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Rep. Shrrod Brown( D-Ohio) and David Vitter (R-La.)

By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

Alex’s Lemonade Stand Event Raises $75,000 for Cancer Research By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

Push-Back Against Wall Street/ to p. 7

Congressional Recognition for their contributions to childhood cancer research. Maynez noted that this year’s event had to compete with a car show in Big Bear and the Spirit of 45 Day Celebration at the USS Iowa, a cross-country tribute to the generation that fought in World War II. The ILWU Southern California Pensioners paid all the expenses of hosting the event, which allowed all donations to go directly to the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation. “Not one cent of donations was used to pay any expenses,” said Dan Imbagliazzo, another member of the Walk the Coast Labor Walks the Walk for Alex/ to p. 2

Remembering Louis Adamic-— A San Pedran and Anti-fascist Labor Writer Page 3 Three LB Council Members Start Battle for Mayor Early Page 6 Nazelie’s New Deals, New Specials, the American Dream Page 14

August 23 - September 5, 2013

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LWU Local 13 raised more money with fewer in attendance at this year’s annual Walk the Coast fundraiser for Alex’s Lemonade Stand. Though they are not satisfied with that distinction, they will take it, said Robert Maynez, one of the coast committee event organizers. NBC4 weatherman Fritz Coleman emceed the event for the second year in a row, cracking jokes and keeping attendees engaged as he introduced The San Pedro High School marching bands and live bands performing at the event. Rep. Janice Hahn honored Coleman and Liz Scott, mother of Alex’s Lemonade Stand’s namesake, with a Certificate of

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Walk the Coast Committee members Dan Imbagliazzo, Robert Maynez, Rep. Janice Hahn, NBC4 weatherman Fritz Coleman, and volunteer Judith Blahnik attended at the Aug. 10 Walk the Coast fundraiser for Alex’s Lemonade Stand to fight childhood cancer. Photo by Betty Guevara

From bottom to top, as the mirage of austerity melts away, there’s a renewed effort to reform our dysfunctional economic system. Fast food workers’ wildcat strikes have spread to seven cities nationwide. The City of Richmond has voted to use eminent domain to seize and write down mortgages to fair market value and there’s new momentum to tackle “too big to fail” banks. “Minds are changing on Too Big to Fail,” Rolling Stone contributor Matt Taibi wrote on the magazine’s website on May 1. He was heralding the introduction of a new bill from senators Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) and David Vitter (R-La.), which would raise the cost of capital for “too big to fail” banks. The signs surrounding it seemed to signal a change in attitude. Brown previously offered an amendment to directly cap the size of banks, but it was defeated, 61-33, with 27 Democrats voting

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Labor Walks the Walk for Alex

August 23 - September 5, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

committee. “This was a major factor in our ability to donate over $73,000 in 2012 and over $75,000 in 2013.” Port of Los Angeles ILWU Locals were joined by locals in Port Hueneme, Port of San Francisco, and the locals in the Pacific Northwest. Maynez said he hopes to extend Walk the Coast to San Diego. Imbagliazzo gave high praise to local business owners such as the Kosmides family, proprietors of Fantastic Cafe and Broiler Grill, and Vanessa Caldera of La Cocina Mexicana for their donations of food and refreshments at the event. “Because these businesses donated this food we were able to donate all proceeds from food sales directly to Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation.” Pacific Crane Maintenance donated all the children’s games, jumpers, snow cone machines and photo booth and Ports America paid for the flyover from the Tiger Squadron, which number

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aerial maneuvers over the breakwater. This year also marked the events second annual poker tournament, which saw the number of contestants rise from 38 to 108. The tournament was a slugfest that ended with a tie between Local 13 dispatcher Jesse “Ungie” Lopez and local resident Victor H. The casino didn’t have the complete spelling of the winner’s name. The tournament was a called a tie at 1:30a.m. The tournament raised $5,660, which included $1,200 from the raffle and silent auction. Though the event’s turnout wasn’t what organizers hoped, it did give them some excitement for Walk the Coast events to come. I was happy to see that we were able to raise $75,000 this year, which was more than we raised last year with a smaller turnout,” Maynez said. “On the positive side, we learned a lot about fundraising. My goal is to see us hit $100,000 next year, including San Francisco, Port Hueneme, and possibly San Diego.”

Rep. Janice Hahn awarded Congressional recognition to Alex Lemonade Stand president, Liz Scott, and NBC4 weatherman, Fritz Coleman, for their contributions in the fight against childhood cancers. Photo by Betty Guevara.

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Laughing in San Pedro’s Jungle

Ponte Vista

Rediscovering Labor and Anti-fascist Writer, Louis Adamic By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

I couldn’t help but feel that we were missing something as we celebrated San Pedro’s 125th Anniversary of its founding. Yes, we did many of the perfunctory things to show our love for this Harbor town. We posted photos of historic homes and scenes of the waterfront in store windows. We honored the towns oldest residents with a “Living Treasures” dinner. Although attendees were only treated to a very small slice of town culture, we got a threeday street festival out of the deal. But I can’t say whether anyone has any clearer idea of what it means to be a San Pedran. This was my thought this past year. This thought only deepened when I discovered the writings of Slovene-American anti-fascist and labor writer, Louis Adamic. Adamic is a curious intellectual. I mean curious in the sense that he was strange. He saw in the United States (and I would extend his argument to San Pedro in particular) an opportunity to create a culture that approached being “pan-human” in its nature. He suggested a potential danger if we did not embrace that opportunity. In an essay published in his book, From Many Lands, Adamic argues for making America safe for differences. It was not enough to be tolerant. He argued for a robust Americanism in which Americans trained to become, “creatively and

positively interested in a man partly because he is different. Because being different he is apt to have something out-of-the-ordinary to offer to us personally and contribute to the evolving culture and civilization.” Born a peasant in a tiny village outside of Grosuplje, Croatia in 1898 (Croatia didn’t yet exist as a nation. Adamic’s village was in a province of the Austro-Hungarian empire before the

empire was dissolved after World War I), Adamic showed uncommon intelligence with little aptitude for life on a farm. As the eldest son of a peasant family, tradition dictated that Adamic would take over the household when his father died. His parents elected instead to send him to school. Adamic immigrated to the United States in Louis Adamic/ to p. 5

Join the Ponte Vista Open House, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Aug. 24, at the Ponte Vista site in San Pedro. During the open house information about the recently released final environmental impact report and the public hearing process will be included, as well as more recent changes to the project like the inclusion of more publicly-accessible open space. Details: (310) 241-0699; info@pontevista.com Venue: Ponte Vista Location: 27501 John Montgomery Drive, San Pedro

C.A.R.E. to DINE

Attend the C.A.R.E. to Dine kick-off party, from 3 to 6 p.m. Aug. 25, at the Long Beach Museum of Art. The idea behind the single-day event is simple and effective: dine out; fight AIDS. Participating restaurants will donate 20 percent or more of food, beverage, and alcohol sales on Sept. 26 to benefit clients of the Comprehensive AIDS Resource & Education Program. Details: (562) 624-4987; http://careprogram.org/ events/dine Venue: Long Beach Museum of Art Location: 2300 E. Ocean Blvd, Long Beach

6th District Budget Summit

The 6th District Budget Summit, will take place from 6 to 7 p.m. Aug. 28, at McBride Park in Long Beach. Details: (562) 570-6816 Venue: McBride Park Location: 1550 Martin Luther King, Jr. Ave., Long Beach

