Page 1

formerly Chef's Special magazine


RARE MEDIUM 0 1 Meat & Livestock Australia Level 1, 165 Walker Street North Sydney, NSW 2059 Phone: 02 9463 9308 raremedium@mla.com.au

EDITOR

Connaugh Sheehan csheehan@mla.com.au

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PAPER STOCK :

Grange by K.W Doggett Elemental chlorine free pulps, sourced with responsible forestry practices.


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COVER : Paper craft by Sonia Rentsch

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COPYRIGHT

This publication is published by Meat & Livestock Australia Limited A BN 39 0 81 678 36 4 ( M L A ) . C a r e i s t a k e n t o e n s u r e t h e a c c u r a c y o f in f o r m a t i o n in t he p ub li c a t i o n ; h o w e v e r, ML A c a nn o t ac c e p t responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information or opinions contained in the publication. Readers should rely on their own enquiries in making decisions concerning their interests. Reproduction in whole or in part of this publication is prohibited w i t h o u t t h e p r i o r w r i t t e n c o n s e n t o f M L A . Š 2 012

ISSN 2201-1609


10

04 F E A T U R E

O N E :

M A S T E R

PURE SUFFOLK LAMB

12 O N

C L A S S :

HOW TO PREPARE DENVER STEAKS FROM THE CHUCK UNDERCUT

T H E

I N T E R N A T I O N A L

S T A G E :

CHEF TOM ALLEN, UNITED KINGDOM

16 O N

T H E

M E N U :

FUNCTION MENUS

28

40

F E A T U R E

T W O :

THE BURGER RULES

BITE SIZED

42

32

M O M E N T A R Y :

CHUCK MINCE FROM ITEM #2260

1.30PM WITH CHEF GEORGES AOUN, LEBANON

44

Special

T R E N D S :

S A N D W I C H

THE CHEF'S GUIDE TO WHAT'S HOT IN 2013

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF THE SARNIE

O N E

C U T

W O N D E R S :

P U L L

O U T :


EDITOR'S NOTE Dear Rare Medium Reader, Welcome to the first issue of Rare Medium: The chef’s journal of Australian beef, lamb & goat! After 20 years of faithfully keeping you up-to-date and (hopefully) inspired about all things red-meat related, the Chef’s Special team have decided that a name change is as good as a holiday. The Rare in our Rare Medium pays homage to the extraordinary skill chefs have in taking raw beef, lamb + goat and (with a mixture of alchemy and gift) produce absolute poetry on a plate – different flavours and textures performing a perfect melody with grace and balance. To you, dear reader, these pages are the Medium between paddock and plate; representing the midway between the extremes of farm and kitchen – bringing you information from a side of the food industry many of you don’t have the opportunity or time to see. After speaking to chefs from all markets, from apprentice through to Executive Chef, we knew it was important to come up with a new name that had a strong association to red meat and Rare Medium is a little play on medium rare, that ‘done’ that most of us love our red meat cooked to. You’ll be happy to hear that Rare Medium still contains all the juiciest red meat info, inspiring recipes and trips to farms and abattoirs across Australia. Love it or hate it, we’re more than happy to hear your thoughts on the new name and, as always, any comment on the magazine's content is also welcome. Email me at raremedium@mla.com.au Read on my Fleishmeister in the making, Connaugh


0 5 . 0 4

Richard Gunner produces Pure Suffolk Lamb, the black faced breed of lamb, on his property on the Coorong South Australia. The Gunner family have been steadily working for years to push the rare breed back from the brink of extinction, all while producing their lightly marbled award winning lamb.

F E A T U R E

O N E

Rich ar d invite d Rar e M e dium t o follow o n e o f his lam b s t h r o u g h t h e p r o c e s sin g ch ain , a ch ain t h a t h e h as s ele c te d o n t h e b asis t h a t it mirr o r s t h e hig h q ualit y o f p r o d u c t io n o n his p r o p e r t y, wh e r e t h e lam b was r ais e d.

PL E A SE NO T E:

This feature focuses on livestock production and therefore depicts scenes of animal processing.


F E A T U R E

O N E

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When ready for processing, the animal is walked up the race to the stunning area in a quiet and orderly manner to minimise stress. Races are designed to a specific Model Code of Practice for the Welfare of Animals which specifies they need to be smooth, curved and easy for an animal to walk through. When the animal reaches the end of the walkway the race must be closed off to both the inside of the abattoir and the other animals waiting to be processed.

02

An electrical stun is used to ensure the animal is unconscious during the first cut which is to bleed the animal, stopping blood flow to the brain. This first cut is across the artery in the neck of the lamb.

03

All blood is then drained from the carcase. The carcase is then shackled to a rail where it will remain throughout the entire process.

O N E

04

Once the carcase has been drained, it goes through a Dentition Checking station. Teeth are a guaranteed ‘proof of age’ and this is where the age of the animal is checked to confirm its classification. The dentition score, or number of teeth, is the industry's accepted description of sheep and is used to classify categories of sheepmeat.

F E A T U R E

Sheepmeat Classifications: • Lamb – has no permanent incisor teeth (adult, front teeth). • Hogget – has 1 but no more than 2 permanent incisor teeth. • Mutton – has at least 1 permanent incisor teeth.


O N E

Removing the hide from a lamb is not easy because the seam in between the muscles and the hide is small and tight simply because the animal is small. Gentle pressure of a knife must be used to peel the hide off.

F E A T U R E

05

The butchers work quickly and carefully to remove the hide. The outer-side of the hide must never touch the skinned surface of the carcase and operators must not touch the skinned surface with the hand that was in contact with the outer-skin.

06

A cut through the brisket allows the hide to be removed completely using a Hide Puller which pulls the hide completely off the bottom half of the carcase – like a jacket.

07

The butcher then performs what is called a ‘Belly Rip’ — the opening up of the carcase for the removal of the offal and other organs. In the Australian processing system everything from the carcase is used including muscle, offal, co-products and by-products.

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08

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Edible offal most commonly derived from a lamb carcase is:

Tongue Lambs fry (Liver) Tendon Heart Kidney Brain Sweetbread (Thymus Gland)

09

The carcase is then sprayed down with potable water before being stored. Any water used inside an abattoir must be no less than 82°C. The washing of the carcase and the water temperature is part of a system called ‘hurdle technology’ which is used by processing plants to increase barriers for pathogens. This step also removes any blood, wool or bone dust from the carcase.

