 E Taylor St in Champaign. Cafe: Mon-Sat 7am-10 pm. Gallery: Tue-Sat 10am-10pm. 366-3204. Ziemer Gallery – Original paintings and limited edition prints by Larry Ziemer. Pottery, weavings, wood turning and glass works by other artists. Gallery visitors are welcome to sit, relax, listen to the music and just enjoy being surrounded by art. 210 W Washington in Monticello. Tue 10am-8pm, Wed-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 10am-4pm. www.ziemergallery.com. 762-9786.

ART EXHIBITS Creation Art Studios – Artwork by instructors Jeannine Bestoso, Amy Richardson, and Shoshanna Bauer, and the studio’s friends and family. 1102 E Washington St in Urbana. Hours: Mon-Fri 35:30pm, Sat 1-4pm and other scheduled studio times. For more information, call Jeannine Bestoso at 344-6955. “Distant Voices Nearer: A Celebration of American Indian Art” – Featuring paintings by DeHaven Solimon Chaffins, jewelry by Ben Yellowhorse, ceramic sculptures by Lynn Hone, ceramics by Laguna Potter and Michael Kanteena, pottery from Acoma and Mata Ortiz. On display at Verde Gallery through Mar 20. Opening reception for Chaffins and Yellowhouse Thur at 7pm. 17 E Taylor St in Champaign. Cafe: Mon-Sat 7am-10 pm. Gallery: Tue-Sat 10am-10pm. 366-3204. “Transitions” – Work from Nicole Cisne on display at Aroma Café through Mar 21. Artist statement: “The vehicle for my artwork is the female nude... Society and the fashion industry of today are the primary causes of an epidemic of eating disorders and false body images in many young women.” 118 N Neil in Champaign. Open 7 days a week, 7am-Midnight. For more information, contact Amanda Bickle at 356-3200 or art4aroma@yahoo.com.

buzz

music

MARCH 4-10, 2004 | GET TO THE CHOPPA!

“The last seven years, it really has just been a matter of survival,” Strang said. “The last three years, it has just been a matter of winding it down, looking for a plateau and thinking maybe it’ll stop dropping. And if it levels it off, we’ll make it survive.” But despite cutting payroll and decreasing inventory, Strang could not find a way to make Record Service survive.

Insurmountable odds Throughout the late 1990s, independent record stores across the country shut down. But even as Record Service closes in 2004, there is no one definitive answer as to why. “People think its just one thing, but its not just one thing,” said Troy Michael, store manager at Record Service. “It’s CD burning. It’s Wal-Mart. It’s Target. It’s the music industry in general. It’s the economy. It’s that dumbass in Washington D.C.” Strang cites not only the presence of big chain stores like Best Buy for Record Service’s decline, but also a general decline in Campustown business and the biggest factor of all, in his eyes: illegal downloading and burning of CDs. “Five years ago, we might have sold 1,000 copies of a new Dave Matthews Band CD because 30 guys from the same frat would all buy it,” Strang said. “Now, one or two guys buy it and they burn them for everyone else.” “The record companies will eventually make downloads work for them,” Strang said. “But brick and mortar is just going to just about disappear. There will still be some places for purists but not as many as before.” Whatever the exact cause, Record Service has faced economic woes for years. Strang estimates that at the store’s peak, Record Service moved about $2.5 million in volume. “Last year we did maybe $200,000,” Strang said. “If you think about $200,000 at a 30% markup which would be optimal, you have $600,000 to pay your expenses.” But those expenses quickly added up for Record Service. Strang said that rent is $5,000 a month at their current location. The power bill ran at an average of about $1,000 a month.

TopFive

Payroll at Record Service used to be somewhere between $3,000 and $4,000 a month. The store has trimmed that down so that it can still operate with a payroll of about $1,000 a month. But even after these cuts, Strang realized around Thanksgiving of last year that the store could not remain open through 2004. “I kept looking for signs. I thought if we could do $1,000 a day, I could keep expenses low enough that we could survive,” Strang said. Strang estimates that the store only hit $1,000 in sales in one day twice in the past year. Michael feels that certain changes could have been made to help the store last. “Moving even a block either way would have saved a couple hundred bucks a month on rent. And it could have been (a) better location. Downtown Champaign is booming right now and that’s where we could have went,” Michael said. “We could have been more in touch with the consumer product. We didn’t stock to where we potentially could have. (Co-Manager) Tim Williams could have blown out the vinyl. With my connections, we could have brought in the indie stuff. The store could have been smaller.” Strang still feels that the closing of the store was inevitable. “Even if I worked for free, which I couldn’t do, and we didn’t have to pay rent, we still couldn’t do it,” Strang said. “There is not enough response. There is not enough need for us to survive.” Record Service owed money to the record companies that provided CDs, and those companies eventually threatened to withhold shipment on new titles. “We couldn’t get in the new products and new releases to sell,” Strang said. “If we can’t get new releases, we can’t stay in business.” Past due bills caused Illinois Power to request a $1,500 deposit on March 15. Strang knew that he could not make that deposit and so March 5 became the closing date, leaving the store a final week to clean and sell off equipment in an estate sale. “I think the bottom line is that

the power company overpowered us,” Strang said. “Those are the expenses you cannot ignore.” This past summer, Strang made sure his employees were paid by not cashing his own paychecks until they cleared. It was a decision that perhaps could have worked when the store opened, but cannot work now. “Part of me is still the hippie that likes music,” Strang said. “But, I’m also a single dad with two kids and a nice house. I want my kids to understand my values, but they need to have clothes and go to college sometime. So you get to the point where there is no choice left.” In spite of the decision made out of economic necessity, closing Record Service was not a simple decision. “I would do this the rest of my life if I could,” Strang said. “It’s very hard to give it up. One way I look at it, and try to get away from looking at it this way because it makes me sad, but Record Service is my oldest child. This was my whole life for a long time. So it is hard just to say I want to walk away from it.” It will also be hard for the local music community, and Campustown in particular, to face the prospect of losing Record Service. “Outside of Borders, there is nowhere a local band can take their CDs to sell.

Popular bands that suck

1. The Eagles

The sort of piss-mellow lite-rock that comes from a bunch of smug, self-satisfied yuppies deciding to blow their colons all over the radio. “Take It Easy” is the crap your parents listen to when they find an old joint amongst their vinyl collection and decide to “go crazy for a night” and smoke up in the bathroom while you are out listening to good music. They were neither country nor rock and Merle Haggard should shove a banjo up each of their asses based on their appalling solo careers alone.This band holds the title of having sold the most copies of any album ever (their greatest hits at 28 million copies sold). There is a reason The Dude hates them ... they suck.

2. Creed

Every sentence beginning with the word Creed (in reference to the band) should end with “fellates goats.” Scott Stapp is a giant, walking ego that takes haircare tips from the cast of Friends. He is not a frontman. Some of the shittiest guitar chords ever strummed come from this atrocity of a band. Couple this with Scott Stapp’s I-wish-I-was-Eddie-Vedder voice and you’ve got a recipe for complete crap. These guys should have never “cleaned up” and stayed in a downward spiral to death in a bathtub. If the son of God ever does get around to returning, you can bet his first act will be to temporarily renounce pacifism, grab a sack full of doorknobs, and beat the living shit out of him. Right on, Jesus.

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And that is really bad for the local scene,” Michael said. “Bands can obviously sell their stuff at shows and online, but for the average person to go out to a store and get a local CD, that’s going to be hard.” While the local scene adjusts to losing this institution, Strang, who is 54 years old, must now adjust to being part of the job-seeking market for the first time. “I put together a resume for the first time in my life,” Strang said. “It is exciting on one hand and scary on the other. I graduated college and it wasn’t like, ‘What am I going to do?’ I’m already doing something. I didn’t have to make that decision of what I’m going to do when I grow up. I get to make that decision now.” When Record Service closes its doors to the public Friday evening, Strang will have no bad feelings about his 35year journey with this true Champaign institution. “It’s been a great ride,” Strang said. “The fact that it was an accident to begin with and lasted this long, I really have no complaints. Reality has turned out that this no longer works. But I had a really great time doing it.” buzz

Next week: Top five album names What’s yours? e-mail us at music@readbuzz.com

3. Journey

Chances are, when you go to hell, the lifeless husk of Neil Schon will be there to greet you playing every solo in death just as he did in life; like every talentless, creatively devoid jackoff who just learned how to climb up the fretboard. Steve Perry will be there wailing the chorus to “Don’t Stop Believin’” like he has his balls in a vice. The next time you hear Journey on some “classic” rock station, do yourself a favor and change it.

4. Dashboard Confessional

The soundtrack to post-adolescent bed-wetting. If there were any justice in this universe, the moment this dwarven, self-indulgent, crybaby decided to put down his Acoustic Guitar for Dummies and inflict his

sixth-grade journal entries on a nation of comb-over loving creamo kids, he would have accidently tripped into a pile of moose crap and suffocated to death.

5. Bon Jovi

Jon Bon Jovi makes John Cougar Mellencamp look like friggin’ genius. If this whole ‘80s revival thing keeps up, the end result will be a re-evaluation of Bon Jovi. Richie Sambora will drag his ass off a lawn chair somewhere in South Beach to “get together with the band” and North Korea will drop the A-bomb because they can’t stand the thought of The Ataris covering “Livin’ On A Prayer.”


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CARL WEATHERS AND ARNOLD . . . TOGETHER AT LAST | MARCH 4-10, 2004

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The end of an era

“Picturing Performance: Japanese Theater Prints of the Utagawa School, 1790–1868” – The focus of artistic production in 18th and 19th century Japan (Edo period) was the world of entertainment. This exhibit captures a views of this world of illusion and fantasy (Ukiyo) through richly-colored and compositionally provocative woodblock prints know as Ukiyo-e. The exhibition is on view through Mar 21. 500 E Peabody in Urbana. Tue, Thu-Sat 9am-5pm, Wed 9am-8pm, Sun 2-5pm. Suggested donation $3. 333-1860.

A familiar face for Campustown closes one last time on Friday

I

n November of 1969, with nothing more than a pad of paper, a pencil and a catalog, a student run organization in the Illini Union placed an order for an album. From those humble beginnings grew the Champaign institution known as Record Service. This Friday, almost 35 years later, Record Service will sell its last album. Due to financial difficulties that have plagued the store for years, Record Service will close March 5. During its lifetime, the store has seen its share of successes and great hardships. The closing of Record Service not only signals the end of Champaign-Urbana’s longest running independent record store, but it also typifies the uphill battles that are being lost by independent record stores around the country.

The store that hippies built Record Service began as a mail order store in the Illini Union in the fall of 1969. Current owner and co-founder Phil Strang was only 19 years old when Record Service started. Strang, who was programming director at WPGU, was asked by friends in student government to use his musical knowledge to help start the mail order service. The first day it was open, the new mail order service took orders for 10 albums. By the second day, that number was 20. Within a few weeks, Record Service decided to stock a few albums in the union instead of just taking mail orders. The first album they had in stock was Jefferson Airplane’s Volunteers. There were 25 copies and they flew out of the store. “We sold all 25 copies within an hour,” Strang said. “Next time, we had 50 copies of Jefferson Airplane and 25 copies of Strange Days by the Doors. Little did we know that those two titles would probably describe the store better than anything.” By Easter 1970, Record Service moved out of the Union to the basement of the

University YMCA on Wright Street. It would not be Record Service’s last move before moving to its current location at 621 E. Green St. in Campustown in December 1981. In the 11 years between its time at the YMCA and the current location, Record Service was housed at four other locations and also operated stores in Normal, Ill., a second store in Lincoln Square Mall and the classical store Figaro’s in its own space. No matter where the store was, though, Record Service operated under the same philosophy it always had from the time it became incorporated. “We decided that everyone that works at the store would be co-owners. Nobody that worked there wanted to be boss and no wanted to be bossed,” Strang said. “This was our revolutionary idea. If we were all equal partners, we would all share the responsibilities. It was incredibly idealistic, but we made it work on that level for seven years.” Strang said the 14 owners that ran Record Service in those seven years made about $1.50 an hour. The $30 Strang brought home at the end of the week easily covered the $37 in rent he paid each month. Strang said that the 14 owners were never in it to make money, though. Instead, Record Service often reached out to the community. “We considered ourselves a political collec-

tive as much as a record store,” Strang said. “We were very actively involved in local politics such as anti-war demonstrations. We helped collect money for the legal defense of people who got arrested for political actions or drug arrests.” Record Service would also collect a nickel on every sale for a “community tax.” The nickels were then gathered up and went to help start other alternative businesses like a restaurant, bicycle shop, gas station and even a grocery store. Strang estimated that there were 75 alternative businesses at one time in Champaign-Urbana. That alternative spirit was shared by all the owners of Record Service. “We were all just a bunch of hippies, but we learned how to do business,” Strang said. “We started because we loved music but we learned the business as we went. We learned how to run a business just by doing it.” Seven years after incorporation, seven coowners had moved on or graduated. By the time the store moved to its current location, there were only three owners: Strang, Tom McCoy and Michael Pollack. In 2000, Pollack was the last partner to leave. Strang was in complete control of a ship that by his own admission had been sinking for several years.

