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Florida a&M university’s campus magazine

+ journey to the draft + attack of blackface

SPLASHION summer fashion

Free MAY 2013


T

his moment was always inevitable. My reign has come to an end. I’ll be honest—it is more sweet than bitter. I can say without a doubt that this experience has presented me with more adversity and criticism than anything else I’ve encountered. It has been a long and trying ride (Journey to the Draft p.22 ) and for Journey everyday has been a fight. Whether it was a battle to find money, get issues printed—on time or if at all—salvage suffering grades or barely hanging-by-the-hinge friendships, best believe we have had our fair share of obstacles thrown in our direction. However, now that all cards have been played and the dust has settled I can confidently say I’m proud of everything my staff has accomplished this year. We have showcased hot and affordable fashions (Splashion p.24 ) that can be purchased in good ole’ Tally ho, addressed issues plaguing the AfricanAmerican community (Attack of Blackface p.16 ) and taken our talents to companies from coast to coast (NYFW p.14 ). The most important lesson I’ve taken from this experience is understanding your worth. People are going to doubt you every step of the way. People will question your every decision and side eye your work ethic. However, once you realize your unique intrinsic value and can snap to your own rhyme (Poetic Justice p.8 ) it will be impossible for anyone to tear you down.

Morgan Grain

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF What do you think about this issue? Tell me on Twitter @Maggi_Miranda


ATTACK OF

BLACK

Brandon Hepburn and other former Rattlers worked out for scouts and coaches from 21 NFL teams during FAMU’s Pro Day on March 19, 2013.

FACE

WORDS BY ASHLEY SMITH

DESIGN BY CHIDOZIE ACEY

Hey, so I looked up blackface and it’s actually one word. Who knew? Also, all magazines titles are italicized. Other than that, it’s cool with me.

I

n 2013, blackface has taken over the fashion industry. Blackface plagued African-Americans in the Jim Crowe era, mocking their full lips, dark skin and complexion. Now fashion magazines are using this hurtful era in American history in the name of artistic expression.

In February, Numéro Magazine published an editorial spread featuring 16-year-old Caucasian model Ondria Hardin covered in dark bronzer. Editors took the blasphemy to the next level by titling the spread “African Queen.”In 2009, model Lara Stone appeared in black face in a 14-page spread in Vogue Paris. Sasha Pivovarova appeared in V Magazine in black face. Paris-based Mongolian designer Tsolmandakh Munkhuu painted models in black face for the Hyères International Festival of Fashion in 2010. Unfortunately, many editors and photographers believe blackface is acceptable; it is seen as “artistic expression”, rather than a re-launch of the Jim Crowe era. Black models are scarce on high-fashion runways and are rarely included in editorial

6’2

7/8

241

about how those in the fashion industry value black beauty.

40 YARD DASH BENCH PRESS (reps of 225 lbs)

4.54 seconds 21 reps

6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24

URBAN RENAISSANCE POETIC JUSTICE WOMEN IN VISUAL ARTS BRIGHT LIGHTS, BIG SHADES NYFW ATTACK OF BLACKFACE ART MUSE ORGANIC HAIR LOVE JOURNEY TO THE DRAFT SPLASHION

Copyright 2013 by Florida A&M University. All rights reserved. This issue of Journey magazine was produced by the student organization Journey with essential support from the School of Journalism & Graphic Communication. Journey is funded through the student activity and service fees, as allocated by the Student Senate of Florida A&M University. For more information on Journey or the Magazine Program, contact the Division of Journalism, 510 Orr Drive Room 3078, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL, 32307 COVER DESIGN BY CHIDOZIE ACEY | COVER PHOTO BY RAYMOND LOVE | ON THE COVER TNIJAH SMITH