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O N E

After an animal is slaughtered and ‘dressed’ (the removal of an animal’s head, feet, hide and internal organs during processing) it is then hung for an average of 24 hours or until it reaches the ideal temperature range for further processing. The way a carcase is hung during this time will impact the eventual eating quality of many cuts on the carcase. The two methods of hanging are Achilles Tendon and Tenderstretch.

F E A T U R E

Lambs processed under the Pure Suffolk Lamb brand are tenderstretched. When a carcase is tenderstretched, it is suspended by the pelvis so that the legs drop down at a 90° angle. As a result, a number of muscles are held in that position so they cannot contract during rigor mortis (when ‘muscle’ turns to ‘meat’). As such, tenderstretch is most effective in the hindquarter and has a varying effect on each cut, such as the leg cuts and the loin cuts.


O N E

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The carcase is tagged to show the classification, the date of processing, and the brand – Pure Suffolk Lamb – as well as the plant the lamb was processed in.

F E A T U R E

12

The animal is then ’branded’ with a roller stamp; the red mark on the skin of the lamb which details the classification – LAMB, the brand – Pure Suffolk Lamb and the plant it has been processed in – SA14. This is done for easy identification when the carcase moves further into the meat chain i.e. into a butcher shop or wholesaler. The carcase is then moved into refrigeration. The Australian Standard for the Hygienic Production of Meat and Meat Products for Human Consumption specifies that the internal temperature of the carcase must reach less than 7°C within 24 hours.

0 8 .

L o o k o u t fo r t h e o n - f arm s t o r y o f Pur e Su f folk L am b in t h e n ex t is su e o f Rar e M e dium .

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HOW TO PREPARE DENVER STEAKS FROM THE CHUCK UNDERCUT #01_ The chuck undercut is prepared from a chuck roll (Item No. 2275).

'Denver' steaks are cut from the chuck undercut. The chuck undercut is prepared from the chuck roll (Item No. 2275) and sits underneath the chuck eye log (Item No. 2264). The undercut is comprised of three muscles: a) Rhomboideus, b) Splenius, and c) Serratus Ventralis. Further preparation is required if the undercut is to be cooked as a steak. The chuck undercut has quite a coarse grain with long muscle fibres. To produce grilling steaks from the undercut, choose meat that is highly marbled and aged.

# 02_ Remove the chuck eye log

M A S T E R

C L A S S

from the top of the chuck roll by following the natural seam starting at the top right hand corner.

# 03_ Continue to follow the seam down using the tip of the knife to gently push through the silverskin and connective tissue. Completely remove the chuck eye log.

#04_ Turn cut over.


M A S T E R

# 05_ Remove the large muscle on the right hand side known as the Splenius by following its natural seam.

C L A S S

# 06_ Follow the muscle to the end by using gentle, small cuts to break through the connective tissue. This cut is perfect for braising and mincing.

# 08_ There you have the chuck undercut. Locate the grain to ensure you slice across it .

# 0 7_ Trim silverskin and any excess fat.

1 0 . 1 1

# 09_ Slice steaks 20-25mm thick. These steaks are known as Denver steaks in the US.


O N

T H E

I N T E R N A T I O N A L

S T A G E

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Tom’s theory of sandwich innovation is to take that classic, simple idea and build on it, “but it’s all about balance” and “you have to know when to stop with a sandwich” he says. It was this rule that guided the sandwich idea that won at the 2012 World Sandwich Championship - his Beef Wellington sandwich with beetroot pickle and horseradish ice-cream.

. 1 3

To imitate the pastry of the Beef Wellington, he buttered the white bloomer, (a bloomer is a type of loaf of bread a crusty loaf with rounded

Tom’s tips for making a great sandwich include the importance of the choice of bread that goes with the filling; if you have quite a strong filling you need lighter bread. If you have a salty filling you need earthy bread like a wholemeal or a rye. “Its textures and layers that visually look great, the sandwich needs to look appealing — you eat with your eyes first after all. Don’t always use the simple option like a flavoured mayonnaise, make layers of flavour yourself.”

1 2

During his career he has worked in numerous kitchens, set up his own catering company − The Supper Company − and became the caterer of choice for the Duke of Rutland. However he really made a name for himself as a result of his obession with sandwiches. “The reason people like sandwiches so much is that anything can go in between the bread, they are hand held, convenient and generally inexpensive. A sandwich can be very on trend with loads of flavours and loads of different textures. Chefs can take inspiration from anywhere in the world,

S T A G E

Tom started chefing to pay his way through university where he studied to be a graphic designer. He abandoned that career path when he decided that he could be more creative in a kitchen than sitting in front of his computer.

I N T E R N A T I O N A L

Tom has spent most of the last 10 years working in the world of sandwich development.

T H E

The UK's top sandwich innovator, Chef Thomas Allen, sat down with Rare Medium to give us an insight into all things between bread......

ends, and typically scored across the top) sliced it and pan-fried it for caramelisation and colour. For pepperiness The prepacked sandwich and colour he used baby market in the UK is worth watercress. Where you would a staggering €7.2 billion normally have duxelles in the annually, with 7 out of 10 Wellington dish he coated people buying and eating a sandwich every day (according the raw beef in a powder of porcini mushrooms and to the Australian Sandwich onions and left it to infuse Association, the Australian 24 hours before cooking. sandwich industry generates in excess of $7 billion a year Roast beetroot is a classic in retail sales). accompaniment to any roast dinner in the UK so he made It was at Adley Group, a manufacturer of sandwiches a roast beetroot chutney with caramelised eshcallot and salads for retailers and and mustard. With the coffee shops across the UK, horseradish ice cream, where he first entered the Tom “wanted to experiment 2009 British Sandwich with delivering a different Championship and won flavour and texture”, while a few categories including keeping true to the traditional Best International Sandwich with a corned beef sandwich. recipe, so he replaced what would normally be hot − the He took the traditional horseradish white sauce − topping of Branston pickle with horseradish ice cream. and looked to Mexico for inspiration and created a chipotle chilli pickle to pair with the corned beef. It was a simple, but winning twist. and make something really exciting” says Tom.