“Bon Coiffure: Hair Signs from West Africa” – This exhibition offers viewers a glimpse into the art of African hair styling, African hair sign painting and African hairstyles in traditional masks and sculpture. Hairdressers also hire artists to hand paint signs to advertise their skills and represent their repertoire of coiffures. Bon Coiffure is on view through Mar 21. 500 E Peabody in Urbana. Tue, Thu-Sat 9am-5pm, Wed 9am-8pm, Sun 2-5pm. Suggested donation $3. 333-1860. “Beyond East and West: Seven Transnational Artists” – The Krannert Museum has put together a traveling exhibition bringing together the work of seven major contemporary artists who share a connection to both worlds. 500 E Peabody in Urbana. Tue, Thu-Sat 9am-5pm, Wed 9am-8pm, Sun 2-5pm. Suggested donation $3. 333-1860. “Whistler and Japonisme: Selections from the Permanent Collection” – This anniversary marks the 100th anniversary of James McNeill Whistler’s death, highlighting his works on paper and examines the influence that Japanese woodcuts had on his artistic technique. On display at Krannert Art Museum through Mar 28. 500 E Peabody in Urbana. Tue, Thu-Sat 9am-5pm, Wed 9am-8pm, Sun 2-5pm. Suggested donation $3. 333-1860. “Water & Wood” – The Hays Center is hosting this exhibit featuring paintings by Beverley Sanderson and sculpture by the Illini Carvers. Opens Friday, runs through Mar 26. The Hays Center, 1311 W Church St, C. 398-2580. Hours: Mon-Fri 8:30am4pm.

ON STAGE “Bring Me an Ice Bucket – Scenes of Hotel Hysteria” – This evening of dance performance follows four women through the rooms of the establishment and their subsequent quest to explore the meaning of feminine and social etiquette in the early twentieth century. Armory Free Theatre. Fri 8pm & midnight. Sat 7pm. Elysium on the Prairie, Live Action Roleplaying – Vampires stalk the city streets and struggle for dominance in a world of gothic horror. Create your own character and mingle with dozens of players who portray their own undead alter egos. Each session is another chapter in an ongoing story of triumph, tragedy and betrayal. Fridays,“Vampire: The Masquerade.” For more information, visit www2.uiuc.edu/ro/elysium/intro.html. Check site for location, 7pm.

Club Fred: Character Count – Presenters from University of Illinois Extension discuss the six pillars of good character. No registration. Douglass Branch Library. Sunday, 4-5pm. Information: 4032090. Captain Underpants Party – School-age children can dress as a favorite character from the Captain Underpants book series to win a prize at this kidcontagious party. Champaign Public Library. Saturday, 2-2:45pm. No registration. Family Resource Fair – Activities, food and information on community services and organizations that serve families and children in the Champaign Urbana area will be available. Wisegarver Hall, Illinois Disciples Building. Mar 14, 12-4pm. For more information, call 344-5459. Family Fun Day Sunday in the Square – Enjoy interactive rides this Sunday. There will also be food, shopping, games, miniature golf and more. Lincoln Square Mall. Sun, 1-5pm. For more info, call the Urbana Business Association at 344-3872.

this week Th Mar 4 Wine Tasting 5pm, free Jazz Crawl and Jam Session 5pm, Iron Post 6:30pm, Krannert Center 8pm, Canopy Club 9:30pm, Zorba's 11pm, Cowboy Monkey Liszt Symposium: Works for Piano and Orchestra 7:30pm, $10-$17 A Raisin in the Sun 7:30pm, $6-$13

Fr Mar 5

Top: The Kate Hathaway band plays an in-store performance at Record Service. Left: After 34 years of business, Record Service will close its doors for the last time on Friday, March 5th. Owner and co-founder Phil Strang said, “I don’t want it to be like a funeral, I want it to go out on an upbeat because that’s how we’ve always been.”

Girls, Girls, Girls! – Games, crafts, and reading time for girls in grades 1-4. Douglass Branch Library. Fri, 4-5pm. No registration. KnowZone – Homework help for school-aged children. Tue 4-5pm. Douglass Branch Library. No registration required. Rookie Cooks – Hands-on cooking class for elementary school students, presented by U of I Extension. Douglass Branch Library. Mar 1, 4-5pm. Registration: 403-2090.

krannert center

Sa Mar 6

We Mar 10

Java and Jazz: Cecil Bridgewater 10am, free Sponsor: Fran and Marc Ansel Anonymous

Meredith Monk 7:30pm, $14-$25 Talkback: after the show, free

Liszt Symposium: Works for Piano and Orchestra 7:30pm, $10-$17 A Raisin in the Sun 7:30pm, $6-$13

Cecil Bridgewater and Clark Terry 7:30pm, $17-$25 Talkback: after the show, free

Patron Season Sponsors

CAROLE AND JERRY RINGER

brought to you by

Boardman’s Art Theatre and buzz will be hosting special midnight screenings several times a month. This weekend, come check out:

UI Wind Symphony and UI Symphonic Band I 7:30pm, $2-$5 A Raisin in the Sun 7:30pm, $6-$13 Studiodance I 7:30pm $7-$14

Afterglow: Chambana 9:30pm, free

Tu Mar 9

Some Krannert Center programs are supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Illinois Arts Council, and patron and corporate contributions.

A Raisin in the Sun is supported in part by the Frances P. Rohlen Visiting Artists Fund/College of Fine and Applied Arts and by the Chancellor's Brown v. Board of Education Jubilee Commemorative Committee. The Jazz Threads project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts Challenge America—Access to the Arts Program.

KrannertCenter.com

Coporate Season Underwriters

SERIE S

Th Mar 11

Cecil Bridgewater’s presentations are supported by the Heartland Arts Fund, a program of Arts Midwest funded by the National Endowment for the Arts with additional contributions from General Mills Foundation, Land O'Lakes Foundation, Sprint Corporation, and the Illinois Arts Council.

Season Sponsors

Midnight Movie SERIE S

Concerto Urbano 7:30pm, $2-$5

CultureTalk: Steven Pinker and Nancy Cantor 7:30pm, free, tickets required

KIDS & FAMILY

Introducing...

Wine Tasting 5pm, free

A Raisin in the Sun Dessert and Conversation 6:30pm, $5.50 Creative Intersections Sponsor:

A Raisin in the Sun 7:30pm, $6-$13

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Boardman’s Art Theatre & buzz

Su Mar 7

Engelbert Humperdinck Concert Cancelled – The Champaign Park District regrets to announce that the Engelbert Humperdinck concert scheduled for this Sunday at the Virginia Theatre has been cancelled. If you have purchased tickets for this event, stop by the Virginia Theatre for a full ticket refund. If you have any questions, please contact the box office at 356-9063.

Gardening Weekend Wizard w/ Sandy Mason – Children will get to take part in activities such as Worm Zoo and Garbage Gardens, Paper Towel Gardening, Flower Arranging, Seed ID, What Part of the Plant Are You Eating?, and Chew on This Like an Insect. Sandy will be assisted by master gardeners and students from Volunteer Illini Projects. Orpheum Children’s Museum. Saturday, 1-4pm. $3, child $2. For more information, call 352-5895.

@

My Preschool Genius – A book-centered program focusing on language. Preschoolers can listen to dynamic picture book presentations and explore the art of picture book illustration. Champaign Public Library. Tue, 9:30-10am. Registration required. Call 403-2030.

Traffic Jam: Metta Quintet 5pm, free

CANCELLATION NOTICE

PHOTOS | CHRISTINE LITIS

BY BRIAN MERTZ | STAFF WRITER

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MARCH 4-10, 2004 | WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com

217/333-6280 or 800/KCPATIX 217/333-9714 (TTY) 217/244-SHOW (Fax) 217/244-0549 (Groups) kran-tix@uiuc.edu Ticket Office Open 10am to 6pm daily; on days of performances open 10am through intermission.

The 1996 re-release in Dolby Digital and restored color of Martin Scorsese’s 1976 film starring Robert DeNiro, Cybill Shepherd, Jodie Foster, and Harvey Keitel

March 5th & 6th at Boardman’s Art Theatre 126 W. Church St., Champaign 1-800-BEST-PLACE or 355-0068 tickets are $6


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WANT TO GET YOUR EVENT LISTED ON OUR CALENDAR? Send your listings to calendar@readbuzz.com | MARCH 4-10, 2004

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MARCH 4-10, 2004 | REMEMBER PREDATOR? THAT MOVIE IS AMAZING.

What’s in it for The Walkmen

illio Shout out to:

9

music THE WALKMEN Bows and Arrows Record Collection

★★★★ BY LOGAN MOORE

C

From: Email: Shoutout: (75 words or less)

* GotSomething Something ToTo Say? Got Say? Place Yours Yours Today! Place Today! $5 for 75 words $5 for 75 words *

Deadline is March 15

Illio office at the Y or e-mail: illiomarketing@illinimedia.com * Illio reserves the right to deny inappropriate messages with a full refund

Check/Money Order (made payable to Illio)

Cash Visa Mastercard

Card #: Exp. Date:

all it human nature or that record-collecting mentality peculiar to rock geeks, but it seems that the holy grail of music journalism is “the scene.” The irrational hope that some young talented cadre of bands and musicians have concocted a glorious alternative to the mainstream, their creativity unchecked by the spotlight of the world’s prying eyes, has driven rock reporters to the extremes of hyperbole for decades. So overwhelming is the desire to play Marco Polo to those scarce pockets of creativity in America’s homogenous landscape that this year music journalists apparently decided to make up their own scene; the Big Apple was everywhere in 2003 and Lord help any band from New York. Neatly returning us to the bowery circa 1975, Pitchfork.com staffers and Mojo magazine writers shouted ecstatically from the rooftops and mountains, “The Strokes are the new Ramones! The Rapture are the new Talking Heads! Dance, you fools. Dance and be mesmerized by their stylish retro fashion sense and delicately mussed white afros!” But, what about the Walkmen? Not a band overtly influenced by garage or post-punk, not a band particularly interested in good fashion sense, but simply an excellent band. Well, they’ve sort of gotten tossed around a bit on the high seas of encapsulated reviews and one-paragraph band bios by virtue of being from New York. The Walkmen are a band of subtleties. Just listen to their sophomore effort Bows and Arrows. It opens with “What’s In It For Me?,” a guitar ascends, ringing, echoing, not so much pummeling the silence as slicing through it like a surgeon’s scalpel through his patient’s flesh. Lead singer Hamilton Leithauser drags his casual, romantic conversational prose through a sea of organ washes and feedback enveloping the listener. The second track “The Rat” kicks in, the rhythm section driving the song through a series of acrobatic crescendos, Leithauser hoarsely screaming a laundry list of accusations. The drummer can actually drum; there’s a novelty. The song is earnest and melodic. It’s like bassist Pete Bauer said when questioned on The Walkmen’s relationship to New York’s nascent garage revival: “I definitely feel that we were trying to get away from that whole sound. At the time, it was probably the most uncool thing you could do.” That about sums it up. Still, for all their uniqueness they are a band that tends to get pigeonholed, due largely to their history. Three-fifths of The Walkmen started off in the almost famous Jonathan Fire*Eater, a critic’s darling dark garage group from New York way back in the mid-1990s. Snapped up by Dreamworks, they were subsequently dropped

after their sole major label album, Wolf Songs for things in a live setting.” Thus, the focus was Lambs, was not the radio-ready money machine shifted a bit and the band seems all the better the higher-ups had hoped for. Friends since for it; more cohesive as a group and much their childhood together in Washington, D.C., more demanding of attention. Still, the album does retain the signature the band tragically disintegrated shortly afterward. It’s the sort of indie band on a major label sound of The Walkmen, one that distinguishes turmoil that tends to steal the spotlight when them from their New York contemporaries. Whereas garage tends to derive its appeal from discussing the band. It shouldn’t, though. Following their defection from the ranks of poorly recorded teenage angst and testosteroneDreamworks, the remaining members valiant- driven hooks, on Bows and Arrows, The ly took their advance money and forged ahead, Walkmen reveal themselves as a band much building a 900-square foot rehearsal space and more interested in the intricacies of sound. To get the delicate, resonating drum sound 24-track recording studio in Harlem, dubbed Marcata Studios. Says Pete Bauer, “It’s part of a that opens up “Hang On, Siobahn,” the band car factory that was converted into industrial fostered an environment of complete silence in offices ... you could record in the hallway and the studio. The result is so slight; one can barely get great reverb.” Picking up a few members hear the sticks tapping the kit, only the sound of from the defunct combo The Recoys and the skins reverberating. Attention to the delicate renaming themselves The Walkmen, our details of an album such as these ensure the heroes crafted their debut Everyone Who band’s appeal will extend beyond the derivaPretended To Like Me Is Gone to general acclaim tive, retro-obsessed veneer of the current musiin 2002. The album seemed to be part and par- cal landscape into the realm of the thoughtful cel to their new recording space, the depth of listener. They may never date Gwyneth or Drew the album drawing attention to each individ- or Winona, but if they continue to craft music of ual sound, every instrument reverberating such timelessness and honesty, The Walkmen from the echo chambers of the heart, pianos will be a band with a shelf life, and that is of tinkling from loft windows, resonating utmost importance. buzz through the city streets at night. Their new platter utilizes the studio in a somewhat opposite direction, using instrumentation The Walkman will perform at Highdive Wednesday, March to wrap the album in a none-too-subtle blanket 10. Orphans and French Kicks will open. Tickets are $8 and of sound; every corner of the album is brimming the show starts at 10 p.m. with subtle organ and guitar textures. Bauer says, “We recorded and mixed a lot of the album at other studios, like in EasleyMcCain in Memphis. It’s a great studio ... but the album didn’t really come together until we finished it at Marcata, so we’ll probably be recording there more.” The intoxicated late-night balladeering of Everyone is also subsumed in favor of tighter songs with a more visceral, upbeat flavor. “We wrote songs a lot more with the live show in mind,” says Bauer, “so some of the songs are a little more rocking.” Bauer admits they started off a little shaky in the live arena. “It was hard to play the spacy slow The Walkmen will be performing at the Highdive on March 10th.

