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The AIDS Committee of Toronto (ACT) Since 1983 ACT has developed programs and services that responded to the changing needs of the communities it serves. We have a unique history: founded by a small group of volunteers determined to combat the misinformation about HIV/AIDS, the organization challenged the stigma associated with those who had AIDS, developed and provided ongoing support for people living with HIV/AIDS; and fought for funding for HIV/AIDS at all levels of government. ACT was a nesting place, an incubator, for the beginning and growth of other organizations that served particular communities at risk; ACT initiated innovative and candid HIV prevention campaigns and programs that drew national acclaim and turned attention to the importance of not only safer sex, but healthy, fun and satisfying sex.

ACT continues to be a strong leader in the fight against HIV/AIDS creating innovative programming and services that address current issues and needs related to HIV/AIDS. From our community health promotion and outreach programming, to practical assistance programs; from our Employment ACTion program that helps people with HIV/AIDS return to the workforce, to our counselling and case management services—we offer a wide and robust range of programming and services.

Resilience!

TOGETHER WE ARE STRONGER

This new strategic plan opens the door to new thinking about the services we provide, opportunities for partnerships, and continuing our legacy as an agency that not only acts but leads.

STRATEGIC PLAN 2010–2015 1 STRATEGIC PLAN 2010–2015


Table of Contents

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Update on HIV/AIDS in Toronto Today The Process What We Heard The 2010-2015 Strategic Plan New vision and mission

Resilience! Together we are stronger The AIDS Committee of Toronto (ACT)

Core values and commitments 14

2010-2015 Strategic Directions

18 20

Health Promotion Priorities Priority Populations

21

Four Pillars of ACT’s Programs and Services

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Resilience! Together We Are Stronger ‘Resilience’: the essence of the AIDS movement. Over 25 years ago, AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome), a disease of the human immune system caused by HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus), drew more questions than answers, incited panic, homophobia and stigma. Many of us watched in disbelief as we lost partners, friends, family, and loved ones—though we continued calling for treatment, supporting those living with the virus and fighting for a cure. Amidst the turmoil of that time, an AIDS movement was born in Toronto. The movement unleashed activism in the community that led to the establishment of the AIDS Committee of Toronto (ACT), an organization created to provide credible and affirming support, to develop and share accurate information and resources, and to work with the broader community to challenge governments and society to take action. ACT became and remains a significant presence in the community where people gather to grieve, celebrate lives lived, and find information, tools and support they need to live with HIV/AIDS. ACT remains a leader in the fight against the spread of HIV/AIDS, and within the broader sector of community-based AIDS service organizations (ASOs). Our contributions to the AIDS movement continue: as drug treatments allow those with HIV to live longer, living well with HIV becomes challenging in new ways and has become more complex. We face new issues related to treatment side effects, aging, mental health, substance use, co-infection, criminalization and stigma. And, HIV infections continue within our city. For ASOs, our challenge is to confront the new complexities of HIV/AIDS with limited resources; to

utilize ingenuity in developing responsive programming; to tell our stories to policy makers, supporters, and the public in ways that describe how HIV/AIDS has changed and why health promotion and HIV prevention efforts are vital to our collective success. We now respond to HIV/AIDS not as one medical condition in isolation, but view it as a fusion of complexities. The disease continues to marginalize people who are most at risk, to stigmatize people living with the virus (regardless of social status) and still requires costly treatment with significant side effects that affect overall health and well-being. Since our start over 25 years ago, ACT continues to contribute to the movement: insisting on the rights and dignity of every person living with, affected by, or at risk for HIV/AIDS; increasing HIV prevention and health promotion efforts; challenging policies and laws that contribute to stigma; remaining active, involved and resilient! There has always been resilience in this movement—how the gay community and allies took a stand to raise awareness, pushed back against stigma, fought for funding for community-based services, and adapted to shifts and changes as treatment prolonged lives. This movement is still here because it is—and we are—resilient. ACT is proud to be part of that movement. We never gave up and will never give up until we realize our vision of a world without AIDS. Kenneth Tong Chair, Sub-Committee on Strategic Planning Board of Directors