O N

Chef Tom Allen is the king of Sandwiches.


1 5 .

BEEF WELLINGTON SAMBO

“ We love our

O N

T H E

I N T E R N A T I O N A L

WINNING TOM’S

S T A G E

SANDWICH

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THE

ice-cream vans in England; it is the sound of our summer. My horseradish ice-cream with sprinkles is a play on what you get from those ice-cream vans and a play on what your taste buds expect with the hot and cold combinations. Enjoy!” — Chef Thomas Allen

White bloomer bread Salted butter Baby watercress Roast Porcini rib of beef > see reci pe Caramelised shallot and beetroot chutney > see reci pe Horseradish ice cream > see reci pe Twist of black pepper


// Meanwhile, whisk the sugar and egg yolks together until the sugar has dissolved and the mixture is smooth. Steadily pour the hot flavoured cream onto the yolks, whisking continuously. Remove from the heat and leave to cool.

// Soften the ice cream in the fridge 30 ‒ 45 minutes before serving.

} Porcini Beef Marinade 120g dried Porcini 70g shallots 50ml vegetable oil 10ml truffle oil 12g garlic 6g salt 4g cracked black pepper 1kg cube roll/scotch fillet

// Blitz the porcini in a food processor until you have a porcini dust. // Add the shallots, garlic, oils and seasoning to the porcini. Blitz until you have a paste.

// Reduce until sticky and nearly dry. // Serve at room temperature.

} Roast rib of beef to your liking; I serve mine rare.

} Assemble sandwich // Butter a 1cm ‒ 1.5cm thick slice of Bloomer. Then fry in a dry pan until golden brown. (This represents the pastry) // Top the hot bloomer with a handful of baby watercress. (Great peppery flavour with a delicate textural visual) // Place your freshly carved beef on the watercress. (The porcini will have infused with the Beef giving the flavour of a Duxelle) // Add a dessertspoon full of the beetroot chutney. // Once you have tempered the ice cream in the fridge, use an ice cream scoop to make a nice ball and nest it on the chutney. Add a tiny twist of black pepper on the ice cream only. 1 4 . 1 5

// Place your rib of beef on cling film and rub in the marinade. Wrap and leave to marinate overnight.

// Add the mustard seeds, beetroot and water, bring to a simmer then add the white wine vinegar and muscovado sugar.

S T A G E

// Churn the mixture in an ice cream maker following the manufacturer's instructions. Alternatively, pour into a freezer proof container and freeze for an hour or until the sides begin to solidify. Stir to break up any ice crystals. Return to the freezer and repeat the process once more, but this time leave the ice cream until firm, then turn into a bowl and beat quickly, or whizz in a food processor. Return to the freezer and leave until completely frozen.

// Heat oil in pan, add shallots and stir until softened. Add caster sugar and caramelise the shallots.

I N T E R N A T I O N A L

// Place the milk, cream and horseradish in a large saucepan and heat gently. Bring the mixture to scalding point, then remove from the heat and pass the mixture through a sieve.

50ml vegetable oil 100g shallots, diced 50g caster sugar 80g Muscovado sugar 500g beetroot, finely diced 8g brown mustard seeds 100ml white wine vinegar 300ml water 10g salt 3g black pepper

T H E

450ml whole milk 900ml double cream 200g fresh horseradish, grated 200g caster sugar 12 egg yolks

} Beetroot and shallot chutney

O N

} Horseradish Ice Cream


O N T H E M E N U

0.1

BRAISED LAMB NECK TERRINE WITH SHITAKE MUSHROOMS, CHANTERELLES, BLACK PUDDING AND LEEKS ······

Chef Lee Jeynes RACV Noosa Resort

− Noosa − 0.2

BEEF TARTARE WITH SOFT-POACHED QUAIL EGG ON PARMESAN PANNA COTTA ······

Chef Uwe Habermehl Sydney Convention & Exhibition Centre

− Sydney − 0.3

BEEF TACOS (CARNE ASADA) ······

Chef Dan Hong Mr Wong − Sydney − 0.4

LAMB TARTARE WITH BLACK CAVIAR ······

Chef Angelito Bautista Crown Casino − Melbourne −


Here at Rare Medium we have nothing against the spring rolls, risotto balls or the duck pancakes you can get at stand up functions. After many hours of watching the food tray go by just out of reach or after too many house-wines, we’ve all been guilty of diving towards a passing tray and tackling the last morsel with so much fervour that anyone would be convinced that a dried, room temperature chicken skewer was definitely on the top of our list of 100 things to eat before we die. However, we think quality and taste needn’t be sacrificed just because the food is hand held. Don’t let your catering be the thing that lets the party down.

‘Tis the season to be jolly after all...... think spicy lamb meatballs in handheld, soft white rolls covered with an in-house tomato sauce; yummy beef, lamb, veal or goat sliders; lamb ribs in some delectable Asian marinade; fresh Vietnamese beef rib rolls; house-made party pies – think curried goat, the mini Shepard or the classic beef party pie. Don’t forget the cured meats such as hand-held Rubens, or salted brisket bagels...... or simply check out these next recipes for more inspiration......


Make s app rox small canap imately 4 é terr ines

BRAISED LAMB NECK TERRINE WITH SHITAKE MUSHROOMS, CHANTERELLES, BLACK PUDDING AND LEEKS Chef lee jeynes RACV Noosa Resort

− Noosa −


METHOD

For B R A ISIN G

Line terrine mould with cling film and sliced prosciutto leaving enough over the sides to cover the top of the terrine.

T H E

1 onion, roughly chopped 1 carrot, roughly chopped 1 celery, roughly chopped 1 leek, roughly chopped 1 bay leaf

5 ....................

O N

1kg lamb neck

6 ....................

Skim and reduce braising liquor to a glaze.

M E N U

sprigs of rosemary & thyme couple of garlic cloves 1 tbsp redcurrant jelly veal jus to cover

7 ....................

For th e T ERRINE MIX

Whilst warm, mix all ingredients together and bind with the cooking liquor. Correct the seasoning and add chopped parsley.

1 leek, thinly sliced 150g shitake mushrooms 150g chanterelle mushrooms 200g black pudding, diced 5 thin slices of Parma ham or prosciutto

(depending on size of mould) handful of parsley, chopped

1 .................... 8 ....................

