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Westminster Record

March 2014

The Consistory and the Mass in Photos: Page 3 The Titular Church, Consistory Mass and a View from the Consistory: Back page

Feedback from the recent questionnaire on the family ahead of two Synods on the family

Pages 14 & 15

Our New Cardinal

Archbishop Vincent Nichols was created Cardinal by Pope Francis at the Ordinary Consistory on 22 February in St Peter’s Basilica in Rome. He received the ring, scarlet zucchetto and biretta from the Holy Father and was assigned the titular church of St Alphonsus Liguori located on the Via Merulana on the Esquiline Hill. ŠMazur/catholicnews.org.uk

Editorial Westminster Record – Contact us

Westminster Record | March 2014

Grateful for the Challenge

Editor Bishop John Arnold Archbishop’s House, Ambrosden Avenue SW1P 1QJ Managing Editor Barnaby Johns 020 7798 9031 Inhouse writer Alex Balzanella 020 7798 9178 Inhouse writer Chris O’Callaghan 020 7798 9030 Design Julian Game Proofing Michael Holmes, John Scott To order copies contact Andrea Black 0161 214 1216 or email andrea.black@thecatholicuniverse.com Print management and distribution by The Universe Media Group Ltd.

March publication dates Editorial Deadline: 17 March Listings email: communications@rcdow.org.uk News and stories call 020 798 9031 communciations@rcdow.org.uk Advertising Deadline: 21 March To advertise call 0161 214 1200 Produced by the Communications Office of the Diocese of Westminster. News and articles published in Westminster Record do not necessarily represent the views of the Diocese of Westminster, unless specifically stated. Appearance of advertisements does not imply editorial endorsement.

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If someone had said to me in March 2013 ‘This is what the Church will look like in twelve months’ time’, I would likely have laughed. No event or person could surely change the mood of the universal Church in such a short period. No-one could make such an impact, even outside the Church, in the way that Pope Francis seems to have done in a year. With no word of criticism of his predecessors he has set new priorities for the Church and made a lot of us feel rather uncomfortable! His challenge is addressed to us all. In Rio de Janeiro he spoke to the South American bishops, saying that it was not enough for them to sit in their churches with the doors open, inviting people in. He asked them to have the courage to go out of the churches and to walk with people, even if they might be walking away from the Church, taking his cue from the two disciples on the road to Emmaus. They had left Jerusalem believing the Lord to be dead. Yet Jesus Himself came and walked by their side as they journeyed away, explaining the scriptures to them and showed why everything that had happened had been intended and predicted. Then, at the end of the day’s journey, they recognised him in the breaking of bread. Had Jesus not been there, would they ever have regained their faith?

To other bishops Pope Francis said not to worry about making mistakes. It is much better to be courageous, and risk making mistakes, than to make no mistakes through fear of getting things wrong. “Mess” is a word that he has used on other occasions. He wants our parishes to be “messy”, because it is in the “mess of life” that real evangelising can be done and people can be met where they are. Another image he evoked was of the Church being “like a field hospital, after a battle”. In such places the wounded are not asking about their cholesterol levels or blood sugars or fussing over details; they first of all need treatment for lifethreatening wounds. There were some who were ready to dismiss the early words and decisions of Pope Francis as superficial gestures. Real change would not follow, they suggested. But there are serious reviews going on within the central organisation of the Church and such reviews, done properly, take time. Perhaps the clearest sign of Francis’s intention to challenge us all has come with his Apostolic

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Exhortation “Evangelii Gaudium” The stark reminder of that document is that the Church is called to a new form of evangelisation and that we are, without exception, called to be “missionary disciples”. He has much to say about how we are all able to play our part through our decisions and actions. He speaks of the energy and enthusiasm that we should have as we witness to the “joy of the Gospel” in our families, our work places and our friendships. Pope Francis wants us to be very comfortable in the reassurance of the loving mercy of God. He has said on many occasions that there is forgiveness for all and that he, with everyone else, is a sinner in need of forgiveness. Being comfortable with that promise, he is not afraid to challenge us to embrace all that we can and must be doing to end the suffering, hunger, poverty and injustice in our world. I, for one, am most grateful for the challenge he places before us, before me!

Bishop John Arnold Editor

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News

Westminster Record | March 2014

The Mission to be Cardinals of Compassion - Pope Francis In his homily at the Consistory Pope Francis told the new Cardinals that the Church had a great need for their courage to speak the Gospel and to witness to the truth, for their compassion, their prayer particularly for the poor, and for them to make peace and reconcile those embroiled in violence He reflected on St Mark’s Gospel: “‘Jesus was walking ahead of them…’ (10:32). At this moment too, Jesus walks ahead of us. He is always before us. He goes ahead of us and leads the way… This is the source of our confidence and our joy: to be his disciples, to remain with him, to walk behind him, to follow him…”

The Holy Father places the ring on Cardinal Vincent’s finger.

The new Cardinal greets members of the College of Cardinals

Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI greets Cardinal Vincent. Westminster Cathedral Choir met the Pope following the Mass on Sunday. Along with the Sistine choir at the Consistory they sang motets by Palestrina and alone they sang music by English and Spanish composers. Follow us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/diocese.westminster

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Cardinal Vincent said he was deeply moved by the election and following the Consistory spoke of his resolution to accept Christ’s invitation to “walk with Him”.

Photos ©Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

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News

Westminster Record Record September Westminster | March2011 2014

Holy Family opens its doors Chris O’Callaghan reports on the opening of the first Catholic primary school built in the Diocese in 40 years. taff, children and parents were joined by Archbishop Vincent Nichols for the official opening and blessing of Holy Family Primary School in West Acton on 12 February. It is the first Catholic primary school to be built in the Diocese for 40 years and, despite still being in its infancy, achieved an ‘Outstanding’ Ofsted report in January. The Mass was led by Archbishop Vincent and local clergy from Acton, with music from the local St Raphael’s School choir, which celebrated its 50th anniversary in October last year. The children of Holy Family, aged between 4 and 6 years, all took part in the liturgy through reading, responses and prayers, a testament to their teachers’ instruction in the Faith. Using

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pictures of the Holy Family drawn by the children, Archbishop Vincent spoke about how to be in a loving family and encouraged the children to form a holy family today in their new school and to make it their home. The school has classrooms radiating from a large central atrium, each fitted with interactive whiteboards and computers. Teaching began in September 2012 in the Parish Hall of Holy Family Church before the new purpose built building in September 2013. Many who attended the opening were impressed by the building and commented on how it is a triumph for the provision of Catholic education in the area. Archbishop Vincent talking to children from Holy Family Catholic Primary School. Inset: Children reading the bidding prayers at Mass

True Harmony of the soulful heart “Open our eyes, let darkness be light. With peace in our hearts may our spirits unite.” True Harmony

by Barnaby Johns

More than 200 students from Maria Fidelis Catholic Secondary School in Camden were offered a heart-warming performance from vocalist Vanessa Quai at Morning Assembly on 13 February. Vanessa, 25, from Vanuatu in the South Pacific has been writing and performing her own songs since the age of 11. She is presently the best selling recording artist in the Pacific and a rapidly rising talent in the international music scene. True Harmony is based on a prayer for peace, love and unity and Vanessa told the students how she felt about the song: “I feel connected to this song as I have a very strong faith in God. I believe that the message of this song speaks very powerfully when we see what is happening in our world today with conflicts and crises. True harmony and true peace come from God. When you know who you are in God that Vanessa Quai and students from Maria Fidelis. She impressed the students with her song True Harmony’s message of peace. is the greatest peace you can

have within yourself. This is who I am and I wish to voice this through my singing wherever I travel.” Writers Mike Croft and Matt Wilson co-operated with producer James McMillan on True Harmony, which was released in January on Steep Smithy Music. See www.steepsmithy.com for more details about Vanessa.

“When you know who you are in God that is the greatest peace you can have within yourself.”

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News

Westminster Record | March 2014

Pinner a winner at 100

News in Brief

© Greg Townsend

by Chris O’Callaghan

The central stained glass figure of St Luke was commissioned by the Parish at Pinner to commemorate the centenary celebrations. St Joseph and St Francis came from the former church.

St Luke’s parish in Pinner celebrated its centenary on 1 February, marking the anniversary of its foundation with a Mass of Thanksgiving celebrated by Cardinal Vincent Nichols.

In his homily Cardinal Vincent talked about all that was worth celebrating in the parish and all that had happened in the church over the last hundred years: “There is much to celebrate; and I

hope that as the year progresses there will be many opportunities to explore this rich history and thank God for all the graces and blessings received here since Mass was first celebrated by Fr John Caulfield on this day in 1914. There have been marriages and baptisms, first Confessions, Holy Communions and Confirmations and, of course the sad memories of funerals, together with the strong promise of the resurrection of the dead to new life in the Lord.” The mission was founded in 1914 when the first Mass was celebrated in a small room within a residential home in Hatch End, Pinner. The land for a new church was bought in July 1914 and the

foundation stone blessed by Cardinal Francis Bourne in April 1915. This building is now the parish centre, after the construction of the present church in 1957. A group from the parish will also go on a pilgrimage, walking part of the Camino to Santiago de Compostela in May.