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Hazelle Palmer Executive Director


The AIDS Committee of Toronto (ACT) Since 1983 ACT has developed programs and services that respond to the changing needs of the communities it serves. We have a unique history: founded by a small group of volunteers determined to combat the misinformation about HIV/AIDS, the organization challenged the stigma associated with those who had AIDS, developed and provided ongoing support for people living with HIV/AIDS, and fought for funding for an HIV/AIDS response at all levels of government. ACT was a nesting place, an incubator, for the beginning and growth of other organizations that served particular communities at risk; ACT initiated innovative and candid HIV prevention campaigns and programs that drew national acclaim and turned attention to the importance of not only safer sex, but healthy, fun and satisfying sex.

ACT continues to be a strong leader in the fight against HIV/AIDS, creating innovative programming and services that address current issues and needs related to HIV/AIDS. From our community health promotion and outreach programming, to our service access area; from our Employment ACTion program that helps people with HIV/AIDS return to the workforce, to our counselling and case management services—we offer a wide and robust range of programs and services.

This strategic plan opens the door to new thinking about the services we provide and opportunities for partnerships, as we continue our legacy as an agency that not only acts but leads.

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Toronto continues to be the epicentre of the epidemic in Canada, with an estimate of over 18,000 people currently living with HIV/AIDS. Every day there are two new HIV infections in Toronto. Gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to be the most at risk, MaKing up the majority of new infections AND people living with HIV/AIDS in our city.

Treatment advances continue to improve the life expectancy of most people with HIV/AIDS who are accessing treatment, continuing the evolution OF HIV/AIDS INTO a chronic, manageable illness. As treatment becomes more normalized and as people living with HIV/AIDS age, there will continue to be challenges for effective responses to health issues that are complicated by, but not caused by, HIV.

HIV/AIDS in Toronto TODAY 67% of newly diagnosed women were from countries

55% of all of Ontario’s positive HIV test reports in

where HIV is endemic.

2008 were in Toronto.

72% of all people currently living with HIV/AIDS in

Gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men continue to form the largest group of new HIV infections in Toronto. In 2008 they accounted for 56% of all new HIV diagnoses.

Toronto are gay/bisexual men.

612 Torontonians were diagnosed HIV positive in 2008. 625 Torontonians were diagnosed HIV positive in 2007.

Although HIV diagnoses among women have declined to 20% of all cases in 2008, infection rates among women are still higher than they were 10 years ago.

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The Process

The AIDS Committee of Toronto (ACT) Since 1983 ACT has developed programs and services ACT continues to be ACT’s process for the 2010-2015 strategic plan builds ona strong the leader in the fight that responded to the changing needs of the against HIV/AIDS creating innovative programming achievements of our previous strategic plan Cornerstones for communities it serves. We have a unique history: and services that address current issues and needs Collaboration and includes andetermined extensive community engagement founded by a small group of volunteers related to HIV/AIDS. From our community health to combat the misinformation about external HIV/AIDS, the promotionThese and outreach programming, to practical process with internal and stakeholders. organization challenged the stigma associated with assistance programs; from our Employment ACTion stakeholders included ACT staff, volunteers, members, board those who had AIDS, developed and provided ongoing program that helps people with HIV/AIDS return to members, other AIDS serviceand organizations allied support for people living with HIV/AIDS; fought the (ASOs), workforce, to our counselling and case for fundingincluding for HIV/AIDShealth at all levels of government. management services—we offer a wide and robust sectors centres, community organizations, ACT was a nesting place, an incubator, for the range of programming and services. and mental health institutions, service users, and community beginning and growth of other organizations that members. Wecommunities also introduced aspects this strategic served particular at risk; ACTnew initiated Thisto new strategic plan opens the door to new innovative candid HIVproviding prevention campaigns thinking aboutfocus the services we provide, opportunities planningandprocess, an opportunity to hold groups and programs that drew national acclaim and for partnerships, and continuing our legacy as an with youth, involved with our fundraising turned attentionvolunteers to the importance of not only safer agency that notevents, only actsthe but leads. sex, but healthy, fun and satisfying sex. Spanish-speaking and Portuguese-speaking communities; key

informant interviews with research and corporate sponsorship partners, as well as discussions with key ASOs outside of Canda about how their organizations have shifted in order to respond to the complexity of HIV/AIDS.