Braise lamb necks in veal jus with mirepoix, rosemary, thyme, garlic and redcurrant jelly for approximately 4 -5 hours at 130°C. When cooked, allow to cool slightly and then gently break meat into small pieces.

Pack the meat mixture into the terrine mould, slightly over filling it, then seal completely with prosciutto. 9 ....................

Wrap with cling film and press overnight. 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Turn out of terrine

2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mould and slice

to required size. 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Serve with crispy toast pieces 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and gherkins. Sauté shitake mushrooms and chanterelles, place to one side. 4 ..................

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Sauté black pudding and place to one side.

1 8

ingredients

Sweat off thinly sliced leeks for terrine, place to one side.


METHOD

2 1 .

To prepare the beef tartare, remove any surface fat and sinew from the beef and chop very finely — the meat should resemble coarsely-minced beef. Refrigerate.

To make the brioche, place all the ingredients in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a dough hook. Mix on low speed to combine, and then continue to knead the mixture 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . on low for at Finely chop the least 10 minutes parsley, eshcallot until the dough and capers and is smooth. place in a bowl 4 .................... with the chilled Place the dough beef and olive oil. into a clean Mix to combine bowl, cover with and season with sea salt and pepper cling wrap and refrigerate until to taste. cold. Remove the chilled dough from the bowl and shape into a long, thin baguette. Place on 200g wagyu beef fillet, marble score 4 a lightly-floured 1 tsp parsley baking tray, cover 25g eshcallot with a cloth and 2 tsp salted capers leave in a warm 1 tsp extra virgin olive oil place for 2 -3 hours sea salt & cracked black pepper to taste to rise (it should 10 quail eggs double in size). 1 tbsp white wine vinegar

To make the parmesan panna cotta, slowly heat the cream and bay leaf in a heavybased saucepan until simmering. Remove the bay leaf, stir in the grated parmesan and allow it to melt completely before removing from the heat.

For th e B RI O C HE

eggs, fill a small pan with 5cm water, add a pinch of sea salt and vinegar and heat to simmering. Fill a separate bowl with iced water.

ingredients

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1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 minute, remove

200g strong white bread flour,

O N

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M E N U

plus extra for dusting

1 tsp dried yeast 1 tsp salt 45ml warm milk, plus 1 tbsp

extra to glaze

1 tbsp caster sugar 50g butter, softened 2 free-range eggs, beaten 1 free-range egg to glaze For th e PARMESAN PANNA COTTA

250ml fresh cream 1 bay leaf 40g Parmigiano-Reggiano, grated 2 gelatine leaves

with slotted spoon and immediately place in iced water to cool.

10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

When all the eggs have been cooked, remove from the iced water and drain on paper towels. Cover with plastic wrap and chill until ready to serve.

7 ....................

Soak the gelatine leaves in cold water until they soften. Remove the leaves and lightly squeeze out any excess water, add to the hot cream and stir until completely dissolved. Pour the mixture through a fine strainer into a shallow tray to a depth of about 1cm, and refrigerate until firmly-set.

11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

To serve, pre-heat oven to 140°C. Slice the brioche into rounds approximately 1cm thick and lightly toast in the oven, set aside to cool on a rack. Using a pastry cutter slightly smaller than the brioche slices, cut rounds of panna cotta and gently set aside.

8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . To poach the quail Press a tablespoon

Pre-heat oven to 200°C. Mix a lightly-beaten egg with a small amount of milk to make a glaze and brush the surface of the brioche. Bake at 200°C for 8 minutes, and then drop the temperature to 170°C and bake for a further 20-25 minutes until golden brown. Cool on a wire rack.

of the beef mix into the same-sized pastry cutter, and then remove the cutter to leave a neat disk of beef tartare.

13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . To assemble,

Gently crack the shell of the egg with a small serrated knife and break into the simmering water. Make sure the water does not boil. Cook egg for

layer the panna cotta, the beef and a poached quail egg on the brioche slice and finish with a sprinkle of sea salt and cracked pepper.


matel proxi p a s Make ves 10 s e r

y

BEEF TARTARE WITH SOFT-POACHED QUAIL EGG ON PARMESAN PANNA COTTA Chef uwe habermehl Sydney Convention & Exhibition Centre

− Sydney −


Make

BEEF TACOS (CARNE ASADA) Chef DAN HONG Mr Wong

− Sydney −

s 50 s erve

s


ingredients

4 ....................

50 soft corn tortillas 3kg beef scotch fillet, thinly sliced 150ml "Maggi" seasoning sauce 50ml fish sauce 24 tbsp sugar 10 tsp salt 2 whole Chinese cabbage leaves, finely chopped 1 bunch green shallots, finely chopped 2 bunches coriander, roughly chopped

5 ....................

Fry beef in a little oil on a high heat until cooked to your liking. 6 ....................

For th e PI C O D E G A L LO

Top tortillas with some beef, followed by a tablespoon of Pico de Gallo and some cabbage, shallots and chopped coriander.

30 tomatoes, finely chopped & deseeded 5 bunches coriander, finely chopped 10 French shallots, finely chopped 10 cloves garlic, finely chopped 5 jalapeno peppers, finely chopped

salt & pepper to taste juice of approximately 8 limes

8 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce,

very finely minced or blended

500g Japanese mayonnaise (Kewpie)

1 .................... 7 ....................

For the Pico de Gallo, mix all ingredients in a bowl and season to taste.

Top with some chipotle mayo and serve with fresh lime wedges.

2....................

Make chipotle mayonnaise by mixing both ingredients until well combined. Set aside.

2 2 . 2 3

METHOD

For th e C HIP OT L E M AYO NN A ISE

M E N U

Warm tortillas in a dry pan on medium heat until slightly charred and tortilla is soft.

T H E

Marinate beef in Maggi, sugar, fish sauce and salt and leave for at least 2 hours.

O N

3 ....................


METHOD

2 5 . 2 4

1 ....................

ingredients

Marinate the lamb in soy sauce and Mirin with salt and pepper for about 1 hour. 2....................

1kg lamb shoulder

3 .................... 4 ....................