Mercy Sisters on the Web Anyone interested in learning more about Venerable Mother Catherine McAuley, Foundress of the Sisters of Mercy, and the 'Mercy Family' can go to a newly launched website: www.mercyassociates.org.uk Flame 2 Announced

The then Cardinal-Designate Vincent with Parish Priest, Canon Robert Plourde

Lourdes in Westminster Cathedral

The Catholic Youth Ministry Federation (CYMFed) has announced the date on which Flame 2 will be taking place as 7 March 2015 at Wembley Arena. Anyone interested in organising a group should contact: youth@rcdow.org.uk

by Chris O’Callaghan Following the example of Pope Francis, the Diocese of Westminster welcomed the sick at the annual Mass in honour of Our Lady of Lourdes at Westminster Cathedral on Saturday 8 February. Those who attended were able to receive the Sacrament of the Sick through anointing with blessed oil. The congregation was bolstered by the presence of the Westminster Redcaps, the young people who accompany the diocesan pilgrimage in the summer. They carried the many colourful diocesan banners and an illuminated statue of Our Lady of Lourdes. The then-Cardinal Designate Vincent concelebrated the Mass with Auxiliary Bishops John Arnold and John Sherrington as well as many diocesan priests. In his homily the Cardinal asked those present to call to mind Our Lady in the Grotto of Lourdes and to pray to her for those who were sick and suffering, not just those present in the Cathedral that afternoon, but worldwide.

The Real Easter Egg Range The Original Real Easter Egg Company is launching a new range that will now include a 24 page Easter story book alongside its traditional Egg. It will also release a special edition Real Easter Egg with an olive wood holding cross made in Bethlehem. The Real Easter Egg company has received endorsements for its educational value and Christian message from prominent public figures including Archbishop John Sentamu, Sir Ben Kingsley and Dame Judi Dench.

We want your News The statue of Our Lady of Lourdes carried in for the Mass. Inset: Fr Richard Nesbitt administering the Sacrament of the Sick during the Mass.

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You can send us your latest news online, please email communications@rcdow. org.uk Page 5

News

Westminster Record | March 2014

Mass at Cardinal Pole for St Josephine Bakhita Cardinal Pole Catholic Secondary School, Hackney, held a Mass in honour of St. Josephine Bakhita on 3 February, led by Fr Gerard King, Episcopal Vicar for the east of the Diocese. The Mass was attended by Year 8 students, who have a particular dedication to St Josephine. At the end of Mass Fr Gerard blessed the school’s statue of the Saint before joining a celebratory lunch with the students.

Pleasantly pleasing poetry Year 11 student and budding poet Ridhi Thukral from St Augustine’s Priory School in Ealing has been awarded the top prize at the prestigious T.S Eliot Shadowing Prize Competition. She submitted a 500 word essay in support of Daljit Nagra, a professional poet and teacher nominated for the T.S Eliot Poetry Prize. In the essay she wrote of her appreciation of Nagra’s “artistic scope and multi-dimensional flair” as well as his “colloquial approach.” Ridhi was invited to attend the prize-giving and poetry reading at the South Bank Centre. She said: “Winning this award was a great way to begin 2014. I am passionate about poetry and literature and Daljit Nagra is someone who particularly inspires me. Having the opportunity to meet him at our school in 2012 strengthened my love of poetry and opened my eyes to a variety of styles and tones.”

St Martha’s School celebrates 110th birthday The anniversary saw the establishment of the new Sister Cecile Scholarship, named after the former Head of the school from 1976 to 1988. This scholarship will be awarded to one girl every year from September 2014 to cover 100% of school fees from Year 7 to Upper 6th. For more information please contact Noreen Mullens on MullensN@saint-marthas.org.uk or call 020 8449 6889

Budding poet Ridhi Thukral (right) The T.S Eliot Shadowing Prize is hosted by the Poetry Book Society, in association with the English and Media Centre. The awards are aimed at students aged 14-19 years old, with a flair for poetry, to encourage them to explore new, exciting poems and forms which may go beyond the National Curriculum.

News in Brief St Thomas More: ‘Most Improved School in Country’ St Thomas More School, Wood Green, celebrated their Prizegiving ceremony with the news that they were Ofsted’s most improved school in Britain. Guest Tristram Hunt MP, Shadow Education Secretary, congratulated the school while Martin Tissot, Executive Headteacher, paid tribute to the bold move to Academy status last year. A Superb Result for St Benedict’s School

Students from St Martha’s

St Martha’s School in Hadley Wood celebrated the 110th anniversary of its foundation by the Sisters of St Martha. It was an opportunity to celebrate the tradition and ethos the Sisters have had at their heart for all the students, teaching and support staff. Headmaster Matthew Burke said: “Although the school now has a lay Headmaster and it is only Sister Teresa who remains a daily reminder of the Sisters as Deputy Head, it is clear to all who come and visit that the Sisters are remembered and celebrated, it is evident that they will continue to support, encourage and inspire generations to come.” Page 6

Sr Cecile handing over the Candle of Light to Headmaster Matthew Burke

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St Benedict’s School, Ealing, has been awarded the prestigious Investors in People Gold Award for going above and beyond in the way they develop, support and motivate their staff. The school joins a group of fewer than 700 organisations in Britain which have gained the Gold Award. The report stated: ‘The school is going from strength to strength and, although there are challenges to be faced in the future, the commitment from everyone at the school is absolute’. Follow us on Twitter at: twitter.com/RCWestminster

News

Westminster Record | March 2014

Cardinal-Designate speaks out for the marginalised on eve of Consistory by Alex Balzanella In the week preceding his visit to Rome for the Consistory, Cardinal Vincent Nichols spoke to the national press about ‘the real crisis’ that was occurring as part of welfare system reforms and the political ‘discourse of fear’ in society today. He spoke in particular of those receiving benefits, single-income households and migrants to the UK. The then-Cardinal Designate Vincent answers questions about the Consistory and welfare reform at a press conference before the Consistory

“Priests of mine tell me that every now and then they put some food in front of a woman and she bursts out crying.”

The Cardinal warned that the basic safety net which prevented people from reaching situations of extreme hunger or destitution had been ‘torn apart’ whilst increasingly tightened administration had led to unintended, but very painful, consequences: “Now if applicants don’t get it right then they have to wait for 10 days, for two weeks with nothing. For a country of our affluence, that quite frankly is a disgrace.” “Priests of mine tell me that

every now and then they put some food in front of a woman and she bursts out crying, she hasn’t eaten in three days. It’s stories like that that are part of the reality of this country today.” Cardinal Vincent also voiced concerns about the increasing poverty facing single-income households, worsened by the tax system which places an ‘inordinate’ tax level on them. This concern has been supported by the Joseph

Lent Reflection: The road to Easter Bishop John Sherrington reflects on the adventure of Lent I always think of Lent as a time of setting out on a journey. The journey is towards Easter but like any journey I can never be sure what will happen on the way. There may be delays, I might get lost, I will meet people I didn’t expect. This is the adventure of any journey. During Lent we are each invited to head out into the desert with Jesus and learn to listen to what he is saying to us. There is often silence and stillness in the desert – it is arid and barren. Like Jesus who is tempted by the Devil and held in the Father’s protective embrace, this will be our experience. We must learn to listen to the call of the Lord and trust in him. Lent is a time when I try to expand my heart and enlarge

my capacity to love, so that I am more aware of the needs of my neighbour and God’s presence in my life. One Lenten practice to help me do this is to fast or give up something I enjoy. Fasting can make me more aware of the emptiness of my heart, my loneliness or my need of God. As soon as I begin, I am tempted to indulge or give up and begin again tomorrow. To say no is a real opportunity to allow the Lord to help me grow in freedom. Being more aware of the needs of my neighbour, following more closely the tragedy in Syria and reading the stories of the plight of refugees or those suffering in Homs will enlarge my heart and make me more sensitive. It is a way of focusing on the

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other person and growing in love for them as well as helping me recognise the gifts I have been given. What do I hope for at the end of the journey of Lent? I would like to be able to say that I have grown in appreciation of God’s gifts to me and so be able to celebrate Easter in greater joy.

Rowntree Foundation which found single-income households to be the most likely to be in poverty. He also criticised the discourse on migrants which, he said, sought to portray them as a drain on society: "If you go to the National Health Service you know very well that a lot of its work and ongoing survival and service is down to immigrant communities. I think we really should have a positive appreciation of the

Holy Land Pilgrimage 2014 Cardinal Vincent invites us to join him this year on the 4th Annual Diocesan Pilgrimage to the Holy Land from 17 – 25 November. We will renew our encounter with the Lord as we follow Jesus’ footsteps from Galilee

Bishop John Sherrington led the Holy Land Pilgrimage in 2013. Here the group is pictured north of Jerusalem in the desert at Wadi el Kelt.

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contribution that people who come to this country make to our well-being and economy.” The Cardinal’s statement elicited a response from Prime Minister David Cameron in the Daily Telegraph, who said he respected and supported the right for religious leaders to make their voice heard whilst disagreeing with the then-Cardinal Designate. Cardinal Nichols said it was a privilege to put the voice of those in need into the public arena. He also said he had tasked Caritas Westminster, the social action agency of the Diocese, with uncovering areas and groups in desperate hardship to help address that need in any possible way. Foodbanks that Caritas Westminster are involved in have already seen serious need with Borehamwood Foodbank, for example, distributing 12.5 tonnes of food since opening last year and new ones are planned in Finchley, St Albans and Bow.

to Jerusalem and on to Bethlehem led by our scripture guide, Fr John Farrell OP, Provincial of the Dominicans. We will also meet the local Christian communities of the Holy Land, praying with them, visiting outreach projects and showing our support for them. Price: £1495 per person sharing a room; £275 single room supplement. For further details and a booking form contact Gerald Daly at the Diocesan Pilgrimage Office: Tel: 020 7798 9173 email: geralddaly@rcdow.org.uk or Gill Didino at Tangney Tours Tel: 01732 886666 Page 7

Social Action

Westminster Record | March 2014

Wasteland to farmland: reflecting on CAFOD’s work in Sierra Leone

Mohammed (left) and his brother farm on converted mining wasteland in Sierra Leone (credit: Simon Rawles/CAFOD)

In Evangelii Gaudium, Pope Francis challenges all of us in our commitment to building a new world, overcoming the inequality at the root of social ills. This call is echoed throughout Catholic Social Teaching and at the core of CAFOD’s mission as the official overseas development agency of the Catholic Church. For Lent Fast Day this year CAFOD has highlighted the transformation seen in Sierra Leone, a country still recovering in the wake of civil war. Even with nearly threequarters of people involved in some form of agricultural work, access to land to grow food is far from equal. With the support of CAFOD and its local partners,

former diamond mining sites once thought useless are now being cultivated as farmland for crops such as rice, cashews, and maize. These crops prove more valuable than diamonds: one CAFOD partner told us that finding a diamond might feed a family for a month or two, but being able to farm these sites is enough to feed families all year round. This Lent CAFOD invites you to give thanks and reflect on this transformation and others which help make a difference to people in the developing world. Join us on Saturday 12 April for a Day of Reflection at the Church of Christ the King, Cockfosters, led by CAFOD’s Theology team. The day will include a

talk by Fr Augusto ZampiniDavies, a CAFOD partner and theological advisor, and conclude with the celebration of Mass. For more information or to book a place, visit cafoddayofreflection. eventbrite.co.uk or contact CAFOD Westminster on 0208 449 6970 or westminster@cafod.org.uk. Thank you also for your generous support of CAFOD’s Lent Fast Day appeal this year and for the positive transformations you help to make through your prayers, fasting and generous support.