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What We Heard Our stakeholders responded to a wide range of questions that provided input on what they felt were strengths, challenges, and future opportunities for ACT; the top five issues affecting the health and well-being of people living with HIV/AIDS; the top public policy issues; and the three most important activities ACT needs to do over the next five years. Stakeholders gave feedback on programs and

services, priorities for future programming, and ACT’s ability to raise awareness about HIV/AIDS. A total of 399 stakeholders completed our survey, 20 participated in our focus groups, and 11 key informants were interviewed, making this the most extensive community engagement process ACT has ever undertaken to develop a strategic plan. The comments were insightful and constructive.

Key themes: Strengths ACT’s Programs and Services A strong majority of stakeholders identified our programs and services as being “high quality”, “professional” and “diverse”. ACT’s involvement and use of research, media/communications campaigns, volunteer training and support, and fundraising were also cited as “key strengths” that have increased our profile over the years and our credibility and reputation as a leader in the HIV/AIDS sector. ACT Staff ACT staff were described as “dedicated”, “hardworking”, “friendly”, “empathetic”, having “a positive attitude” and exhibiting “professionalism”. ACT Volunteers The work of ACT volunteers and the training we provide were cited frequently as a core strength of ACT. The knowledge, dedication and commitment of our amazing volunteers were evident to many respondents. ACT Offices Our location at 399 Church Street was found to be “accessible”, “perfectly placed in the gay community”, close to other ASOs and funding partners. The environment was called: “welcoming” and “warm”.

Challenges

Opportunities

Stigma Our stakeholders noted many challenges as barriers facing people living with HIV/AIDS, the HIV/AIDS sector, as well as ACT. Foremost was stigma. Stigma associated with HIV/AIDS has made people afraid to seek support and information, to get tested and/or access other programs and services.

ACT programming should avoid duplication; help to address gaps that other ASOs cannot.

Fundraising Shrinking financial support to address HIV/AIDS was seen as a huge barrier to allowing ACT and other ASOs to maintain, sustain and create new programming and services.

Be a good partner and collaborate with other organizations that are best able to meet programming goals.

Public Profile Respondents found the lack of profile for HIV/AIDS in the media and public debate to be “misleading” as it assumes “there’s a cure or treatment” or that “we don’t need to worry anymore.” Criminalization Criminalization of non-disclosure of HIV was identified by practically all respondents as a key issue, barrier and challenge. Focus While ACT has exceptional programs and services, many respondents felt we should focus our work: articulate and streamline the work we do in order to distinguish ourselves from other ASOs. Facility Upgrades Other stakeholders requested ACT “enhance our facility” by upgrading the furnishings, and improving the “look” of the offices. 8 STRATEGIC PLAN 2010–2015

Strengthen services for gay men, youth, long-term survivors, people of colour, and those affected by HIV/AIDS. Play a role in heightening awareness of HIV/AIDS and key policy related issues.

Be innovative with programming and take advantage of “using online and other new technologies.” Expand fundraising activities to support our work; explore joint fundraising opportunities with other ASOs; be an “advocate” of greater financial support for ACT and other ASOs.


The 2010–2015 Strategic Plan ACT’s new strategic plan includes a new, succinct vision and a mission statement that clearly defines what we do. The plan also re-affirms ACT’s values and commitments to the communities it serves and to those with whom we work.

Vision

Working together to achieve a world without AIDS.

Mission

The AIDS Committee of Toronto (ACT) develops and delivers innovative programs and services that promote the dignity, health and well being of individuals and communities living with, affected by and at risk for HIV/AIDS.