(sliced 2mm thick, trimmed of sinew) 250g Kisame wasabi (pickled wasabi) 150g black caviar 10 pcs green apple, thin julienne cut 100g spring onion 50 pcs Gyoza skins 250g Tamarind Mayo sauce 5 cups Kikkoman Soya sauce 5 cups Mirin

Remove from marinade, shake off excess liquid and blow torch both sides of the lamb pieces. Dice into small pieces.

In a bowl mix the diced lamb with Kisame wasabi.

Deep fry the Gyoza skin on medium to high heat for a few seconds only, using chopstick to curve like a taco shapes. 5 ....................

For th e TA M A RIND M AYO SAU CE 50g tamarind (powder or paste) 1/2 cup hot water 250g Japanese mayonnaise (Kewpie)

O N

T H E

M E N U

Taking the Gyoza taco shell, put in some julienned apple slices, place lamb on top. Drizzle with tamarind mayo sauce, and thin sliced spring onion. Top with black caviar.

TA M A RIND M AYO SAU C E ___________ Dissolve the tamarind powder in hot water, then mix in the mayonnaise and stir very well. Put into a squeeze bottle.


l imate pprox a s e ces Mak 50 pie

y

LAMB TARTARE WITH BLACK CAVIAR Chef ANGELITO BAUTISTA Crown Casino − Melbourne −


F E A T U R E

T W O

THE BURGER RULES

2 8

.

2 9


F E A T U R E T W O

V E A L S L I D E R V I T E L L O T O N N AT O

2 8

C H E F M AT T M O R A N

. 2 9

· CH ISWICK − SYDN EY ·


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The Hamburger Steak is believed to have come from Hamburg, Germany during the 18th Century. It is thought that Russian sailors introduced the German’s to Steak Tartare, and that the German’s then adapted this idea to create a cooked patty with bread. Today, people are so intent on finding the perfect burger that there are burgers clubs all over the USA and UK where members evaluate burgers on the grounds of juiciness, value for money, meatiness, greasiness, brownness, doneness and patty shape! Colin Fassnidge of Four in Hand & 4Fourteen says “A great burger starts with the meat. Sh*t meat equals a sh*t burger.”

(Time out Sydney, Burger Wars, May 2011)

F E A T U R E

T W O

There are many ideas around what makes the perfect burger, but like Colin, the majority believe it comes down to quality and, finding the perfect balance of fat and meat – or the chemical lean of the mince. Chemical lean is defined as total meat minus the fat content and is generally expressed in percentage terms – i.e. 85% CL or 15% fat content. This can be achieved by combining different cuts of meat, in different quantities. Heston Blumenthal did extensive research into the burger and his ideal patty consists of 50% chuck for texture, 25% brisket for the fat and 25% short rib for the flavour. Thomas Keller combines sirloin (the rump in Australia) with trim (residual fat and fresh meat portions) from aged wagyu steaks that he serves at the restaurant – turning his waste product into one of his biggest selling items. Laurent Touroundel at his restaurant BLT Burger in New York likes to have 2025% fat which he gets from combining sirloin (rump), chuck, short ribs and brisket. Matt Moran uses chuck or brisket put through the coarse setting of the grinder as close to cooking time as possible, this way you can keep it rare to medium/rare – as you won’t have the same issue with bacteria load on pre-minced meat. (For other perfect burger patty cuts, check out Bite Sized pg.40)

The key is to play with a variety of cuts of meat to get the right balance of flavour, texture and fat distribution through your patty. Most chefs agree that a burger patty needs to taste of meat, not mince, and using a medium/coarse grind results in a patty with an open texture, adding to the juiciness of the burger and to the beefiness. Overworking the meat can lead to a tight-bind burger which isn’t ideal.


4 small buns _ _ 4 veal patties _ _ 80g Vitello Tonnato mayonnaise 4 ortiz anchovy _ _ 8 semi sundried tomato _ _ 40g green beans

F E A T U R E

I N G R E D I E N T S

V E A L PA T T Y

VIT ELL O T ON N AT O M AYON N AISE

T W O

1kg veal chuck _ _ 250g soft pork fat _ _ 15g table salt 1/2 tsp ground white pepper _ _ 1 tbsp parsley, chopped _ _ zest of 1 lemon

100g mayonnaise _ _ 15g Ortiz anchovy _ _ 15g capers _ _ 40g fresh tuna

V E A L S L I D E R V I T E L L O T O N N AT O C H E F M AT T M O R A N · CH ISWICK − SYDN EY ·

M E T

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H O D

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Preheat the oven 180°C. To prepare the veal patty, dice the veal chuck and any fat roughly and put through a mincer. Put half the mince back through the mincer a second time then combine the two in a bowl. Add salt, pepper, and parsley and lemon zest to the mince and mix by hand until combined. Roll the mixture in plastic wrap to form a thick sausage of approximately 5 - 6 cm in diameter. Place the sausage mixture in the fridge for approximately one hour or until the mixture has cooled, then remove from fridge and slice into 60g to 70g slices. To prepare the Vitello Tonnato mayonnaise, bring a small saucepan of salted water to a simmer and poach the tuna for approximately 2 minutes or until cooked through. Remove from the heat and drain on a paper towel. Place the poached tuna, capers and anchovy in a blender and churn for approximately 30 seconds. Add the mayonnaise and churn for a further 45 seconds. Season the mixture with salt and pepper and set aside in the fridge until needed. Bring a frypan to medium heat with a tablespoon of olive oil. Cook the veal patty for approximately 2 minutes on each side. Meanwhile, bring a saucepan of salted water to the boil. Place the beans into the water and blanch for 1 minute or until tender then plunge into a bowl of iced water and drain. Split each bean in half and then cut in one inch pieces.

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Warm the bun in the oven for 2 minutes then cut each bun in half using a serrated knife. Spread the mayonnaise on the bottom half of the bun and layer on top the veal patty, sun dried tomato, anchovy and green beans. Top with the other half of the bun and serve.


O N E

C U T

W O N D E R S

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C U T W O N D E R S

The chuck is a full flavoured cut that contains a lot of connective tissue, including collagen. It has a perfect balance of meat and fat which means it can be minced without the need to add any other lean muscle meat or fat. This can be then used in burgers or any other mince dishes.