PHOTO EDITOR

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

MORGAN GRAIN

LaGRETTA JOHNSON

ART DIRECTOR

CHIDOZIE ACEY

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

WESTIN GILES

MASTHEAD

COPY DESK CHIEF

KRISTEN SWILLEY

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

ADAM HARDY


STYLIST

ROBYN MOWATT

STAFF

LIFE SUPPORT

ADVISER BRANDON VAUGN PRINTER GANDY PRINTERS CONTRIBUTORS JASMINE LOUIS, RAYMOND LOVE II ART TEAM COURTNEY JORDAN, GEOFFREY EVANS SPECIAL THANKS WHITE HOUSE | BLACK MARKET, THE RATTLERS’S EDGE, BOHEMIA PHOTO TEAM JASMINE MITCHELL, RAYMOND LOVE II PR TEAM RENEE MOWATT

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR

JABARI PAYNE


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T

The high note never hit, failure to recover from one fiascos. According to most the fullness of my glass is halfway empty, oblivious to the depth of the well. If anything don’t let slight malfunction lay eggs in your stomach. It will birth doubt, and grow old in your voice. Bask in the smallest of feats.

o instill pride in someone, you must first say you are proud of them. Knowing the difference between disappointment and disappointing is the catalyst of one more chance to achieve, or coming up short of expectation.

Terrified of ones expertise at burning bridges, The water that passes under fails to hold the weight of your own words. Disappointment is finding love letters of past high-school girlfriends, that articulates their love, accompanied by hopes of marriage. Refuse to drown in your masochism, departure. Not understanding the concept that misery loves company. Believe sanity slips silently. People will always take time to point out, what you used to be. Disappointing is achievement going unrecognized. “Mother, why must you focus on the negative?” Tenth grade ignorance leaves sour taste in mouth. I am not my mistakes. I just tend to offspring a lot of them. Dunce hat is chiral to a crown of thorns. Scar stained hands plead the fifth.

DISENCHANTMENT

Lucifer is the relative that never calls ahead of time that their coming for a visit. He will always overstay his welcome. To disappoint is to let dreams dwindle in a pendulum of mediocrity.

M

e lodic fragrances run my mind. Especially those found on my man; His cologne does to me what weed does to a fiend; His intoxicating scent is stronger than any aphrodisiac. Enamored, I bury my face in his shirt. And inhale. I am connected with him. I am at his mercy. And inhale. He tickles my waist and laughs at my obsessiveness. I miss him more when I smell his scent and he is not there... Instantly, I am more alert when I smell the sweet sweat of him. In adoration, I snuggle my nose to his neck. And inhale. My attraction to him intensifies. And inhale.

SCENT -MorgAN G rain

aNDRE cARBONELL

W

h en I look in the mirror I see three. The blackness, the womanist and the black woman. Triple threat and a triple conscious. Black women aren’t feminists you say? Black men don’t acknowledge themthey laugh at our bluntness. Feminism is powerful. Understand you descend from royalty. You are more than breasts and ass. Believe you areshift your thoughts to queendom, you are regal. Elevate your mental process and become wholly conscious. After all, you stand on the backs of phenomenal women. Prove their struggle and tears weren’t in vain. Push for equality for women of all colors. Your vagina is powerful. Realize your bodies and minds are equal in honing your strength. Understand you do not have to submit to anyone. No thoughts of oppression should wreak havoc on your brain. Your actions should speak soundly of the progress you yearn for. Women have been powerful beings for centuries, and will continue to flourish. Yell, write, protest, riot, and organize.

F*ck Patriarchy (The Bop Form) -Robyn mowatt

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No Boundaries to A Woman's Creativity Words by: Alexandria Collins

Design by: Westin Giles

Women have made strides in the realm of the visual arts as being respected creators, but there’s still separation. When you think about your favorite painter, film director or sculptor, the names will most likely be men. But, why? Women have long been creating art in all realms and deserve to be highlighted. Journey encourages you to research female artists. You never know, your new favorite visual artist might be a woman.

