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THE FIVE PHASES OF EFFECTIVE GOSPEL TEACHING “Every member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is, or will be, a teacher. Each of us has a vital interest in the content and effectiveness of gospel teaching. We want everyone to have great gospel teachers, and we want those teachers to help all of us to find our way back …..to our Heavenly Father….. Our Savior’s occupation was that of a teacher. He was the Master Teacher, and He invites each of us to follow Him in that great service.” [Elder Dallin H. Oaks, Gospel Teaching, Ensign Nov. 1999, 78] Every member of the Church will eventually have the opportunity to teach. Your chance will happen sooner than you think. If you have had no prior teaching experience, the anticipation of such an assignment can be dreadful. To help you gain some confidence and competence in teaching, I have prepared a simplified overview of the pattern of gospel teaching. I have broken it down in five short phases so you can quickly obtain understanding of how it works. The intention of this article is to give you a crash course. Remember, our definitive resource to gospel teaching is “Teaching: No Greater Call.” Read the entire book and refer to it often. PHASE ONE –Preparing Spiritually for Effective Gospel Teaching “And the Spirit shall be given unto you by the prayer of faith; and if ye receive not the Spirit ye shall not teach.” [D&C 42:14] The key to effective gospel teaching is teaching by the spirit. Therefore, gospel teaching requires us to prepare spiritually. In order to obtain the spirit, we must work diligently to understand the gospel principles we are to teach to our students. The source of gospel teaching is the scriptures. Embarking on a regular scripture study will build your foundation of understanding the gospel. Seek to obtain the word first. We cannot teach what we do not know. The power of the convincing of men is learning the word of God first and then, the spirit touching the hearts of our students of the truthfulness of God’s words. “Seek not to declare my word, but first seek to obtain my word, and then shall your tongue be loosed; then, if you desire, you shall have my Spirit and my word, yea, the power of God unto the convincing of men” (D&C 11:21). By studying the word of God, you plant the seed of faith in your heart. (D&C 88:118) Daily scripture study from fifteen minutes to one hour will to endow you with gradual confidence. You will receive knowledge line upon line, precept upon precept.” (2 Ne. 28:30) Live the gospel of Jesus Christ. We receive the power to teach by courageously living the gospel. “If any man will do his will, he shall know of the doctrine, whether it be of God, or [whether] I speak of myself.” (John 7:17) It will take patience, perseverance, and commitment to apply the gospel in our lives. Strong testimonies emanate from submitting our will to the Lord and keeping His commandments diligently. We have to know for ourselves the truth of the principles we teach and that knowledge only comes from righteous living. Be true and faithful to your covenants in that there is power.


Effective Gospel Teaching

Preparation is prerequisite to inspiration. The cure for fear is preparation. (D&C 38:30) Prepare, prepare, and prepare. Diligent preparation is what the Lord requires in order for His grace to attend us. (D&C 88:78)This is a principle of power that should give us comfort. We are to prepare diligently and the Lord’s grace will empower us to do that we cannot do for ourselves. The spirit teaches, not us. This is a true promise. Pray for guidance. As you commence to prepare for your lesson, pray to the Lord to seek His guidance. You are in His errand and He will generously provide you His spirit if you seek, ask, and work for it. This is God’s work. He will not leave you alone. Review the lesson in its entirety. Go over the entire lesson at least twice until you can mentally visualize the lesson structure. Lessons have a major objective and usually three to four concepts to reinforce it. Sub-points and activities support each concept. “Review each lesson at least a week in advance. When you study the reading assignment and the lesson material early, you will receive thoughts and impressions during the week that will help you teach the lesson. As you ponder the lesson during the week, pray for the Spirit to guide you. Have faith that the Lord will bless you.” [B.O.M. Gospel Doctrine Manual, p. vii] Read and ponder the scriptural references, quotes, and insights. Each lesson material will include scriptural references, quotes, and insights pertaining to the gospel principles from the General Authorities of the Church. Read and then ponder on them. Search out your own life’s spiritual experiences and body of wisdom of these principles that you might be able to share to your students. Pray for your students. Each time you prepare for a lesson, conclude your spiritual preparation with a prayer. Invoke the spirit in helping you teach the gospel effectively. Pray for your students individually and seek the spirit’s promptings to help you fill their needs. Prayer combined with fasting results (Alma 17:3) to teaching with power and authority. Think how the lesson can meet your students’ needs. Since lesson materials are often lengthy, you will have to choose which principles in the lesson will meet the needs of your students. Select the scripture accounts, doctrines, principles, ideas, questions, and other lesson material that will best meet the needs of class members. I usually utilize a highlighter and mark the ones I want to teach. Do not feel obligated to cover the entire lesson material at the expense of limiting stimulating discussion and engaging participation. Answer the question “so what?” to provide explanation to your students why a particular lesson is relevant to their lives. Create an outline of the lesson. If you are a new teacher, I strongly recommend that you go through the process of writing an outline out of the lesson. Observe how lessons are structured. You will begin to see a pattern consistently utilized in every lesson. This understanding will enhance your teaching confidence. (Refer to sample outline) Take notes of the inspirational outbursts. Make sure to write down the strokes of inspiration you will receive in the process of reading, pondering, the lesson material and the inspiration that comes to you while thinking of how your lesson can help your students. Immerse yourself with gospel knowledge. The Lord cannot inspire an empty mind. Gospel knowledge precedes the inspiration that we desperately need to teach with effectiveness. “Neither take ye thought beforehand what ye shall say; but treasure up in your minds continually the words of life, and it shall be given you in the very hour that portion that shall be meted unto every man.” (D&C 84:85) Aside from reading the scriptures, immerse yourself with positive reading materials such as Church magazines, conference reports, seek out from the best books words of wisdom (D&C 88:118) to sustain gospel learning. You will be surprised to receive wisdom at the very moment of need. Copyright © 2005 Randy F. Rubio All rights reserved “Being Anxiously Engaged in a Good Cause”