O N E

The chuck is a boneless piece of meat located on the forequarter and sits on the shoulder of the carcase. The chuck can be broken down into multiple muscles; the neck, rib meat, the chuck roll, the chuck eye log and the undercut, all of which can be used to create a variety of dishes.

Mince allows for recipe development that crosses over entrÊe and main courses, as well as bar snacks, finger food, tapas menus, children’s menus and high volume catering. Mince can be baked, pan fried, poached, used as a stuffing or stuffed with something.

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BABY OOST BURGER Pan Seared Beef Patty with Char Grilled Bacon, Cheddar Cheese, Beetroot Relish, Belgian Mayonnaise and Red Oak lettuce with Fresh Turkish Roll

Makes 100

BELGIAN BEER CAFE OOSTENDE Chef Christopher 'Gian' Manning INGRE

DIENT

S

W O N D E R S

B E E F PAT TI E S 5kg chuck mince 2 large brown onions 1/2 bunch fresh rosemary 1/2 bunch fresh thyme 8 gloves garlic 1/2 bunch flat leaf parsley 2 chef spoons French dijon mustard 5 eggs salt and pepper BEETROOT RELISH 1 tin beetroot 1 bunch fresh beetroot 1 large red capsicum 1 large red onion 1 large red chilli 1/2 bunch fresh basil 5 cloves garlic salt and pepper to taste

O N E

C U T

100 small Turkish rolls

char grilled bacon cheddar cheese in-house mayo red oak lettuce

METH

OD

> B E E F PAT TI E S Dice onion, rosemary, thyme and garlic, sweat off together. Cool. Combine with mince, parsley, mustard, eggs and salt and pepper. > BEETROOT RELISH Roast beetroot and peel. Rough chop onion, capsicum, chilli and garlic. Sweat off. Combine all ingredients and blitz till smooth. > TO FINISH Make burger patties. Grill and assemble with all other ingredients.

(Sorry, the Belgian mayo is a secret recipe. Use your house-mayo recipe instead.)


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W O N D E R S

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LEV'S DAWG “ The original and maybe the best dawg I ever came up with.

Lev’s Dawg is kinda Mexican with a nice stripe of chipotle mayo down the middle and some tomato salsa on top. There’s also some pickled grilled yellow peppers in there to keep things multi-regional. This is a good dog — so good I had to name it after me, if only to constantly hear my name being mispronounced by drunks.”

Makes 4 hot dogs

THE DIP AT GOODGOD Chef Levins

INGRE

DIENT

S

2 banana capsicums (yellow peppers) 2 tbsp rice wine vinegar 2 tsp olive oil 1 tbsp sugar 1 tsp salt 4 Kosher frankfurts, made with chuck mince 4 good quality hot dog buns 1/4 cup chipotle mayo 1 cup tomato salsa

O N E

C U T

W O N D E R S

American mustard

METH

OD

____Heat a char-grill pan to high. Wash the banana capsicums and cut off the stalks. ____Grill them until black on all sides. ____Clean off blackened skin and chop them finely or process in a food processor until chunky. ____Place the chopped capsicums in a bowl and stir through the rice wine vinegar, olive oil, sugar and salt until well combined. ____Set aside. ____Fill a large pan with water and place a steamer over the top. ____Bring it to a rolling boil over high heat. ____Grill Kosher frankfurts lengthwise across the grill until they start to char. Turn regularly to ensure they are cooked evenly. ____Cut the buns lengthwise, leaving 1cm of bread at the bottom of the roll. Steam the buns in the steamer for 2 minutes until soft and piping hot. ____Spread some chipotle mayo along the bottom of each bun. ____Place a grilled frankfurt in each bun. Spoon some tomato salsa on one side of each bun, next to the frankfurt. Spoon a smaller amount of the pickled capsicums over the other side. Squirt a zig-zag of mustard over the top of each hot dog and serve.


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DEEP FRIED BEEF PUFFS on AVOCADO SALSA with CHILLI DIPPING SAUCE BURSWOOD EN TER TAINMEN T COMPLEX

4 Entrée size

Chef Abbey Chee

O N E

C U T

W O N D E R S

INGRE

DIENT

METH

S

OD

— PAS TRY W A T E R D O U G H 150g plain flour • 80ml water • 60g margarine O I LY D O U G H 100g plain flour • 80g shortening • 5g salt — B E E F F I L L I N G 500g chuck, minced • 100g onion, chopped 10g garlic, chopped • 1 tbsp turmeric and coriander powder 100ml tomato puree • 200g pumpkin, diced • salt and pepper to taste — C H I L L I D I P P I N G S A U C E 200g red chilli, deseeded 100g onion, diced • 20g garlic • 100g red capsicum, diced — A V O C A D O S A L S A 2 avocados, diced • 50g red onion, diced 50g tomatoes, diced • 10ml lime juice and Tabasco 5g chillies and coriander, chopped >

W A T E R D O U G H Rub margarine and flour together. Gradually add water and knead to a smooth dough. Leave aside for 15 minutes.

>

O I LY D O U G H Rub shortening into the flour to form oily dough. Leave aside to rest for 15 minutes.

T O M A K E PA ST RY Wrap oily dough inside water dough. Flatten the dough and roll to a cylinder shape. Repeat the process and roll up dough like a Swiss roll. Rest for 10 minutes. Slice dough to 1cm thick, even pieces. Using a rolling pin, flatten each piece further and add one scoop of the beef filling (see recipe below). Seal each side and shape into a scalloped design. Deep fry in medium hot oil.

>

B E E F F I L L I N G Heat oil. Sauté onions garlic and ginger until fragrant. Add spice, chuck mince, pumpkin, tomato puree and simmer until thick. Season to taste and leave to cool until required.

>

C H I L L I D I P P I N G S A U C E Confit all ingredients with oil until soft and blitz into a purée. Pass through a fine strainer and season.

>

A V O C A D O S A L S A Mix all ingredients and season.


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SIZED

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BITE

NOT ALL BURGER PATTIES ARE CREATED EQUALLY. WHICH CUTS GO INTO YOUR MINCE IMPACTS THE FLAVOUR, TEXTURE AND JUICINESS OF THE RESULTING PATTY. THESE MIXES ARE TWO OF THE BEST BETS FOR BURGERS ACCORDING TO THE FRANKENSTEINS OF FOOD; Nathan Myhrvold, Chris Young & Maxime Bilet (Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking. 2011).