West Division Leadership Forum

Cmdr. Rocchi will host the West Division Leadership Forum, at 6 p.m. Aug. 28, at First Baptist Church in Long Beach. Venue: First Baptist Church Location: 1000 Pine Ave., Long Beach

Labor Day Pancake Breakfast

Animal Care Services Spay, Neuter Vouchers in August

August 23 - September 5, 2013

Long Beach Animal Care Services will be distributing spay and neuter vouchers in person at the PD Pitchford Companion Animal Village. Animal Care Services usually offers a limited number of vouchers on the first Thursday of the month; however, the program has been increased this month and vouchers are being offered each day Animal Care Services is open in August. Vouchers are only valid at participating veterinary hospitals and clinics, and will only be distributed to Long Beach residents and the Long Beach Animal Care Services contract cities of Los Alamitos, Cerritos, Seal Beach and Signal Hill. A full listing of participating veterinarians can be found at www.longbeach.gov/acs under Spay & Neuter Programs. The village is open from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Saturday. Venue: D. Pitchford Companion Animal Village Location: 7700 E. Spring St., Long Beach

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San Pedro United Methodist Church will host its 58th Annual Labor Day Pancake Breakfast, from 7 to 11 a.m. Sept. 2, in San Pedro. Beacon House men will be serving eggs, sausage, juice, coffee, and of course, pancakes. The United Methodist Women will raffle a handmade quilt, along with other raffle prizes. Proceeds will benefit the children of Harbor Day Preschool. An adult breakfast is $ 8 at the door. Children younger than 12 years old are admitted free. . Details: (310) 548-1001 Venue: UMC Friendship Hall Location: 580 W. 6th St., San Pedro.

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Clean Air Pumps Multi-Billions Into Local Economy AQMD Socioeconomic Report Shows Benefits Far Outweigh Costs By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

August 23 - September 5, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Ever since the modern environmental movement emerged in the 1960s, industries involved have screamed about high costs and lost jobs, and the media has uncritically framed the economy and the environment as competing goods. But that’s not actually how the real world works. Case in point: the 2012 Air Quality Management Plan, the latest such long-term plan approved by the Air Quality Management District board in December 2012. And it’s not the first. “I have been doing this for over 20 years and all our plans have demonstrated that the clean air has more benefits than costs,” said AQMD Deputy Executive Officer Elaine Chang. Of course, not all costs or benefits can be quantified, but as more and more of them have

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been quantified, the pattern has continued to hold. The purpose of the plan is environmental—to bring the region into compliance with the Clean Air Act. And yet, the quantifiable economic benefits—estimated to average $10.7 billion annually from 2014 to 2035—outweigh the estimated $448 million in annual costs by more than 20 to 1. What’s more “there is a net modest job gain due to cleaner air” of about 37,000 jobs annually, according to the 2012 AQMP Socioeconomic Report. Jobs created outnumber job growth foregone by more than 10 to 1. “We have the benefits outweighing the costs, but we’re not doing this just because the benefits outweigh the costs,” Chang said. “It’s a federal mandate …. It’s probably even worse costs if we don’t meet the mandate.” Those costs would start with the loss of federal transportation funding, which run into the billions, supporting the ongoing upkeep and modernization of the region’s transportation infrastructure. The most recent AQMP, in 2007, projected $14.6 billion in benefits annually between 2007 and 2025, compared to costs of $2.3 billion. The vastly different figures reflect differences in the new measures being adopted. “As we move from plan to plan, the scope of the plan changes over time, and also the control measures are different from last time,” Chang explained. So, the benefits calculated in the 2012 plan are in addition to the benefits of past plans as well. However, those past benefits tend to reduce the benefits projected in the current plan, explained report co-author Sue Lieu, an AQMD program supervisor. “In estimating the benefits, we are estimating the ‘delta effect’”—meaning the change in air quality due to the plan. “But if the air quality has been improving, as you can imagine, the delta will be becoming smaller,” Lieu said. “So that’s another reason why the benefit is smaller, compared to the last AQMP.” The preponderance of benefits over costs is one of two main conclusions cited in the report’s executive summary. The other is that “The 2012 AQMP is not expected to result in dramatic impacts on the region’s competitiveness as measured by share of national jobs, cost of production, relative delivered prices, and exports and imports.” Indeed, Lieu said the plan could be expected to strengthen regional competitiveness. “When we have cleaner air... people will know and they will be more willing to stay here, so we will see less out-migration,” Lieu said. “On the other hand, people will be more willing to move into a cleaner environment.” The report itself confirms this, stating, “As the air gets cleaner, the continued on following page

from p. 3

Louis Adamic

1913 at the age of 15. He worked at a number of odd jobs before enlisting in the Army and served at the tail end of the first World War. After he was discharged, he drifted from job to job, from city to city, struggling to find employment ashore. He worked as a merchant marine for some months before realizing that the sea was not for him. Then he made his way to Los Angeles, lured with advertisements that made Southern California out to be a place where jobs were as plentiful as sunshine. He continued to drift until he picked up a job as a reporter for a Los Angeles newspaper writing news and advertising copy. It was during this time he began covering the activities of the International Worker’s of the World union (or the Wobblies) and their organizing activities in San Pedro. The union had shut down the port with a strike in 1923 before it was broken by the Los Angeles Police Department. This was also when Upton Sinclair (arguably Adamic’s biggest intellectual influence) was arrested for reading the Bill of Rights on private property to an audience of 2,000 to 3,000 people on Liberty Hill. In his autobiography, Laughing in the Jungle, Adamic paints a picture of a clean town that was ethnically diverse and beautiful in its simplicity. In his vision, San Pedro was a town filled with working stiffs and booze runners in the era of Prohibition.

Writer Louis Adamic hard at work. File Photo

Adamic quit his job at the newspaper and moved to San Pedro, where he began working on the docks alongside the rest of San Pedro’s immigrants and migrants. He met Croatians, Dalmatians, Serbians and any number of ethnicities and nationalities from the Balkan states, as well as Italians, Latinos and black folks. All of them became profile material from which he was able to draw his own conclusions of how immigrants and America can prosper without being destroyed by the Jungle. When Adamic took a job as a munici-

from previous page

Clean Air Boosts Economy

Clean Air Economy/ to p. 6

Adamic/ to p. 24

August 23 - September 5, 2013

percent, including hospitals, real estate, private households, food services and bars, textiles and apparel, motion picture and sound recording, while only three transportation sectors have costs over one-tenth of 1 percent: Transit and ground passenger transportation at 0.319 percent, rail at 0.298 percent, and scenic and sightseeing transportation at 0.107 percent. Reduced congestion costs mean these sectors will also benefit disproportionately as well, however. The only sectors projected to experience less net job growth as a result of the plan are truck transportation and the catch-all “other services.” The plan also breaks down impacts geographically into 21 subregions. Although rates vary, job growth would be greater in all of them as a result of the plan. It would benefit all income levels as well. Despite the proven economic benefits of clean air, the recent recession lead to an unprecedented degree of business concern. “What’s new this time around is that we have comments from the business community,” Chang said. “The business community at large, they are not naturally subject to the AQMD regulations, but just because of the recent recession—the region is still trying to climb out of recession to reduce the jobless rate. The concern was that any regulation would just make that more difficult.” This gave rise to objections to the ozone measures, whose delay would only make attainment more costly and difficult in the long run. It also lead to various complaints about the socioeconomic review, and calls for it to be outsourced to a private firm. There were even complaints