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Effective Gospel Teaching

PHASE TWO – Building a Relationship of Love with your Students “And no one can assist in this work except he shall be humble and full of love, having faith, hope, and charity, being temperate in all things, whatsoever shall be entrusted to his care.” (D&C 12:8). Once you become a teacher, you automatically acquire a personal and emotional relationship with each of your students. Learning to love your students and demonstrating that love is crucial to your success as a gospel teacher. Love is not merely a feeling. It also means showing acts of kindness and compassion. (Moroni 7:45-47) Some teachers may just be content to delivering lessons. However, if you want to create a greater impact on your students, here are some ideas: Call your students by first names. Know and memorize students’ names. Find out how they got their names. Your students will feel special when you call them by their names. It is particularly a challenge to know everyone’s names in a big class. Get to know them anyway. Encourage your students to remember the names of other students as well. Know your students’ personal background, circumstances, and challenges. Spend one-on-one visits with your students to get to know them better. Get to know their families. Find out about their interests, hobbies, talents, and abilities. Ask about their hopes and aspirations. When you have established trust in your relationship, they will feel encouraged to share with you some of their challenges. Visit your students in their homes. Occasional visits to your students’ homes can convey a message of concern and love. By seeing their home situation, you will also be able to understand the context of your student’s life. You can learn much about them by observing their home environment. This understanding will help you incorporate their needs into your lessons. Keep in touch through phone calls, text messages, or e-Mail. If they are unable to come to your class, call and find out why. They might be going through a tough situation where you can help. You can also call to express verbal appreciation or concern. Send inspirational text messages on their way relevant to their present circumstances. e-Mail can also connect you with your students more conveniently. You can announce forthcoming lessons, commit students to completing reading assignments, or persuade them to take action on gospel principles. Remember birthdays, wedding anniversaries, and other special occasions. When starting a new class, prepare a form for your students to fill-out to obtain as much personal information as you can. In this way, you can greet them as they celebrate the special occasions in their lives including birthdays, wedding anniversaries, baptism dates, children’s birthdays, etc. Write notes of appreciation. Aside from verbal expressions, writing your appreciation is more memorable. You will make your students feel special and the good feeling it generates enhances their self-esteem. Brief and sweet written notes have a great impact. Facilitate class friendships. Part of our goal in class is to help our students develop friendships. In time, you will notice students sitting with the same person in class. You can encourage them to sit with others during the class as a way of getting to know others. You can facilitate this by inviting your students at the beginning of the class to stand and choose another seatmate. You may also just prepare a seating arrangement with deliberate periodic changes. Organize activities outside of the classroom to further build bonds of friendship. Forty minutes is really too short to establish bonds of friendships among class members. Organize occasional activities to help them get to know each other better. You can invite them to your home and have fun together socializing. Outdoor picnics can also provide wonderful ambience for increased camaraderie. When you host these social functions, ensure to include activities that elicit personal and professional (older students) information. Copyright © 2005 Randy F. Rubio All rights reserved “Being Anxiously Engaged in a Good Cause”

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Effective Gospel Teaching

PHASE THREE – Creating a Learning Atmosphere “And now, behold, I give unto you a commandment, that when ye are assembled together ye shall instruct and edify each other, that ye may know how to act and direct my church, how to act upon the points of my law and commandments, which I have given.” [D&C 43:8] As members of these assemblies of learning, we have the Lord’s mandate to instruct and edify each other. A learning atmosphere is the teacher’s foremost responsibility. You will help students learn better with a caring and positive environment. You set the tone of the learning atmosphere. Everything you do as a teacher will contribute to the kind of atmosphere you produce in the classroom. Your words, actions, and nonverbal language will determine whether the class will be interesting or boring, honest or guarded, enthusiastic or mechanical. Your zest for learning the gospel is contagious. Promote mutual respect. Everyone is a teacher and a learner. As teacher of your class, your main responsibility is to teach and your students’ responsibility is to learn. However, unlike other educational institutions, we come together as children of our Heavenly Father. “The preacher was no better than the hearer, neither was the teacher any better than the learner; and thus they were all equal, and they did all labor, every man according to his strength” (Alma 1:26). Formulate some rules of engagement. Usually at the beginning of a new class or at the start of a new school year, it is appropriate to set some class rules. The class rules will promote order and discipline which is necessary to create a positive learning atmosphere. It is best to generate these rules with the help of your students. Some rules might be – listen while others are speaking; say “pass” if you do not wish to answer; please come to class on time; excuse yourself only when there is a valid reason, completely weekly reading assignments, bring your scriptures, etc. Revisit the rules especially when you notice the class’ demeanor deteriorating. Be creative with discipline. Look for ways to exercise discipline in a non-threatening way. When my combined youth Sunday school class of twelve to seventeen had difficulty paying attention to the lesson, I devised a new seating arrangement. I had boys, girls sit alternately, and made sure that the cliques stayed farthest from each other. If I instructed them to speak to their seat mates, I resumed the discussion by calling their attention and telling them a specific way to respond. For example, if I asked: “Class, are you ready to resume our discussion?” I instructed them to respond, “Yes, Papa Bear.” They would chuckle and then gave me back the time to speak and listened attentively. You will have to be more creative with adults. Organize yourselves; prepare every needful thing…. (D&C 88:119) Your classroom environment will determine whether it is favorable to learning or not. If your classroom is full of litter where chairs are dirty and ventilation is poor and the immediate surrounding noisy, these things can impede students’ learning process. It is very important to prepare your classroom for optimal gospel learning. Ensure your classroom is clean. Before the class begins, check your classroom to make sure it is clean. Pick up any litter. Arrange any other fixtures in your classroom. If there are items that do not belong there, move them out. They can be a distraction to your students’ attention. A clean and orderly classroom environment invites the presence of the spirit. Lighting, ventilation, and noise. The classroom should have adequate lighting in order to make reading easier. If the classroom is too hot, it will distract your students’ attention. So will noise. Make sure to manage all these aspects of classroom environment for maximum learning. Copyright © 2005 Randy F. Rubio All rights reserved “Being Anxiously Engaged in a Good Cause”