MIXTURE ONE

*

Chuck Striploin Flank

S I Z E D

Short rib meat Aged rib eye Hanger

MIXTURE T WO

B I T E

*The quantities of each cut in each mix depends

on flavour and juiciness desired, and of course how much you want to spend making it. Each of these mixtures will yield around 75% chemical lean.

*


B I T E

It’s simply because some muscles use fat for fuel and so keep it stored close by, and other muscles use different forms of energy. Just like in a human body, the role of fat is to store energy for long periods of time. It takes a little while for the body to get this energy out of storage to use, so the muscles which require energy in a hurry don’t use fat as their fuel — which is why you won’t find any stored around that particular muscle.

S I Z E D

EVER WONDERED WHY SOME MUSCLES ARE LEAN – SUCH AS THE TENDERLOIN, BACKSTRAP OR FLANK, WHILE OTHERS HAVE MORE FAT AROUND THEM SUCH AS RIBS, BRISKETS, NECK OR BELLY?

Endurance muscles such as the neck or cheeks need prolonged supplies of energy and are geared to steadily burn the fat that surrounds them.

― CHEF LEVIN’S THE DIP, SYDNEY : DAWG RULES ―

“ I love hot dogs so much that I have developed some rules that you must abide by.”

Grill your frankfurts. It tastes better and by not boiling them you avoid one of the worst things about hot dogs: the dreaded hot dog flavoured water.

Every hot dog needs a squiggle of American mustard down the middle. Hot dogs just look and taste better with that squiggle of mustard. It’s essential.

.

Steam your buns. It makes the entire dog nice and warm and the pillowy bread makes the whole thing easier to eat. We have brioche hot dog buns made especially for our dawgs, try to find something similar.

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Only use Kosher frankfurts. They are 100 per cent beef, smoked and delicious. They grill better than pork frankfurts and are nicer, much redder in colour. Try getting them from a Kosher butcher or in the Kosher section of the supermarket.

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S I Z E D

Chef Georges Aoun

B I T E

M O M E N TA RY

23rd September 2 0 12 Beirut, Lebanon Boubouffe Restaurant is a shawarma joint in Beirut that has been carving lamb from the spit since 1 9 7 7. Even through the Lebanese Civil war it was open, serving up the shawarma throughout the shelling and using sandbags to protect their loyal customers from stray bullets.

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The gyro itself is not cooked with the usual gas-powered orange gauze but an actual wood fire, contributing smokiness and a maillard char. The chefs use the fat from fat tailed lambs to moisten and baste the meat while it cooks.

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• No Goat, No Glory • Stealth Health Continued... We said it last year and we see this trend getting stronger – your customers want a bit of health help when they’re in the dining scene which includes lighter options (think veal!) and fresh, clean and natural flavours. We’re not asking you to throw away your creative culinary genius by compromising flavour, what we’re talking is WHOLE foods, whole FLAVOUR. And don’t forget the PG rated food for those mini food connoisseurs. Frozen nuggets and pizzas don’t make the grade anymore & boy, we know parents are jack of their children having to eat them too. The recent wave of mini food critics want fresh, they want flavour and they want to feel included. This is a massive opportunity not to be missed by the discerning chef or restaurateur – think about it: ‘foodies’ have kids too.

We may be a bit biased here at Rare Medium – considering goat is one of ours – but goat farmers have been growing some incredibly beautiful product – lean, delicate and with really good eating quality. You just have to know the what and the how when ordering from your wholesaler. Goat meat is the same as all other meats; know your specifications and you’ll get what you ordered. Remember, a steak is not a steak, is not a steak is not a steak...... do your research and you’ll be well rewarded.

THE CHEF'S GUIDE TO WHAT'S HOT IN 2013

• Shared Plates

T R E N D S

We’ve already seen a huge number of restaurants doing away with the formerly fashionable main menu category and replacing it with names such a ‘tasting menu’, ‘small plates’ ‘to share’ or ‘piccolo piatti’ and ‘piccolini’ as well as improved bar food menus across the pub and small bar scene alike. One theory for the rebellion of the mains’ usually loyal little sibling is that diners are simply bored of the monotony of flavour they get from eating a single main dish. They don’t want to suffer food envy and they want to experience more. It also means they can choose how much or how little they want to eat and this ability to choose makes for happy customers.


Being a tight arse has never been so hot. Ribs and belly, chuck, brisket, shin, neck and skirt are just some of the pieces that make up the puzzle: so many cuts to choose from, so much flavour, so many creative possibilities. You can't swing a cat in the industry these days without hitting a brisket and the smart chefs are changing it up once more with the second round of Beef Masterpieces. All these cuts however all these must be got from a well-produced beast with a story to boot! Look to branded beef, lamb and goat as well as red meat produced under the MSA eating quality system for something a little bit ‘spesh’. Don’t forget to detail the cut on your menu – restaurant goers are getting sharper than a boning knife when it comes to meat and they want to know it all!

T R E N D S

• The Cheapest from the Fancy

• Corning, Pickling, Smoking, Curing Corning, pickling and curing is bigger than ever with chefs shoving anything not nailed down in vinegar or covering the weird and the wonderful in salt; the prehistoric preparation of smoking has become a modern culinary art form, with the wood choice just as important as the cut of meat. Think broader than the Bresaola to the Suho Meso, Carne Seca, Dutch loafs, headcheese, Bakkwa, Abons, Lengua... the list goes on.

TH E FO LLOW I N G TR E N D S A R E TH E 2013 FO O D FRO NTI E R S ACCO R D I N G TO AU S TR A LI A’S O N LY R E D M E AT J O U R N A L R A R E M E D I U M:

• It's All in the Details In Australia we are just like kids in a candy store. There are so many beef, lamb and goat farming methods, so many post-production methods (think dry-ageing or newly fabricated cuts), so many breeds, so many farms, so many farmers and you know they’re amazing; let’s all shout it from the rooftops! But Rare Medium would also be happy if you just put the detail on your menus. Your customers would too – they’re looking for that scoop straight from the farm. Whether it be biodynamic or 650 day grain fed, Angus or rare breed, from Cape York or North West Tassie; whatever it is, wear it proudly.