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Candace Allen Q: What has inspired your specific visual art endeavors? A: I am inspired by my own thoughts and fantasies. I also pull my inspiration through nature that I feel around me. Q: What advice do you have for someone looking to enter the visual art world? A: Go for it. Be diligent and develop the best product you can: your creativity. Q: Do you think it's important to highlight women in the visual arts? If so, why? A: I think it is more important to highlight the individual. No matter, black, white, woman or man. Individuals are what the fine arts is built upon.

prof. k.Pamela bowens-saffo

Q: What has inspired your specific visual art endeavors? A: My artwork is often motivated or inspired by questions of various interests and often-particular inquiries of the everyday “cause of the affects”. Many times these are social and political themes related to African American culture. Q: What are your future goals concerning your artistic career? A: My future goals in art are large-scale collaborative projects that are interdisciplinary with university students bridging Art, Architecture and Engineering disciplines with the Humanities. My goal is building “Think Tank” initiatives developing problem solving concepts that are innovative, product base, as well as public art.

Brianna Paschao Q: What are your future goals concerning your artistic career? A: I am currently developing a brand, L.I.S. (little in stature) based off a character developed in October 2012. A brand that represents vision and being able to dream and achieve all things no matter the obstacle. Q: Do you think it's important to highlight women in the visual arts? If so, why? A: Yes, it’s imperative because women let alone people of the African Diaspora are not acknowledged in the art industry and I feel as though we are overlooked and not highlighted enough. When you study you learn about Van Gogh and Salvador Dali but black artists such as Augusta Savage are hardly recognized. If we were exposed to women artists and African Americans in art, I believe our culture would expand its idea of visual art and become more appreciative of it.

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ATTACK OF

WORDS BY ASHLEY SMITH

DESIGN BY CHIDOZIE ACEY

I

n 2013, blackface has taken over the fashion industry. Blackface plagued African-Americans in the Jim Crowe era, mocking their full lips, dark skin and complexion. Now fashion magazines are using this hurtful era in American history in the name of artistic expression. In February, Numéro Magazine published an editorial spread featuring 16-year-old Caucasian model Ondria Hardin covered in dark bronzer. Editors took the blasphemy to the next level by titling the spread “African Queen.”In 2009, model Lara Stone appeared in black face in a 14-page spread in Vogue Paris. Sasha Pivovarova appeared in V Magazine in black face. Paris-based Mongolian designer Tsolmandakh

Munkhuu painted models in black face for the Hyères International Festival of Fashion in 2010. Unfortunately, many editors and photographers believe blackface is acceptable; it is seen as “artistic expression,” rather than a re-launch of the Jim Crowe era. Black models are scarce on high-fashion runways and are rarely included in editorial spreads. This is just another slap in the face. It says a great deal about how those in the fashion industry value black beauty. Take a look at how many times the blackface offense has occurred in several different fashion magazines.

Sources Beyoncé in French magazine, L’Officiel Paris, 2011, March issue celebrating their 90th anniversary. Knowles was originally showcasing African queens. Source: straightfromthea.com | Constance Jablonski, a French model, wore bronzer and a fro. Jablonski imitated an African mother. Numéro’s first blackface, in October 2010 issue. Photographer: Greg Kadel Source: nymag.com | Ondria Hardin, 16-year-old, Caucasin model is Numéro’s second launch of blackface. Photographer: Sebastian Kim Source: dailymail.co.uk | Lara Stone, a Dutch supermodel, in French magazine, Paris Vogue. Photographer: Steven Klein Source: nymag.com | Sasha Pivovarova (left), Russian model in V magazine, November 2009 issue. Photographer: Mario Sorrenti Source: nymag.com | Claudia Schiffer, supermodel, in a 2012, ad campaign for Dom Perigon. Schiffer posed as an Asian “yellow face” and African American “blackface”. Photographer: Karl Lagerfeld Source: women24.com | Kate Moss in 2006, in The Independent. They used Moss to “trivialize hunger, racism and sexual violence against women in Africa.” Source: feministe.us | Illamasqua, UK make-up brand used a white model for white and black face. Source: huffingtonpost.com | Paris based Mongolian designer, Tsolmandask Mankhuu, black face collection won Public Prize at Hyères Fashion Festival for emerging designers in Southern France. 16

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words by Kristen swilley Design by Geoffrey evans Photos by lagretta johnson, J.L. Evans and raymond love II

Da Vinci. Picasso. Warhol. They're all famous artists who drew their inspiration from others. Journey took some of Florida A&M's most talented artists tocreate something, in any medium, representing our staffers favorite outfits. Check out how they made our looks their muse.