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Core Values Meaningful Involvement of People with HIV/AIDS (MIPA) • Commit to the meaningful involvement of people living with HIV/AIDS at all levels of the organization. Equity and Access • Value the diversity and distinct needs and contributions of our program and service users, volunteers, staff and supporters. • Provide targeted programming and services to specific communities in order to realize optimal health outcomes. • Acknowledge that diversity in age, culture, (dis)ability, gender, HIV status, language, race, religion, gender identity, sexual orientation and socioeconomic status is central to our work. • Recognize the presence and impact of all forms of discrimination and marginalization on individuals and communities living with and at risk of HIV/AIDS, and commit to eliminating them. • Ensure that our services are accessible and our programming inclusive of diverse perspectives and approaches. Self-Determination • Work with individuals and communities to enable them to take an active role in determining, planning and directing their health, care and well-being.

• Create targeted strategies to meet the particular needs of people living with and at risk for HIV/AIDS. • Value the rights of individuals to make informed choices that include, but are not limited to: sex, sexuality, reproduction, health care, substance use and treatment. • Employ harm and risk reduction approaches to provide information and education in effort to reduce people’s risk of HIV infection. Respect • Commit to treating each of our staff, volunteers, service users and community partners with respect. Strengths-based approach • Honour and recognize the enormous amount of work that we, our partners, and our communities have contributed to the fight against HIV/AIDS. • Honour and recognize the resilence of those communities that have been deeply affected by HIV/AIDS in Toronto. • Acknowledge that while the fight is not over, we have had successes in raising awareness, reducing HIV infection, influencing public policy, and improving the health and well-being of those living with and at risk of HIV infection. • Share the successes and strengths of our work.

• Provide confidential, responsive, caring, respectful, sex-positive, non-judgmental and client-centred services that promote the health of people living with and at risk for HIV/AIDS. This includes our outreach and prevention work.

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Core Commitments • Be accountable to the communities with whom we work, our funding partners, and our supporters. • Engage with our communities for input, to share information and to partner in program delivery. • Ensure our services demonstrate our professionalism and expertise. • Foster an environment of learning and inquiry. • Influence public policy that benefits the communities we serve. • Be a change agent, a catalyst and incubator of ideas when developing programming and services that advance our vision and mission. • Challenge ourselves to be creative, innovative and bold.

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what our stakEholders said:

“As recent studies suggest that the number of women living with HIV is growing, service programming in this area is vital, especially given that many such women are more vulnerable given economic and social situations.”

“Make sure ACT has the ability to meet the needs of anyone with HIV (including youth) who may come there and want support, but don’t duplicate what others are doing, look critically at what will have the best effect given limited resources. Don’t move away from where there is clearly a need/gap in services just because it might be hard to say “look – we really can’t take that on”. Stop trying to be a “department store” in the world of boutique shopping.” “Engaging youth is paramount in changing the attitudes and beliefs and practices regarding sex, risky behaviour in general and HIV/AIDS.” “ACT. you were there for me when I was at the most desperate time of my life and ready to give up.” “While I believe that all of these issues are important, helping people deal with the stigma and discrimination will better allow them to deal with other issues like finding work or seeking support. A person’s mental state determines how well they can function.” “Fear, stigma and discrimination are [barriers]. Let’s work to overcome them.” “ACT’s community based research: Although some might not see this as a priority or significant. I feel knowledge is a good thing.” “I like the shift that ACT has made in looking at syphilis and crystal meth and how these pieces impact a person’s risk for HIV.”

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“ACT is the leading organization in Ontario and Canada for being able to address the LGBT struggling with HIV. “ “There is very little tailored to being queer and a senior and accessing health care.” “People are now living with a really serious chronic illness and living on medication and living much longer than anticipated.” “Co-morbidities related to older adults - e.g., HIV positive with high blood pressure and heart disease – there is not a lot of research on this and the cumulative effects on your health.” “Start to think about mental health issues, lack of housing, addiction, no access to services, factors that drive social equality, education, income” “ACT is needed to play a major role for research and move evidence into action to influence their programming services.” “Organizations tend to want to do too much. There is a need to narrow the scope of the work and look internally to identify core strengths.”