• Between Bread

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The Australian sandwich industry generates in excess of $7 billion a year in retail sales – just think of how many sandwiches are bought and eaten by Australians every year. These quintessential comfort foods provide a familiar format for mainstream consumers to explore bold new flavours. They also allow established chefs to take their “brand” to the masses without losing their credibility. For some beef, lamb and goat sandwich inspiration see the A-Z of Sandwiches from across the globe (overleaf).

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SPECIAL

: S A N D W I C H P U L L- O U T

THE WO N D E R F U L WO R L D OF THE SARNIE


} Vietnam

Pickled carrots and daikon, meats and fillings on a baguette. Barros Luco

Melted cheeses and thin fried beef on crusty bread. } USA

Beef on Weck

Roasted beef and horseradish on a Kummelweck roll (similar to a Kaiser roll) topped with pretzel salt and caraway seeds. Bifteck Haché

} France

French variation on the Hamburger served with bread, not usually between. Bifteck Haché à cheval

} France

Same as above with a fried egg. } Spain

Breville

} UK

Sealed toasted sandwich made in a specially designed sandwich toaster. Always with cheese. Brisket Bialy

} New York

A bialy is somewhere between a bagel and an English muffin; sprinkled with onions before being baked. Serve with slices of slow roasted brisket in a tomato glaze. Cermita Poblana

} Puebla

Veal cutlet served on fluffy sesame seeded egg roll from the city of Puebla, Mexico. Philly Cheesesteak

} Philadelphia

Strips of steak with melted cheese (normally Cheez Whiz), often with peppers and onions. Chili Size

} USA

A burger patty, topped with chili, cheese, onions and fries served on a soft hamburger bun.

} USA

Various sliced meats, cheeses and fillings. De Miga

} Argentina

Argentine tea sandwiches on crust-less white bread. } Turkey

Diner Kebab

Shaved lamb served in pita bread with accompaniments of the eater's choice such as tabouli, hummus, shaved iceberg, chilli sauce, garlic sauce etc. Egg and Cheese

} USA

Breakfast sandwich with eggs, cheese and sausages. } Texan

Enchurritos

Sliced bread with a wide variety of ingredients.

} Miami

Ground beef, spicy chorizo and crunchy fried potatoes. Deli Sandiwich

} Brazil

Bocadillo

Beef with mayonnaise and tomato sauce. Cuban Hamburger

} Chile

Melted cheeses and thin fried beef on crusty bread. Bauru

} Dominican Republic

Chimichurris

Steak served in flour tortilla with Tex Mex tomato sauce and melted cheese. } Portugal

Francesinha

Made with steak or roast beef covered with melted cheese, hot, thick tomato and beer sauce and fries. Frankfurter

} Germany

Beef-based sausage in a top- or sideloading bun. Fluffernutter

} USA

A dessert sambo with Peanut butter and marshmallow. French Dip

} USA

Thinly sliced roast beef on a French roll or baguette, most commonly served au jus. Gizmo Sandwich

} USA

Minced beef and Italian sausage covered in sauce and seasoning and melted mozzarella on a crusty Italian roll.

Credit note: (this feature was inspired by) GOOD/Meatpaper Sandwich Supplement, Fall 2010

Banh Mi


Gringa

} Mexico

A tortilla-based sandwich made by placing a slice of carne al pastor and a portion of Oaxaca cheese between two flour tortillas, then grilled until the cheese melts and the tortillas become crispy. Cut into halves or wedges to serve. Gyro

} Greece

Shaved rotisserie lamb, onions, tomato and tzatziki sauce in pita. Huarache con Carne Asada

} Mexico

Corn tortilla with steak. Hamburger

} USA

Mince beef patty in a round bun with various other fillings. Hoagie/Italian/Grinder

} USA

Oblong roll with various deli meats, cheeses and fillings. Hot Dog

} USA

Beef-based sausage in a bun with various fillings such as pickles, American mustard, onions. Khima Chapati

} Kenya

Spiced beef mince baked inside flat bread. Lomito Completo

} Uruguay

Meatball Sambo

} USA

Steak, sauerkraut, mayo, tomato sauce Meatball and marinara sauce served on a roll. Muffuletta

Various meats and cheeses, grilled in a sandwich press. } USA

Eponymous; classic of the Jewish deli. Can also be with corned beef and chopped liver. Patty Melt

Porilainen

} Finland

Printzesa

} Bulgaria

Thick sausage in a bun with diced pickled onion, chopped pickled cucumber, tomato sauce, mustard and mayonnaise.

Ground veal, kashkaval and feta, grilled. Reuben

} USA

Corned beef or Pastrami, Swiss cheese, sauerkraut, Thousand Island dressing or Russian dressing. Rossi Burger

} France

Beef filet Mignon, truffles and foie gras on a brioche bun. Sausage Sambo

} Australia

BBQ beef sausage and BBQ onions between two pieces of white bread with tomato sauce. } Lebanon

Shawarma

Shaved goat or lamb rolled inside a Taboon bread. Sliders

} USA

Small hamburgers (around 7.6cm across). Sloppy Joes

} USA

Loose meat in a tomato sauce spooned into a hamburger bun. } USA

Dried beef (beef jerky) and bĂŠchamel on toast. Tea/Finger Sandwiches

} Italy

Pastrami on rye

} USA

Meat with lettuce, tomato and mayo on special Louisiana French bread.

S.O.S

} USA

Signature round Sicilian bread filled with deli meats, cheeses and fillings. Panini

Po Boy

} USA

Hamburger patty and melted cheese.

} UK

Small sandwiches, made with crustless white bread. Tramezzino

} Italy

Italian tea sandwiches usually served alongside an aperitif such as Aperol Spritz. Wrap

Variety of meats, cheeses and vegies in a flour tortilla; often a low calories option. Wurstbrot

} Germany

Sliced sausage on bread.


I I SS SS UU EE


Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA) is a service company that invests in marketing and research and development on behalf of its 47,500 beef, lamb and goat producer members. Our role within foodservice is to bridge the gap between farm and kitchen by providing chefs with information and inspiration on red meat. For your FREE Subscription 180 0 550 018 raremedium@mla.com.au

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