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KEVIN "CHUBBZ" BANNATE INSPIRATION : MORGAN GRAIN, EDITOR IN CHIEF

M

y Name is Kevin Banatte, but everyone knows me as CHuBBZ. I was born in Queens, N.Y.and raised in South Florida. I’m a senior psychology student with a minor in juvenile justice. Mygoal in life is to help and inspire people to maximize their potential. I’m the co-founder of Clique Visuals, which specializes in photography, video editing, event planning and graphic design with a partnership with Dirty Close. I’m also a photographer for Dream Defenders with a role in political activism. I love music. I like to write poetry (rap) and freestyle. I’d love to write a book–definitely a memoir and a book on relationships. I like to do a lot because I love a challenge. I have this passion for life that sparks what other people call my creativity. There’s not much I think I can’t do, but so much I want to do! Where did CHuBBZ come from? Well, my older brother had an AOL screen name, Chubby Hollis (Hollis because we lived off of Hollis Ave in Queens). I don’t know where the Chubby came from because he wasn’t chubby. Me on the other hand, I was Chubby. I liked the name but I thought Chubby was lame, so I created Hollywood CHuBBZ as a screen name. That was in 7th grade, but it wasn’t until college when everyone started calling me by the Facebook name I created, “CHuBBZ”(all letters capitalized except the u). It was so serious that people thought CHuBBZ was my last name, friends would introduce me to their parents as CHuBBZ. Nobody had any idea who Kevin was until I recently started using both names. Part of me sees Kevin and CHuBBZ as the same person but I like to consider my creative/artistic side CHuBBZ only because I feel like FAMU taught me how express and develop my innate creativity. So it’s kind of my way of crediting FAMU for guiding me in the right direction.

cANDACE "CANDii" allen inspiration: robyn mowatt, female stylist

M

y name is Candace Marie Allen, but I’m more commonly known as Candii – just Candii. I’m a senior fine arts student and I hail from the historical city of Quincy, Fla. To understand my design and artistic visions you have to understand where I am from. In an extremely agriculturally rich city I was very much in tune with my surroundings. I grew up not just in my school and inside my home, but I grew with my land. Where some artists are influenced by architecture and busy streets, I aimed for my artwork to be a subconscious dialogue between myself and the Azalea bushes and honeysuckles. The soft curvy lines of my art are intended to resemble that sure but slight bend that is so commonly found in nature. From the rotation of a turtle’s shell or the playful rippled edges of the ferns my aunt grew in her yard, I was inspired by the world around me. In Quincy, there are no schools geared towards the arts. Music and art classes are a privilege and aren’t actually mandatory in elementary schools at all, and by the time I was in upper level grades, I was enrolled in private schools that didn’t offer a single art class. I began a journey to practice and perfect my artwork on my own. Because I was not privileged to have traditional training, I would consider myself to be self-taught artist. And because of this, my subject matter and art’s overall feel is a whimsical way of entering a dream-like state. With my artwork, I aim to use bright colors or bold darkened lines to arrive at the perfect marriage of a way for my viewers to “relate and then escape.” I will give you something in my artwork not too abstract, like a full-figured woman, and then add in something unexpected like a flying trapeze! In that way, I aim to entertain my viewers with bright, happy, unique images that I hope will inspire a dialogue between viewers and their own dreams. JOURNEY