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Effective Gospel Teaching

Provide only enough chairs. It is human nature to try to sit at the back rows of a big class. The goal being is to sit it out throughout the class without having to participate. However, as a teacher our goal is to ensure that every class member participates no matter what the number. I have always found it useful to provide only enough chairs for everyone in my class. When there are too many chairs, students have a tendency to scatter throughout the classroom. I do reserve extra chairs placed near me in case additional students come to the class. If the extra folding chairs are at the back, students will get them even if there are still open chairs elsewhere. When students sit closely, there is increased likelihood of developing bonds of friendship. Arrange functional seating. The seating in most church classrooms follow traditional school seating arrangements. When students in the back speak, your other students in the front rows do not have eye contact with them. Since interaction among students is important to a positive classroom atmosphere, there are other seating arrangements you may consider. Ensure comfortable space between seats. Traditional Seating

U - Seating

If you have a big class of thirty students or more, you will likely go for traditional seating. If you have to, then provide a wide enough aisle so you can walk in the middle as you speak. Personally, I use the U-seating arrangement because the middle area is open and most students can have eye contact with each other. If you have a small class of eight to twelve students, you can use a small circle. The small circle is very comfortable seating and projects a relaxed learning atmosphere. You can also be conveniently sitting down while teaching your lesson to a small class. If you prefer standing, you may also opt for a semi-circle or a small U-seating with the same effect. Control and direct where students sit. In a big class, you may even consider calling ushers and greeters. Their job would be to fill all the front row seats first. They should also guide latecomers to occupy all open seats. You can also take the first few minutes of the class directing students where to sit. Remember, how you seat your students will affect the learning atmosphere in your classroom. Do not leave it to chance. Decorate for appropriate ambience. You can further enhance your classroom setting by decorating it with flowers, hanging pictures with gospel themes, and Church-oriented colorful art.

Copyright © 2005 Randy F. Rubio All rights reserved “Being Anxiously Engaged in a Good Cause”

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Effective Gospel Teaching

PHASE FOUR – Presenting the Gospel Lesson Effectively “Teach ye diligently and my grace shall attend you, that you may be instructed more perfectly in theory, in principle, in doctrine, in the law of the gospel, in all things that pertain unto the kingdom of God, that are expedient for you to understand” (D&C 88:78). Presenting a lesson effectively requires diligent effort. As we put our best efforts, the Lord’s grace will sustain us. Please refer to article, “Preparing & Delivering Inspiring Talks.” The concepts of eye contact, voice projection, vocal variety, dress and appearance, good posture, appropriate humor, are all elements of effective communication. Teach the doctrine, then principles, and then rules. “True doctrine, understood, changes attitudes and behavior. The study of the doctrines of the gospel will improve behavior quicker than a study of behavior will improve behavior” (Elder Boyd K. Packer, CR, October 1986). Also according to Elder Henry B.Eyring we must teach the doctrine first, then elaborate the principles that pertain to the doctrine, and only then should we teach the rules. True doctrines have the power to create positive changes. Maintain eye contact and teach from the heart. Eye contact is the one act that will increase your communication effectiveness dramatically. In order to have the spirit when we teach is to teach from our heart. Our eyes seem to be the windows to our souls. You may refer from the manual occasionally but do not just read from it. As you prepare spiritually, the spirit will guide you. “We must get…. our teachers to speak out of their hearts…, to communicate their love for the Lord and this precious work, and somehow it will catch fire in the hearts of those they teach.” [Teachings of Gordon B. Hinckley (1997), 619-20] Teach with a variety of effective methods. There is a multitude of ways to teach the gospel. Lecturing is only one of them. You can brainstorm, create buzz sessions, plan a panel discussion, invite a resource speaker, assign student reports, develop case studies, prepare activity sheets, group choral reading, scripture memorization, inspiring gospel music, etc. (see Teaching No Greater Call: Part F Methods of Teaching) In other words, there are many other appropriate ways to enliven your gospel teaching. Employ variety. Teach only from Church-approved curriculum materials. There is an overwhelming supply of Church materials. Use only those approved by the Church. Elder M. Russell Ballard has said this: “Teachers would be well advised to study carefully the scriptures and their manuals before reaching out for supplemental materials. Far too many teachers seem to stray from the approved curriculum materials without fully reviewing them. If teachers feel a need to use some good supplemental resources …. they should first consider the use of the Church magazines” (in Conference Report, Apr. 1983, 93; or Ensign, May 1983, 68). Understand the inherent pattern in every lesson. Go over your lesson material and notice that there is a pattern. Each lesson has a primary objective. To grab your students’ attention in the beginning of the class, there is usually an “attention getting” activity. Then the lessons consist of at least three important principles in relation to the lesson’s objectives. Subpoints reinforce each point. There is a lesson summary and then you are prompted to conclude with your testimony of the gospel principle being taught. Summarize and bear testimony. Summarizing the lesson is an effective method of helping students recall the principles you have presented. Go back to the three main ideas of the lesson and their respective sub-points. Relate your concluding remarks on the main lesson objective and bear testimony of its veracity. Teach youth classes in English. If you are teaching youth class groups, teach in English if possible. Our students already know their dialects. What they need is the ability to speak, read, and comprehend English. Their proficiency in English will help them advance professionally and open many opportunities for learning. English will always be the primary language of the Church. Copyright © 2005 Randy F. Rubio All rights reserved “Being Anxiously Engaged in a Good Cause”