housing restaurants, cafés or some other high visitor drawing entity to serve as a mechanism to draw people into downtown once the Waterfront transformation is complete. Now, without commenting on whether the idea is a sound one or not — indeed there are some stumbling blocks in the idea — critics of the idea immediately responded by appealing to history and tradition, and their desire to maintain physical evidence of memories in a building. But there was not so much of a plan as to how it would be done. As each member of the audience rose to speak for or against the idea, upon introducing themselves they stated the number of years they have been a resident. Some had lived in town for 10 years or less, while others had lived in town for 35 years or more. And, a number of others that were somewhere in between. As they spoke, it occurred to me that to an outsider, it would appear that 35-year or lifelong multi-generational San Pedro residents had the most credibility or at least held the higher esteem. One gentleman, after introducing himself, said he was a 13-year resident, but quickly noted his wife is a lifelong San Pedro resident, as if this would add more credibility to his statements than if he didn’t. Another gentleman recalled taking his children, when they were still children some 30-plus years ago, to the museum and the memories made and wondered aloud what would parents today do if they wanted their children to have the same experience. Even particular community divisions, peculiar only to San Pedro, seemed to emerge when a representative from the Ratkovich Group explained the absence of one of the principals because the presentation was at the Croatian Cultural Center. He said he was uncomfortable because he is Serbian, referencing the centuries long rift that goes beyond the 1990s war in the Balkan states. The center’s executive director, Maya Bristow defended the center as being open

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four-county region is predicted to gain a larger share of total national jobs through 2025.” As a percentage, the difference is small, but real, and widely distributed across all subregions and almost all industries. A key goal of the 2012 AQMP is to bring the region into compliance with the 24-hour standard for fine particulate matter, known as PM2.5, by 2012. PM2.5 is both directly emitted, and created by chemical interactions of other pollutants in the air. The plan also contains ozone control measures, even though compliance with ozone standards is not an immediate AQMD goal, as the ozone deadline is 2023. “We need to take down our gap gradually,” Chang explained. Control measures fall into four main categories: basin-wide short-term PM2.5 measures, primarily episodic ones during high PM2.5 days; contingency measures that will kick in if the basin fails to meet the 24-hour PM2.5 standard by 2014; 8-hour ozone measures; and transportation control measures (TCMs) designed to reduce vehicle miles travelled (and hence, congestion) as part of the 2012 Regional Transportation Plan developed by the Southern California Association of Governments. In terms of benefits as well as costs, the last category is easily the largest—roughly 72 percent of each. On the benefit side, the $10.7 billion breaks down into about $7.7 billion for congestion relief for all TCMs, $2.2 billion for averted illness and higher survival rates, $696 million for visibility improvements, and $14 million for reduced damage to materials. On the cost side, TCM’s account for $326.4 million out of the annual $448 million cost. It’s also worth noting how much of the economy will bear almost no cost at all. Out of more than 60 sectors analyzed, almost twothirds have cost less than one 1/1000 of 1

pal port pilot’s clerk, guiding ships into the Harbor, he got an even greater freedom to pursue his writing pursuits. It was my reading of his chapters on San Pedro in Laughing in the Jungle that I realized what was missing from this past year’s festivities of San Pedro’s 125th birthday. Annually, we celebrate Liberty Hill Day commemorating the Wobblies success in shutting down the port for two weeks and Upton Sinclair’s being arrested for a righteous cause. We memorialize the martyrdom of Dickie Parker and John Knudsen in the days leading up the 1934 strike. As we march forward in developing our waterfront, we pay homage to the days when Beacon and Front streets were the center of town. Locally there are still multi-generational families that continue passing down local lore in private settings. The problem is that we failed to collaborate across lines and link all of the important milestones that define what it means to be a San Pedran, while maintaining the flexibility to remain inclusive of the new. There was no collaboration between downtown San Pedro’s business interest and the ILWU, between the Liberty Hill organizers and modern labor unions. What we have had was disparate parts doing their own thing. To illustrate my point: Jerico Development president and partner in the LA Waterfront Alliance, Alan Johnson, floated the idea of repurposing the Ferry Building that houses the Los Angeles Maritime Museum during the Central San Pedro Neighborhood Councils Land Use committee on Aug. 19. The idea was to move the museum to the center of Port O’ Call Village while converting the Ferry building into a venue

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Three-Way Council Combat for Mayor: Lack of Training Can Jeopardize PostPanamax Vessels

The completion of the renovated Panama Canal is scheduled for completion in 2015. But, the focus has shifted to whether or not the pilots and personnel of the Panama Canal Authority are able to properly run the operation. Capt. Rainiero Salas, president of the Panama Canal Pilots’ Association doesn’t believe so and says that inadequately trained staff members are a concern in terms of safety. Salas perceived the main problem to be the way the third set of locks operates. Initially, ships are guided through the locked entrance by mechanical mules. Now, because of the extensiveness of the lock, employees and personnel from the Panama Canal Authority will lead the cargo ships through the entrance inside tugboats. This practice requires all parties to be on the same page 100 percent of the time. So, an inadequately trained staff can mean trouble. Flight simulators and practice maneuvers may be helping, however Salas believes a more detailed program is necessary. Salas said he showed the results of their training procedure. He hopes for a well-rounded training program that would almost eliminate concerns about safety.

Port of Portland Violates Oregon Public Records Act

August 23 - September 5, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

The ILWU is filing a lawsuit against the Port of Portland for numerous violations of the Oregon Public Records Act. The port requested $200,000 up front to locate and release the records. They deemed those fees to be the phase 1 fees and wouldn’t specify the amount of the phase 2 fees, which would cover attorney and legal costs. The port asked for the payment to be made upfront without giving a guarantee the information sought and paid for would be disclosed. The ILWU made requests in June, September and December of 2012. The union is seeking, among other remedies, that the court issue an order declaring Port of Portland’s handling of ILWU’s public records requests to be dilatory, in bad faith, and in violation of the Oregon Public Records Act; issue an order compelling Port of Portland to waive or substantially reduce its fees. The Port of Portland has responded to the lawsuit by saying it has abided by state public records law and that the high fees were due to the broad scope of the information requests, which the port estimates would take hundreds of hours and a large allocation of port resources to compile.

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The port says it eventually lowered the $200,000 preliminary quote to $50,000 and offered to set up a payment plan, an offer the union has yet to respond to. The union has been seeking port records as part of an ongoing labor dispute involving contract negotiations with a Port of Portland grain handling terminal.

National Labor Relations Board and Mexican Foreign Ministry Strengthen Bond

The Labor Relations Board and the Mexican Foreign Ministry signed a letter of agreement aimed at offering Mexican laborers in the United States information, guidance and access to education regarding their rights and responsibilities under the National Labor Relations Act. The NLRB and Mexican Embassy in the Washington, as well as the NLRB Regional Offices will provide the assistance.