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2010–2015 Strategic Directions

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1.

Provide Exemplary Programs and Services

ACT will deliver effective and responsive programming built on the foundation of excellence and innovation. Our programming will focus on our strengths and will acknowledge the roles and contributions of our partners to ensure improved and seamless integration and navigation of services for the communities with whom we work. The four pillars of our programs and services are: research and knowledge exchange, community capacity building and training, community health promotion, and support services. This represents a refined range of programs and services that address the many factors that determine and influence the health and well-being of people living with, affected by or at risk for HIV/AIDS.

What We Will do • Focus our programming and services organized under the four key pillars of our work. • Identify new programming opportunities that build on our current work. • Conduct effective program and service use evaluations and use research evidence to inform practice. • Identify ways in which technology can enhance program and service delivery. • Work collaboratively and in partnership with ASOs and/or allied organizations to develop programming and services that are responsive to issues related to HIV/AIDS.

How We Will Do It

What We Will Deliver

• Develop a new organizational structure that better supports what we do. • Develop program evaluation tools for reviewing our programs and services. • Implement needs assessment(s) for both program and service development and technology integration. • Explore funding options for the development of new programming which increases services and revenue for the agency.

• Improved, targeted services and programs for both individuals and communities that increase accessibility and enable enhanced service delivery. • Program evaluation approaches and tools geared to meet our agency’s needs. • Research projects and needs assessments that contribute to program development initiatives. • A record of feedback from our service users to inform our program development.

• Participate and work with networks and organizations to ensure better system integration that removes barriers to access for people living with HIV/AIDS. • Initiate and/or join partnerships that create relevant and responsive HIV/AIDS programming. 15 STRATEGIC PLAN 2010–2015


2.

Strengthen Our Organization

ACT will be a strong, supportive and healthy organization in which to work, volunteer and participate. We will enhance our resilience as an organization through various initiatives that strengthen and/or clarify our roles and responsibilities, systems, structures, policies, programs, fundraising, and physical infrastructure. Decision-making authority will be informed by those who are closest to the issues. Leaders within our organization will be supported to effectively encourage responsibility, acknowledgement, and creativity. We will remain flexible, adaptive and open to alternative ideas and new approaches.

What We Will do • Increase the effectiveness of our fundraising and capital development programs to ensure financial sustainability. • Continue to support the capacity and capabilities of our staff and volunteers in order to contribute to achieving our mission. • Foster leadership development at all levels of the agency that encourages responsibility, acknowledgement, and creativity. • Improve and make better use of our physical infrastructure.

How We Will Do It

What We Will Deliver

• Provide exemplary training to staff and volunteers to enhance their skills.

• Improved financial stability through increased financial resources to support our activities.

• Create professional development opportunities that cultivate an environment and culture of life-long learning.

• A supportive environment in which to work and volunteer.

• Initiate tools and opportunities that solicit input from staff, volunteers, service users – in particular, people living with HIV/AIDS and other stakeholders – to monitor and evaluate our programs and services. • Develop an information technology plan that projects future needs and requirements. • Adopt best practice financial forecasting and program financial performance tools.

• A systematic process to elicit feedback from people living with HIV/AIDS and our key stakeholders. • Strengthened capacity and capability of our staff, volunteers and leaders. • Effective and efficient use of our resources. • Improved use of physical space to better serve service user and community needs.

• Develop a comprehensive and dynamic fundraising plan aimed at increasing revenue performance. • Explore in-kind contributions to upgrade and improve our current building infrastructure.

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3.