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Effective Gospel Teaching

PHASE FIVE – Facilitating Student Involvement “Appoint among yourselves a teacher, and let not all be spokesmen at once; but let one speak at a time and let all listen unto his sayings, that when all have spoken that all may be edified of all, and that every man may have an equal privilege.” [D&C 88:122] Some ideas in this phase will apply mostly to adult classes. We must orchestrate lively and engaging discussion. Our goal as teachers is to ensure everyone contributes in our class. Some members will talk too much, set reasonable limits. Others will hardly speak, push gently. Present doctrines and principles, then ask questions. Let more than one person respond to the questions. Spread the opportunity to speak. Acknowledge and validate answers. Redirect questions from the floor to your students. Give students priority for talk time. When discussion strays, lead it back on course. Think student participation. The question to ask ourselves when preparing for and presenting the lesson is “What can I do to involve my students in the learning process?” My goal has always been to give up anything in the teaching process that I can extend in favor of my students. I will not do in the classroom as a teacher what my students can do instead. For example: The lesson manuals sometimes show quotes and scriptures for oral reading assigned to the teacher. I still let my students do this legitimate teacher assignment. Minimize lecturing. Maintain a ratio of 40-60. Minimize talking as much as possible. A ratio of 40% teacher talk and 60% student participation is ideal. Present a doctrinal foundation, expound on the principles, and then involve the student in a stimulating discussion or activity. Students’ attention span is short. Always find ways to engage them every so often during the entire class period. For example: The rule I have tried to follow in a forty-minute class is a break of talking at least every three to five minutes. Think, pair, and share. How can you engage everybody in a discussion especially in a big class of thirty, fifty, or even a hundred? I recommend the learning partner technique. This technique has four parts. First, ask the question you want them to respond. Choose a question that you are sure to have general interest and application to your students. Repeat the question for clarity. Second, instruct your students to pair with the person on their left or right (or both). Third, they are to discuss their responses with the person(s) beside them. Fourth, terminate the learning partners and resume the class discussion. For example: Ask the question: “Why does the Lord allow trials to happen in our lives?” Repeat the question exactly or with a slight variation: “Again, I would like you to think why the Lord allows adversities to happen to us?” Note that this question fits the criteria of general interest and application. During an entire class of forty minutes, consider doing this maybe twice or thrice. Give them time to think, and then instruct your students if you are doing it for the first time: “Since I would like everybody to respond to this question, I would like you to discuss your answer with the person seated beside you. You may form pairs or trios. I will give you two minutes for discussion. You may begin now.” This is a very effective way of engaging all students. However, you may use this method sparingly and with caution. Use it along with other methods. Remember, to choose questions that will stimulate discussion. In the beginning, you will need to coach some people to talk to their seatmates and may even have to repeat the instruction. This unusual approach will likely create an unusual reaction. Try it until you are confident with the method. Stay with it and you will be pleased with the results. You can use the same technique effectively at the end of the class. “Please share with your seat mate two insights that you have learned in today’s lesson and how you are going to apply it.” The last part of this technique is to resume the class discussion. You will notice that it is hard to break the partners once they are talking. You might even feel bad for doing so because you see your class engaged. However, the class discussion must move on. “Class, your time is up. May I have your attention please? So, would some of you share some of the responses you have shared?” Call on some volunteers, summarize the answers, and proceed with the lesson. Copyright © 2005 Randy F. Rubio All rights reserved “Being Anxiously Engaged in a Good Cause”