Bows and Arrows is the sound of a band casually establishing themselves as artists to watch. It may not be apparent from the outset.The album starts off in the sort of dreamy, half-awake territory that they explored on their debut, Everyone Who Pretended To Like Me Is Gone, but by the time the band has ripped their way through tracks like “The Rat” and “Little House of Savages,” it is apparent that a diametric shift has occurred. It’s a very good one, folks. The Walkmen officially tear it the fuck up. Whereas the debut tended to meander occasionally, songs drifting into and apart from one another,Bows and Arrows seems to show off a band that has gotten its legs, much more willing to explore varied sonic territory without losing the thread of the album or the listener’s attention. Nowhere is this demonstrated better on the album than “The Rat.”As Paul Maroon hammers out an arching, descending guitar line, drums thunder, and lead singer Hamilton Leithauser yowls like a rabid Rod Stewart, “Can’t you hear me / I’m calling out your name / Can’t you see me / I’m pounding on your door.” One can almost envision the terrified young girl on the other side of that door. It’s thrilling. They come pretty close to topping this elsewhere on the album. “Little House of Savages” is a portrait of paranoid escape roughly crooned over looping drums and a robotically beaten guitar with the supreme melodic breakdown of the album. “New Year’s Eve” is a piano-driven, Kinks-derived pop rocker replete with samba beats and humorous lyrics like,“ The music’s loud in your room / Turn it down / There’s a neighbor who can’t take it anymore.” And though, much like the Lee Majors, The Walkmen have become better, stronger, faster, and they haven’t given up the attention to sonic detail or the ice sculpture delicate ballads that distinguished Everyone. Partially due to the uniqueness of their self-built Marcata studios, the guitars on Bows and Arrows still chime, organs still churn and blur, drums still crack and reverberate. The whole album seems ready to ricochet off the precipice into the abyss at any moment, just like intelligently composed rock should. Keep an eye on The Walkmen.

PHOTO COURTESY OF BIG HASSLE MEDIA

BY LOGAN MOORE | STAFF WRITER


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"RAY, WHEN SOMEONE ASKS YOU IF YOU'RE A GOD, YOU SAY 'YEEESS!' " | MARCH 4-10, 2004

Stephen Adly Guirgis

BY SYD SLOBODNIK | CONTRIBUTING WRITER ur Lady of 121st Street, the Steppenwolf Theatre Company’s present production, is a wonderful actor ’s ensemble piece that will remind veteran Chicago theatergoers of the Steppenwolf’s best productions of two decades ago. An era when that group of young, recently college graduated North Siders began making a unique impact on Midwestern theater. Written by another young New York playwright, Stephen Adly Guirgis, and directed by Will Frears, Our Lady of 121st Street is a delightful mixture of the comedy and seriousness of urban life. Its short-ondetail plot contains a wealth of street-smart dialogue and a dozen or so authentic New York urban types, who have seen some of their best dreams and aspirations fade with the years. Guirgis’s narrative centers on a reunion, of sorts, of a group of neighborhood friends and acquaintances who are attending the wake of a Harlem parish’s most beloved nun, Sister Rose. Rose was an early guide and inspiration to many of the play’s now nearly middle-aged characters. In a series of humorous two- to four-person scenes, director Frears skillfully blends the humor and pathos of the play’s key personal conflicts of these once childhood/teen friends, uncovering deep character flaws and personality inadequacies. Some of the most interesting characters include Rooftop, the former Harlem resident, now a

CultureTalk: Steven Pinker with Nancy Cantor – Pinker and Cantor will talk about the evolving relationships between the arts and contemporary society. Colwell Playhouse. Tuesday, 7:30pm. Free.

well-known Los Angeles-based radio host, who is so spiritually lost he hasn’t been to confession is nearly 30 years; Inez, Rooftop’s ex-wife, who despite looking only years older, has had more than her share of rough times with men in her life; Balthazar, a tough New York City cop who is looking for a stolen body; Flip, an attractive black professional who returns to his ‘hood with a Caucasian gay lover; and Edwin and Pinky, two Latino brothers who seem stuck in their routine lives. Situated next door to the funeral home is the local Catholic parish where Sister Rose served, which is now run by an elderly handicapped priest who openly expresses his doubts in his faith. Scenes are mixed with intense feelings of past regrets over old responsibilities and bad intentions, as many of the characters carefully protect their fragile egos and deny faults that lead to their unfulfilled lives. The multi-ethnic cast of mostly younger, non-Steppenwolf ensemble members—with the exception of the always interesting and entertaining Robert Breuler—is as sparkling a group of performers as those of Steppenwolf’s heyday; productions that featured John Malkovich, Gary Sinise and Laurie Metcalf. Standouts in the Our Lady of 121st Street cast include E. Milton Wheeler as the explosive Rooftop, Shane Williams as Inez and Sammy A. Publes as the rather pathetic Edwin.

“Share a Meal with Community Shares” – This fundraiser helps local non-profits. Thirty percent of your meal at Silvercreek restaurant goes to one of these charities. Call 328-3402 for info. “Soft Materials and Nanopatterning Techniques for Electronics” – part of the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology Seminar Series. John Rogers, Prof of Materials Science and Engineering at the University will speak. Coordinated Science Laboratory Auditorium. Wed, 4pm. Brown Sisters of Topeka, Kansas Lecture – The lecture will consist of reflections by Linda Brown Thompson and Cheryl Brown Henderson on the impact, legacy and significance of struggles to achieve the promise that the Brown vs. Board of Education case represented. Foellinger Auditorium. Mar 11, 4pm. Free.

Department of Theatre

MEETINGS & WORKSHOPS Community Workshop on SSI – SSI Project to explain basics of Supplemental Security Income and help qualified residents apply for benefits. Illinois Disciples Foundation. Saturday, 10:30am12pm. For information, call 352-6533. 2004 Art Exhibition Series Call for Artists – The Champaign Park District is seeking local visual artists to apply for this exciting new venue at the Springer Cultural Center. Exhibits strive to present artistic and ethnic diversity of Champaign Urbana and surrounding area artists. Now-Mar 19. For more information, call 398-2376.

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Our Lady of 121st Street, a contemporary drama about urban realities, runs through March 28 at Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre at 1650 N. Halsted.

By Lorraine Hansberry

PHOTOS COURTESY OF STEPPENWOLF THEATRE

Directed by Shirley Basfield Dunlap With guest artist Cheryl Lynn Bruce

(Above, Right) Marisabel Suarez (Norca) and Shane Williams (Inez) in Our Lady of 121st Street by Stephen Adly Guirgis, directed by Will Frears. Our Lady of 121st Street opens in the Steppen wolf Downstairs thetre, 1650 N. Halsted, Sunday , Februarty 15, 2004. For tickets call (312) 335-1650 or visit www.steppenwolf.org. Credit: Micchael Brosilow.

Mar 4-14

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Champaign County Audubon Society early morning bird walks – Busey Woods every Sunday morning starting this Sunday at 7:30am. Meet at Anita Purves Nature Center parking lot. 344-6803.

Our Lady of 121st Street

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Champaign County Audubon Society – Mike Ward, a Ph.D. candidate in the animal biology department from the University will talk about Studying the Behavior of Endangered Blackcapped Vireos in Texas and Terns in Northern Illinois for Population Management. Meet in Room 242, Bevier Hall. Thur, 7:30pm. Call Arlo, 443-2499. Foundation of Teamwork – Competition demands that organizations do more, in a shorter response time, with fewer resources. Participants will identify their communication style and develop plans to build better working relationships with other team members. Class meets Thursday from 8:30am-12:30pm at 1315 N Mattis Ave, Champaign. Course fee is $110. To register, call 351-2235.

MIND BODY SPIRIT Life Map Workshop – A life map is a collection of visual images, a method of connecting with your intuition, a tool for visualizing your dreams or goals. Come explore life mapping--approaches, uses, and the opportunity to create your own life map. McKinley Foundation, C. Mar 13, 9:15am-1pm. To register or for information, contact Jo Pauly at 337-7823 or jopauly@prairienet.org. Simplicity Discussion Group – Ideas to simplify & bring meaning to life. The group will discuss the book Repacking Your Bags by Richard Leider & David Shapiro. Borders Bookstore. Thursday, 7pm. 351-9011. Sunday Zen Meditation Meeting - Introduction to Zen Sitting, 10am. Full Schedule: service at 9am followed by sitting, Dharma Talk at 11am followed be tea until 12pm. Can arrive at any of above times, open to all, no experience needed, no cost. Prairie Zen Center. For information, call 355-8835 or go to www.prairiezen.org. Mystery Discussion Group – At this group meeting, the group will discuss the book A Drink Before the War by Dennis Lehane. Borders Bookstore. Monday, 6pm. 351-9011.

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film

★★★

BY MATT PAIS | LEAD REVIEWER

A

fter months of editing, endless controversy and an interview with Diane Sawyer, it turns out that Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ isn’t quite the legendary cinematic achievement that everyone would have you believe. It’s groundbreaking in the historical sense—an epic recreation of a shocking, 2,000-year-old tragedy—but beneath the pervasive media saturation, religious feuds and some truly gruesome violence, the film feels less like a whole story and more like the ending to a different, deeper movie. In chronicling the final 12 hours of Jesus’s (Jim Caviezel) life, Gibson fast-forwards right to the end, which doesn’t seem disjointed at the beginning of The Passion of the Christ. The film opens with Jesus praying alone in the forest as he waits to be found and persecuted by the Jews and Romans. Judas (Luca Lionello) has already betrayed him, and he has already

moviereview

BROKEN LIZARD’S CLUB DREAD ★★★

BY JASON CANTONE | STAFF WRITER

H

ow do you make fun of a film genre that’s already a joke? That’s the question Broken Lizard, a group of five master thespians, must have asked themselves during the making of Club Dread. The “I’m a naked teenage bimbo running in the woods from a bad, bad man with a machete” genre of horror film might have ended decades ago, but like a song by Journey, it will never be forgotten. By itself, Club Dread is not a phenomenal movie. The acting is poor, the scriptwriting is shoddy and it seems like everyone in the film was high or drunk during filming. However, before judging this film, one must look at the slasher films it pokes fun at. Generally, they have poor acting, shoddy writing and gags so stupid you’d think the director was drunk if he thought they’d work. Definitely some subtle similarities, don’t you think?

It might seem that the Scary Movie trilogy closed the book on how to parody horror films, but every over-the-top and heavy-handed gag in that trilogy was stolen from other films. From the Scream mask to the overly drawn out 8 Mile parody in the third film, the trilogy reeked of repetition. While Club Dread obviously draws its inspiration from ‘70s slasher flicks, it rides the line between comedy and parody successfully and provides great entertainment value for the college crowd. Most of the film is blood and bodies and most of those bodies are straight from a Girls Gone Wild! video, but it isn’t the blatant sexuality that will keep viewers entertained—it’s also the nonstop fun. In the first scene alone, there’s a menage a trois, three brutal slayings and more laughable moments than your average, run-ofthe-mill teen comedy contains. All of the action takes place on Pleasure Island, an amalgamation of everything Spring Break. From a club staff ready to please the guests in every way possible, to a Jimmy Buffett-like honcho singing “Pina Colada Berg,” (which sounds oddly like “Margaritaville”), there’s just too much happiness for the island NOT to be hounded by a crazed serial killer. Paxton parodies Buffett successfully and the main actors do their best in their stereotypical roles. But it’s not the acting that keeps this boat afloat. Unlike their role models in Monty Python, none of the Broken Lizard troupe stands out as a particularly gifted comedic actor. Luckily, the jokes keep coming, as each

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Oscar Winners ICON DISTRIBUTION, INC.