Manning Sentenced to 35 Years

FORT MEADE, MD—U.S. military whistleblower Pfc. Bradley Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison Aug. 21, after leaking hundreds of thousands classified documents to WikiLeaks in 2010. Military Col. Judge Denise Lind, who convicted Manning earlier this month on 20 counts including espionage and theft, could have sentenced Manning up to 90 years in prison. Prosecutors had pushed for 60 years arguing that a stiffer term would deter other whistleblowers from leaking classified information. News Briefs/ to p. 26

Long Beach Politicos on the Lookout for Shenanigans By Greggory Moore, Long Beach Columnist

What do you get when you take nine highprofile, powerful people whose job it is to work together for the common good and have a third of them compete for a single, even higher-profile and more powerful position? If that’s the setup of a joke, you’ll have to wait until April 8 for the punchline, because this is exactly what is happening right now on the Long Beach City Council. No fewer than three council members—Robert Garcia (1st District), Suja Lowenthal (2nd District), and Gerrie Schipske (5th District)—are in it to win it, with the brass ring being a one-way ticket to succeed Bob Foster as mayor of the 36th most populous city in the United States. If you cannot imagine that such a scenario might interfere with the council conducting the business of the people, you need an imagination transplant. Not only are all three competing for votes in general, but in many respects, for overlapping demographics as well: All three are Democrats; Garcia and Schipske are gay, while Lowenthal has been a strong ally of the LGBT community; Garcia and Lowenthal are both in the 35-to-44 age group and represent the two downtown council districts; etc. Probably no one is in a better position to appreciate the potential issues that may arise from Long Beach’s political Thunderdome (“Three council members enter, one council member leaves [as mayor]!”) than the trio’s council cohort, past and present. “I haven’t seen any factionalism so far,” says 7th District Councilmember James Johnson, a so-far-so-good sentiment expressed by most of the current council members. “When you’re in City Hall, you have a job to do, and everyone is expected to do it with professionalism.” Third District Councilman Gary DeLong concurs, though with a dose of pessimism—or realism, depending on how you view it. “So far everyone’s been behaving themselves, and there have not been any conflicts. So far it’s been business as usual,” he says. “Could things change as we get closer to the April election? They certainly could. […] If councilmembers start giving endorsements to one person or the other. If that starts happening, I think there could develop a chasm.” DeLong says it’s not for nothing that campaign season is also known as “the silly season.” “You will see people running for office all of a sudden start putting silly items on the city council calendar,” he prognosticates. “That will definitely happen. You know, there’ll be an agenda item to appease this group, and an agenda item to appease that group. And that’s unfortunate.” Eighth District Councilman Al Austin says that, although it’s too early in the game to comment on any seismic shifts in the council ground, already he finds himself mindful of the political calculus at work. “I’m a little more cognizant now on what I bring forward [and] what I sign on to,” he says. “[…] It’s a hot political climate right now. You have to be little bit more cautious and judicious. […] When a city council member puts something on the agenda, we’re trying to get other city

Long Beach City Councilmembers, from left, Suja Lowenthal, Gerrie Schipske and Robert Garcia are competing for the mayor’s seat. File Photos

council members to sign on. With that said, you may be asking someone to sign on and not someone else, which may be disruptive. I don’t want to get into that kind of dynamic.” Not surprisingly, the former council members with whom I spoke have a slightly more critical take on the situation. After joking that he was about to file papers to run for mayor, “because I don’t want to be left behind,” former 9th District Council member and current Los Angeles County Housing Commission Chairman Val Lerch, sounds a theme that is echoed by many observers: that from now until the election there will be a lot of second-guessing of the motives of the three mayoral candidates. “You’re going to have to start questioning that every time these three people make any decisions,” Lerch says. “Are they [making a

given decision] because of the city, or did they do it because it would advance their political careers?” Lerch says that he would not have run for mayor while serving his district as council member. “I thought about running for mayor […] but that was after I left office,” he says. “I wasn’t going to leave a [council] seat empty or cause a special election—which could happen with at least one of the three [seats of council members who are running for mayor]. I’m a guy who went into city politics to help my neighbors, help my community, help my city. That was my driving force all the way along.” Former 7th District Councilwoman Tonia Reyes Uranga, presently a candidate for the 70th Assembly District, sees the current electoral Three-way in Long Beach/ to p. 21

from p. 5

Clean Air Economy that AQMD was “inherently biased,” Chang said. AQMD already relies on an advisory group of outside experts from academia and consulting firms, and has a built-in peer review process as part of the AQMP, which business groups did not appear to be fully familiar with, according to Random Lengths’ review of comment letters and AQMD responses. “They felt that even the peer review was not be independent enough,” Chang said, adding, “They also raised the health impact of joblessness. It’s not just the health impact of clean air...” But the report shows more jobs, and thus less joblessness with the plan. How would analyzing health impacts of joblessness make the plan seem more costly? Random Lengths wanted to know. “They don’t believe the benefits of clean air,” Chang explained. “They only look at the cost side.” But even their grasp of the cost side is faulty.

On the cost side, the report speaks of “jobs foregone,” not “jobs lost.” “We’re talking about future jobs,” Chang confirmed. “We have less growth than we projected. We’re not talking about now, losing, a ‘net jobs lost’ from today’s level.” AQMD’s analysis has also been recently reviewed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as well. Nonetheless, AQMD’s board also agreed to hire an outside entity to assist in “evaluating and refining” the socioeconomic report. A request for proposals has been issued. Responses were due July 26. “We have respondents very well representative of the academic field and also the consulting field,” Lieu said. “We’re pleased to receive these proposals.” “We have received less than 10 proposals,” Chang said, but that was “what we expected” she said, adding, “This is a very specialized area.” The board is expected to consider a finalist at its October meeting.

Push-Back Against Wall Street from p. 1

against it. Taibi called the new approach “more elegant,” saying: Studies have shown that these banks borrow money at about 0.8 percent more cheaply than other banks, and that this implicit government subsidy is worth about $83 billion a year just to the top 10 banks in America. This bill would essentially wipe out that hidden subsidy and make the banks bailout-proof.

—William Black, former banking regulator

month on mortgage payments. A significant portion of the savings could be expected to be spent in Richmond’s local economy. The total face value of the 624 mortgages is $241.98 million, compared to a current market value of $177.16 million, for $68.82 million in negative equity. Mortgage Resolution Partners has approached other local governments with similar proposals in

the past—most notably San Bernardino County and two of its cities, Fontana and Ontario—but Richmond is the first to proceed in the face of industry opposition and threats. Other cities have expressed interest in partnering with Mortgage Resolution Partners, including North Las Vegas and, here in Southern California, the towns of El Monte and La Puente. The floodgates may finally be about to open.