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Effective Gospel Teaching

Ask stimulating, thought-provoking questions. Avoid questions answerable by just “yes” or “no.” Practice formulating your questions to start with why, how, who, what, when, and where. The manual provides ideal suggestions. For example: Instead of asking, “Was it right for Lehi to murmur against the Lord when they could no longer hunt for food in the wilderness?” You can reformulate it by asking: “Why do you think Lehi murmured against the Lord?” Then follow it through with an application: “Why do we sometimes murmur about our own adversities?” “What does murmuring do to our attitude towards the Lord?” When a student asks a question, redirect it to other students. When someone asks a question, resist the urge to answer. Instead, repeat the question and bounce the question to someone else. Connect their answers and continue to direct it to other students. For example: “Joshua’s question is – how we can know for sure that Joseph Smith was a prophet of God?” Pause to allow your students to think through the question. After a moment’s pause, ask: “Who among you would like to respond to Joshua’s question?” Once you have heard as many comments, you may then share your own or simply move on. Be profuse and specific with your praise. One of the best ways to encourage participation is to express appreciation for every effort a student exerts to respond to our questions or participate in class activities. Everybody loves a sincere compliment or appreciation especially coming from the teacher. Our effort to appreciate may lead students to participate more in our class. For example: “Jane, I really like your answer.” “Teresa, you have such a beautiful insight. I haven’t thought of it that way.” “Claire, I appreciate your thoughtful answer.” “Joe, I know how hard it is for you sometimes to participate, so thank you very much for trying.” “David, I appreciate you for just being in my class. I like the way you listen to the lessons.” Praise students’ efforts often and let them hear that you do. You can extend the appreciation by telling parents about their child’s active participation, thoughtful answers, and kind actions. For added effect, you can do this in front of your student. For example: “Sis. Robles, I was very pleased with your son Roberto’s efforts to befriend a new student. He went out of his way to help Joseph (a new convert) become comfortable in class. He introduced Joseph to the other students and he sat with him throughout the lesson. You should be proud of him. ” Addressing your student: “I really appreciate what you did for Joseph, Roberto.” Take a chance on the shy student with caution. Our reluctance to call on the shy student is understandable. We don’t want them to be embarrassed. It is important to be sensitive to these students and yet we should nudge them gradually to take part in our class. The solution is for you to take risks. Pry the student out of her shell with simple questions and easy activities. If the student does not respond, immediately release the pressure, extend appreciation for any sign of effort, and move on. For example: “Emily I can sense that you are probably afraid to say something. I understand. I use to feel that way. But thank you for your very nice smile.” Think of other ways the student can participate. Handle the dominant student gently. The talkative student is your ally and resource in class. He can be very valuable when the class encounters a lull. He can help you stimulate discussion when others are quiet. But he has to be managed well or he will dominate air time. When he has talked too long, gently interrupt by summarizing his thoughts and thanking him. When he raises his hand for the tenth time, you may have to let him know you would like to hear from others as well and get back to him later. Make sure to keep a promise when you make one. Coach him how long he may speak. Give recognition for his contribution. Call your students to action and follow-up. Our lessons will not matter in the lives of our students unless they apply them. At the end of each class, think of the actions that they can exert to make the lessons relevant. It might be asking them to write a letter to a missionary, expressing love and appreciation for their parents, reconnecting with a loved one, forgiving someone who has hurt their feelings, perform an anonymous service, writing an entry in a journal, etc. Students should be encouraged to identify one specific action in relation to the lesson they are going to do during the week. The point of teaching is to influence students to apply a gospel principle and experience its power. Then, ask them to share their experiences and realizations. Copyright © 2005 Randy F. Rubio All rights reserved “Being Anxiously Engaged in a Good Cause”

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Effective Gospel Teaching

Reading assignment monitor. While teaching Gospel Doctrine class, I noticed that most students did not read the assignments in connection with the lessons. At times, I asked the students to signify by raising their hand if they have complied with the reading assignment. I noticed that while there were a few who did, I was afraid I might be alienating those who did not. I also wanted the students to develop the habit of daily reading. So, I devised a reading chart of the Book of Mormon based on the Gospel Doctrine lessons and incorporated some of the features of the Institute reading monitor. Here’s what I came up with. I distributed them to my students and showed them how it might help them follow the reading assignments pertaining to our weekly lessons. I challenged them to read just ten minutes a day, mark those days and chapters when they have read them. Gospel Doctrine Class Book of Mormon Reading Chart “I told the brethren that the Book of Mormon was the most correct of any book on earth, and the keystone of our religion, and a man would get nearer to God by abiding by its precepts, than any other book.” (Joseph Smith, History of the Church, 4:461) DAYS I READ TEN MINUTES [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M]

[T] [T] [T] [T] [T] [T] [T] [T] [T] [T] [T] [T] [T] [T] [T] [T] [T] [T] [T] [T] [T] [T] [T] [T]

[W] [W] [W] [W] [W] [W] [W] [W] [W] [W] [W] [W] [W] [W] [W] [W] [W] [W] [W] [W] [W] [W] [W] [W]

[TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F] [TH] [F]

[S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU] [S] [SU]

LESSON TITLE 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

Tsart sa Pagbabasa ng Aklat ni Mormon

“All Things According to His Will” “The Vision of the Tree of Life” “The Things That I Saw While I Was Carried in the Spirit” “Hearken to the Truth, and Give Heed Unto It” “Free to Choose Liberty and Eternal Life” “I Know in Whom I Have Trusted” “O How Great the Goodness of Our God” “My Soul Delighteth in the Words of Isaiah” “He Inviteth All to Come Unto Him” “Press Forward with the Steadfastness of Christ” “Seek Ye for the Kingdom of God” “The Allegory of the Olive Trees” “For a Wise Purpose” “Eternally Indebted to Our Heavenly Father” “Ye Shall Be Called the Children of Christ” “A Seer… Becometh a Benefit to His Fellow Beings” “God Himself… Shall Redeem His People” “None Can Deliver Them but the Lord” “My Soul is Pained No More” “Alma Did Judge Righteous Judgments” “Have Ye Received His Image in Your Countenances?” “More Than One Witness” “Give Us Strength According to our Faith… in Christ” “They Taught with Power & Authority of God”

ASSIGNED CHAPTERS I Nephi [1][2][3][4][5][6][7] I Nephi [8-11][12:16-18][15] I Nephi [12][13][14] I Nephi [16][17][18][19][20][21][22] 2 Nephi [1][2] 2 Nephi [3][4][5] 2 Nephi [6][7][8][9][10] 2 Nephi [11-15][16-20][21-25] 2 Nephi [26][27][28][29][30] 2 Nephi [31][32][33] Jacob [1][2][3][4] Jacob [5][6][7] Enos[ ] Jarom[ ] Omni[] WofM[ ] Mosiah [1][2][3] Mosiah [4][5][6] Mosiah [7][8][9][10][11] Mosiah [12][13][14][15][16][17] Mosiah [18][19][20][21][22][23][24] Mosiah [25[26][27][28] Alma [36] Mosiah [29] Alma [1][2][3][4] Alma [5][6][7] Alma [8][9][10][11][12] Alma [13][14][15][16] Alma [17][18][19][20][21][22]

I did an English and Tagalog version. I taught the class in Tagalog.