THE PASSION OF THE CHRIST

prophesied Peter’s (Francesco De Vito) denial, and it’s not long before Jesus is beaten near death by merciless nonbelievers. The damage enacted upon his body, from countless public lashings to the ultimate affixation to the cross, is every bit as bloody and disturbing as advance word suggested. Try not to avert your eyes when the spiked whips clutch to Jesus’s back for a moment before jarring loose and spurting blood every which way. This is an appallingly brutal film, and Gibson doesn’t hesitate to make every drop of blood squish and splatter. His point is that Jesus’s pain is our pain, and The Passion of the Christ is indeed often extremely painful to watch. Yet, in focusing solely on the unthinkable pain Jesus endured, Gibson manages to hollow out one of humanity’s most widely known and emotive stories into a shell of repetitive religious grandstanding. Every second is meticulously crafted, with a harrowing adherence to Scripture and an unflinching determination to chronicle Jesus’s every step from conviction to crucifixion. But while fervently presenting Jesus’s extreme suffering, the film displays surprisingly little feeling toward its subject. This becomes apparent when, by the time Jesus’s head droops for the last time, his skin lacerated and limbs impaled by large nails, you weep for the ferocity of the violence but not for the suffering endured. Sure, The Passion of the Christ is more about what happened to Jesus than about Jesus himself, and the problem isn’t that it lacks sympathy. Rather, it treats its cen-

THE PASSION OF THE CHRIST | JIM CAVIEZEL tral figure solely as a biblical icon and never as a person; the movie prefers hovering on the surface of Jesus’ shredded skin to spending even a moment inside his head. Consequently, Gibson’s religious labor of cruelty succeeds only as an eye-opening picture of suffering rather than a presentation of the faith and sacrifice that led to such extraordinary pain. The film occasionally intersects the persecution with placid shots of Jesus spreading his peaceful message and random moments of his quietly pious life. These are few and far between, however, and a half-hearted effort by Gibson and co-writer Benedict Fitzgerald to break up the monotony of innumerable slowmotion collapses and redundant reaction shots of teary-eyed women. This is a monumental, historical accomplishment, made with intense passion, courage and brains, even if its mind focuses more on shallow malevolence than spiritual catharsis. What it needs is a heart.

Leading Actor: Sean Penn - Mystic River Supporting Actor: Tim Robbins - Mystic River Leading Actress: Charlize Theron - Monster Supporting Actress: Renée Zellweger - Cold Mountain Animated Feature Film: Finding Nemo Art Direction: The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King Cinematography: Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World Costume Design: LOTR: Return of the King Directing: Peter Jackson - LOTR Documentary Feature: The Fog of War Documentary Short Subject: Chernobyl Heart Film Editing: LOTR: Return of the King Foreign Language Film: The Barbarian Invasions Honorary Award: Blake Edwards Makeup: LOTR: Return of the King Music (Score): LOTR: Return of the King Music (Song): “Into the West” - Fran Walsh, Howard Shore and Annie Lennox Best Picture: LOTR: Return of the King Short FIlm (Animated): Harvie Krumpet Short Film (Live Action): Two Soldiers Sound Editing: Master and Commander Sound Mixing: LOTR: Return of the King Visual Effects: LOTR: Return of the King Writing (Adapted Screenplay): LOTR: Return of the King Writing (Original Screenplay): Sofia Coppola for Lost in Translation

C-UViews

Compiled by Roderick Gedey

The Passion of the Christ FOX STARLIGHT PICTURES

moviereview

A LIST OF THE MOST PREDICTABLE OSCAR WINNERS IN RECENT MEMORY | MARCH 4-10, 2004

CLUB DREAD | STOLHANSKE, DANIEL, SOTER death setup is more over-the-top than the last. Taking this film seriously would be a crime, and those who do are sure to hate it. With films such as Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ bringing suffering and torture to millions of people, a simple, dumb film like Club Dread should be in theaters to counter some of that anguish. Club Dread won’t make you more religious and it won’t make you a better person, but you also won’t have to suffer for some movie entertainment.

SCREEN REVIEW GUIDE

★★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★ no stars

Flawless Good Mediocre Bad Unwatchable

★★★★ Blake Wagahoff Raymond, IL

“It was violent, it got the point across ... it was moving.”

★★★★ Laura Zeigler Raymond, IL

“I don’t think it was (anti-Semitic). They had to portray it as it happened.”

★★★★ Donna Weaver Philo, IL

“Having two sons, I don’t know if I would have done what Mary did.”

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arts

MARCH 4-10, 2004 | "NOW, SON, YOU DON'T WANT TO DRINK BEER. THAT'S FOR DADDIES AND KIDS WITH FAKE IDS."

The Company works to produce quality productions and continues to renovate the building, but persists to let new people experience the theater. The community feel gives actors like Manolakes a chance to direct, but it also gives directors like McCain a chance to act. His role in A Lie of the Mind is his first acting gig with The Celebration Company. “Champaign-Urbana has got a nice supportive arts community,” McCain said. “I think that is why The Station Theatre has been able to exist for so long.” The actors support each other as well. Before rehearsal Duderstadt learned that she did not receive the role she wanted for the next Parkland Theatre performance. Actors rushed over to console her. “It’s not just a theatre in the community,” Bailey said of The Station Theatre. “There is a community here within the theater.” A week prior to the show, the empty black-box theater is transformed. The goat is no longer suspended from the ceiling and blocking tape makes the floor look like a backgammon board. Manolakes explains that later the tape will be painted. Her purple scarf floats as she scurries

back and forth, making sure props and her actors are in place. The tan and navy couch is now accompanied by a chair and a brown backdrop. The actors are more refined in their roles, the monologues more intense and the dialogue more natural. McCain goes through his lines with another company actor minutes before he is set to practice his scene. Manolakes sits at the far left corner of the audience to make sure everything looks right, even from the worst seats in the house. Lights dim, brighten and flicker on and off as Kaiser tries to memorize his cues. The deer’s behind has arrived and everything seems to be in place. “I love acting on the stage,” Manolakes said. “I am enjoying directing, but I don’t see myself doing it again.” Manolakes will continue to polish the performance until opening night when her job will be nearly over. She will add the score, composed by her best friend, Ian Shepard, and the introduction read by Richard Burton by means of a crackling LP. Manolakes calls for the lights to go dark and, right on cue, says, “It’s magic time.” buz z

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Mindy Manolakes directed the play A Lie of the Mind, which runs through March 6 at the Station Theater.

ARTIST’S CORNER BY KATIE RICHARDSON | ARTS EDITOR

D

errick Holley is a local artist whose work is currently on display at Highdive and Boltini Lounge in Champaign. He mainly creates self-portraits, which examine the role of identity insofar as how he perceives himself, how others perceive him and how these two perceptions coexist and perhaps conflict. He was trained at Black Hawk College and the Art Institute of Chicago, receiving his MFA at the latter. He has a calm, cool demeanor, but he is not at all aloof or unthankful. On the contrary, he has a great deal of gratitude toward

those who appreciate his work, and said he is especially thankful toward Ed WiseKamp, Carlos Nieto, Tom Gillespie and many other patrons for being particularly supportive. When did you first start painting? When I was little boy, about five or six, I was sitting in a waiting room of some sort and I saw a magazine with a picture of a cowboy on it. I really wanted the picture on the magazine, but my mother said that it didn’t belong to me, it was the hospital’s, and I couldn’t have it. I studied the cowboy really, really closely, and memorized the picture, sticking it in my mind’s eye. I went home and was determined to draw it. I must have gone through 100 pieces of paper trying to replicate that Painter Derrick Holley (above) picture. Ever since then, I’ve known that painting was the art form by which I most strongly expressed myself. I think Where do you see yourself going as an artist? I feel as though I’m pretty settled as an artist right it’s crucial that each and every one of us find our “strongest voice,” whether it be painting, now. Every day for me is just a matter of becoming poetry, music, etc. By the way, I finally painted more alive and excited about my subject manner. I don’t have bad days anymore, just things I can paint the cowboy a couple of years ago. about. I’m also constantly fine-tuning my eye and Who were your earliest sources of influence becoming more and more adept at capturing the images that I envision in my head. I think a lot of my and inspiration? My earliest influence was Eddie Murphy. work improves when I spend a little time away from When he became famous, it was the first time it, just thinking about it rather than working on it. I that I got a solid sense that there was a place for think time spent thinking about your artwork is as me in society. I was in high school and people important as time spent in the studio. When I come said I looked like him, and there was this kind back to a painting I find that there are a lot of of acceptance of me because of his influence and improvements and corrections that I can make, which popularity, and that granted me the realization didn’t occur to me while I was originally working that I, too, could forge a name for myself. So far on it. as painters, when I first began school, I really loved Leonardo da Vinci and Rembrandt. The Why did you decide to come to Champaign-Urbana? I wanted to slow down a bit, do some work. In contemporary artists that I really came to admire are Jerome and Joel Witkin. Jerome is a Chicago, as well as other big cities, so many things painter, while Joel is a photographer who cap- can run you down. Champaign-Urbana isn’t an arts tures bizarre encounters between people and mecca, but it has served its purpose. It’s offered me a nice change of pace. also focuses a lot on identity in his work.

PHOTOS | RODERICK GEDEY

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arts

"SON, WHEN YOU PARTICIPATE IN SPORTING EVENTS, IT'S NOT WHETHER YOU WIN OR LOSE; IT'S HOW DRUNK YOU GET." | MARCH 4-10, 2004

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Take one with Mindy Manolakes

Station Theatre favorite makes directorial debut in A Lie of the Mind

A

s trains once rushed by The Station Theatre, a remodeled train depot from the early 1920s, Mindy Manolakes (pronounced man-uh-LAKE-us) quickly rushes through the front door. She’s carrying armfuls of scripts and fliers. The first-time director doesn’t sleep much. She fills her nights with anxieties over missing props and X-Files marathons. Surprisingly, there is still a glimpse of excitement in her eyes as she steps through the black curtain from the intermission space to look at the freshly painted floor of the stage. Outside, a long stretch of railroad ties extends east to west. The small wooden station was home to one of Urbana’s largest industries, the Big Four Railroad, until the birth of multi-lane highways pushed the passenger rail service out of business in 1956. Now, the Celebration Company owns and maintains The Station Theatre. With fewer than 70 chairs, a packed house is bursting. The Station Theatre is one of the only black-box theaters in ChampaignUrbana, and its moniker describes the small auditorium. The walls and ceiling are black. The lighting booth window

at the upper left-hand corner provides the only light as Manolakes enters the stage. Props sprinkle the far wall. A dead, stuffed goat has been suspended from the ceiling, since The Celebration Company’s last performance of The Goat or Who Is Sylvia? Black-box theaters are home to shows with low-tech arrangements and simple lighting. Loose chairs straddle the platforms. The audience is nearly on top of the stage. “It’s my favorite theater, where you can see a tear, “ Celebration Company actor Deb Duderstadt said. The Station Theatre’s 31-year history has fostered a community theater that allows individuals to try different roles in productions. Manolakes was an actor for her 20 years with The Celebration Company and on Feb. 19, she took the director’s chair for A Lie of the Mind’s three-week run. Manolakes looks nervous. “I have a really good crew. I don’t feel like things are going to fall apart,” she says with a giggle. “It’s hard to see what things look like until they’re done, like a puzzle.” Manolakes chose Sam Shepard’s A Lie of The Mind. When she discusses it, her eyes twinkle under black Buddy Holly style glasses. She saw the play at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts years ago and fell in love with it. A Lie of The Mind dissects the nature of human love and its limitations by alternating from the story of Jake and Beth’s abusive marriage to their families’ own struggles with love. The play moves back and forth between two scenes and two sets. This creates a challenge for Manolakes to make sure the audience stays with the action taking place on stage. The self-proclaimed drama queen professes a secret jealousy about sitting this one out. As her actors rehearse, she sits on the edge of her chair, following the script and stage like a spectator at a tennis match. Nearly every night

THE CONTROVERSY OF THE CHRIST

at rehearsal, the actors move her to tears. Manolakes’ love for the theater and acting experience carry through when she directs her actors. As she reviews Jake’s mother’s lines with lead actor Mike Prosise, her voice slips into a Southern accent, much like the characters’. “Some directors are more actor-friendly, and some have a very good balance, but that’s rare,” Prosise said. With the addition of nightly rehearsals lasting until the late hours, mornings with her kindergarten class at King School come early. In class, Manolakes commands the attention of her students. With prompts like, “Let’s take an imagination walk to opening night” to inspire her actors’ best work, it is clear that Manolakes uses her classroom skills in the theater. Surprisingly, the theater can be much more unpredictable than a classroom of children. “You have such control in the classroom,” Manolakes said. “Everything is so out of your control here. It’s very unsettling for me, but you just have to throw it all away and be flexible.” From the first week of rehearsals, Manolakes has learned to be flexible. Lead actors Annamarie Macleod and Jason McCain are involved in the production of Sylvia at the Parkland Theatre. One of the actors is away in Ireland and a major prop The Company was to borrow—the rear end of a deer—is missing from the Steppenwolf Theatre in Chicago. But, with a crew of seasoned veterans, Manolakes is only slightly concerned.