Pedal Against Poverty this Spring Volunteering@CAFOD

Sr Carmel Ring holds a poster for the IF campaign.

Volunteering is at the heart of CAFOD’s work and here Sr Carmel Ring, from the Sisters of Marie Auxiliatrice, Muswell Hill, writes about her experience co-ordinating CAFOD’s work across the Diocese as an office volunteer: I find working for CAFOD extremely rewarding. I spend Wednesdays in our Westminster office in Cockfosters. To see the level of commitment and dedication of the team of volunteers is totally inspiring. It is easy give one’s best in such an atmosphere so full of love. At the moment, my main responsibility is to get in touch with Parish Catechists to introduce them to the social study package for use with Confirmation groups and encourage them to invite some Page 8

of our volunteers to host a workshop for them. I have also taken part in the IF campaign and the lobbying of MPs on the eve of last June’s G8 summit. The CAFOD ‘JUST ONE WORLD’ logo is truly fitting. I think that when Blessed Marie Therese looks down from Heaven and sees the volunteers going about our humble tasks, she sees us, as Malcolm Muggeridge once said of Mother Teresa, as doing “something beautiful for God”. I am sure she is pleased with our offering. Why not give up a bit of your time this Lent volunteering? A full DBS clearance is required for this role and full training and support is provided. For more information and an application form, contact CAFOD Westminster on westminster@cafod.org.uk or 0208 449 6970. This isn’t the only way you can help though! Whether you’ve got a few minutes, hours or days, there is a plethora of ways you can give a bit of your time to help others overseas. Find out more online at cafod.org.uk/volunteer.

Registration is now open for Pedal Against Poverty, CAFOD’s annual sponsored cycle ride in the Lea Valley Regional Park, North London. This annual ride not only is a fun day out, but one that makes a tremendous difference in CAFOD’s quest to help others overseas to work their way out of poverty. Riders of all ages and skills are welcome to join us on either a 10 or 19 mile return route on the flat towpaths alongside the River Lea, commencing from two locations in North London and Hertfordshire and coming together for a community picnic at midday. All are welcome, so why not form a team with your family and friends, or invite a group from your parish or school to ride with you on the day? It’d be great if every parish in the diocese could be represented! Last year more than 200 riders helped us to raise enough money to develop two new health clinics in El Salvador, so we hope you can join us to

make an even bigger difference this year! The ride will take place on Sunday 18 May starting at approximately 10am. Register online at https://cafodpedalagainst poverty.eventbrite.co.uk, or contact the CAFOD Westminster office for a registration form: 0208 449 6970 or westminster@cafod.org.uk. If you’re looking for a challenge later this summer, why not register for a Team CAFOD place in the “London Marathon on Wheels,” the

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RideLondon100, on Sunday 10 August? This closed road event follows a 100 mile route through London and Surrey and is suitable for both amateur and competitive cyclists. For more information, visit cafod.org.uk/Fundraise/ Sponsored-events/ RideLondon100, or contact cafodchallenge@cafod.org.uk Don’t forget as well the London Marathon coming up on Sunday 13 April so be sure to cheer for Team CAFOD as we race again against poverty this year.

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Justice & Peace

Westminster Record | March 2014

Cardinal Turkson on reforming the world’s financial institutions

Poverty and the financial structures

by Barbara Kentish

SEE

Ghana’s Cardinal Peter Turkson, President of the Pontifical Justice and Peace Commission, delivered a talk focusing on ways to reform the international financial and monetary systems at the London School of Economics on 6 February. In his talk the Cardinal called for all countries and individuals to work towards a world political and economic monitoring institution, so as to serve the common good of all humanity: “The birth of a new society and the building of new institutions with a universal vocation and competence are a

prerogative and a duty for everyone, with no distinction. What is at stake is the common good of humanity and the future itself.” Cardinal Turkson also commended Cardinal Vincent’s recent initiative, Blueprint for a Better Business, which encourages businesses to focus on personal ethics and to rediscover their purpose. The audience ranged from Occupy London students from the chaplaincies and a range of academic personnel. Cardinal Turkson’s talk is on the diocesan website: www.rcdow.org.uk/news

The financial crisis and parishes St Thomas More parish, Manor House, linked three special Sundays recently, using them as an opportunity to reflect on how to respond to the financial crisis, which continues despite recovery in the South East. Peace Sunday, Poverty Sunday and Homelessness Sunday followed one another from 19 January to 2 February. We mounted a display of the parish’s outreach: from the refugee night shelter run by Catholic Worker, to individuals aided by SVP through to our parish advice

worker, who runs a weekly support session. But what is it like for all of us? The Justice and Peace group wanted to explore further how people are experiencing the financial squeeze. A sandwich lunch discussion on Homelessness Sunday revealed that nearly everyone is feeling the pinch. Parents are supporting unemployed adult children. Young couples cannot get a mortgage. One parishioner from overseas told us he was supporting his elderly disabled mother, his sister and

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her baby, in a one-bedroom flat on an hourly wage of £6.40 an hour, much less than the living wage. We hope to make our opinions heard through the London Citizens’ meeting with Mayor Jules Pipe of Hackney in early March, and at the hustings for London Mayor in May. A delegation from the parish will attend both of these events. We don’t have the answers to the financial crisis, but we go on sharing our experiences, in the faith that ‘The Lord hears the cry of the poor!’

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In the UK economic recovery has started with lower unemployment in the SouthEast, but this is not matched elsewhere in the country. Thousands of young people are converging on the SouthEast for work, and once established, they are not going home. We know from global reports that less developed countries than ours are even harder hit, and it was encouraging recently to hear Cardinal Turkson calling for reform of world financial systems. OXFAM tells us that

the world’s richest 85 people are as wealthy as the poorest half of the global population. This state of affairs needs challenging at all levels. For instance, people condemned in reality shows like ‘Benefits Street’ form a minute fraction of claimants and the great majority of our Social Security budget goes on pensions. Cardinal Vincent Nichols’s call for a people-centred rather than profit-centred economic system, points the right future direction.

JUDGE Reports on poverty are excellent in helping us to think. Oxfam’s report, Truth and Lies about Poverty: Ending comfortable myths about poverty, December 2013, is a good place to start. Read Occupy Finance at http://occupyfinancebook.wordpress.com/ to understand the current financial problem. Posters available from Westminster Justice & Peace also challenge some of the myths. Scripture is very firmly on the side of the poor, and Jesus’ parable (Mt 25) of the Last Judgment makes care for the poor and needy the only criterion for salvation.

ACT • Pray together for a vision of a new social and economic structure. Both the poor and those who help the poor are blessed. The poor are God’s priority. • Offer direct help: food banks, night shelters, soup runs etc., but make sure to talk with the people who use them, to learn of their experience. • Take part in Citizens’ discussions for joint action regarding payday loans and the rise of betting shops. • Discuss the financial system and what alternatives there might be, such as credit unions. • Support the Living Wage Campaign Page 9

Parish Profile

Westminster Record | March 2014

Parish Profile

Westminster Record | March 2014

Our Lady of Victories, Kensington: A Church of Quiet Nobility community though, with many parishioners and volunteers having been in the parish for much of their lives.” “Our Lady of Victories Primary School has also always been very involved in the life of the Church here.” For Fr Lorenzo, ordained in 2011, Our Lady of Victories is the first parish he has served and its youthfulness was what first struck him: “The church is full of young couples and families, especially the 10.30 Mass; it’s a nice noise, full of the sound of children.” Mgr Jim agrees: “One thing visitors always comment on is the number of children and young adults in the congregation.”

Youth and Young Adults: A Real Hunger for God When I ask how young people can get involved following Confirmation, Dan tells me that the youth in the parish are keen, with plenty of willing, charismatic volunteers, a combination

which has led to the success of two projects: a postConfirmation group and Tutor plus. “The post-Confirmation group is a way to encourage further formation, based around what they want to do. Over the past year they’ve shown real interest in getting involved in a soup kitchen and now help out at the St Vincent de Paul Society at Holborn, and they really love it.” “Now, whenever I offer them a pizza night, they say ‘No, no, Dan we’d rather go help the poor’, which is inspiring to hear.” “We also saw a need in our own community, as many students do well in school because they have tutors, but those who cannot afford them are being left out. We now have a new tutoring group, Tutor plus, which provides free tuition for anyone who wants it and we’ve worked together with local parishes as well as the Assumption Sisters and Heythrop College to provide an army of tutors to

help out in any subject.” Reflecting on the location I ask Mgr Jim if this presence of young adults is due to the nearby Heythrop and Imperial Colleges: “There are some students in the parish, but it’s primarily young professionals we see here, many of whom are brought by their friends. Our Young Adults group has a long history in the parish; they come primarily to the 6.30pm Mass which has a popular gospel-style choir.” “Whether it’s through the Mass or by the work of the parishioners making this a place for young people, they have really grasped at it. There is a real hunger to get involved.”