August 23 - September 5, 2013

on Aug. 2. Wise works at both Burger King and Pizza Hut and is a member of the Stand Up Kansas City campaign. “So why not speak up, and stand up, and let the nation know that we are suffering? This is really a cry for help. This great nation should not turn its back on working-class people that need help.” The problem is not just low wages, but splitshifts, short hours and—on top of it all—wage theft. According to a survey in New York City released in mid-May, 84 percent of fast-food workers report wage theft of some kind, with nearly half reporting three or more instances. Even worse, 100 percent of delivery workers reported wage violations. Random Lengths has previously reported that losses due to wage theft in California exceed those due to regularly reported street crime— robbery, burglary, auto theft, etc. But the extent of wage theft seems to have only increased since that earlier reporting. “This is by far, the largest strike by fast-food workers in the history of the United States,” labor journalist Josh Eidelson told Democracy Now! host Amy Goodman. “It comes less than a year after the first big strike by fast-food workers anywhere in the United States. And it demonstrates a real escalation in this campaign.” It’s precisely the kind of wildcat strike movement that played a pivotal role in building the modern labor movement during the depths of the Great Depression. On a third front, on July 29, the City of Richmond wrote to 32 mortgage holders offering to buy 624 underwater mortgages, discounted to the homes’ current value. If refused, Richmond said it may use the power of eminent domain to condemn and seize the mortgages paying court-determined fair market value. After that, Richmond would help homeowners refinance to take on the new mortgages. “After years of waiting on the banks to offer up a more comprehensive fix or the federal government, we’re stepping into the void to make it happen ourselves,” Richmond Mayor Gayle McLaughlin told reporters the next day. Richmond is partnering with a San Francisco firm, Mortgage Resolution Partners, for technical assistance and financial backing. It would receive a flat fee of $4,500 per mortgage, while homeowners will save an average of $1,180 a

A demonstrator picketing for higher wages for fast-food workers. File Photo

The Local Publication You Actually Read

As a fearless high-profile Wall Street critic, Taibi is second to none, except for William Black, author of The Best Way To Rob a Bank is to Own One and the former regulator who helped send armies of white collar criminals to jail in the wake of the Savings and Loan crises. Nine days after Taibi’s piece, Black blasted Brown-Vitter, in a piece subtly titled, “Brown-Vitter Will Not and Cannot Work but it is Criminogenic.” “Under Obama,” Black argued, “bipartisan bills have a dismal fate because the Democrats negotiate away key elements necessary to create a good bill and add provisions that make parts of the bill harmful—just to pick up a few token co-sponsors—and then the Republicans kill good parts of the bill anyway and try to enact the bad parts. Brown-Vitter exemplifies all three problems.” Brown-Vitter misdiagnoses the problem in at least two major ways, Black argued, The bill misunderstands the role of accounting control fraud, which can easily render the capital requirements meaningless. In fact, Black argues, tighter requirements increase the incentives for fraud. It also misunderstands the true source of the government subsidy—the guarantee that Too Big To Fail creditors will be taken care of in case of bankruptcy, which has nothing to do with capital requirements. At the same time, Brown-Vitter lets most of the problematic institutions off the hook—including banks in the $50 to $500 billion range—and even provides them with additional protection against effective regulation. A few months later, there is little sign of legislative movement on Brown-Vitter, but regulators have taken a half-step in the direction of raising capital requirements. Both senators applauded loudly. Meanwhile, Sen. Elizabeth Warren has introduced a bill to restore the separation of commercial and investment banking established under the Glass-Steagall Act in 1933, which was repealed in 2000. It may not go anywhere in the bought-and-paid-for Senate, but it gives reformers something clear and direct to rally around. It also helps to further the process of changing the debate, as Kevin Roose of New York magazine explained in the article “Elizabeth Warren’s Long Game Against Wall Street.” In short, regardless of Brown-Vitter’s flaws, Taibi is right that minds are changing—and not just with respect to the financial pinnacles of power, but about those on the bottom as well, as seen in the recent wave of wildcat fast food worker strikes. These have drawn attention to the plight of minimum-wage workers trying to survive on wages far below what a minimum wage provided in the past, in an era when more adults than ever are trying to raise families on those meager wages. The strikes started in New York City this past year, and have now spread to Chicago, St. Louis, Kansas City, Detroit, Milwaukee and Flint. “What else do we have to lose? We are already slowly dying in our day-to-day lives,” fast-food worker Terrance Wise said on Democracy Now!

“Under Obama, bipartisan bills have a dismal fate because the Democrats negotiate away key elements necessary to create a good bill and add provisions that make parts of the bill harmful—just to pick up a few token co-sponsors—and then the Republicans kill good parts of the bill anyway and try to enact the bad parts. Brown-Vitter exemplifies all three problems.”

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Government Secrets First they come for the files, then they come for the journalists and then they come for you James Preston Allen, Publisher

August 23 - September 5, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Pvt. Bradley Manning’s sentence of 35 years in prison with possible parole in 8 years for his releasing of classified documents to WikiLeaks was announced today as I was writing this column. This is a victory of sorts I suppose. He could have gotten 90 years. We ran one of the first reports on the documents Manning leaked to WikiLeaks three years ago. The document released included a video of a U.S. Apache helicopter firing on and killing two journalists and several civilians. It was this one video along with thousands of other classified files that troubled Manning and ultimately got him arrested on espionage charges. It was his act of courage that broke open the gates of secrecy surrounding our war in Iraq. On Aug. 20, the editors at The London Guardian revealed that they were ordered by the British government to destroy all of their computer hard-drives that contained secret files leaked by private NSA contractor Edward Snowden. The Guardian was the first to reveal the U.S. National Security Administration’s secret wiretapping of both foreign and domestic telephone lines and collection of Internet metadata from telecommunication companies. This revelation comes just days after The Guardian reporter who broke the Snowden story, Glenn Greenwald’s domestic partner, David Miranda, was detained at London’s Heathrow Airport for 9 hours under the United Kingdom’s Terrorism Acts law. British authorities stopped him en route to his home in Brazil from Berlin, during which they confiscated his laptop, cell phone, USB smart sticks and hard drives. Miranda is suing the government for the return of these items and the admission that this detention was “illegal.” Fortunately for The Guardian (and unfortunately for the government), the editors had already backed up copies of the oncesecret files outside of the UK and reporters for the newspaper must now “off shore” their reporting. Greenwald is in Brazil. These are just a few of the War on Terrorism’s casualties as it morphs into a war on the scribes whose job it is to print the truth, and what little that can be told. Snowden is in exile in Russia. Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, is camped

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out in the Ecuadorian consulate in London. Both fear extradition to the United States– home of the brave and once-land of Freedom of the Press– where they would be tried like Pfc. Manning on espionage charges. At this point it is an abject lesson in the meaning of liberty to which I’d refer you to the wisdom of Ben Franklin who once said, “Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.” One would think that after all these years of war and with our growing sense of insecurity, we all would object to the ongoing pilfering of our national treasury for these expensive wars and subsequent invasion of our rights. But it’s likely that this issue will become like the other grievances Congress is unlikely to redress: The Vietnam War started on the basis of a lie and pursued on false pretexts until exposed, and President Nixon’s instigation of the War on Drugs on similar pretexts. The War on Drugs is a war that is nowhere close to being won, but still consumes billions per year. In fact the stepping up of the drug war in Mexico over the last six years has only led to some 120,000 murders of civilians–many of them journalists who dared to speak the truth about the drug cartels. And I am sure that our government’s clandestine involvement across the border is a classified matter not for publication. The two wars in Iraq, which were based on false premises (lies to be more exact) and the misguided mission in Afghanistan, for the express purpose of retaliating for the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Towers. That war has now cost us more lives than were originally lost when the towers fell. Just how much vengeance do we really want to extract from the peasants of a third world country? If this is what winning a war looks like, then I’d hate to see what it means to lose. And indeed, we are losing. We just aren’t admitting that we have lost most, if not all of these wars. We are just too arrogant or self-righteous to admit the obvious. So secrecy persists in the defense of the indefensible, using the fear of terrorist threats as justification for abdicating our fundamental rights. The residual effect on our country is the intimidation of the general population at the airports and harbors and intimidation of the Publisher/Executive Editor James Preston Allen james@randomlengthsnews.com

“A newspaper is not just for reporting the news as it is, but to make people mad enough to do something about it.” —Mark Twain Vol. XXXIV : No. 17

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Published every two weeks for the Harbor Area communi- Assistant Editor Zamná Ávila ties of San Pedro, RPV, Lomita, Harbor City, Wilmington, zamna@randomlengthsnews.com Carson and Long Beach. Distributed at over 350 locations Senior Editor Paul Rosenberg throughout the seven cities of the Harbor Area.