The furniture has just been purchased for the set. Stage Manager Paul Kaiser and Set Director Ted Bailey carry the navy and tan furniture through the black curtain onto the stage. “It looks like Montana,” Manolakes said of the set. It’s a compliment to Kaiser and Bailey because that was the intent. After the furniture is placed, Manolakes sits down on the second riser and says, “It’s magic time.” Kaiser dims the lights and the actors know to rehearse the first scene. It’s an emotional scene, where Jake (Prosise) performs a touching monologue after beating his wife. As the scene closes, Manolakes tears up. There is discussion as to whether Prosise should stand or lie down at the end. Manolakes asks Prosise what he wants to do. He decides to stay on the couch. “Mindy’s an actor so she knows exactly what I go through. She let’s me develop the character,” Duderstadt said. “It’s another whole person you have to develop and get to know, it’s not just ‘acting.’ “ Manolakes is not the only veteran at The Station Theatre; many of the actors have been a part of the Company since its founding. The Celebration Company was established as a training ground for actors’ individual growth and experience. There is always room for volunteers, and experience is not necessary. “It was not intimidating at all the first time I came to an audition,” Kaiser said. “I felt very comfortable.”

moviereview

THE FOG OF WAR

BY ANDREW VECELAS | STAFF WRITER

★★★★

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BY SYD SLOBODNIK | STAFF WRITER

Jesus of Montreal (1989) — Denys Arcand directs this Canadian film about a theater group putting on a production of the Passion. They give it a modern twist and the actors in the play start living their roles in real life. An interesting take on the Jesus story that leads to the question: What would Jesus think if he was put in the midst of modern society? Probably best not to chew on that one for long.

The cast of A Lie of the Mind poses with their pet "Stumpy."

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MARCH 4-10, 2004 | JESUS, WAR AND DANCING ... WHAT A PAGE

ith The Passion of the Christ hitting theaters and creating mounds of controversy (and ticket sales) along the way, it’s as good a time as any to look back at some past representations of Jesus onscreen that have led to contention among certain groups. In no particular order, here are four other films that each took a unique view of the story of Jesus and instigated a lot of debate in the process.

PHOTOS | RODERICK GEDEY

BY MARISSA MONSON | EDITOR IN CHIEF

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The Last Temptation of Christ (1988) — Until this year, this adaptation of Nikos Kazantzakis’ book stood as the ultimate controversial religious film. Willem Dafoe turns in a great performance (minus any sort of accent) in the title role. Jesus is shown as more human, tempted by thoughts of a worldly life at his moment of greatest despair on the cross. In the end, he still chooses to complete his sacrifice for the good of humanity over living a “normal” life. Christians protested the visions of Jesus and Mary Magdalene eloping, but overall, the film delivers a very powerful message. Jesus Christ Superstar (1973) — The adaptation of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s and Tim Rice’s rock opera shows the last week of Jesus’s life through the eyes of Judas. The movie has gone on to achieve some degree of cult popularity despite raising a few eyebrows for showing Judas in a more sympathetic light than people were used to, and implying a relationship between Mary Magdalene and Jesus. Pretty dated by today’s standards, but it still works as a conversation piece that has a little more depth than its musical roots would suggest. Monty Python’s Life of Brian (1979) — The Python boys take the gloves off here and target so many historical and religious figures with their offbeat humor that it’s hard to keep track. The movie follows Brian (played by the late Graham Chapman) who unwittingly becomes a Messiah figure at the same time as Jesus. The jokes can be pretty offensive, but they also have some depth to them and are utterly priceless—the whole crucifixion scene, complete with a musical number, is a gem. Possibly the troupe’s best all-around film. The Passion of the Christ is now showing at local theaters. The above-mentioned films can be found at your local video store.

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rrol Morris’s Oscar-wining documentary film The Fog of War is not only a fascinating historical profile of former Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, but a provocative analysis of some of the more dubious national policies which defined U.S. foreign policy for much of the 20th century. Morris’s not-so-subtle theme is that lessons of history are never outdated. In a famous 1966 book, on the eve of massive and escalating U.S. involvement in Vietnam, then Arkansas Senator J. William Fulbright coined the phrase “The Arrogance of Power,” describing the path of U.S. foreign policy decisions. Fulbright’s elaboration—”The presumption of the very strong, who confuse power with wisdom and set upon self-appointed missions to police the world, to defeat all tyrannies, to make their fellow men rich and happy and free”—clearly relates to Morris’s film. Morris’s profile of McNamara is certainly one of an “arrogant” Washington and corporate world insider. Former Harvard professor, former president of Ford Motor Company (who claims he insisted on the 1956 introduction of

moviereview

DIRTY DANCING: HAVANA NIGHTS ★ BY DAN NOSEK | STAFF WRITER

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efore Dirty Dancing, Patrick Swayze was just another attractive face among hundreds in the Hollywood spotlight. Today, all women remember him as the handsome heartthrob who captured the heart of one lucky girl during dance lessons. The mere notion of a nerdy teenager falling in love with her dance instructor soon became the lifelong dream of every single female. The original thus became an instant success and was hailed in many circles as the ultimate romantic love story. Although a sequel was never intended, the formulaic plot seemed to be very appealing to many directors. Seventeen years after the original gem hit theaters, Miramax now attempts to revive the passion and popularity of the first film by releasing Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights. This rendition almost parallels the original plot to perfection but changes its venue to a tropical location in Cuba.

the seat belt), secretary of defense from 1961-68, and head of the World Bank, McNamara, still a rather active 85, is interviewed extensively by Morris. Unlike the excessively flamboyant Oscar-winning Michael Moore, Morris’s most controversial moments are kept in the revelations of his interviews and not self-promoting grandstanding. McNamara’s history is a fascinating tale of clearly explained memories of the many key events of the ugly history of wars in the 20th century. Morris structures his interviews around what he calls “The 11 Lessons from the Life of Robert McNamara,” as McNamara vividly recalls the most chilling events of his life: remembering an armistice parade for soldiers at the end of World War I when he was two years old, to a fact-finding meeting with the former foreign minister of North Vietnam in 1995. In a bittersweet mix of pompous bravado and tearful reminiscence, McNamara tells how he helped determine a policy of firebombing Japan’s largest cities at the end of World War II and how he sought rational debate during the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962, when we came dangerously close to the brink of World War III and nuclear annihilation. Along with these discussions, McNamara’s maxims, “No. 5: Proportionality should be a guideline in war” and “No. 1: Empathize with your enemy” are given the most emphasis. At no time, though, does Morris ever present McNamara as either a glorified super-patriot or a demonized ex-administrator, who should be faulted for one of the darkest periods of U.S. history. Like his most successful films, Morris lets the interviewee’s answers speak for themselves and lets his viewers decide. In long dis-

Just as Jennifer Grey’s character was ripped from her suburban lifestyle to a forbidden paradise, a girl of similar qualities named Katy is transported from her home in St. Louis to the lovely island of Cuba. She arrives with her wealthy boyfriend, Phelps, the son of another princely family. Just the name Phelps should have been sufficient reason to dump him, but Katy manages to be seduced by a clumsy waiter named Javier who is close to her age. Her new tour guide leads her to all the famous hot spots and nightclubs in Cuba. The opportunity to join a dance contest presents itself, and the two cannot resist entering. Of course, as soon as Javier learns of Katy’s dancing dilemma, he offers to be her personal instructor. As their dance lessons grow longer, their passion for each other becomes more intense. Obviously, the ending comes as no surprise as their days of practice are finally rewarded, and their love for each other is consummated through their dancing. Despite the plots of both films being almost identical, Havana Nights attempts to incorporate a political message that is completely unnecessary and unclear. Amid Javier’s and Katy’s romantic exploits, a revolution led by Fidel Castro is brewing against the Bautista regime in Cuba. Scenes of violent uprisings and mass hysteria sweeping across Cuba could have provided additional depth to the plot if done properly. However, it seems as though they were just ran-

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THE FOG OF WAR | ROBERT MCNAMARA cussions of the morality of war and decisions directly related to Vietnam policies, McNamara admits “we were wrong.” Underscoring most of these interviews is an entertaining compilation of historical documentary footage, newsreels, television video and numerous still photos of many of the past events McNamara describes along with composer Phillip Glass’s hypnotic musical score. Later, in a chilling moment, McNamara recalls that nearly 25,000 Americans died in Vietnam under his watch at the Defense Department and Morris shows a phone booksized register of those names. Many times too, McNamara comes off as a strong self-critic, seeking some sort of reconciliation for his past decisions and “mistakes.” Whether The Fog of War is one elderly statesman’s attempt at redemption or Morris’s lesson for contemporary leaders of our superpower nation, it will teach many of the paradoxes of powerful decision makers’ actions.

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HAVANA NIGHTS | ROMOLA GARAI & DIEGO LUNA domly inserted to deviate from the love story from time to time. The political backdrop is neither relevant nor practical in the context of this film and belongs in a historical documentary rather than a sappy romance. To call Havana Nights an expected disappointment is almost an understatement. Diego Luna, who plays the dashing Javier, does not nearly have the onscreen magnetism of a Patrick Swayze to accurately portray his character. Although he was brilliant in Y Tu Mama Tambien as an energetic and free-spirited troublemaker, Luna simply falls short in charm and style as the dance instructor in Havana Nights. Romola Garai as Katy does not submit a very impressive performance here, but is wonderful in I Capture the Castle. Theese mediocre performances and a rehashed plot make a trip to Havana Nights a trip to forget.


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PREDICTABLE OSCARS, UNPREDICTABLE COMMENTARY | MARCH 4-10, 2004

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A lord of a story to rule them all:

A journey through the precious Oscars and other witless Lord of the Rings puns BY JASON CANTONE | STAFF WRITER

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ome might say this year’s Oscars were action-packed and filled with surprising, shocking moments. These people were probably drunk. With The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King sweeping the awards and tying Titanic and Ben-Hur for the most Oscars won, there were few interesting moments. Luckily, I had a group of friends out to spice up the most boring hours of television in my recent memory (Three hours and 41 minutes, to be exact). What follows is my Oscar journal, written from the moment Billy Bush stopped making inane comments until Billy Crystal thanked all of Long Island (probably because the entire p o p u l a t i o n o f N e w Z e a l a n d h a d already been thanked twice).

0:34 The hilarious Robin Williams falls flat with his accent jokes as he presents the Best Animated Film Oscar to Finding Nemo. I wonder if Michael Eisner is under a bed crying somewhere. Hopefully next year, Disney will offer more than Brother Bear. 0:50 Best Supporting Actress goes to Renee Zellwegger, possibly the least deserving of the five nominees. However, after losing for Bridget Jones’s Diary and Chicago, the politics of Oscar guaranteed her a win over Shohreh Aghdashloo, whose nomination alone made a powerful statement for women in Iran. 0:54 My friend Joe comments on Zellwegger’s speech, “Considering they’re actors and actresses, you’d assume they could put words together and speak better than they do.” You tell ‘em, Joe. 0:57 Bob Hope provides the night’s funniest jokes in a

montage. After the montage, he stands up and turns to the audience, smiling for all of the applause. “I THOUGHT HE WAS DEAD,” my friend Andy yells out. And if I didn’t know better, I would assume he was there as well tonight, because they stupidly cut from footage of people clapping for him to footage from tonight of people clapping for him in the same building. That’s just bad editing. 1:19 Me: “I don’t think Peter Jackson showered before the Oscars.” Joe: “I don’t think Peter Jackson showers ever.” 1:28 Will Smith announces, “I’m doing it with my wife; I’m just happy.” A little too much information, Big Willie. Oh, and LOTR won another Oscar. 1:37 Blake Edwards has the last laugh as he careens on stage in a wheelchair and leg cast, only to pick up his Oscar and slam through a plaster wall on the other side of the stage. If only this 20 seconds of fun could poke into the drab four hours of the ceremony. 1:54 Master and Commander wins its first of two technical Oscars, making sure it doesn’t pull a The Shawshank Redemption and win none of many nominations. Of course, both its wins were the two techie categories LOTR wasn’t nominated for.

0:07 Michael Moore gets stomped to death by an elephant. Simply hilarious.

2:09 Diane Lane’s supple breasts and John Cusack’s total awesomeness awake us all from a slumber. This could be the most boring Oscar ceremony in history.

0:15 Billy Crystal continues his occasionally funny but overlong opening montage by singing to Clint Eastwood and a skeleton-like woman sitting next to him—his mother?— who might have been alive during the original Passion of the Christ.

2:14 Errol Morris’s cocky acceptance speech for Best Documentary includes a shout-out to Mike Williams, my roommate’s name. Some say it’s just a common name, but I’d like to think it was meant for him. I can only hope Charlize Theron thanks a random Jason Cantone.

0:29 Before any of its nominations are heard, The Lord of the Rings is presented as a Best Picture nominee. With so much fuel behind it, LOTR could win anything tonight: director, picture ... hell, it could win the gold medal for ribbon dancing if it entered the competition. This is followed by LOTR’s first win of the night.