The Challenge of Pope Francis This ‘hunger ’ has been fed by the impact of Pope Francis. Fr Freddie says that many whom he meets have been inspired in this way and Fr Lorenzo notes that talking about Pope Francis offers

The west front of Our Lady of Victories Catholic Church

S

Page 10

“Always an International Parish” They are keen to underline each others’ strengths. Mgr Jim begins with Sr Maureen, whose experience as catechetical co-ordinator and teacher at Our Lady of Victories Primary School totals 34 years. She says: “This has always been an international parish. It was formed by French priests and has always welcomed communities from around the world: Italian, Spanish, Americans have all come here. There really is a strong sense of

by Sarah Nagle

The ordination of Fr Shaun Richards 25 January

people who wouldn’t normally volunteer it a way to talk about their faith. Mgr Jim says that many groups in the parish have been inspired by the Holy Father’s message of solidarity with the poor. “We’re also looking at how to become more involved in West London Churches Homeless Concern and have been working with Caritas Westminster to develop a Contact the Elderly group in the Parish.”

“It’s important to discover and address the needs in our community”

by Alex Balzanella

tanding back from busy Kensington High Street, Our Lady of Victories Church is set in a small courtyard giving it a quiet, tranquil atmosphere. It was at the nearby clergy house that I met Monsignor Jim Curry, Parish Priest, Fr Freddie Jackson and Fr Lorenzo Andreini, his assistants and Sr Maureen McNamara and Dan McNamara (no relation!), catechetical co-ordinator and youth worker respectively. This team is supplemented by a committed group of volunteers.

My Parish: OLV, Kensington

Mgr Jim, Fr Lorenzo and Fr Freddie in the site of the soon to be completed Parish Hall

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“We couldn’t have asked for a more generous response.” After talking to the Parish team we enter the Church. The building is in a ‘Festival of Britain’ style, yet very much in homage to the original Church destroyed in World War Two. The height, tall windows and impressive altar lend the Church what Mgr Jim rightly describes as a “quiet nobility.” A restoration project, initiated by former Parish Priest Fr Perry Sykes, has included a new floor, redecoration of the chapels and provision of greater accessibility. The generosity of

parishioners will enable the completion of the Parish Centre by the end of March. “All our groups have kept meeting, even without there being anywhere for them; neighbouring parishes have also been incredibly kind in offering their facilities to us, we couldn’t have asked for a more generous response.” The Church has already celebrated an ordination to the priesthood since the restoration. Fr Shaun Richards, Assistant Priest at St George’s Sudbury and former pastoral assistant at the parish, was ordained on 25 January by

Archbishop Vincent. Mgr Jim tells me that the then-Cardinal will be returning on 18 July to ordain Stefan Kaminski, a young man from the parish. Two elements of the project that Mgr Jim is keen to point out to me are the glass doors and roundel outside the front of the Church. The Church being set back from the road, the roundel acts as a way to draw the eye toward the Church, whilst the glass doors encourage people to step inside. I have a sense that whilst this may draw people in, there is much more in the parish that will keep them coming back.

I was drawn to OLV because whilst it is busy, transient and full, it also felt very real and somewhere that could become my new Church home. I usually read about once a month at the Sunday evening Mass, which is a vibrant and full occasion that sets me up for the week ahead. Last September Mgr Jim asked for volunteers to help with a post-confirmation youth club. I had some free time and so went along to the training sessions. The youth club is run in conjunction with St Mary’s, Cadogan Street and aims to encourage young people to develop and grow in their own faith as they become independent adults and hopefully stay involved in the life of the parish community. The activities of the evenings alternate between learning, discussion and fun and those that attend really seem to enjoy what we do. They keep coming back! I also help with the Confirmation group. We meet most Mondays until the candidates are confirmed in July. It is a great responsibility to be part of the journey that these teenagers are undertaking towards developing their own adult faith. They are the future of our Church and I feel it is vital to help demonstrate that being a Catholic is a joyful and amazing gift, something to be treasured and not just given up on as they get older simply because the majority don’t do it.

“WYD has left me inspired, spiritually enlightened and I loved every second of it.” Mgr Jim (Back, Centre) with Fr Freddie and Fr Lorenzo, Sr Mareen and Dan with two of the many volunteers in the Parish

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Page 11

Parish Profile

Westminster Record | March 2014

Parish Profile

Westminster Record | March 2014

Our Lady of Victories, Kensington: A Church of Quiet Nobility community though, with many parishioners and volunteers having been in the parish for much of their lives.” “Our Lady of Victories Primary School has also always been very involved in the life of the Church here.” For Fr Lorenzo, ordained in 2011, Our Lady of Victories is the first parish he has served and its youthfulness was what first struck him: “The church is full of young couples and families, especially the 10.30 Mass; it’s a nice noise, full of the sound of children.” Mgr Jim agrees: “One thing visitors always comment on is the number of children and young adults in the congregation.”

Youth and Young Adults: A Real Hunger for God When I ask how young people can get involved following Confirmation, Dan tells me that the youth in the parish are keen, with plenty of willing, charismatic volunteers, a combination

which has led to the success of two projects: a postConfirmation group and Tutor plus. “The post-Confirmation group is a way to encourage further formation, based around what they want to do. Over the past year they’ve shown real interest in getting involved in a soup kitchen and now help out at the St Vincent de Paul Society at Holborn, and they really love it.” “Now, whenever I offer them a pizza night, they say ‘No, no, Dan we’d rather go help the poor’, which is inspiring to hear.” “We also saw a need in our own community, as many students do well in school because they have tutors, but those who cannot afford them are being left out. We now have a new tutoring group, Tutor plus, which provides free tuition for anyone who wants it and we’ve worked together with local parishes as well as the Assumption Sisters and Heythrop College to provide an army of tutors to

help out in any subject.” Reflecting on the location I ask Mgr Jim if this presence of young adults is due to the nearby Heythrop and Imperial Colleges: “There are some students in the parish, but it’s primarily young professionals we see here, many of whom are brought by their friends. Our Young Adults group has a long history in the parish; they come primarily to the 6.30pm Mass which has a popular gospel-style choir.” “Whether it’s through the Mass or by the work of the parishioners making this a place for young people, they have really grasped at it. There is a real hunger to get involved.”

The Challenge of Pope Francis This ‘hunger ’ has been fed by the impact of Pope Francis. Fr Freddie says that many whom he meets have been inspired in this way and Fr Lorenzo notes that talking about Pope Francis offers

The west front of Our Lady of Victories Catholic Church

S

Page 10

“Always an International Parish” They are keen to underline each others’ strengths. Mgr Jim begins with Sr Maureen, whose experience as catechetical co-ordinator and teacher at Our Lady of Victories Primary School totals 34 years. She says: “This has always been an international parish. It was formed by French priests and has always welcomed communities from around the world: Italian, Spanish, Americans have all come here. There really is a strong sense of

by Sarah Nagle

The ordination of Fr Shaun Richards 25 January

people who wouldn’t normally volunteer it a way to talk about their faith. Mgr Jim says that many groups in the parish have been inspired by the Holy Father’s message of solidarity with the poor. “We’re also looking at how to become more involved in West London Churches Homeless Concern and have been working with Caritas Westminster to develop a Contact the Elderly group in the Parish.”

“It’s important to discover and address the needs in our community”

by Alex Balzanella

tanding back from busy Kensington High Street, Our Lady of Victories Church is set in a small courtyard giving it a quiet, tranquil atmosphere. It was at the nearby clergy house that I met Monsignor Jim Curry, Parish Priest, Fr Freddie Jackson and Fr Lorenzo Andreini, his assistants and Sr Maureen McNamara and Dan McNamara (no relation!), catechetical co-ordinator and youth worker respectively. This team is supplemented by a committed group of volunteers.

My Parish: OLV, Kensington

Mgr Jim, Fr Lorenzo and Fr Freddie in the site of the soon to be completed Parish Hall

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“We couldn’t have asked for a more generous response.” After talking to the Parish team we enter the Church. The building is in a ‘Festival of Britain’ style, yet very much in homage to the original Church destroyed in World War Two. The height, tall windows and impressive altar lend the Church what Mgr Jim rightly describes as a “quiet nobility.” A restoration project, initiated by former Parish Priest Fr Perry Sykes, has included a new floor, redecoration of the chapels and provision of greater accessibility. The generosity of

parishioners will enable the completion of the Parish Centre by the end of March. “All our groups have kept meeting, even without there being anywhere for them; neighbouring parishes have also been incredibly kind in offering their facilities to us, we couldn’t have asked for a more generous response.” The Church has already celebrated an ordination to the priesthood since the restoration. Fr Shaun Richards, Assistant Priest at St George’s Sudbury and former pastoral assistant at the parish, was ordained on 25 January by

Archbishop Vincent. Mgr Jim tells me that the then-Cardinal will be returning on 18 July to ordain Stefan Kaminski, a young man from the parish. Two elements of the project that Mgr Jim is keen to point out to me are the glass doors and roundel outside the front of the Church. The Church being set back from the road, the roundel acts as a way to draw the eye toward the Church, whilst the glass doors encourage people to step inside. I have a sense that whilst this may draw people in, there is much more in the parish that will keep them coming back.