“May kapangyarihan sa aklat na magsisimulang dumaloy sa inyong buhay sa sandaling simulan ninyo ang seryosong pag-aaral ng aklat. Makakasumpong kayo ng kapangyarihang makaiwas sa panlilinlang. Makasusumpong kayo ng kapangyarihang manatili sa makipot at makitid na daan… Kapag nagsimula kayong magutom at mauhaw sa mga salitang ito, makasusumpong kayo ng higit sa kasiyahan sa buhay” (Pres. Ezra Taft Benson sa Conference Report, Okt. 1986, 6; or Ensign, Nob. 1986, 7). ARAW NA NAGBASA AKO [L] [L] [L] [L] [L] [L] [L] [L] [L] [L] [L] [L] [L] [L] [L] [L] [L] [L] [L] [L] [L] [L] [L]

[M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M] [M]

[MY] [MY] [MY] [MY] [MY] [MY] [MY] [MY] [MY] [MY] [MY] [MY] [MY] [MY] [MY] [MY] [MY] [MY] [MY] [MY] [MY] [MY] [MY]

[H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B] [H] [B]

[S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG] [S] [LG]

BILANG NG ARALIN AT PAMAGAT 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48

“Nagbalik-loob sa Panginoon” “Ang Lahat ng Bagay ay Nagpapatunay na may Diyos” “Ang Salita ay Na Kay Kristo Tungo sa Kaligttasan” “Pakinggan ang Aking Mga Sata” “Ang Dakilang Plano ng Kaligayahan Happiness” “Di Matitinag sa Pananampaltaya kay Cristo” “Sinunod Nila ang Bawat Salita ng Pag-uutos na may Kahustuhan” “Tunay na Saligan” “Paanong Nakalimutan Ninyo ang Inyong Diyos?” “Magsisi at Mabalik Loob sa Panginoon” “Kinabukasan Paparito Ako sa Daigdig” “Kung Sino Man ang Lalapit, Siya ay Aking Tatanggapin” “Mga Lumang Bagay Lumipas na at Lahat ng Bagay ay Naging Bago” “Masdan, Ang Aking Kaligayan ay Lubos” “At Pagkatapos Sila ay Titipunin Ko” “Kanyang Ipinaliwanag ang Lahat ng Bagay sa Kanila” “Ito ang Aking Ebanghelyo” “Paano Kayo Napalihis sa mga Landas ng Panginoon?” “Ako ayNangungusap sa Inyo na Parang Kayo ay Narito” “Kailanma’y Hindi Pa Naniwala ang Tao sa Akin na Tulad Mo” “Sa Pamamagitan ng Pananampalataya ang Lahat na Bagay ay… ” “Upang Mapanati sila sa aTamang Daan” “Lumapit Kay Kristo”

MGA KAPITULO Alma [23][24][25][26][27][28][29] Alma [30][31] Alma [32][33][34][35] Alma [36][37][38][39] Alma [40][41][42] Alma [43-45][46-49][50-52] Alma [53-56][57-59][60-63] Helaman [1][2][3][4][5] Helaman [6][7][8][9][10][11][12] Helaman [13][14][15][16] 3 Nephi [1][2][3][4][5][6][7] 3 Nephi [8][9][10][11] 3 Nephi [12][13][14][15] 3 Nephi [17][18][19] 3 Nephi [16][20-21] 3 Nephi [22][23][24][25][26] 3 Nephi [27-30] 4 Nephi [] Mormon [1-6] Moroni [9] Mormon [7][8][9] Ether [1][2][3][4][5][6] Ether [7-9][10-12][13-15] Moroni [1][2][3][4][5][6] Moroni [7][8][10]

Pangalan: ____________________________ Purok: _____________________ Araw ng Umpisa: _____________ Araw na Natapos: ________________

Copyright © 2005 Randy F. Rubio All rights reserved “Being Anxiously Engaged in a Good Cause”

9


Effective Gospel Teaching

Since many of our members are first generation, they need a lot of help to develop the habit of reading the scriptures and bringing their scriptures to class. I noticed that verbal reminders every Sunday was not effective. I decided to change my method. After handing them their individual reading monitor, I devised a way to determine if they were reading their weekly assignments and brought their scriptures as well. I wanted to stop sounding like a broken record, so I made slight changes to the attendance roll. STUDENT BOOK OF MORMON READING MONITOR

Student Name

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

1Ne 1-7

1Ne 8-11 15

1Ne 12-14

1Ne 16-22

2Ne 1-2

2Ne 3-5

2Ne 6-10

2Ne 11-25

2Ne 26-30

2Ne 31-33

Jac 14

13 Jac 5-7

14

15

Enos to Wof M

Mos 1-3

16 Mos 4-6

Acosta, Delbert Acosta, Angela Bondoc, Juanito Bondoc, Zenaida Bondoc, Lamberto Bondoc, Trinidad Cortez, Gerry David, Virgilio David, Sotera David, Alfredo David, Marissa Deleon, Magdalena Escalera, Carolina Gutierrez, Ricardo Gutierrez, Luz Lising, Jesus, Jr. Lising, Lilia Luat, Phoebe Lumbao, Alex Lumbao, Irene Manaloto, Cristina Mercado, Felicidad Mesina, Rodel Rengell, Emiliano Rengell, Virginia Robea, Russell Robea, Elena Rodriguez, Joviata Rubio, Randy Rubio, Iryne Tranate, Milagros Pingol, Pedro Sampang, Rodolfo, Sr. Sampang, Teresita Sebastian, Ricardo Sebastian, Honorata Sibug, Ligaya Verdejo, Franklyn Verdejo, Nelia Villamin, Domingo Villamin, Sally [ 1] Attendance [2] I have completed the weekly reading assignment [3] I have completed the weekly reading assignment and brought my scriptures