2:17 The president of the Academy might be a past Oscar winner, but it sure wasn’t for acting. His speech was the equivalent of George W. Bush with a

muzzle (yes—that awful.) 2:20 After the death list rolls, Andy asks, “Who’s going to win THIS ONE?” We all break down laughing, which is probably inappropriate considering we were supposed to be mourning for Robert Stack. 2:30 With LOTR’s sweep, Jake comments, “It must have sucked if someone rejected (being in) this trilogy because it was too nerdy.” I immediately think of Sean Connery, who rejected roles in The Matrix and LOTR to do The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. Is it too late to take his Oscar back? He already lost his dignity, although any woman in America over age 40—maybe any woman—would still leave her husband for him, I’m betting. 2:31 LOTR, a film whose ending seemed to involve no content editing whatsoever, wins for Best Editing. 2:35 Eugene Levy and Catherine O’Hara; the singers behind The Triplets of Belleville; Jack Black and Will Ferrell all try to breathe life into the ceremony, but like a dead horse, it ain’t coming back to life. Still, the Best Song Oscar goes to Annie “Mysteriously Unattractive” Lennox and Fran “I store wild animals in my crazy hair” Walsh for LOTR. 3:05 With her Best Original Screenplay win, Sofia Coppola redeems herself after her singlehanded destruction of one of the greatest trilogies of all time. 3:11 Tom Cruise presents Best Director and they don’t flash to Nicole Kidman. This means either the ceremony has become tasteful or she was in the bathroom. I’m going for the latter. 3:28 Sean Penn wins Best Actor. This category was more of a race before Jude Law told everyone to send their votes for him over to Penn. But, then again, Law probably got no more than five votes anyway. 3:41 In a shocking upset, LOTR wins best picture. Now, New Zealand officially has more Oscars than people. And the painfully boring Oscars are finally over. buzz

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MARCH 4-10, 2004

From the beginning, people at church provided the spiritual community McNabb had not had and which, once she found it, she realized she was missing. Now, it is as though she has two families. Stewart, McNabb’s youngest son, is 12 but looks about eight or nine. He is apple-cheeked with dusty blond hair like his mother. Stewart is autistic. He is not very verbal and rarely initiates speech. When he gets home from school one particular afternoon, McNabb meets him at the door. She asks about his day, repeating each of her questions times in a slow, clear voice. Sometimes he ignores her, and sometimes he gives single-word answers. Stewart comes into the living room with his mom and climbs into the recliner with her. The chair is only big enough for one person, but he snuggles up and she makes room for him. She turns to him. “You are…” she starts. He smiles at her. “Silly,” he finishes the sentence. Family is of utmost importance in LDS faith; there is nothing more valuable to do in this life than raise a loving and devout family. If a husband and wife are married in one of the church’s sacred temples, they are considered to be “sealed” for eternity, married on Earth and beyond. Such a couple’s children will also be automatically sealed to them so that entire families, going back innumerable generations, might be together forever. McNabb also believes her deceased relatives have had the opportunity to accept church membership posthumously, but she does not know whether they have chosen to—and she does not worry about it. “I know God is fair, and things will be the right way, whatever that is,” she says. So while she may see her mother or some other family members again, her focus now is on her own family. McNabb teaches piano lessons in her home, but her primary vocation is, and always has been, as a stay-at-home mother. The church encourages women to stay at home with their children, and men are encouraged to define themselves not by their careers, but by their roles as husbands and fathers and members of the priesthood. “I feel as if my husband and I are equally committed to each other and to our family, that we both recognize that our family’s the most important thing we’re going to do on this Earth, she said.” McNabb prays by herself in the morning, kneeling by her bedside. She prays that she will be able to listen to the spirit if there is someone she needs to help that day, and sometimes she makes personal requests, though she is uncomfortable asking for “special favors.” She prays for her deceased mother and for her extended family. And she always prays that Emma, her daughter who died more than 15 years ago, will know her family loves her. McNabb and her four kids were visiting friends in Kentucky a few months before Emma’s second birthday, when the little girl

came down with a cold and had a small seizure. Emma had had a few febrile seizures before, but McNabb had forgotten her daughter’s Phenobarbital, so that evening, the friend, who was a doctor, brought some home for her. Emma died in her sleep that night. Her death was officially determined to be the result of SIDS, but McNabb thinks she probably had another seizure. The family was devastated. But Nancy felt immediately that Emma had returned to her Heavenly Father. “When she died, here was this dead body, but it was like a shell. It was so obvious that it wasn’t her spirit there.” McNabb’s religious faith made it easier for her to cope with Emma’s death. Her belief that her whole family will be reunited reminded her that the loss was temporary. Though Emma’s death was painful and dealing with Stewart’s autism will be an enduring challenge, McNabb feels the trials her family has experienced have brought them closer together and made them stronger. McNabb plays the organ for her ward every fourth Sunday. She sings in the choir. She teaches lessons in church members’ homes.

Q & A

DavidLeake

As both a professor at Parkland College and director of the Staerkel Planetarium, the second largest planetarium in Illinois, David Leake juggles many activities. Leake considers himself lucky to be pursuing a career in astronomy, a field he has enjoyed since fifth grade. A graduate of the University of Illinois, Leake also helped start the local astronomy society through the Champaign Park District. Leake currently resides in Champaign with his wife and two children.

How did you get interested in astronomy? It started with my fifth grade teacher. We didn’t have a planetarium so he took black construction paper, cut holes in it, and put it on

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Nancy has been playing the organ at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for 15 years, while her husband, Paul, has been the church's bishop of the second ordinance for one and a half years.

PHOTO | CHRISTINE LITAS

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PHOTO | CHRISTINE LITAS

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She works at the church’s Family History Center. She works with the Young Women. Her husband is their ward’s current bishop, or leader, and some people have said that she is

therefore the “mother of the ward.” This sentiment illustrates her journey from religious indifference to not only having a spiritual family, but being, to some, its mother. buzz

a transparency. It was sort of like a planetarium works. He made us learn five constellations. From there, I raided the library and found out there was more. My sixth grade teacher gave me my first star chart which I still have at home. That was the start of things.

it’s keeping up with classes and keeping up with the work at the planetarium, doing the budget and the marketing here. I wish there were two or three of me. There are a lot of things to do and if all those things happen at once, I am likely to lose my hair.

How did you come to work at the planetarium? I had been doing some teaching in the area. I helped start the local astronomy society through the park district. They needed someone here who knew some backyard astronomy and to run the Friday night show so I took the job in January of 1989 part-time. The next fall, they needed someone full-time.

What is the best part of the ChampaignUrbana community? I am a University of Illinois grad and I think that’s neat. I still follow the football and basketball teams. It’s the best of both worlds here, somewhat rural and somewhat urban.

What does the planetarium offer? It is a big variety. (We) do everything from live background sky shows to canned shows where we don’t have to do the soundtrack or the artwork, though we still have to adapt them to the theater. The light show is very popular with the University students. We do the loud rock ‘n’ roll music shows and science lecture series. We also do programs for kids. About half of the almost 40,000 people that visit the planetarium each year are school children. What is the best part of your job? There are two things and I don’t know which is better. This is really cliché but the first is the people. We have great school groups that come in. I like the younger kids, with them it’s like, ‘Kids say the darndest things.’ Second, I get to do my hobby for a living. I get to take my job home with me and getting paid to do a hobby is a fun thing. What is the most challenging part of your job? Multi-tasking. I hate using that buzzword, but

What would you be doing if you weren’t directing the planetarium? I am not sure. Hopefully teaching somewhere and looking for another planetarium. I have thought about what it would be like if I gave up one or the other but I would miss both too much. I say that two-thirds of my time is spent teaching and the other two-thirds is spent at the planetarium. What is the best piece of advice you have been given? My high school physics teacher gave a lot of good advice. But the best came when I was working at a laboratory right after college. A teacher there told me that the difference between a good and a bad teacher is the ability to say ‘I don’t know.’ People will respect you if you say ‘I don’t know’ and then focus on how to find out. How would you describe yourself in one word? Dedicated. My second choice would be goofy. I try to put my heart into what I do but with so much to do it is sometimes hard.


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MARCH 4-10, 2004

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PHOTO | CHRISTINE LITAS

ancy McNabb sets out the props for her Sunday morning lesson: a foot-tall hourglass made of blond wood and a paper plate of chocolate cookies. The hourglass will serve as a visual metaphor; the cookies are just cookies. “We’re big on refreshments,� she says. The “we� she refers to are Latter-day Saints, or Mormons, members of the growing Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints founded (or restored, as church members believe) in the United States in the 1820s. Members believe their church is the authentic Christian church, the one originally established by Christ. According to church members, because early adherents’ strayed from the truth after Christ’s death, he removed the church from the Earth until its restoration through Joseph Smith, the modern church’s first prophet. McNabb is one of about 1,100 members in the Champaign-Urbana area and almost 12 million worldwide. McNabb is preparing this lesson for the oldest girls in Nancy McNabb watches as her husband Paul helps their son Stewart move his game piece across the board of the game “Uncle Wiggly.� the Young Women youth group She was also attracted to the kind of people each subsequent generation, forging religious in the Champaign Second Ward. (A ward is a Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS). She grew up paths for their descendants. congregation.) Five 16- and 17-year-old girls in a nominally Protestant family, and had only Mormons were. McNabb finds benefits to being a first-gener“It was just so nice to find people who felt sit in a ragged semi-circle facing McNabb. attended church a few times while growing up. They are dressed in teenage versions of McNabb took the missionary discussions (a the same way I did, people who had the same ation LDS church member. “It’s nice to be able to be a convert and to be Sunday best—ski jackets over dresses, series of six lessons taught by LDS missionar- amount of seriousness, but were fun, people slouchy socks with high heels, a cotton T-shirt ies to potential converts) but thought they who had something that I felt that I wanted, able to know you made the decision yourself. who knew things I felt that I wanted to know,� You weren’t forced into anything, she said.� were “a bunch of baloney.� with a velvet skirt. But it can also be difficult, even lonely After high school graduation, McNabb began she said. McNabb shows the girls the hourglass and But, perhaps more importantly, by joining sometimes. Besides her husband (who is also a tells them it is like the course of a person’s to wonder about religion and whether there life—if she makes the right decisions. Right might really be anything beyond this life. She the church, McNabb found a spiritual family, convert) and her children, none of her relatives are Mormons. While no family members now, the girls are at the narrow point where took the discussions again as a freshman at the something she had never had before. “My parents raised us (McNabb and her two were ever hostile about her decision to join the they may feel constricted; only a small set of University of Illinois, and that time “they stuck.� She was attracted to the concept of the older sisters) to be moral; they raised us to be church, she is hesitant to share parts of her choices among all the possibilities open to them are appropriate. But if they choose nar- authority of God and the belief that men who honest; they didn’t raise us to be spiritual. The church life. For LDS families whose church membership rowly now, keeping Heavenly Father’s com- belong to the church’s priesthood (which is community that the church provides we didn’t goes back several generations, relatives—even mandments in mind, their lives and opportu- almost all male church members) can act for have,� McNabb said. Some church members can trace their LDS if they do not attend the same ward—and nities will expand like the wide base of the God. Instead of employing professional clergy, hourglass. It is a metaphor that might just as the LDS church is led entirely by the laity. lineage back to the original pioneers who set- church family would be part of the same reliMcNabb had never been comfortable with the tled the Salt Lake Valley in 1847, fleeing per- gious network. But for converts, the two are easily represent McNabb’s life. Thirty-one years ago, when she was 18, idea that graduating from seminary could give secution first in New York state, then in the separate, and the functions of family become Midwest. New converts have come out of compartmentalized. McNabb converted to the Church of Jesus someone the authority to act for God.

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★ BY DAN MALONEY | STAFF WRITER

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ean Penn once said that “if you put three thoughts into a movie, then you’ve broken the law and no one will come.� However, when nary a single thought is put into a film, what happens then? Only a few films have the distinction of being labeled completely worthless. Twisted has now joined those ranks. The premise is so simplistic and so mindnumbing that those who actually attend this film will find no surprises. Ashley Judd plays Inspector Shepard of the San Francisco Police Department who has some life-shaping dark secrets: Her father was a serial killer who murdered her mother and then killed himself. She was raised by the now commissioner of police, played by an unusually calm Samuel L. Jackson. After being promoted to the homicide division and given a new partner—an unusually overactive Andy Garcia—Shepard finds out her past one-night stands are being killed one by one. The opening shots are the single redeeming quality of this film: a montage of a fogged-in San Francisco that slowly spirals into a warehouse with a woman’s sweat running down the side of her face. The camera pulls back to reveal a knife to the woman’s throat. The woman fights back, but not before uttering some stupid one-liner. After that, it all goes downhill. Sadly, those opening shots—the entire minute and a half they lasted—really brought a glimmer of hope to a film that already looked about as exciting as, well, name a cliche, any cliche. Ashley Judd plays her typical Morgan Freeman sidekick role, allowing Jackson to be a younger version of Freeman. But even Jackson and Garcia seem out of place. Jackson never yells once and Garcia does, and it’s obvious the roles are reversed. Director Philip Kaufman makes the film seem as if he just didn’t care. It’s sad to see such a talented director and cast waste their time. One thing is for certain about Twisted: its faults are magnified by the cast’s and crew’s fame. If this had been an independent film circulated through the Sunset or Toronto film festivals, the inevitable notoriety which it will gain for being “the worst film of the century� would certainly not be there.