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WORDS BY MORGAN GRAIN

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HAIR LOVE

DESIGN BY CHIDOZIE ACEY & COURTNEY JORDAN PHOTOS BY JASMINE MITCHELL MODELING BY CAMILLE FREEMAN


I

t’s safe to say the story is the same for most African-American women. Heat damage, alopecia, low growth retention, hair loss and breakage have caused many African-American women to rethink the chemicals they put in their hair. But relaxers and color treatments are not the only chemicals that can harm the healthy growth of hair. There are several chemicals found in shampoos, conditioners and moisturizers that are damaging to natural hair shafts and follicles. Some of these chemicals include parabens, sulfates, phthalates and synthetic fragrances. African-American hair in its natural state has a different chemistry causing it to need more moisture, protein and organic nutrients to remain healthy and manageable. The natural hair movement has opened doors for entrepreneurial minded African-American women who understand the chemistry of African-American hair better than big beauty brands like Pantene, Paul Mitchell and Garnier Fructis. For years, the black hair market has been a multibillion dollar industry. Unfortunately, even though African-American women represent more than 90 percent of this industry’s consumer market, African-American people own less than 20 percent of the industry’s products. The natural hair movement has helped in changing that dynamic.

Carol’s Daughter Chocolat (Smoothing) Blow Dry Cream

$22.00

Made with love, this product contains cacao extract, which aids in smoothing down tresses. The soy protein controls frizz for those hot and humid days and Keravis helps rebuild the hair shaft.

Curl Junkie’s Hibiscus & Banana Honey "Butta" Leave-InConditioner

$20.00

Discovering a bomb conditioner is paramount because it provides moisture for your hair in its weakest state (when it is wet). This adds lasting moisture, smoothes frizz and defines your specific curls and coils.

Shea Moisture African Black Soap Deep Cleansing Shampoo This shampoo helps regulate sebum production while alleviating itchiness and flaking. Sebum production, or “skin oil,” is produced by your sebaceous glands located in your skin. These oils protect, moisturize and waterproof your skin—well in this case your scalp. However, when sebaceous glands become overactive or fail to secrete these oils properly, your hair texture and moisture levels can be affected.

$9.99

Miss Jessie’s Curly Meringue

Grassroots hair product lines like Shea Moisture, Mixed Chicks, Carol’s Daughter, Jane Carter Solutions, Miss Jessie’s and Black Earth Products have sprouted up in department stores like Sephora, Target and Macy’s. Here are some all organic natural hair products maunfactured by black women who are committed to the healthy hair care of all black women.

$7.00$38.00

This curl booster is great if you want buoyant strands. For best results, use after shampooing and conditioning the hair while it is still wet. Works great with spiral rod sets, finger styling and two strand twists.

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WORDS AND DESIGN BY ADAM HARDY

New Detroit Lions Linebacker and former FAMU Rattler Brandon Hepburn is ready to show the NFL what FAMU has to offer.

A

nyone who regularly attends Florida A&M football games should be familiar with the name “Brandon Hepburn.” Last season, the 6’2, 241 pound inside-linebacker had his name called very often as he piled up 86 tackles, 5.5 sacks, seven pass breakups and one forced fumble. Seeing that #52 fly across the field became a staple on Saturdays for Rattler fans over the last two seasons. NFL scouts took notice and the Detroit Lions selected Hepburn with the 39th pick in 7th round, making him only the third FAMU football player drafted since 2000. Hepburn’s journey has required much dedication and hard work. Coming out of North Rockland High School, the Pomona, New York native wasn’t recruited by any big name schools. He did, however, have offers to play football from a number of Division III, Division II, and FCS schools. He chose FAMU over others because he knew he “wanted to play ball down south.” He was originally recruited by coach Rubin Carter, so he had to walk on to the football team when FAMU made the coaching transition to Joe Taylor. Playing football and balancing school work is a tough task for all student athletes and Hepburn is no exception. “God blessed me with the strength to do it. I found out what times of the day I functioned best and used those times to study.” After redshirting his freshman year and being mostly a special teams player the next year, Hepburn had a breakthrough season in 2011, playing in all 11 games and recording 63 tackles and one sack.