I was drawn to OLV because whilst it is busy, transient and full, it also felt very real and somewhere that could become my new Church home. I usually read about once a month at the Sunday evening Mass, which is a vibrant and full occasion that sets me up for the week ahead. Last September Mgr Jim asked for volunteers to help with a post-confirmation youth club. I had some free time and so went along to the training sessions. The youth club is run in conjunction with St Mary’s, Cadogan Street and aims to encourage young people to develop and grow in their own faith as they become independent adults and hopefully stay involved in the life of the parish community. The activities of the evenings alternate between learning, discussion and fun and those that attend really seem to enjoy what we do. They keep coming back! I also help with the Confirmation group. We meet most Mondays until the candidates are confirmed in July. It is a great responsibility to be part of the journey that these teenagers are undertaking towards developing their own adult faith. They are the future of our Church and I feel it is vital to help demonstrate that being a Catholic is a joyful and amazing gift, something to be treasured and not just given up on as they get older simply because the majority don’t do it.

“WYD has left me inspired, spiritually enlightened and I loved every second of it.” Mgr Jim (Back, Centre) with Fr Freddie and Fr Lorenzo, Sr Mareen and Dan with two of the many volunteers in the Parish

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Page 11

Youth

Westminster Record | March 2014

O Director’s Spotlight

ur events programme is beginning to crystallize and we are looking forward to Youth Pilgrimages to Lourdes (Summer) and the Holy Land (November 17 to 26). Both will be a wonderful opportunity for our young adults to see the breadth of the Universal Church. We are also moving into the planning stages for our youth pilgrimages to Santiago in Spring 2015 and WYD Krakow in Summer 2016. Young adults of the West also kicks off on 22 March in Twickenham and will provide young Catholics the chance to take part in Mass followed by

food, socialising and faithsharing. Further locations will soon be announced. Our Parish Youth Ministry activity is truly bearing fruit and we thank the parishes of Harpenden, Borehamwood, Bishop's Stortford and Clapton for giving us the opportunity to help them develop their local youth programmes; we are making real progress and are proud of the local efforts. We are soon to lead Mill Hill's Together Day as it focuses on Parish Youth Ministry, and it will be a great opportunity to have a full day dedicated to forming the parish's youth vision.

Of course, the most immediate and vital piece of work is the support of the SPEC Team who will hold their final retreat at London Colney this month. During March and April they will move to Maxwell Farm, Pinner, and from May will be offering day retreats for young people from across the diocese. Finally, we brought together the Youth Workers of the Diocese for a day of reflection on 24 February, led by Fr David Reilly and Fr Christopher Jamison. Everyone had a wonderful day and it was a great gift to be with this group of truly inspirational people. Phil Ross

Let’s go Redcaps On Saturday 8 February, Westminster Cathedral was packed out to celebrate the 22nd World Day of the Sick and honour Our Lady of Lourdes. Our Westminster Redcaps attended too and did themselves and the Diocese proud. Sporting their distinctive red tabards and big smiles, they assisted people to their seats; supplied candles and leaflets; moved furniture; carried banners in the processions; assisted the priests with anointing and Holy Communion; and generally added that tangible feeling of service in love. Known as the ‘Redcaps’, almost two hundred young people visit the shrine and town with us each summer; they give so generously and selflessly of their own time and effort, and form a wonderful group at the core of the pilgrimage, helping pilgrims who are less able but who nevertheless want to visit the place where Our Lady appeared to St Bernadette.

The young people form a community, a group of pilgrims, who are happy to work, pray and relax in each others’ company. They are also supported by a special programme of formation, support and spiritual guidance to help them make the most of the transforming experience of helping at Lourdes. The Diocese of Westminster organises a pilgrimage to Lourdes every year in July. Young people from across the diocese volunteer to support the sick and elderly on their pilgrimage. This year the pilgrimage will be taking place from 20-26 July and will cost around £470. For more information please email youth@rcdow.org.uk Our Lady of Lourdes – Pray for us!

Youth Pilgrimage to the Holy Land 2014 The Diocese of Westminster Youth Ministry Team is leading a ten-day pilgrimage to the Holy Land from 17 – 26 November. It is a profound experience for all Christians as we return to the most important places in the life of Jesus. The pilgrimage starts at the Sea of Galilee and then will take in Nazareth, Cana and the Mount of the Transfiguration. Then the group will move down to Jerusalem for the sites of our Lord’s Passion and concludes in Bethlehem. The time spent in Bethlehem is particularly important, as it highlights and brings muchneeded support for Christians in the West Bank. The pilgrimage to the Holy Land is a unique opportunity for Christians to renew their faith by living in the land of Jesus himself, and allowing us to see and hear the age-old way of life that so marks the Holy Land itself. Price: The cost is capped at £1,100 and accommodation will be reserved with twin rooms. For further details and a booking form contact Diocesan Youth Ministry: Tel 020 7387 1971 or email youth@rcdow.org.uk

Redcaps working in Lourdes last summer Page 12

To find out more about the Youth Ministry and experiences of our young people at: wym.rcdow.org.uk.

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See photos of youth events at: http://tinyurl.com/5vqohvo

Youth

Westminster Record | March 2014

Chaplain’s Journal

M A R C H 2014 Fr David Reilly, Diocesan Youth Chaplain

‘Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs in the kingdom of heaven’ (Matt 5:3). These words were spoken by Jesus in his teaching during the Sermon on the Mount. They have been chosen by Pope Francis as the theme for his message to young Catholics for 2014. World Youth Day is celebrated on an international level every two or three years. But each year in between the Pope offers a theme for World Youth Day, to be marked in the local churches. His message for 2014 is the first official text he has offered to young people since his election and the first major words to youth since he arrived among us in Rio de Janeiro last July. Pope Francis’s choice of themes for the coming years forms a kind of ‘Triptych of the Beatitudes’ that will accompany the whole Church all the way to World Youth Day in Krakow 2016. ‘Jesus challenges us, young friends, to take seriously his approach to life and to decide which path is right for us and leads to true joy. This is the great challenge of faith. Jesus was not afraid to ask his disciples if they truly wanted to follow him or if they preferred to take another path.’ With these words, Francis presents the same challenge once more. This challenge, the journey of faith, is a pilgrimage we will take for the next three years: a journey into the heart of the Beatitudes. May we take this journey together, encouraged and supported by the words of Pope Francis, and rediscover once again the living words of the Gospel that build the Kingdom of Heaven.

Step into the Gap with CAFOD Are you aged between 18 and 30, and ready to take an adventure that will transform your life and the lives of others? Applications are currently open for Step into the Gap, CAFOD’s gap year experience scheme. Your journey starts here at home, but will take you to one of the poorest countries in the world to share in the lives of people working their way out of poverty and injustice. Step into the Gap is intended to offer a rounded experience, by working both overseas and in the UK. It will bridge the ‘gap’ between the elements of adventure and service that occur in traditional year-out experiences. Last year “Gappers” travelled to visit CAFOD’s partners in Sierra Leone, and Lawrence, one of the students on the journey, reflected on the

experience: “I am continually building on the skills CAFOD helped nurture last year. The international experience in Sierra Leone will stay with me forever. … Since I returned from West Africa I have become a lot more grateful about what I have, and more inspired in my beliefs that current world problems can be solved.” The gap year placement runs from September 2014 to July 2015 with a four week overseas trip during the year. Those on the scheme receive accommodation, living and travel expenses, training, and mentoring throughout the scheme. For more information and to download an application form, visit cafod.org.uk/stepintothegap, or call 0208 449 6970. Hurry though; the application deadline is 31 March!

Gapper Clare Smith (centre) visits a CAFOD-funded school in Liberia during her Step into the Gap placement in 2012.

School is back in town James Kelliher writes about an important new educational initiative in the diocese An important new educational initiative is being launched in Kensington and Chelsea. Local parishes, together with the Assumption Sisters, Carmelites, Jesuits and students of Heythrop College are providing Tutor Plus, a scheme offering free tuition for school pupils from 7–18 years old. Tutor Plus offers support for almost every subject schools and colleges offer, with English the most popular especially for those for whom it is not their first language. The scheme developed in the local parishes in Kensington and Chelsea out of the developing youth ministry in the area. Dan McNamara, Youth Worker for Kensington and Chelsea, said: "While talking to young people and parents I noticed how busy young people are. Almost every minute of their day is filled with an extracurricular activity. However, one thing I noticed was the disproportionate way in which our parishioners benefitted from good tuition. After much thought and prayer I approached the Assumption Sisters with the idea of a tuition service for the local parishes." The Tutor Plus programme is already established in the diocese as part of the Social Outreach Programme ‘Called to Serve’ at Newman House, the Catholic Chaplaincy for the Universities, and other Higher Education institutions within the diocese. If you, your son/daughter, or someone you know would benefit from free tuition or space to do homework, and live within travelling distance of High Street, Kensington please see: kandcyouth.com/tutor-plus in order to register. If you have any queries please contact: k&cyouthworker@rcdow.org.uk or call: 020 7937 4778. If you would like to set up a branch of Tutor Plus in your school or parish please contact Sr. Carolyn carolyn@universitycatholic.net

To find out more about the Youth Ministry and experiences of our young people at: wym.rcdow.org.uk.

Follow Westminster Youth Ministry on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/doywm

Follow Westminster Youth Ministry on Twitter at: twitter.com/dowym

See photos of youth events at: http://tinyurl.com/5vqohvo

Page 13

Marriage and Family Life

Westminster Record | March 2014

Crisis means Opportunity - Pastoral Care of the Family Edmund Adamus discusses initial feedback from the recent questionnaire on the family which came from Rome ahead of two Synods on the family called by Pope Francis. to the Catechism, especially in the light of simple rules, such as ‘One may never do evil so that good may result from it’ (CCC 1789). Matters of conscience centre upon the issues of responsible parenthood and the regulation of fertility. Formation of the moral conscience, therefore, demands fresh efforts on many levels.

©Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

“Maximum pastoral attention must be given to marriage preparation.” (Pope Benedict XVI)

Preparing for Marriage

A

t the conclusion of the recent consultation in the diocese for the forthcoming 2014 Extraordinary Synod, Cardinal Vincent expressed genuine concern, but also a realistic hope that the issues raised by both the questions and responses are, in his words: “A challenging agenda for action.” The preamble to the nowfamous questionnaire stated that: ‘Never before has proclaiming the Gospel on the Family in this context been more urgent and necessary.’ The Crisis of the Family The list outlining the crises in the family is familiar, from rising levels of co-habitation and divorce, through the cultural and legal normalisation of same-sex unions, to surrogate motherhood.

“The family is the fundamental cell of society, where we learn to live with others despite our differences and to belong to one another” (Pope Francis) In the recent Apostolic Exhortation Evangelii Gaudium, Pope Francis spoke of this profound cultural Page 14

crisis, which is particularly serious because ‘the family is the fundamental cell of society, where we learn to live with others despite our differences and to belong to one another; it is also the place where parents pass on the faith to their children.’ The power of family ties This says something extremely profound about the power of family ties and their in-built capacity according to God’s plan for our happiness to overcome all sorts of obstacles, tensions, and be resilient. He goes on to speak of ‘the indispensable contribution of marriage to society.’ Addressing and finding lasting pastoral strategies to the increasing complexities of contemporary family situations is clearly not going to be easy. Thus consideration of these challenges will take place over both the forthcoming Extraordinary Synod and the Ordinary Synod in October 2015. The result will be working guidelines in the pastoral care of the person and the family. It is a long process for the Church as a whole community to have a more accurate picture of the situation, so that eventually we can devise a more credible proclamation of

the Gospel of the Family. The Questionnaire Despite the challenging nature of the questionnaire, 16,500 submissions were recorded nationally and of these well over 1,600 were handled by the Westminster Marriage and Family Life office. What we can share now is an initial response; a sort of barometer as to the scale of the challenges we face in addressing the depth of feeling expressed in the responses. We suggest that these fall into the following broad categories: Conscience Clearly there is a great deal of confusion over what is meant by conscience. There is an urgent need to help people revisit what it means according

Marriage as social institution and Sacrament of the Church is universally accepted as an irreplaceable good. There is sincere appreciation for efforts to provide marriage preparation but the fact remains there are considerable gaps and variety in what people experience. In 2007, Pope Benedict insisted that ‘maximum pastoral attention’ be given to marriage preparation (Sacramentum Caritatis n29). It must therefore become more widely available, excellent in content and adequate in length. The whole of the parish community, including schools, in partnership with parents, must be actively involved in seeking to inspire the young from an early age to aspire to lifelong matrimonial commitment in a loving and stable union open to life. Transmitting the Faith There is both deep ©Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

heartache and joy in families’ experience at the perceived levels of failure and success at passing on the faith to the next generation. No-one doubts the enormous scale of the challenge facing parents and grandparents in this task against the backdrop of aggressive secularism and the IT revolution. We need to explore ways of making the partnership between home, school and parish better in this shared task as a top priority; within which the truth of the parent as the primary educator must have pride of place. Blessed John Paul II said that loving the family means giving it back reasons for confidence in itself. Confidence-building measures must begin with parents.

“Be protectors of God’s gifts!” (Pope Francis) A Culture of Life The authentic dignity of every person from the moment of conception to natural death is a radical teaching in our modern ‘throwaway culture.’ However, responses show a considerable imbalance in peoples’ views about a life ethic and the social ethic. Our cue from Pope Francis is: “Be protectors of God’s gifts!”, calling us to see the whole of creation, including the integrity of our families, as precious. The imagination has to be captured to deepen the understanding of human ecology. To this end, anything and everything that can be done to raise awareness of and deepen the lived understanding of the goodness and truth of the body is both timely and vital as a pastoral response to many painful situations. For further details contact Edmund Adamus at the Diocese of Westminster Office for Marriage and Family Life edmundadamus@rcdow.org.uk or 020 7798 9363

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Marriage and Family Life, Vocations

Westminster Record | March 2014

Ministers of Mercy A Pastor’s Vision Speaking of the parish in Evangelii Gaudium, Pope Francis reminds us that much depends upon the ‘openness and missionary creativity of the pastor and the community’ if it is to be the Church ‘living in the midst of the homes of her sons and daughters.’ There is deep appreciation of the support and Christian compassion experienced in parish life but, as the Pope says, parishes have to prove themselves ‘capable of selfrenewal and constant adaptivity.’ They will do this by recognising it is ‘certainly not the only institution which evangelises.’ The Christian household, just by being a loving and forgiving place, lies at the heart of the mission of the Church and spouses are the primary agents of the mission.

The Church yearns to reach out Such a depth of awareness presumes that the parish, as the Pope describes it, ‘really is in contact with the homes and the lives of its people.’ Yet in order to raise our game in this way the diocese will need a fresh focus of thinking and energy on family life ministry at the parish level to prevent it being ‘a useless structure out of touch with people.’ Sadly, as we know, the vast majority of baptised Catholics do not frequent the Sacraments, not so much out of a wilful rejection of the Lord but more often because they incorrectly view themselves as beyond the reach of the Church. Holding views fuelled by biased media and exposure to a popular culture purveying the ‘banalisation of sex,’ they believe that the Church is irrelevant. Among many of these are sincere individuals in unions at odds with church discipline. The Church yearns to reach out to them, like Jesus to the woman at the well: “If

only you knew what God is offering and who it is that is saying to you: Give me a drink, you would have been the one to ask and he would have given you living water.” (John 4:10) How can we find a way of communicating our need as a community of faith for them to become more actively involved with us, just as Christ shared his human need of thirst with the woman at the well, thereby allowing her freely to respond? In short, how do we show them that it is not just their lives that are affected by not being part of the worshipping community, but that the parish is greatly impoverished by their absence?

“A family of families, able to share with each other not only the joys but the inevitable difficulties of initiating family life” (Pope Benedict XVI) “Favour reciprocal knowledge” said Pope Benedict, “so that the parish community increasingly becomes a family of families, able to share with each other not only the joys but the inevitable difficulties of initiating family life". Instigating family-oriented associations such as the Family Groups Movement, the Family of Nazareth community, the Beginning Experience and Catholic Grandparents Association to name but a few, and, indeed, anything that can be done in parish life to bring families together socially as well as spiritually will go a long way to addressing the sense of isolation and frustration expressed by so many.

Parents are the “priests of the domestic church” (Familiaris Consortio)

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The poet Thomas Moore said: 'the ordinary acts we practice every day at home are of more importance to the soul than their simplicity might suggest.' The consultation shows that only a minority of people have any appreciation of the profound value of such a spirituality. If the family, as Catholic doctrine acclaims, really is the domestic church and parents are the ‘priests of the domestic church’ (Familiaris Consortio), then it is the parents whom we need to be more actively and creatively supporting as the first and best of teachers in the school of love, that is the home. But talking about this and making it happen are at times two very different things. Fortunately there are some really useful family-friendly resources available to complement existing parish initiatives enabling households to be places where faith formation can be a more consciously chosen activity. As the diocese discerns a way forward in response to the Synods, it will need to do so in such a way as to treat the family not so much as an object of evangelisation but its active agent.

by Fr Richard Nesbitt When a priest marks your forehead with the Sign of the Cross on Ash Wednesday, he will himself have that same mark smeared on his own skin. It is a sign that the priest is in just as much need of conversion as anyone else during Lent. To be a minister of Christ’s mercy to others he must first experience in his own life the mercy of God. I love these words from the Catechism: “When he celebrates the Sacrament of Penance, the priest is fulfilling the ministry of the Good Shepherd who seeks the lost sheep, of the Good Samaritan who binds up wounds, of the Father who awaits the prodigal son and welcomes him on his return... The priest is the sign and the instrument of God’s merciful love for the sinner” (CCC 1465).

A priest cannot be the Good Shepherd unless he has first been the sheep. But a priest cannot be the Good Shepherd unless he has first been the sheep, he cannot be the Good Samaritan if he has not had his own wounds healed deeply by Christ, he cannot be the father welcoming back the prodigal son if he does not know what the loss of that relationship means and if he does not see that same loss in the eyes and hearts of the people he serves. As priests we need to hear the words of absolution as much as we proclaim them. We are indeed “earthenware vessels”, cracked and chipped and yet entrusted with the greatest of treasure. But when we celebrate the Sacrament, we see God’s grace at work and we are reminded of who we are called to be. So this Lent, hear that call to conversion spoken personally to you by God and come to receive Christ’s mercy in the Sacrament of Reconciliation. And pray for your confessors, for us your priests, that we too may be healed in Christ so that together we can live out the joy of the Gospel.

“The Church is a home and family for everyone, especially those who labour and are heavy laden.” Events (Blessed John Paul II)

We express our gratitude to all those who took the time and effort to respond to the questionnaire and for sharing such heartfelt convictions. To everyone we repeat the words of the great ‘Pope of the family’, Blessed John Paul II: ‘no-one is without a family in this world: the Church is a home and family for everyone, especially those who “labour and are heavy laden."’

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Permanent Diaconate. Interested in finding out more about serving the Church and the world as a Permanent Deacon? Men between 35 and 60 are invited to a Come and See meeting, 10-12noon on a Saturday morning. Wives are very welcome. Venues: 15 March at the Parish Hall of St Edward the Confessor, Golders Green, 26 April at Ealing Abbey & 24 May at Sacred Heart, Ware. Further information available from: anthonyclark@rcdow.org.uk or adriancullen@rcdow.org.uk

Theology of the Body Dawn Eden, renowned Theology of the Body author, will be speaking on "What the Saints can teach us about Forgiveness" at Newman House University Chaplaincy, WC1E 6AR on 7 March. The talk and discussion will be preceded at 6pm by Stations of the Cross. For more info contact Fr Richard: richardnesbitt@rcdow.org.uk Page 15

Technology Review

The Mass App By Chris O’Callaghan

Page 16

Westminster Record | March 2014

A

s the Catholics tap into social and new media to explore their faith, the most recent step has been the creation of Apps. The MassExplained App, available for smartphone and tablet devices, is the latest entry into this field. The Westminster Record was approached recently by its American designer, Dan Gonzalez from Miami, who asked us to cast our critical eye over it. Beginning with the ‘Source and Summit’ of what the Mass is, the App breaks the Mass down into sections and explaining their importance, significance and role. Chapters include discussions on the Readings, Homily and Creed. Each page has additional information in its borders, such as small biographies of saints, facts and figures and references to the Catechism and biblical teaching. The content provides the history of each element of the Mass as well as how it is used and its purpose in our liturgy.