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3!6/9 2OUTE"URWASH!VE

Exclusive HPS-4000 & SDDS/DTS/DD Presentations

Local Latter-day Saint Nancy McNabb’s religious journey BY HADLEY MOORE | STAFF WRITER

film

MARCH 4-10, 2004 | COULD TWISTED REALLY BE AS BAD AS GIGLI?

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April 5th, 2004 April 5th, 2004 @ Foellinger @Auditorium Foellinger

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STARSKY & HUTCH (PG–13) (2 SCREENS) Fri. & Sat. 12:20 12:40 2:40 3:00 5:00 5:20 7:20 7:40 9:40 10:00 12:10 Sun. - Thu. 12:20 12:40 2:40 3:00 5:00 5:20 7:20 7:40 9:40 10:00 HIDALGO (PG–13) (2 SCREENS) Fri. & Sat. 12:15 1:00 3:15 4:00 6:30 7:10 9:20 10:00 12:00 Sun. - Thu. 12:15 1:00 3:15 4:00 6:30 7:10 9:20 10:00 ◆ PASSION OF CHRIST (R) (2 SCREENS) Fri.

& Sat. 11:15 1:15 2:00 4:15 5:00 7:00 8:00 9:45 11:00 Sun. 11:15 1:15 2:00 4:15 5:00 7:00 8:00 9:45 Mon. - Thu. 1:15 2:00 4:15 5:00 7:00 8:00 9:45 50 FIRST DATES (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 12:40 3:00 5:10 7:20 9:30 11:40 Sun. - Thu. 12:40 3:00 5:10 7:20 9:30

DIRTY DANCING (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 1:10 3:20 5:30 7:40 9:50 12:00 Sun. - Thu. 1:10 3:20 5:30 7:40 9:50 EUROTRIP (R) Fri. & Sat. 12:50 3:10 5:20 7:40 9:50 12:10 Sun. - Thu. 12:50 3:10 5:20 7:40 9:50 RETURN OF THE KING (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 12:20 4:20 8:20 MIRACLE (PG) Fri. - Thu. 1:10 4:20 7:10 10:00 MONSTER (R) Fri. & Sat. 12:20 2:40 5:00 7:30 10:00 12:15 Sun. - Thu. 12:20 2:40 5:00 7:30 10:00 MYSTIC RIVER (R) Fri. - Thu. 12:50 4:00 7:00 9:50 TWISTED (R) Fri. & Sat. 12:40 3:00 5:20 7:40 10:00 12:20 Sun. - Thu. 12:40 3:00 5:20 7:40 10:00 WELCOME TO MOOSEPORT (PG–13) Fri. Thu. 12:30 2:50 7:20

CLUB DREAD (R) Fri. & Sat. 12:30 2:50 5:10 7:40 10:00 12:15 YOU GOT SERVED (PG–13) Sun. - Thu. 12:30 2:50 5:10 7:40 Fri. & Sat. 5:10 9:40 12:00 Sun. - Thu. 5:10 9:40 10:00

TICKETS ON SALE TOMORROW!!! Purchase TICKETS at Illini Union Ticket Central

TEEN DRAMA QUEEN (PG) Fri. & Sat. 12:30 2:50 5:10 7:20 CITY OF GOD (R) Fri. & Sat. 9:20 11:20 Sun. - Thu. 12:30 2:50 5:10 7:20 1:00 4:00 7:00 9:40 12:10 Sun. - Thu. 1:00 4:00 7:00 9:40 9:20 Showtimes for 3/5 thru 3/11


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WHERE IS MY MIND? LALALALA | MARCH 4 - 10, 2004

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Do you ever feel an urge to kiss trees? Do animals sometimes talk to you? Can you predict the future by divining the way corn flakes float in the last puddle of milk in your bowl? Do you have a special fascination with chocolate roosters, statues of pro wrestlers, and conspiracy theories? Have you ever fantasized of being a transsexual spy? Are there patterns that resemble constellations on the soles of your feet? If you answered yes to two or more of these questions, you're most likely an extraterrestrial who has amnesia or is in disguise. The upcoming week will be fantastic because events will remind you of life on your home planet. If you answered no to four or more questions, you're probably not an alien, but for maximum comfort you should act like one this week. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The world's largest private bank, Citigroup, has agreed to stop financing projects that damage sensitive ecosystems. It has promised to invest more in projects that use renewable energy and to pursue policies that protect indigenous people. How did this impossible dream come to pass? The humble but dogged environmental group, Rainforest Action Network, creatively pestered Citigroup for years until the corporation gave into its demands. I see a comparable David over-Goliath victory in your future, Taurus, so keep plugging away at your quixotic quest. For inspiration, recall Margaret Mead's words: "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If you live in the Northern Hemisphere, the sun is rising about a minute earlier each morning and setting a minute later every evening. As a result, you're drinking in about 15 minutes more sunlight every week.The psychological effect of this steady influx has been slowly growing, and, in concert with certain astrological influences, will soon reach critical mass. As a result, you will become sun-like: a luminous beacon of warmth. Everything you shine upon will look brighter, and your own beauty will be highly visible, too. It will be a perfect time, therefore, to make a dramatic move that helps you pursue your dreams harder and smarter. QUANTUM FLUX (also known as CANCER) (June 21-July 22): Many people have come to feel that nature is boring, notes educator Thomas Poplawski. Writing in "Renewal" magazine, he fingers TV's hyperactive imagery as the cause. In becoming addicted to this alternative reality, the mass audience has become numb to the more slow-paced entertainment value of trees and mountains and streams and clouds. Have you been contaminated? Has your capacity for patient observation and reverent objectivity been damaged? If so, this is a perfect astrological moment to seek the cure. I urge you to wander out into the wild places and stay there until you see how interesting they are.

FIRST THING’S FIRST...

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If you eventually become a millionaire philanthropist at some later date, it will probably be because of the forces you set in motion during the next three weeks. If, in the 22nd century, there arises a religious cult that worships you as a sex god or love goddess, it will be because of a seed you germinate very soon. Finally, Leo, if you are ultimately destined to discover the key to eternal youth, it will have a lot to do with the spacious new question you begin to ask now. These are days of awe and mystery. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In order to live, you've got to be a demolisher.You take plants and animals that were once alive and rip them apart with your teeth, then disintegrate them in your digestive system. Your body is literally on fire inside, burning up oxygen you suck into your lungs. You didn't actually cut down the trees used to make your house and furniture, but you colluded with their demise. Then there's the psychological liquidation you've done: killing off old beliefs you've outgrown, for instance. I'm not trying to make you feel guilty, Virgo -- just pointing out that you have a lot of experience with positive expressions of destruction. Can you think of other forms this magic takes? It's your specialty these days. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): It's a perfect time to launch an uprising against God. Due to a favorable alignment of your sign, the "rebel goddess" asteroid Lilith, and Cruithne, Earth's "second moon," you have special leeway with the Supreme Being. It's almost certain that you won't be punished if you bitch and complain to Him about the injustices he has allowed to fester in your life. In fact, expressing your angry protest may even get things changed for the better. Sometimes the squeaky wheel really does get the grease, even in divine matters. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Some branches of Eastern religions teach the doctrine "Kill out desire." In their view, yearning for earthly pleasures is at the root of all human suffering. The Western religion of materialism takes the opposite tack, asserting that the meaning of life is to be found in enjoying earthly pleasures. Its message is "Feed your raw longings like a French foie gras farmer cramming eight pounds of maize down a goose's gullet every day." We here at Free Will Astrology walk a middle path. We believe there are many degrading desires that enslave you and a few sacred desires that liberate you.Your mission in the coming weeks, Scorpio, is to identify the sacred kind and pursue them with your wild heart unleashed. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Your power this week will come primarily from decisions not made, words not spoken, actions not taken, and spaces not filled. Everything you need will arrive if you have created enough emptiness.Everything you love will thrive if it has the freedom to do and be nothing. To ensure

that you never succumb to the pressure of Type A bullies who think every moment has to be filled with ambitious commotion, steal away often to stare dreamily out the window and listen to the sound of silence. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): It's time for a check-in, Capricorn. What progress have you been making in your work on this year's major assignments? As I suggested last December, you're most likely to attract good fortune in 2004 if you regularly break out of your comfort zone and go wandering in unfamiliar places. You'll discover fresh secrets about how to feel happy and healthy whenever you dip into an experimental mode and try things you've never tried before. Alas, I fear many of you have yet to make a whole-hearted commitment to this thrilling quest. But if you have been waffling, it's the perfect week to dive in. And if you did take the plunge a while ago, you'll harvest a big reward any day now. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Since 1994, Mexico's Zapatistas have evolved from a small guerrilla army fighting for the rights of indigenous people to an international cultural force whose battles are mostly waged with symbols and words. The Zapatista leader, who goes by the pseudonym Subcomandante Marcos, always appears in public wearing a mask. Periodically, his old mask wears out and he has to replace it with a fresh one. Rumor has it that he has gone through ten in ten years. I think this would be a good standard for all of us to live up to: to molt our persona, or social mask, once a year. It's about that time for you, Aquarius. Considering how much your inner world has transformed, it wouldn't make sense for you to keep your same old game face much longer. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Normally I endorse the proverb that says, "You can't cross a chasm in two short jumps." In your current state of grace, however, you just may be able to find a loophole in that cosmic law. The massive amounts of dumb luck that have been surging your way seem to be on the verge of mutating into out-and-out miracles. You could be the first anti-hero in your family line to turbo-charge a quantum leap of faith in mid-leap.

✍ HOMEWORK:

Rob Brezsny's Free Will ☎ Astrology beautyandtruth

I dare you to unleash the smart animal within you that has been restricted because of the actions of the dumb animal in you. www.freewillastrology.com.

@ f r e e w i l l a s t r o l o g y. c o m 415.459.7209(v)• 415.457.3769 http://www.freewillastrology. com P.O. Box 798 San Anselmo, CA 94979

CROSSWORD PUZZLE ACROSS 1 Like going in circles 12 Atlantic City, e.g. 14 Academy Award winner who said “I dream for a living” 16 Western bulrushes 17 Sch. that Roger Staubach played football for 18 Freshwater fish with bill-like jaws 19 Serving edge 20 “The Optimist’s Daughter” author 22 Viva ___ 23 Crisper 24 Chip flavoring 25 “Hotel de ___” (195960 TV western) 26 Camp seat 27 Moolah 28 Father ___, the leper priest of Molokai 29 Blue prints 31 Exotic stamp collectors, maybe 32 Keeps from 33 Gives the heave-ho 34 Org. with writing fellowships

35 Things seers see 36 Off one’s trolley 37 Year that Eric the Red

was born, traditionally Place to dry tobacco “Check it out!” Park opened in 1964 Former MGM rival Santa suit stuffing Defensive play It’s dangerous for you to fly by 48 Stiffs 49 Roadwork equipment 38 39 40 41 42 43 44

DOWN 1 Full of vinegar 2 Mystery writer’s award 3 Plays for a sap 4 It could be original 5 Stats on some backs 6 Put off 7 Longtime record label for Whitney Houston and Kenny G 8 Small 9 ___ Margarita, in the Caribbean 10 Head, slangily

11 They’re

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MARCH 4-10, 2004 | JUST KIDDING. JOURNEY SUCKS!

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always unac12 companied 12 2001’s 14 “Planet of the 17 16 Apes” and others 20 21 19 13 Selenium and zinc 24 23 14 Openings for 27 horse trainers 26 15 Healthful 31 29 30 dishes 20 W.W. II volun- 32 33 teers 36 21 “The Intimate 35 ___” (1990 39 38 jazz album) 22 “Hard 42 41 Hearted 44 45 46 Hannah” of song 48 24 Irving Berlin’s “Blue ___” 49 25 Velvety plant Puzzle by Mark Diehl 28 Packed 30 Affect in a 40 It can be icy subtle way 42 Laugh, in showbiz 31 Place of hard knocks? slang 33 Kind of battle 43 Showcase lead-in on “The Price 36 Procrastinator’s reply Is Right” 39 Misstep

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45 Your, in Roma 46 20-time Rose Bowl

winner: Abbr.