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2012 STATISTICS

86 TACKLES 5.5 SACKS 9.5 TACKLES FOR LOSS 7 PASS BREAKUPS


Although there are players in the NFL who attended FAMU, most of them have made there way into the league as undrafted free agents. Hepburn is the first to be drafted since Curtis Holcomb was drafted by the San Francisco in the 7th round in 2011. Every year, the NFL Scouting Combine features all of the big name players who are headed to the NFL. “It was fun,” said Hepburn, referring to working out along side the top recruits from around the country. “Many of them already have a lot of hype surrounding them. I was just a regular guy.” He helped improve his draft stock with good workouts at the scouting combine and at FAMU’s Pro Day. His workout numbers are comparable to those of any linebacker headed to the NFL right now. Hepburn has also had private workouts with several NFL teams who wanted a closer look at him. Hepburn’s prowess doesn’t end on the football field. He is also an exceptional student and human being. He already has his degree in biochemistry from Florida A&M and is currently working on a graduate degree in marketing. During a summer internship, Hepburn found a way to kill cancer cells in rats by using copperloaded nano particles. His dream is to one day own a biochemical company so he can lead research that will find cures to deadly diseases. Hepburn is also very active in the community. He was named to the Allstate/AFCA Good Works Team for his work with the homeless. He and 21 other players were honored during halftime of The Allstate Sugar Bowl on January 2. He also spent many of his weekends during college doing community service for his church. His charity work has always been important to him and he always makes time for it. “It’s extrememly important. You get to help out people in ways that you usually don’t consider.”

photos courtesy of FAMU Athletics

NFL coaches frequently talk about how they covet players with leadership qualities and impeccable character. The Detroit Lions have gotten that and more. He is an excellent role model for kids, teenagers, and even college students. He excells on the field, in the classroom, and in the community. He is the epitome of the term “student-athlete.” Regardless of how far he makes it, he always knows he’s representing for the highest of losive p x E seven hills. eline to Sid e n i l e -Sid er -Lead

Brandon Hepburn and other former Rattlers worked out for scouts and coaches from 21 NFL teams during FAMU’s Pro Day on March 19, 2013.

6’2

7/8

40 YARD DASH BENCH PRESS (reps of 225 lbs)

VERTICAL JUMP

241 4.54 seconds 21 reps 36 inches

20 YARD SHUTTLE

4.47 seconds

3 CONE DRILL

7.31 seconds JOURNEY

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SPL

PHOTOS BY RAY

HAIR STYLING BY SHAYNA MCLAR

Dive into s

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PLASHION

YMOND LOVE II

DESIGN BY CHIDOZIE ACEY

REN of the RATTLER’S EDGE

STYLING BY ROBYN MOWATT

MAKEUP BY JASMINE LOUIS

CREATIVE DIRECTion BY RAYMOND LOVE

SET ASISTANCE BY MARKEL MAZELIN

MODELING BY TNIJAH SMITH

summer fashion with a bold attitude and a splash of color.

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american apparel Bikini Top

$10

urban outfitters Bottoms $20

Nike Sneakers

$50

shop als (shop-als.com) Sneakers

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$23

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White house black market Blazer

$108*

American apparel Bodysuit

bohemia Necklace

$44

$16

AlDo Wedges $60 Earings $10

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WHITE HOUSE BLACK MARKET Tank

$84*

forever 21

Polka Dot Skirt

$45

Steve madden $55

Heels

Target

Necklace

$20

Bohemia

Ring $10

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WHITE HOUSE BLACK MARKET $160*

Floral Dress

steve madden Heels

$45

vintage Polka Dot Skirt

$15

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Green vintage jumper Suit

$63

MIA

Platforms $40

Bohemia

Necklace $16

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Summer 2013 Visual Issue