This App is certainly well worth looking into buying if you are a Catholic who wants to know more about the Mass and why we do the things we do. The content certainly finds the right balance between informative and interesting – it is not so theologically heavy as to be inaccessible to grassroots Catholics, whilst not too simplistic in a way that would be patronising or childish. To make sure there were no errors contained within the App, the director of the Office of Worship in the Archdiocese of Miami spent three months going over the details to check its doctrinal accuracy. It has therefore clearly been deeply researched and is skilfully

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written in a way that is accessible to all. Visually, the App is beautiful. It reads like a book but each page is illustrated by pictures of the liturgy, pull-out quotes from the Bible, paintings of Biblical scenes and maps of the journeys of the Apostles, most of which are interactive. All of these add to the quality of the App. One of the best visual features is full screen 360° pictures of churches such as the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem and Santiago de Compostella in Spain. This App is certainly well worth looking into buying if you are a Catholic who wants to know more about the Mass and why we do the things we do. It is a visually colourful and beautiful expression of the Mass and an example of the next step in the development of the Church’s communication in the digital 21st century. MassExplained is available from the App Store priced at £17.49 and is compatible with iOS 6.0 or higher.

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Arts, Reviews

Westminster Record Record September Westminster | March2011 2014 Gallery Review

The Lent 2014 faith-sharing resource

Rebirth in the V&A

The Lent 2014 faith-sharing resource explores our personal relationship with Christ as it underpins and impels us to reach out to others: to evangelise. Inspired by Pope Francis’ Evangelii Gaudium, the booklet includes six sessions for use by small groups or individual meditation. To order copies please contact 020 7798 9152 or visit www.rcdow.org.uk/bookstore

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by John Scott The Victoria and Albert Museum has an ongoing ‘Futureplan’ and in 2009 we were able to see the first of the refurbished and reordered galleries devoted to the Medieval and Renaissance periods. They repay frequent revisiting. Two floors of artifacts cover the period 300-1600, with major sculptural and larger objects (including a Florentine chapel) occupying much of another gallery. Two factors affect what is displayed here: first, the English Reformation which entailed the destruction of so much of our artistic (and Catholic) heritage and secondly the remarkable later English zeal for continental collecting which has made the whole V&A such a storehouse of wonders from Europe and beyond. What attracts attention? Perhaps the smaller-scale objects, such as the ivory miniatures, reminders of the widespread desire for devotional pieces for domestic use, a desire which later fuelled the lucrative Midlands industry in alabasters. The latter are often quite crude, some with traces of their original bright colouring. Yet it is the quality of workmanship that constantly astounds, in pieces like the 12th century Gloucester candlestick, a masterpiece of twisted gilded complexity portraying the battle between darkness and light. Objects remind us of the centrality both of the apostles and of the martyrs. St Thomas Becket’s mitre (on loan from the diocese) sits near an enameled casket designed for a relic of the saint, whilst Holbein’s St Sebastian reliquary brings together both veneration and perceived healing and prophylactic power. Yet size matters, too. Do not miss the early 16th century limewood nativity and crucifixion scenes from Sant’Agostino in Piacenza. The calm of the Nativity contrasts with the frenetic 3D activity of the Crucifixion (it is about 4’ by 4’, every inch filled with people). And if height is your thing, then the 1470 builders’

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Reliquary of St Sebastian German (Augsburg), 1497 (made) © V&A London

“Holbein’s St Sebastian reliquary brings together both veneration and perceived healing and prophylactic power.” drawing for the lower part of the tower of Ulm Cathedral in Germany (the world’s tallest at 528 feet) may satisfy. We are perhaps used to seeing altars unadorned and in the open nowadays; but go through into the main sculpture gallery, through the ‘s-Hertogenbosch Cathedral (Netherlands) screen, and take in the great carved altarpieces displayed there.

The whole experience of the Medieval and Renaissance Galleries can underline for us how earlier generations were exposed to and rejoiced in the richness of the Christian story, from the smallest through to the largest and most elaborate objects. And above all we must wonder at the beauty and humanity of what we have in the V&A.

The enameled casket designed for a relic of St Thomas Becket French (Limoges) about 1180-90 © V&A London Page 17

Saints & Obituaries

Westminster Record | March 2014

St John of God – Patron Saint of the sick Saint John of God was born in 1495. He became a shepherd before enlisting in the Spanish army against the French and the Turks. His life was dramatically changed after hearing a sermon preached by Saint John of Avila in Granada. For a while he was mentally disturbed and he was admitted to the Royal Hospital for the insane. As a result of this experience, John took up the call to serve the poor and the sick because of the mistreatment of the patients in the Royal Hospital he had witnessed and experienced, and was determined to change the practices of the day. He was offered a shelter in Granada where he took his first patients. It was through this venture that John came to gather the support of many people and particularly the encouragement of the Bishop of Granada who gave him a distinctive form of clothing, and sowed the seeds of the Hospitaller Order of Saint John of God, whose Brothers continue in his way of life and work. Canonised in 1690, he was proclaimed patron of hospitals and the sick in 1886, and in 1930 he was further proclaimed patron of nurses and their associations by Pope Pius XI.

Liturgical Calendar - March 1 Sat St David, Bishop, Patron of Wales 2 Sun + 8TH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME 3 Mon feria 4 Tues feria or St Casimir 5 Wed ASH WEDNESDAY 6 Thurs Lent feria 7 Fri Lent feria (Sts Perpetua and Felicity, Martyrs), Friday abstinence 8 Sat Lent feria (St John of God, Religious) 9 Sun + 1ST SUNDAY OF LENT 10 Mon Lent feria 11 Tues Lent feria 12 Wed Lent feria 13 Thurs Lent feria (St Peter Damian, Bishop & Doctor), Anniversary of the election of Pope Francis 14 Fri Lent feria, Friday abstinence 15 Sat Lent feria 16 Sun + 2ND SUNDAY OF LENT 17 Mon St Patrick, Bishop, Patron of Ireland 18 Tues Lent feria (St Cyril of Jerusalem, Bishop & Doctor) 19 Wed ST JOSEPH, Spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Patron of the Diocese 20 Thurs Lent feria 21 Fri Lent feria, Friday abstinence 22 Sat Lent feria 23 Sun + 3RD SUNDAY OF LENT 24 Mon Lent feria 25 Tues THE ANNUNCIATION OF THE LORD 26 Wed Lent feria 27 Thurs Lent feria 28 Fri Lent feria, Friday abstinence 29 Sat Lent feria 30 Sun + 4TH SUNDAY OF LENT (Laetare Sunday) 31 Mon Lent feria Page 18

2014 Summer programme in Liturgy and Latin at Ealing Abbey Short courses for credit (KU Leuven) or interest “Research Seminar” D. McCarthy 7-18 July (not 12, 13 July) morning “Liturgy in the West: History” E. Carr 7-18 July (not 12, 13 July) afternoon “Liturgy and Ecumenism” B. Nichols 7-18 July (not 12, 13 July) morning “Western Liturgical Books” D. McCarthy 21 Jul-1 Aug (not 26, 27 July) morning “Theology of the Liturgy” E. Carr 21 Jul-1 Aug (not 26, 27 July) afternoon “Christian Initiation” J. Leachman 21 Jul-1 Aug (not 26, 27 July) morning “Beginners, Intermediate and Proficient Latin” D. McCarthy and others 11-22 August (not 16, 17 August)

Novices from the Sisters of Nazareth joined Archbishop Vincent in December to visit the sick and retired priests in East Finchley.

Monsignor Canon Adrian Arrowsmith RIP Monsignor Canon Adrian Arrowsmith died peacefully on Saturday 15 February at St Anne’s Home in Stoke Newington, having been a priest for 49 years. During his ministry Canon Adrian filled numerous roles including Parish Priest of Our Lady, St Mary of Walsingham, London Colney; Most Sacred Heart, Ruislip and Our Lady of Victories, Kensington. He was appointed Canon in February 1990. Mgr Jim Curry, Parish Priest of Our Lady of Victories where Canon Adrian served for 13 years, said: “Canon Adrian had a gift for friendship. Parishioners and clergy past and present will attest to his generous hospitality. With a kindly authority he helped guide many who found themselves

knocking at his door. During his time as Parish Priest a number of important renovations were undertaken in the Church and Crypt. Most of all he leaves a legacy of deep affection amongst those whose lives he touched in his living of the Gospel.” Canon Adrian’s Requiem Mass will be celebrated at the Church of the Most Sacred Heart, Ruislip, on Tuesday 4 March at 10.30am.