47 Sorority letter

Drinking and driving: Damned if you do, damned if you don’t BY MICHAEL COULTER | CONTRIBUTING WRITER

J

ust as an example of how stupid people act when they drink, let’s look at a familiar piece of drinking logic. Two drunk folks are talking and one says, “Hey, you’re pretty sauced. I’ll follow you home in my car to make sure you’re OK.” Yes, that’s always a fine idea: Add yet another car to the fiasco. People are idiots when they drink. Basically, following a drunk person home does one of two things. It either satisfies one’s sick desire to see another person involved in a car accident, or enables one to be a witness to the possible accident. “Wow, dude, you really smacked the piss out of that parked car.” Either way, it’s just never an especially sound idea. It’s impossible to argue that drinking and driving is acceptable. Still, it’s also naive to believe it doesn’t happen every night of the week or that you’re ever going to stop it completely. Like I said, people do stupid things when they drink. There’s been talk lately of Illinois lowering its blood alcohol limit even further from its current level of .08. That means you could only have one or two drinks and still be able to drive, instead of two or three. The problem is, it probably won’t matter much. I would wager that 90 percent of people walking out of bars are well past the current legal limit. I’m one of them on a pretty regular basis. I try not to drink and drive anymore, but if I were to be honest, I’m positive I’ve done it within the last two months. I thought I was fine at the time, but in hindsight, I was very wrong about that, and it wasn’t because of just one extra beer. Lowering the limit might make law enforcement’s job much easier. Pull someone over for whatever violation and ask them if they’ve been drinking. If they say yes, hook them up to the machine. You know their ass is guilty. It only takes two beers, after all. I’m sure there are some folks out there who only have one beer when they go out, but I’ll be damned if I’ve ever seen one and I’ve never drunk with one. Considering the crowd I hang out with, you’d have a better chance of spotting a Yeti. Say what you will, but people lie their ass off—to others and to themselves—when they talk about drinking. I know I do. “I had

a couple of drinks after work” usually translates into “I had four or five drinks and ate some peanuts, so I’m going to say I’m fine.” That’s the problem: No one ever thinks they’re as drunk as they are. Let’s say we manage to convince all of these people who now drink and drive not to. What’s their best plan of attack? Let’s see, downtown Champaign is the place to go, have a few drinks and see some friends, so let’s say you go there. You park your car in a lot or on the street. Then a few hours later, you realize you shouldn’t be driving. What do you do? Most folks would take a cab. OK, that’s probably about $10 one way, another $10 the next day to pick up your car. That’s $20 right there. What about your car? Well, the city will slap a ticket on it for sure, which will cost at least $25. There’s also a good chance they’ll go ahead and tow it. That’s another $75 and a whole extra pain in the ass, the cost of which is priceless. Taking care of the previous night will take up your whole next morning and cost you at least $100 for doing the right thing. Well, it should be hard, right? The city doesn’t want you drinking to begin with. They always whine about what a problem it is, but if you’ve got a bottle of vodka, a bag of ice, seven Dixie cups and plenty of money, they’ll give you a liquor license. It makes them a lot of money. Well, that’s fine, but then they decide bars should also be open until 2 a.m. Yeah, adding an extra hour to the cocktailing is really helping. I bet there are a ton of people who go out at 1:30 a.m., have one beer and then head home for some shuteye. A later closing time basically means most of us are going to drink for an extra hour, and that once a year, Roger Ebert can have a beer after he shows his late movie. They make it seem as simple as finding a designated driver. Trust me, no sober person has any desire to hang around with a bunch of drunken monkeys all night long, and even less desire to pile them all in the car for a ride home afterward. I walk nearly every time I go out now, but I live a few blocks away from the places I frequent. If I were you other people, I’d be careful. They’ll get you one way or another.

Michael Coulter is a videographer at Parkland College. He writes a weekly e-mail column, “This Sporting Life” and has hosted several local comedy shows.

News of the weird THINNING THE HERD

BRIGHT IDEAS

A 46-year-old motorcyclist, speeding, yelling obscenities, and shaking his fist alongside an 18-wheeler that had made a left turn of questionable etiquette on a Corpus Christi, Texas, street, lost control of the cycle, fell off, and was fatally dragged underneath the truck (October). And in Tampa, Fla., a 20year-old man chased down another driver (both in pickups), finally jumping onto the first driver’s door so he could punch him through the window. The distracted driver continued on for two blocks but finally hit a tree, which caused the truck to roll over onto the man clinging to the door, and he died at the scene (October).

Albuquerque emergency room physician Sam Slishman is working to launch his Endorphin Power Co., which is a homeless shelter providing drug rehabilitation based on vigorous exercise at on-premises workout stations. However, Slishman also wants his center to help pay for itself by selling the electric power that could be harnessed by his downand-out population’s daily workouts (pedaling, lifting, working the treadmills). Endorphin Power, Slishman says, will be the city’s flagship for “social rehabilitation and renewable energy.”

DENTAL FOLLIES Dentist Mohamedraza Huss Bhimani (Orland Park, Ill.), whom police say fondled three female patients, was arrested in his office while he happened to be working on another patient, in mid-filling (October). (The patient had to rush to another dentist to finish the job.) And Dr. Leon Gombis (Oak Lawn, Ill.) had battery charges filed against him after he, wielding pliers, ripped a cap out of the mouth of a 58-year-old patient, believing (mistakenly) that she was behind on her payments (January).

MORE TO WORRY ABOUT The owners of FM 106.7 in York, Pa., having ended the station’s country-music format but not yet having introduced a new one, played “Pop Goes the Weasel” 24 hours a day during the interim (February). And a recently active methamphetamine lab (fuel, tubing, foil, coffee filters and a liquid compound) was discovered in a search of cells in the Pikeville, Tenn., county jail (December). And a Pacifica, Calif., father filed a $15,000 claim against the school district, saying officials have not stopped students from taunting his 12-year-old son, who is an internationally acclaimed ballroom dancer (September).

Copyright 2004 Chuck Shepard, distributed by Universal Press Syndicate


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JUST A SMALL TOWN GIRL, LIVIN’ IN HER LONELY WORLD | MARCH 4-10, 2004

insidebuzz

editor’snote BY MARISSA MONSON | EDITOR IN CHIEF

The Story

5 Q & A with director of Staerkel Planitarium

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upersize no more! That’s right, McDonald’s has decided to phase out the supersize option from its 13,000 restaurants nationwide. The phaseout comes after pressure from the public concerning the health value of the extra fries and cola. They have phased in yogurts, salads and fruit. I for one applaud McDonald’s for taking a step to fight obesity in this country. Well, sort of. I’m not sure the absence of the super-size will curb weight gain. The problem lies in the greasy burgers and fries, not the few extra fries the consumer receives when they heartily answer yes to the inevitable question, “Would you like that supersized?” How’s this for a slogan: “McDonald’s, home of the salad.” Doesn’t quite sound right, does it? According to an Associated Press article, McDonald’s spokesman Walt Riker said, “This core menu, which has been under development since 2002, simplifies our menu and restaurant operations and provides a balance of choices for our customers. A component of this overall simplification, menu and balanced lifestyle strategy is the

As both a professor at Parkland College and director of the Staerkel Planitarium, the second largest planetarium in Illinois...

Arts 8 The work of artist Derrick Holley Derrick Holley is a local artist whose work is currently on display at Highdive and ...

Music 10 Saying goodbye to an old friend, Record Service In November of 1969, with nothing more than a pad of paper, a pencil, and a catalogue, a student run...

Calendar 12 Hip-hop Awareness Week This Saturday is a big night for hiphop lovers as Melodic Scribes, d-lo, Spinnerty, Brother Ali and Scratch...

Film

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ongoing phase-out of the Super-size fries and Supersize drink options,” Riker said. I’m just wondering how the fast food pioneers thought their delectable french fries and Big Macs would affect the nation’s waistline. Granted, I never subscribe to the thinking behind the lawsuits that claim, “McDonald’s gave me health problems.” Yes, McDonald’s knows how much fat is in your burger and fries, but so should you, the consumer, just by looking at the greasesoaked bag your food comes in. It’s great that McDonald’s is taking the Supersized stuff off the menu, but come on, folks, who’s kidding who here? America’s obesity problem is no one’s fault but our own. Of course we want McDonald’s. Fat tastes good, no one will deny that. But, let’s take some initiative. America is the fat kid that always has Twinkies in our lunch box. As we huff and puff trailing behind France and England, we really have no one to blame but ourselves. We bought the Supersize, and we ate it. So it’s nice to see McDonald’s is being the bigger man here, so to speak. Say no to fries all together! There’s a campaign slogan for the ages.

27

buzz MARCH 4 - 10, 2004 | I LOVE THIS WEATHER

There’s a great story about jazz in Champaign-Urbana. It holds chapters from the past. Sounds from the present. And ideas yet to be lived. Step into the groove of life in C-U Featuring Cecil Bridgewater March 1 - 7 • April 29 - May 2 Jazz Threads Underwriter

-M.M.

Creative Intersections Sponsor

24 Oscar wrap-up Some might say this year’s Oscars were actionpacked, and filled with suprising...

Corporate Platinum Sponsor

PHOTO | RODERICK GEDEY

BUZZ STAFF Volume 2, Number 9 COVER DESIGN | Jordan Herron

Editor in chief Marissa Monson Art Directors Meaghan Dee & Carol Mudra Copy Chief Chris Ryan Music Jacob Dittmer Art Katie Richardson Film Paul Wagner Community Emily Wahlheim Calendar Maggie Dunphy Photography Editor Christine Litas Calendar Coordinators Lauren Smith, Cassie Conner, Erin Scottberg Photography Christine Litas, Roderick Gedey Copy Editors Chris Ryan, Jen Hubert, Suzanne Sitrick, Erin Green Designers Adam Obendorf, Sue Janna Truscott, Jordan Herron, Glenn Cochon, Chris Depa Production Manager Theon Smith Sales Manager Jon Maly Marketing/Distribution Melissa Schleicher, Maria Erickson Publisher Mary Cory

Got an opinion? E-mail us at buzz@readbuzz.com or you can send us a letter at 1001 S. Wright St., Champaign, IL 61820. We reserve the right to edit submissions. Buzz will not publish a letter without the verbal consent of the writer prior to publication date. Free speech is an important part of the democratic process. Exercise your rights. All editorial questions or letters to the editor should be sent to buzz@readbuzz.com or 337-8317 or buzz, 57 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820. Buzz magazine is a student-run publication of Illini Media Company and does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students.

Copyright Illini Media Company 2004

Corporate Bronze Sponsor The Great Impasta

Patron Co-sponsors Fran and Marc Ansel Anonymous

Jazz Threads is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts; and by the Heartland Arts Fund, a program of Arts Midwest funded by the National Endowment for the Arts with additional contributions from General Mills Foundation, Land O'Lakes Foundation, Sprint Corporation, and the Illinois Arts Council.

Jazz Crawl and Jam Session

Cecil Bridgewater and guests in concert

A feast of local jazz musicians and venues, plus a chance to jam at the end of the evening; all are welcome to listen or jam

Clark Terry, trumpet Ron Bridgewater, saxophone and the U of I Concert Jazz Band

Thursday, March 4, 5pm to midnight 5pm: U of I Jazz Band II at the Iron Post, 120 S. Race, Urbana 6:30pm: U of I Lab Band at Krannert Center’s Tryon Festival Theatre, 500 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana 8pm: Susan Hofer and Friends at the Canopy Club 708 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana 9:30pm: Jeff Helgesen and Chip McNeill at Zorba’s 627 E. Green, Champaign 11pm: Jam Session with the LaMonte Parsons Experience at Cowboy Monkey, 6 Taylor St., Champaign

Sunday, March 7, 7:30pm Tryon Festival Theatre at Krannert Center $17 to $25 Talkback after the show, free

Afterglow with Chambana Casual night music at Krannert Center’s Interlude bar Sunday, March 7, about 9:30pm Lobby at Krannert Center Free Cash bar

Jazz Threads Celebration Concert Traffic Jam: Metta Quintet Rejuvenate after work with this Brooklyn quintet, leaders of New York’s JazzReach program Friday, March 5, 5pm Lobby at Krannert Center Free Cash bar

A powerful combination of community and music Sunday, May 2, 2pm Virginia Theatre Free

Java and Jazz Cecil Bridgewater with Chambana A free, family-friendly, informal concert, with coffee and bagels for sale in the lobby beginning at 9am—you can even take them into the theatre Saturday, March 6, 10am Tryon Festival Theatre at Krannert Center Free; tickets required

For information on all events 217/333-6280 800/KCPATIX KrannertCenter.com


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WHAT’S YOUR NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION? BROKEN IT YET? | MARCH 4 - 10, 2004

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r food u o y s e Do ce suck? servi

! s r e t a C s Foudini Special events, Fraternities, and don’t forget We Deliver! Now Signing Contracts for Next Semester!

z buz March 4-10, 2004

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COMMUNIT Y

A look at family and faith (Page 4)

ARTS

meredith monk

t a y l n O Roasted Garlic Alfredo Pizza ~~~~~~~~~~~~ California Club Wrap ~~~~~~~~~~~~ And Much More!

MacArthur “Genius” Award-winner and composer Meredith Monk presents a solo concert showcasing her extraordinarily creative work, capturing the audience's attention with evocative sounds from her one-of-a-kind vocal instrument.

(Page 6)

3.10.04 7:30pm

MUSIC

Interview with The Walkmen

m e r cy

A new work by Meredith

(Page 9)

Monk and Ann Hamilton

Neil

Prospect

Galen

Filled with visual and sonic wonders, mercy offers a stunning meditation on the mystery, beauty, and sadness of life. Vocal pioneer Meredith Monk collaborates with artist Ann Hamilton, a fellow MacArthur "Genius" Award-winner whose work has been shown at Krannert Art Museum. Produced by The House Foundation for the Arts, Inc.

3.13.04 7:30pm

Carry Out

being matters.

CALENDAR

Brother Ali and Scratch at Canopy (Page 14)

FILM

Windsor

359-1994

Local actress takes director’s chair

217/333-6280 KrannertCenter.com

The Passion of the Christ review (Page 22)

Arts | Entertainment | Community

Buzz Magazine: March 4, 2004  

March 4, 2004

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