Stimulate a Strong Community-based HIV/AIDS Response

Together, with our partners, we will work to leverage the existing strengths in the ASO sector and support the ongoing development of HIV/AIDS programs. Informed by the experience of people living with HIV/AIDS, those at increased risk of HIV infection, and the efforts of our partners, we will share our lessons learned in the areas of policy development, service delivery, and research and innovation.

What We Will do • Work collaboratively and in partnership to support and develop new initiatives and programs. • Inform public policy at municipal, provincial, national and international levels. • Conduct community-based research that increases understanding of the complexities of HIV/AIDS. • Transfer and translate knowledge to individuals and communities.

How We Will Do It

What We Will Deliver

• Initiate and join partnerships that aim to develop new initiatives that increase access, services or programming for people living with, at risk or affected by HIV/AIDS. • Strategically participate on networks, working groups, and coalitions that seek to influence public policy related to HIV/AIDS. • Initiate or partner on research projects that advance our understanding of HIV/AIDS, inform our programming or policy, and/or other initiatives in the broader ASO and health sector.

• Contributions to policy, service design and delivery, and overall ASO sector development. • Informed program development, research and fundraising. • Strengthened relationships with the communities we serve, ASOs, and other allied sectors.

• Create forums for the exchange of information and knowledge. • Develop innovative ways to increase access to HIV/AIDS information using new technologies. • Attend and participate in HIV/AIDS forums, workshops and conferences to enhance our understanding and knowledge of what others are doing. • Be open to hearing other perspectives on HIV/AIDS both from ASO partners and allied sectors on related concerns. • Continue to provide the public with information on HIV/AIDS that is timely, credible and accessible using a variety of modalities. 17 STRATEGIC PLAN 2010–2015


Health Promotion Priorities The 2010 - 2015 strategic plan introduces health promotion priorities identified by ACT staff as the key emerging trends or issues to be addressed over the next five years. The process to identify the new health promotion priorities—mental health, stigma, and HIV over the life span—was informed by the results of a comprehensive consultation process that included a general survey of stakeholders (e.g., members, people living with/affected by HIV, individual donors), separate surveys of board and staff, and interviews and focus groups with key stakeholders from research, service and funding organizations. The consultations were designed within the framework of a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis, tailored to evaluate the role and interests of the respective target audiences. In addition, to prepare for the priority-setting exercise, staff and management benefited from presentations of recent research and evaluation initiatives implemented by ACT within the past two years. Discussions were also informed by staff members’ understanding of HIV/AIDS trends and community issues gained through their ongoing program and community development work. Overall, the identified health promotion priorities provide a context within which ACT staff can make informed decisions about future directions for programs and services. The health promotion priorities are initiatives ACT will integrate into its delivery of programs and services under the four pillars of our work in order to raise awareness of HIV/AIDS issues, expand programming and services, and inform public policy development. Having ACT staff select these priorities for inclusion in our plan recognizes the valuable contribution of experience, skills and knowledge they provide to the organization. It is their work that makes us strong; it is their knowledge and passion that makes us realize our mission. 18 STRATEGIC PLAN 2010–2015


Mental Health

Stigma(s)

Mental health is a complex component of health and well-being. In selecting this as an emerging issue, staff reflected on the need to view mental health as an integral part of providing holistic services, as mental health issues are difficult to identify in client support and can have an impact on risk-taking behaviours. For many, mental health invokes a narrow definition of clinical or therapeutic illnesses. But mental health viewed from a broader perspective includes issues that are significant barriers to health and well-being including depression, stress, self-esteem, anxiety, loneliness, social isolation and discrimination: issues identified as significant concerns by our service users and our communities.

Not surprisingly, stigma was identified as a health promotion priority as it undermines efforts to achieve a balance of mental and physical health and wellbeing. HIV/AIDS has been stigmatized since the beginning of the epidemic. So too have those at increased risk for HIV infection, including gay men, substance users, and newcomers. As long as stigma exists, people living with HIV/AIDS—and those communities most affected by HIV/AIDS—will continue to be marginalized, and our HIV prevention efforts will be limited. In addition, other issues that are stigmatized also impede HIV prevention and health promotion efforts: sexual orientation, gender identity, sex work, drug or substance use, mental health, poverty. These affect how we see ourselves and how the world sees us. ACT’s work on this issue is a challenging one, but one that we are committed to take on, and we hope, in partnership with others.