When I presented this monitor, I told the class that it was my desire to stop nagging them about their reading assignments and bringing their scriptures to class. I saw many faces smile with relief. However, I explained that since it was my job as their teacher to help them do both, I said that I made some minor changes to the attendance roll. Firstly, I instructed them to mark along their names with the corresponding lesson column for the week the number 1 if they were present but have not read the assignment nor brought their scriptures. I assured them that their attendance was the most important to me. Secondly, if they have complied with their weekly reading assignment to mark their names 2. Thirdly, if they have read their assignment plus brought their scriptures, to mark their names 3. I promised my students I would visit them individually to help resolve whatever barriers or concerns they have in accomplishing these tasks. This might seem silly to you and it probably is. However, I am committed to doing everything that I can to help my students to read their weekly assignments and bring their scriptures. I know that the quality of their study and participation will vastly improve by these two things. Since I found the verbal reminders to be ineffective, it would be sillier if I kept doing the same ineffective method and expecting a different result. Same formula, same result. Change the formula, expect different results. Evaluate the results and see what works and what doesn’t. Revise and repeat the cycle. Copyright © 2005 Randy F. Rubio All rights reserved “Being Anxiously Engaged in a Good Cause”

10


Effective Gospel Teaching

Let me now demonstrate to you how I might prepare teaching a lesson by using some of the ideas I have presented here. I have chosen “Lesson 8” of the Book of Mormon Gospel Doctrine Manual. Step 1. I will first review the purpose of the lesson as indicated in the manual, try to understand it, and use it as my guide in preparing the lesson. Step 2. With the purpose of the lesson in mind, I will browse through the lesson in its entirety to give me an overview. Step 3. After I have skimmed through the lesson, I am now ready to focus my mind on the scriptural references and quotes. The green highlights are my marks in the manual to remind me of the parts I want to remember or use in the lesson.

Most lessons will provide a suggested “attention activity.” The purpose of which is to draw your class’ interest to the lesson. You can also come up with your own appropriate introductory activity. When I don’t have the materials to present the activity, I resort to one of my favorites. I would formulate a question of general interest related to my lesson and have my class respond in learning pairs. It always works to help my class immediately focus on the lesson. Copyright © 2005 Randy F. Rubio All rights reserved “Being Anxiously Engaged in a Good Cause”

11


Effective Gospel Teaching

An important aspect in your preparation is to “prayerfully select the scripture passages, questions, and other lesson material that will best meet class members’ needs.” Do no feel obligated to deliver the content of the entire lesson. Present only those relevant to your students.

Copyright © 2005 Randy F. Rubio All rights reserved “Being Anxiously Engaged in a Good Cause”

12


Effective Gospel Teaching

You will notice that this lesson content offers you an overwhelming number of portions to teach yet with limited time. With such a substantial content, I can choose to use the method of small group discussion by dividing my class into three. I can designate a discussion leader in each group. I will provide the group with the scriptural references and questions in advance as contained in this lesson for each subtopic. I will ask them to respond to the questions in their groups and report their responses to the larger class. I can give each group as much as twenty minutes. I will monitor the small groups and then resume the class by discussing what the groups have shared. Copyright © 2005 Randy F. Rubio All rights reserved “Being Anxiously Engaged in a Good Cause”

13


Effective Gospel Teaching

I usually download the lessons from the internet so I am only holding a few pages instead of the entire manual. I refer to the lesson material as I teach particularly paying attention to focus on the highlighted areas. These are the portions in the lesson that I have decided to cover. If a good “attention getting activity” needs to capture my students’ attention in the beginning, I also need a solid conclusion to call my students into action and seal the teaching with my testimony. Copyright © 2005 Randy F. Rubio All rights reserved “Being Anxiously Engaged in a Good Cause”

14


Effective Gospel Teaching

LESSON OUTLINE O HOW GREAT THE GOODNESS OF OUR GOD (2 Nephi 6 – 10) OBJECTIVE Understand the need of the Atonement of the Savior and to teach how to receive the all its blessings. INTRODUCTION Show pictures of the Savior and ask class members to think of the things He has done for them. SUB TOPIC A. Savior offers redemption from spiritual and temporal death. 1. Define temporal and spiritual death. Discuss 2 Nephi 9:1–26, 39–54. 2. Through the atonement of Jesus Christ, all people will be resurrected. 3. All people will be restored to God’s presence to be judged. DISCUSSION QUESTIONS: What would happen to us without the power of Christ’s Resurrection? According to Jacob, what are some of the things we must do to be “saved in the kingdom of God”? Why is faith in Jesus Christ essential in order to receive all the blessings of His Atonement? What does it mean to endure the crosses of the world? SUB TOPIC B. Attitudes and actions that prevent us from receiving the blessing of the Atonement. 1. Read and discuss 2 Nephi 9:27–38. 2. The five attitudes and actions that prevent us from receiving the blessings of the Atonement. 3. Transgressing the commandments and wasting the days of probation; placing learning, money and other idols above God; being spiritually deaf and blind; being ‘uncircumcised of heart’; lying and committing murders and whoredoms. DISCUSSION QUESTIONS: How might people waste the days of their probation? In what situations are learning and riches good? How can we open our ears and eyes to the truths of the gospel? SUB TOPIC C. The Lord remembers His covenant with His people. 1. Read and discuss selected verses of 2 Nephi 10. 2. Elder Boyd K. Packer taught: “The discouraging idea that a mistake (or even a series of them) makes it everlastingly too late, does not come from the Lord. He has said that if we will repent, not only will He forgive us our transgressions, but He will forget them and remember our sins no more (in Conference Report, Apr. 1989, 72; or Ensign, May 1989, 59). 3. “Cheer up [their] hearts” because the Lord remembers His covenant people (2 Nephi 10:22–23). DISCUSSION QUESTIONS: How can we find comfort in the knowledge that the Lord remembers His covenant people? Why is it important to remember that “it is only through the grace of God that [we] are saved”? CONCLUSION Have a class member read aloud 2 Nephi 10:25, which is Jacob’s concluding message in this discourse. After bearing my testimony, invite someone to sing “Dear to the Heart of the Shepherd and announce the person who will offer the benediction.