In Memoriam: March 6 Mgr Frederick Row (1974) Mgr Canon Clement Parsons (1980) 7 Fr Henry Dodd (1992) Fr Harold Riley (2003) 8 Fr Thomas Nobbs (1977) 9 Fr Paul Lenihan (1992) 13 Fr Patrick English (1971) 14 Bishop David Cashman (1971) Canon Jeremiah Galvin (1973) Fr Reginald Watt (1975) 15 Bishop George Craven (1967) Fr Walter Donovan (1981) 17 Cardinal Arthur Hinsley (1943) Fr Michael Buckley (1993)

Fr Lionel Keane (1997) Fr Charles Connor (2005) 20 Canon Desmond Swan (1995) Fr Edward Bushey (1996) 21 Fr James de Felice (1978) 22 Fr Edward Higgs (1998) 23 Fr Peter Day (2006) 24 Fr John Gill (1985) Fr Pat Heekin (2006) 25 Mgr Richard Kenefeck (1982) 27 Fr Cormac Rigby (2007) Fr James Brand (2013) 30 Fr William Hutchinson (1984)

“Seminar on Initiation” E. Carr 11-22 August (not 16, 17 August) Contact: http://liturgyinstitute.org/cour ses-summer-2014/ Post: 74 Castlebar Road, W5 2DD: T: 020 8862 2156 E: il@bsac.ac.uk Follow us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/diocese.westminster

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Events

Westminster Record | March 2014

Other regular Masses Deaf Community Mass First Sunday of the month 4.30pm, Westminster Cathedral Hall, Ambrosden Avenue SW1P 1QW Young Adults Mass First & Third Sunday of the month, 114 Mount Street W1K 3AH. Quiet prayer at 7.15pm, Mass at 7.30pm. Social gathering afterward. Contact: organise@fsplus.info or visit www.fsplus.info Mass at Canary Wharf Tuesdays 12.30pm at 2 Churchill Place E14 5RB. Organised by Mgr Vladimir Felzmann, Chaplain to Canary Wharf Communities. Details www.cwcc.org.uk St Albans Fridays at 12 noon. Mass in the Lady Chapel of St Alban’s Abbey AL1 1BY EXTRAORDINARY FORM MASSES Sundays Low Mass 9.30am, St James Spanish Place W1U 3QY. Low Mass 9am, The Oratory, Brompton Road SW7 2RP. Mondays Low Mass 8am The Oratory, Brompton Road SW7 2RP Mass 6.30pm Corpus Christi, Maiden Lane, WC2E 7NB.

REGULAR EVENTS

If you have an event, please email communications@rcdow.org.uk

Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays Low Mass 8am The Oratory, Brompton Road SW7 2RP. Fridays Low Mass 7.45am St Mary Moorfields, 4/5 Eldon Street EC2N 7LS.

Prayer Groups SUNDAYS Taizé at St James, Piccadilly Every third Sunday 5pm. Call 020 7503 5128 for details. Lectio Young Adults Group Lectio Divina with time for reflection and discussion afterwards. Every first and third Sunday in term time at 6.45pm. Contact davidreilly@rcdow.org.uk or https://www.facebook.com/ lectio.divina.961 Tyburn Benedictines Monastic afternoon Every first Sunday 2pm-5pm Martyrs’ Crypt, Tyburn Convent, 8 Hyde Park Place, W2 2LJ. Westminster Cathedral Young Adults meet socially after the 7pm Mass on Sundays and then at the nearby Windsor Castle pub. For further details please contact: westminsteryoungadults@gmail.com

MONDAYS Mothers’ Prayers at St Dominic’s Priory, Haverstock Hill NW5 4LB Mondays 2.30-3.30pm in the Lourdes chapel. All are welcome.

TUESDAYS Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament Tuesdays 6-9pm concluding with Benediction at Newman House, 111 Gower Street WC1E 6AR. Details 020 7387 6370

Prayers for London at the Shrine of Our Lady of Willesden Tuesdays 7.30pm. Organised by the Guild of Our Lady of Willesden, Nicoll Road NW10 9AX Vocations Prayer Group Second Tuesday of the month 8pm at 47C Gaisford Street NW5 2EB

WEDNESDAYS Wednesdays on the Wall (WOTW) Every first Wednesday 6pm at All Hallows on the Wall 83 London Wall EC2M 5ND. A short service of prayer and reflection at 6pm, coffee at 6.45pm followed by discussion. Corpus Christi Contemplative Prayer group for young adults Wednesdays from 7pm at Corpus Christi, Maiden Lane WC2E 7NB. For further details please contact corpuschristipg@yahoogroups.co.uk

Evangelisation prayer group for young adults meets from 7pm on Wednesdays at Notre Dame de France, 5 Leicester Place WC2H 7BX. For further details please contact Armel at apostles.jesus@yahoo.co.uk

Soul Food A Catholic charismatic prayer group for young adults meets Thursdays 7-9pm at St Charles Borromeo, Ogle Street W1W 6HS. Details at www.soulfoodgroup.org Blessed John Paul II Prayer Group Every second Thursday of the month 7-8pm, Mass, Adoration and Prayer at Corpus Christi, Maiden Lane WC2E 7NB.

FRIDAYS Association of Divorced and Separated Catholics Every third Friday of the month. All divorced and separated Catholics are welcome. Call Frank or Christine 020 8422 1591 Divine Mercy Prayers and Mass Every first Friday 2.30-4.30pm at Our Lady, Mother of the Church, 2 Windsor Road W5 5PD. Westminster Cathedral Charismatic Prayer Group Every Friday 7.30pm Prayer, Praise and Teaching. First Friday is a healing Mass. Details: 020 8748 2632

THURSDAYS Jesus Christ the Fullness of Life Every first Thursday of the month. Young adults from all Christian denominations pray and share a meal. Details www.jcfl.org.uk

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SATURDAYS Taizé at Notre Dame de France, 5 Leicester Place WC2H 7BX 7.15pm Call 020 7437 9363

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"Day for Persecuted Christians" (DfPC) Persecuted Christians: a day for prayer, fasting, and discernment during Lent. Saturday 8 March, 10:00am to 4:15pm. At Church of Our Lady, Queen of Heaven, 4a Inverness Place, Queensway W2 3JF. For more information on this free event (including a map and directions to the venue) please visit www.comptium.com/dfpc

Low Mass 8am The Oratory, Brompton Road SW7 2RP. Low Mass 6pm St Etheldreda, Ely Place EC1N 6RY First Fridays only. Low Mass 6pm St John the Baptist Church, King Edward's Road E9 7SF First Fridays only. Low Mass 6.30pm, Corpus Christi, Maiden Lane WC2E 7NB Second Fridays only. Saturdays Low Mass 12.15pm, St Wilfrid’s Chapel, The Oratory, Brompton Road SW7 2RP Low Mass 4.30pm, Side Chapel, Westminster Cathedral SW1P 1QW Second Saturday only.

We want your News You can send us your latest news online, please email communications@rcdow. org.uk Page 19

Spotlight

Westminster Record | March 2014

A View from the Consistory

The new Cardinal’s Mass in St Peter’s Basilica

Cardinal Vincent receiving the zucchetto and biretta from Pope Francis

by Bishop John Arnold

B

eing in St Peter’s Basilica, there had to be something of splendour and solemnity about the Consistory. The presence of the Pope, the Pope-Emeritus, one hundred and fifty Cardinals and many more bishops in the packed church has to speak of grandeur. Yet, there was a clear note of simplicity and prayer running through the whole occasion. Pope Francis was introducing nineteen new members into his

group of personal advisors, and we were privileged on-lookers. He welcomed them, speaking directly about their role of service and mission in the Church and what he expected of them, assisting him in his office as Bishop of Rome. The fact that so many of the new Cardinals come from either the world's biggest cities or poorest countries underlines the Pope's priorities of having representation from the universal Church in the College

of Cardinals and of confronting the scandal of poverty in all its forms. The emphasis was on a Church with an urgent mission which must walk always in simplicity with the Lord. Privileged on-lookers we may have been, but there was no doubting the reminder that each and every one of us has a role as what Pope Francis calls missionary disciples.

Cardinal Vincent Nichols received his formation at the Venerable English College (VEC) and 15 current Venerable English College students served at the consistory Mass on Sunday. Four of us came from the Diocese of Westminster, so the Mass was an occasion for pride and thanksgiving for the honour bestowed on our Diocese. We celebrated twice over: a festive lunch was held after the Consistory on 22 February and a buffet supper the following

day. Several bishops from England and Wales attended the lunch while 350 guests, including 200 from Westminster, took part in the celebration on 23 February. In a speech, Cardinal Nichols spoke of the three things he said he was bringing home to England with him: a new appreciation for the universality of the Church, the friendships he had witnessed in Rome, and the resolve to accept Christ’s invitation to “walk with Him”.

©Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

©Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

by Antonio Pineda

Pope Francis celebrating the Mass for the Consistory on Sunday

Titular Church reflects Cardinal’s pastoral care concerns

The Church is best known for housing the famous icon of Our Lady of Perpetual Help, which was given to the Redemptorists by Pope Pius IX in 1866. Page 20

As is customary when a new Cardinal is appointed by the Pope, he is designated a titular church in Rome. Cardinals have a loose patronal relationship with their titular churches (their names and coats of arms are inscribed inside), but they do not participate in the actual management of the churches. Cardinal Vincent has been given the Church of St Alphonsus Liguori on the Via Merulana in the centre of Rome. This beautiful church is dedicated to St Alphonsus Liguori (1696-1787) who is one of the thirty-three Doctors of the Church and the founder of the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer, better known as the Redemptorists, who staff the church. Built between 1855 and 1859 by the Scottish architect George Wigley, the church is one of the rare examples of neo-Gothic architecture in the city.

Blessed John XXIII named it as a cardinal titular church in 1960 and it has had three previous patrons, the most recent being Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua, Archbishop of Philadelphia

between 1988 and 2003. Cardinal Vincent recently spoke of St Alphonsus in an interview with Vatican Radio, in particular the importance of the tradition of pastoral practice in the life of the Church.

The Cardinal’s titular church - St. Alphonsus Liguori on the Via Merulana in the centre of Rome.

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Published by The Diocese of Westminster, Archbishop’s House, Ambrosden Avenue, London SW1P 1QJ. Printed by NWN Media Limited, Mold, Flintshire. All rights reserved.

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Westminster Record March Edition