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press via threats, illegal secret wiretaps and the subsequent shredding of the Bill of Rights. In New York, it’s “stop and frisk” policing or the use of surveillance cameras in neighborhoods and shopping districts and domestic use of military drones to spy on civilians. Any sense of a right to privacy is forfeited for the sake of security. And before you know it, the NSA is hauling

off your computer and you in shackles holding you incommunicado; very much like the scene from the 1985 Terry Gilliam film Brazil, in which a bureaucratic typo lands an average citizen renditioned out of his own living room on charges of “terrorism.” Just how much of your individual rights do you want to forfeit in order to have “security”?

I Support the New Ponte Vista and I Will Tell You Why By John Mavar, Northwest San Pedro Resident My family has a long history in San Pedro going back three generations, and was influential in creating the community as we now know it. Bringing new people to our town is part of what makes this place so unique. San Pedro is a vibrant and diverse community because it welcomes people from far and wide, whether visiting through the port, or coming to live and be a part of the community. I’m proud of my family’s legacy, started by my grandfather, who built apartment buildings for working San Pedrans. Generations of families have grown up in the homes my grandfather built here in town. One of the reasons I have chosen to be active in the community is because of this legacy from my grandfather, who has always believed in—and invested in—this community. I would like to challenge my fellow San Pedrans to think about the future of our community. We can look forward to a redeveloped

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waterfront and a revitalized downtown. Our port will continue to be a source of employment and economic growth. But where does housing fit into the picture? As part of my work in the community, I used to be a member of the Northwest San Pedro Neighborhood Council, and I participated in many of the discussions about the Ponte Vista project over the years. We finally have a development team that has listened to what we have been saying all along. We wanted less density, a smaller number of units, and reasonable traffic improvements. We wanted more single-family homes, open space, and for the Ponte Vista community to feel like part of San Pedro. With the new plan for Ponte Vista, San Pedro has a golden opportunity to write its future. The former Navy site, which has been closed off for over 15 years, will be opened up for the continued on following page

Random Lengths News editorial office is located at 1300 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731, (310) 519-1016. Address correspondence regarding news items and news tips only to Random Lengths News, P.O. Box 731, San Pedro, CA 90733-0731, or email to editor @randomlengthsnews.com. Send Letters to the Editor or requests for subscription information to james @ randomlengthsnews.com. To be considered for publication, all Letters to the Editor should be typewritten, must be signed, with address and phone number included (these will not be published, but for verification only) and be kept to about 250 words. To submit advertising copy email adv@randomelengthsnews.com or reads@ randomlengthsnews.com. Extra copies and back issues are available by mail for $3 per copy while supplies last. Subscriptions are available for $35 per year for 27 issues. Random Lengths News presents issues from an alternative perspective. We welcome articles and opinions from all people in the Harbor Area. While we may not agree with the opinions of contributing writers, we respect and support their 1st Amendment right to express those opinions. Random Lengths News is a member of Standard Rates and Data Reporting Services and the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. (ISN #0891-6627). All contents Copyright 2013 Random Lengths News. All rights reserved.

RANDOMLetters

Stowaways and Architects

California Democrats have been submitting lots of stories about how their families came to this country or this state to help remind Republicans—and the voters—of the actual human beings and families impacted by immigration reform. Robert from Glendale shared this story: My maternal great grandmother came to California from Colima, Mexico to work on the citrus ranches as support staff for the many migrant pickers that would need food, lodging and laundry services. She eventually married and had four daughters, two of which she sent to college. I am very proud of my abuelita and her sacrifices to provide for her family during the Depression. I am an architect today because of her belief that you can accomplish anything you set your heart and mind to.

That’s a far cry from [Iowa] Republican Rep. Steve King’s fearmongering stories about people carrying drugs through the desert, and sharing stories like these is how California Democrats are coming together to build support for comprehensive immigration reform. Just look at the difference. Here’s what Rep. King said: For every one who’s a valedictorian, there’s another 100 out there who weigh 130 pounds—and they’ve got calves the size of cantaloupes because they’ve been hauling 75 pounds of marijuana across the desert.

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Ponte Vista

I wish to comment on your article of July 28, 2013. I feel you are way out of line when you compare the Trayvon Martin tragedy to other racial crimes such as the Emmett Till and the Medgar Evers. We currently have the professional black leaders such as Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson demanding justice. They lead a group that is acting like a lynch mob hoping or demanding that George Zimmerman be tried under a Federal Hate Stature. The liberals like yourself have joined the clamour for the justice. For the record, I always consider myself a liberal having voted for Barack Obama twice. The chief cause of the tragedy is the laws that allow people to carry guns. The “Stand Your Ground” law is stupid and unnecessary. We had a jury trial. What happened was not a hate crime. Calm heads have to prevail in order to prevent riots, etc.

So the new plan for Ponte Vista is not designed for the rich, giving them the option to lock themselves away in an exclusive R1 development. It’s designed for all of us— that’s why they have included housing, like townhomes and condominiums, that will be accessible to working people. It’s designed for San Pedrans, many of whom, like me, work at the port. Kids used to play at the Navy housing, families lived there, it was part of the fabric of this town. We have a moment now where we can get that back and move forward at the same time. Let’s build Ponte Vista and bring new families to San Pedro and make space for families that are already here but need a new home. Let’s put out the welcome mat and welcome people home, just like our families were welcomed in the past.

Public Lobbyist Wilmington

Don, Your use of the title “Public Lobbyist” is a polite euphemism for what you do. James Preston Allen, Publisher

Should LAPD HR be Audited?

Willie Sutton was a bank robber. He robbed banks. He didn’t rob bars or barber shops or other businesses. He robbed banks. A reporter asked him why he robs banks, and he answered, “Because that’s where the money is.” Using that simple logic, Angelenos might think about calling for an audit of the Los Angeles

Police Department. Consider these figures from the Mayor’s proposed budget of 2013-14. 1.) The LAPD received a Departmental Appropriation of One Billion, 310 million, 810 thousand, 443 dollars. That’s 39 percent of the Departmental Appropriation for all 34 Budgetary Departments in City Government. 2.) The Police Department received an allocation of $1, 241,368,772 just for salaries. That’s 43 percent of the total City budget for salaries. 3.) Of the $1,001,976,483 provided in the budget for Pensions/Retirement, 51 percent is More Letters/ to p. 12