Copyright © 2005 Randy F. Rubio All rights reserved “Being Anxiously Engaged in a Good Cause”

15


Effective Gospel Teaching

TEACHER’S LESSON PLAN WORKSHEET Title __________________________________________________________________________________________________ Objective __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ Introduction __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ Sub Topic A. __________________________________________________________________________ 1. _______________________________________________________________________________ 2. _______________________________________________________________________________ 3. _______________________________________________________________________________ Discussion Questions: __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ Sub Topic B. __________________________________________________________________________ 1. __________________________________________________________________________ 2. __________________________________________________________________________ 3. __________________________________________________________________________ Discussion Questions: __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ Sub Topic C. __________________________________________________________________________ 1. _______________________________________________________________________________ 2. _______________________________________________________________________________ 3. _______________________________________________________________________________ Discussion Questions: __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ Conclusion

__________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________

Copyright © 2005 Randy F. Rubio All rights reserved “Being Anxiously Engaged in a Good Cause”

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Effective Gospel Teaching

METHODS I CAN USE TO ENRICH MY LESSON

1. Assignments

[]

16. Memorizing

[]

2. Audiovisual Equipment

[]

17. Object Lessons

[]

3. Brainstorming

[]

18. Overhead Transparencies

[]

4. Buzz Sessions

[]

19. Pictures

[]

5. Chalkboard Illustration

[]

20. Posters

[]

6. Charts & Maps

[]

21. Questioning

[]

7. Committee Work

[]

22. Reports

[]

8. Demonstrations

[]

23. Talks

[]

9. Panel Discussion

[]

24. Role Playing

[]

10. Displays

[]

25. Singing

[]

11. Dramatization

[]

26. Student Teaching

[]

12. Music

[]

27. Resource Speaker

[]

13. Flash Cards

[]

28. Worksheets

[]

14. Instructional Games

[]

29. Learning Partners

[]

15. Lecturing

[]

30. Affirmations

[]

Copyright © 2005 Randy F. Rubio All rights reserved “Being Anxiously Engaged in a Good Cause”

17


Effective Gospel Teaching

TEACHER PREPARATION CHECKLIST

I have read my lesson thoroughly

[]

I have pondered and prayed about the lesson

[]

I have chosen principles in the lesson that will meet students’ needs

[]

I have prayed for specific students who need help the most

[]

I have a prepared lesson plan or outline

[]

I have a copy of the standard works

[]

I have a good introduction

[]

I have at least three sub topics to teach the lesson

[]

I have at least three methods I can use to enrich the lesson

[]

I have made prior students assignments

[]

I have made appropriate seating arrangements

[]

There is adequate light and ventilation

[]

The chalkboard is clean and ready

[]

I have a good conclusion

[]

I read and ponder the scriptures regularly

[]

I read a church reading material at least 15 minutes daily

[]

I know my students by name and important information about them

[]

T gxtv{xÜËá W|ä|Çx VÉÅÅ|áá|ÉÇ Teach the gospel of Jesus Christ and no other. Teach it out of the standard works. Teach it by the Holy Spirit. Apply it to the life situation of the student. Seal it by a personal testimony of the truths taught. Elder Bruce R. McConkie

Copyright © 2005 Randy F. Rubio All rights reserved “Being Anxiously Engaged in a Good Cause”

18


Effective Gospel Teaching

TEACHER’S FEEDBACK I want to know what I do well as a teacher. I also want to know what areas I can still improve on. Please rate my actual teaching performance in the following categories using this rating scale: 1 – 3 Beginner My Body Language

4 – 6 Good

7 – 9 Very Good

10 – Professional

Positive Comments or Suggestions

Eye Contact

[________]

__________________________________________________________

Posture

[________]

__________________________________________________________

Hand Gestures

[________]

__________________________________________________________

Facial Expression

[________]

__________________________________________________________

Dress & Appearance

[________]

__________________________________________________________

Voice & Vocal Variety [________]

__________________________________________________________

My Lesson

Positive Comments or Suggestions

My Introduction

[________]

__________________________________________________________

My Conclusion

[________]

__________________________________________________________

My Teaching Methods [________]

__________________________________________________________

Student Participation

[________]

__________________________________________________________

Discussion Facilitation [________]

__________________________________________________________

My Questions

[________]

__________________________________________________________

My Use of Time (40% - 60%)

[________]

__________________________________________________________

Please comment on how I involved my students, facilitated the discussion, presented the lesson, teaching impact, etc. __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ Name: _____________________________ Date: __________________ Observer: ______________________________ Copyright © 2005 Randy F. Rubio All rights reserved “Being Anxiously Engaged in a Good Cause”

19

Five Phases of Effective Teaching  

Chapter 17 "Anxiously Engaged in a Good Cause" A crash course for beginners on teaching effectively.