Aging – HIV over the life span This priority urges ACT to look at service delivery within a life-span continuum. How is our programming reflective of the different needs of our service users, and the communities we work with as they age? How can we better serve those needs and address any service barriers? Aging as a health promotion priority recognizes that for many people living with HIV/AIDS, anti-retroviral therapies have increased the capacity for a longer life, but services have not been augmented to address complex issuesassociated with aging that are unique to those with HIV/AIDS. This presents an opportunity for ACT to assume a new role in serving people living with HIV/AIDS over an entire lifespan (youth to seniors) and to lead in building the capacity of other organizations and institutions to recognize the unique needs of people living with HIV/AIDS.

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Priority Populations ACT provides services to diverse individuals who are living with, affected by or at risk for HIV/AIDS. While ACT’s support services are open to all people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS, over the years we have developed programming that focuses on specific communities where HIV/AIDS has had the greatest impact. By working with community partners (for example the Portuguese-speaking community through

VIVER, the Portuguese-speaking HIV/AIDS Coalition), ACT has extended services and supported communities with culturally competent approaches to health promotion and HIV prevention. We will continue to focus our HIV prevention and sexual health promotion efforts on communities or populations that epidemiological data shows are at greatest risk for HIV transmission.

Our priority populations are: GAY MEN Current targeted programming: • Gay Men’s Community Education and Outreach; Harm Reduction; Bathhouse Counselling; Online Outreach; Counselling; Case Management; Men’s Retreat, Support Groups, Employment Training; HIV and Sexual Health Promotion Campaigns and Information.

women

YOUTH (13 to 29 Years)

Current targeted programming: • Community Development (Women and HIV/AIDS Initiative); Women’s Retreat; Women’s Coffee Night; Community Kitchen; Career Training Micro Enterprise Development; Counselling, and Case Management.

Current targeted programming: • Youth Drop-in; Case Management; Positive Youth Outreach events; Employment Training; Youth Retreat.

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Four Pillars of ACT’s Programs and Services RESEARCH AND

Initiating community-based research projects to inform our program development that focus on emerging trends and issues related to HIV/AIDS and sharing the research findings with the communities with whom we work.

KNOWLEDGE EXCHANGE

COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING AND TRAINING

Community HEALTH

Creating opportunities for individuals, communities and organizations to enhance their knowledge and understanding of HIV/AIDS. Providing individuals with ways to enhance their own learning and skills.

Increasing knowledge, skills and resilience within communities at risk for HIV/AIDS, and linking this to the social determinants of health.

PROMOTION

SUPPORT SERVICES

Providing services and supports that help and empower people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS to achieve self-determination, informed decision-making, independence, and overall well-being.

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THANKS The Board of Directors would like to thank the following individuals for their contributions to this Strategic Plan: The Board Sub-Committee on Strategic Planning Ken Tong (Chair) Hazelle Palmer Robyn Bolivar Jessica Cattaneo David DesLauriers Kyle Greenwood Winston Husbands Peter J. Macdonald John Maxwell Kadidja Mone Peter Perdue Consultants Nicole Greenspan Jan Campbell, StrategiSense Inc. Glen Brown, Glen Brown and Associates Consulting Graphic Design Raymond Helkio We gratefully acknowledge a grant from the AIDS Bureau, Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-term Care to support our strategic planning initiative.

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“My gratitude goes out to all the volunteers, staff members and individuals that provided their time, money and support to ACT. We have a history within our communities. Let’s not forget that. Let’s draw strength and inspiration from all those who have worked and contributed thanklessly day-in and day-out.” — ACT survey participant.

ACT Strategic Plan 2010-2015  

AIDS Commitee of Toronto Strategic Plan Graphic Design: Raymond Helkio

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