Message from the Public Lobbyist

It is astonishing that for the first time in quarter of a century, C.D. 15 Council Officer, Mr. Joe Buscaino has put into writing to the Public Lobbyist for Wilmington, Donald Compton, some six months ago that he supports connecting downtown Los Angeles with the Harbor area by modern light rail system and wants the lobbyist to keep his feet to the fire on the issues to boot. So the lobbyist still is pushing for Councilman Buscaino to get a Mayoral Appointment to the M.T.A. Board of 13 directors. As of this date, there are still three open seats on that M.T.A. Board for mayoral appointees. On 2 July, the WTC chair, Cecilia Moreno signed a formal letter that she composed and mailed out, based on unanimous vote by her own WNC board, of 16, at the 26 June meeting, must passed, supporting such a letter in support of a mayoral appointment of Councilman Buscaino to the MTA Board of Directors that has been received by Mr. Buscaino to the M.T.A. Board of Glearson, policy director, and Ms. Alison Becker, Director of planning and economic development for C.D. !15, both of whom told the Lobbyist that they were on board the connection by modern metro issue at the moment he mentioned it to them as his pet project for the past ten years, or so. Given all of this, now that it appears that his honor is in no hurry to fill those three slots on the board quickly, the lobbyist asked you, Mr. Allen to consider the following. Would you be willing to mention this message to the current president of Central San

August 23 - September 5, 2013

community to live in and enjoy. Both residents and neighbors will be able to take advantage of walking trails, playgrounds and open space. We will all be able to come in and enjoy the views. And, finally, we will have beautiful new housing for San Pedro families, seniors and working folks. We got what we wanted. I believe there are people in the community who may never be satisfied with any proposal, but I think we have come such a long way—from over 2,300 units to 830 units. And, they heard us about including more single-family homes (208). The plan includes such a wide range of housing types and sizes that everyone from a large family with four kids, to a single guy like me, could find a home there.

The New Civil Rights Movement?

Mr. Rodriguez, You are referring to my Al Jazeera English op-ed, “Blood sacrifice: The wages of white supremacy.” But your complaint about “professional black leaders such as Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson demanding justice” and “lead[ing] a group that is acting like a lynch mob” are the same sort of ill-founded complaints that were raised against Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. back in the 1950s and 60s—a point that I explored at length in my following AJE op-ed, “Martin Luther King, race-baiter?” Indeed, his famous “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” was a direct response to just this sort of accusation from conservative white clergymen in Birmingham. What was true then remains true today: riots are not caused by civil rights leaders. They are caused by ignoring civil rights leaders. Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

Pedro’s Neighborhood Council at its very next meeting? IF that person is not Ms. Linda Alexander, then, it must be you as the former [actually the current] Vice President. Lobbyist would be willing to send you photocopies of Councilman Buscaino’s letter to the lobbyist making him the liaison person in the matter and the Ceclia Moreno’s official WNC letter of Strong Support for the aforesaid Mayoral appointment, so that, if you like, Central San Pedro’s group up can take up the issue too, and, if agreeable, write its own letter of support for that Mayoral appointment, the original to his honor and a C.C. to Mr. Buscaino as the WNC has done. Donald Compton

The Local Publication You Actually Read

And here’s what Dorothy from San Francisco, a California Democrat just like you, said: My paternal grandfather

and his 15 year old brother stowed away on a ship leaving Oslo, Norway around 1900. My grandfather was only 13 years old and felt the need to come to America to make money to help his family back in Norway. They spoke no English, had no money, but did have a strong desire to make a future for them and to help their family. They arrived in New York harbor on the 4th of July to a grand celebration. My grandfather asked what all the parades, music and fireworks were all about and Uncle John told my grandfather he had “arranged” for it all to welcome the boys to America! Peace and friendship, John Burton Chairman California Democratic Party

I lived through the 1992 LA Riots where violence took about 53 dead. There were no police to be found. Only when I reached Torrance were a police presence. Manuel Rodriguez P.S. I was born in what is now called Harlem, New York

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The March On Washington: Fifty Years On

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By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

August 23 - September 5, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

arlier this summer, the 4th of July weekend marked the 150th Anniversary of the battles of Gettysburg and Vicksburg, the twin turning-point battles in the Civil War, resulting in the First Reconstruction. This coming weekend marks the 50th Anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, the turning-point battle in the Civil Rights Movement, which resulted in the Second Reconstruction. As people from around the country converge on Washington for a commemorative march led by participants from the original march, much of the media is filled with backward-looking rhetoric, of questionable accuracy, while those more intimately involved continue looking forward, some even talking about a Third Reconstruction, finally building a true multi-racial democracy, inclusive of one and all. Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I Have A Dream” speech clearly stands at the center of the 1963 march, but it cannot be truly understood in isolation—not just in terms of the civil rights struggle it spoke for, but also in terms of the forces it struggled against, and how those forces continue down to this day. Regarding the original march, civil rights historian Taylor Branch recently recalled the widespread fear of violence that preceded it—“The Kennedy Administration quietly deployed 4,000 riot troops near downtown, with 15,000 paratroopers on alert”—the dramatic

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Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in front of thousands at the 1963 march on Washington D.C. File Photo

transformation in mainstream perceptions afterwards, the sharply contrasting continued hostility of J. Edgar Hoover—who approved a secret directive marking King as “the most dangerous Negro of the future in this nation”— and the rapid evolution of George Wallace’s

opposition into narrative forms that remain remarkably unchanged today: By the end of 1963, with segregation losing its stable respectability, he [Wallace] dropped the word altogether from a fresh stump speech denouncing “big government” by “pointy-

headed bureaucrats,” tyrannical judges, and “tax, tax, spend, spend” legislators. He spurned racial discourse, calling it favoritism, and insisted with aplomb, that he had never denigrated any person or group in his fight for continued on following page

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local control. Today, Tea Partiers following in Wallace’s footsteps, wearing tri-corner hats, reading Ayn Rand, and talking endlessly about tyranny and freedom, have done much to obscure King’s message, and that of the larger movement he symbolized. But their antisocial conception of freedom— Rand’s first protagonist in a novel was modelled on a serial killer—has nothing in common with the pro-social vision of freedom as King understood it, which reached its highest expression in service to others—the central message of one his last major speeches, “The Drum Major Instinct” delivered just one month before his assassination. What’s more, Branch highlights a related perversion of King’s memory: [H]e did not win favor by promising that African Americans would behave like

white people. He said nearly the opposite, quite plainly. His ringing conclusion invited polyglot America—“all God’s children”—to join hands and sing a Negro spiritual, so that everyone for that moment could share inspirations forged during slavery. King invoked a larger patriotism in which people of every stripe reach from tip-toe stance across divisions between them. Free citizenship requires meeting each other half way to build ties of comfort and strength. In short, no one took “e pluribus unum” more seriously than Martin Luther King, Jr. And the same is true of those who truly carry forward King’s message today. One such individual, who speaks in terms of a Third Reconstruction, is Rev. Dr. William Barber, president of the North Carolina NAACP, lead organizer of the “Moral Monday” protests against the hard right agenda of the GOP-

dominated state government. Over 800 Moral Monday protesters have been arrested doing civil disobedience since their protests began in April. Unlike protests in other states in recent years, such as Texas or Wisconsin, the North Carolina protests have been broadly multi-issue, as well as multiracial and cross-generational, with a strong foundation in the same biblical social justice vision that lay at the heart of King’s mission. Barber sees the presidential election of Barack Obama with a multi-racial electoral base as mirroring the racial fusion foundations of the first two Reconstruction movements— both of which were undermined by waves of racist violence— but he looks to the mass rallying of ordinary citizens as the key to long-term progress and historical success. And the movement he’s helped build in North Carolina is a testament to exactly that.

“There was a legislative agenda that was being enacted in the General Assembly that was disproportionately impacting the poor, the elderly, the vulnerable, and potentially disenfranchising even some voters,” North Carolina Episcopal Bishop Michael Curry said. “So what could have been seen as simply politics, as

usual, became much more a matter of public morality.” “I’m a real conservative evangelic,” Barber told the Moral Mondays rally on July 15. “I believe what the book says…and the book says you can’t love God on one hand and hate your brother on another.” “You can’t simply say, ‘Help me God’ and then pass

laws that are hurting people! That’s you!” Barber continued. “God doesn’t help people hurt other people! God doesn’t help people take the rights of other people, God doesn’t help people mistreat the poor.” The mutli-issue, but morally integrated nature of the Moral Mondays movement is indeed March/ to p. 12

The Local Publication You Actually Read August 23 - September 5, 2013

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RANDOMLetters from p. 9

August 23 - September 5, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

earmarked for Police Department employees. 4.) The total direct cost of operating the LAPD this year is expected to be $2,399,020,982. Now, Angelenos would surely not want to cut back on police protection. On the other hand, they have a right to demand that their considerable investment in the LAPD be managed effectively. And that leads me to ask if it’s time to audit the way that Department manages the job performance of its employees. IT should be noted that, in effect, the Police Department

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maintains two, very different, work forces. One force consists of about 10,000 sworn police officers, the other force includes about 3,000 civilian employees. Current information was not made available to me regarding the performance appraisal of sworn employees and probationary officers. The most recent reliable information on that subject comes from a report published by AN LAPD BOARD OF INQUIRY a decade ago. According to that report, police department appraisals rarely reflect what employees actually do on the job. They have no credibility at any

level of the Department, and they may have been one of the several factors that allowed the Rampart Division scandal to happen. But current information is available about the police department’s 3,000 civilian employees. They include Equine Keepers, Detention Officers, Firearms Examiners, Secretaries, Welders, Fingerprint Identification Experts, Accountants, Mechanics and employees in as many as 100 wildly diverse classification. And they were all hired-not on their personal job performance-but on a one-size-fits-all trait list. Samuel Sperling San Pedro

from p. 11

March reflective of King’s politics, which spanned civil rights, labor rights, opposition to the Vietnam War and laying the foundations for the multiracial Poor People’s Movement. While almost everyone in politics today tries to lay claim to King in some way, and he’s become a veritable 20th Century Founding Father in that respect. But his actual politics, rooted in the Gospels and the Hebrew Prophets, as well as America’s founding promise, are as opposed to American imperial politics as their inspirations were opposed to the imperial politics of their day. Others following in King’s footsteps are equally aware of this as well, Another prominent example is the Dream Defenders, a Florida-based organization of young activists strongly reminiscent of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), which was headed by John Lewis—now Congressman John Lewis—at the time of the 1963 March on Washington. The Dream Defenders held a 31-day sit-in at the Florida State Capitol following the acquittal of George Zimmerman, calling for the repeal of Florida’s so-called “stand your ground” law, as part of a broader agenda that includes ending the racial profiling and the school-to-prison pipeline. They began their sit-in seeking to get Florida Governor Rick Scott to call a special session to repeal “stand your ground.” After initially ignoring them, he reversed himself and met with them, but refused their call to reconsider

the law. But in short-term failure, they appear to have planted seeds of eventual success, having drawn supporting visits from legendary activists Harry Belafonte, Jesse Jackson, and Julian Bond (another former SNCC leader) as well as rapper Talib Kweli. “Gov. Scott, through his inaction, created a new group of leaders who will have a lasting effect on Florida,” said Democratic State Rep. Alan Williams. These are just two examples of renewed civil rights activism, building from the ground up in Southern states. But in those two states, and many more, renewed barriers to democracy are being erected in the form of restrictive votersuppression laws. And so the civil rights struggle once again comes down to basic questions of citizenship and fundamental rights. Six years prior to the 1963 march, King spoke before a crowd of 25,000 at another Washington civil rights rally, commemorating the third anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education decision, and calling on the government to do more to translate that ruling into reality. King’s speech was titled “Give Us the Ballot”, and in the light of recent voter suppression efforts it is as timely today as it was back then. “The denial of this sacred right is a tragic betrayal of the highest mandates of our democratic tradition,” King said, “And so our most urgent request to the president of the United States and every member of Congress is to give us the right to vote.” In the aftermath of the Supreme Court striking down Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act, there have been widespread calls for Congress to act, to pass an updated version of it. Nothing could be more fundamental to honoring the memory of King and those who struggled beside him than for Congress to heed those very same words today.

Gloria (Oprah Winfrey) and Cecil Gaines (Forest Whitaker) in Lee Daniels the Butler. File photo.

by: Danny Simon, Film Columnist should push for equality. Believing his father’s incrementalism only perpetuates the status quo, Louis believes in direct confrontation with white supremacy. But if not for Cecil’s self-sacrifice, Louis would never have found the education and liberty that fuels his revolution. For Louis, and many real-life men of the generation of activists he depicts, blackness and a commitment to black power are weighed in terms of open revolution, and a hostility towards what they see as the prior generation’s submission to white hegemony. Stuck between father and son in the role of peacemaker, Gloria Gaines (Oprah Winfrey) eventually crumbles beneath the pressure, but slowly, she finds her way back to sanity and redemption. Seldom has a film spoke so dynamically to the internal pressures wrought upon the black family during this period.

Forrest Whitaker portrays Cecil Gaines with a rare dexterity. So much of the role seems about holding back and holding in, a disciplined restraint resisting an eruption that never arrives. Far beyond makeup, Whitaker ages in the mouth that twitches and the eyes that dulls and gleams. As he did in The Last King of Scotland, Whitaker seems to inhabit a foreign body for the duration of production. And like The Last King of Scotland, Whitaker should win an Academy Award. Oprah Winfrey portrays Gloria Gaines with a deep warmth that aptly counters Whitaker’s cool restraint. Gloria must survive the contest of wills within her home, and Winfrey achieves the right balance between glib untouchability and fragile desperation. Obviously, Winfrey is immensely watchable and charismatic, but, in this, her most vulnerable of performances in many years, she is dynamic and engrossing. Lee Daniels assembled an impressive cast of actors for The Butler, but often as not, he abuses their talent by casting them in roles that suit them poorly. While Terrence Howard and Adriane Lenox fill out their respective roles (Howard in particular), both Cuba Gooding Jr., and Lenny Kravitz seem out of place, if not ridiculous to

the point of distraction. But this is nothing in comparison to every actor who portrays a president: Robin Williams, James Marsden, Liev Schreiber, John Cusack, Alan Rickman. All are solid actors, but not one of them even remotely acts or feels like the iconic men they are supposed to represent on the big screen. And so, it begs a persistent, if petulant, question: Do all white presidents look the same to Lee Daniels? This is history with a small “h.” Too often, historical dramas fixate on grand figures, like heroic warriors of the vanguard, and neglect the voices and experiences of the people with considerably less overt power. However, as this film reminds us, there is an immense power in the population should they wake up and take the control. This is a story about the inter-generational argument at the heart of the civil rights movement. As one generation is long gone, and the latter is on the way out, there is a small justice in remembering correctly: Equality was won from below despite a successive wave of presidents that followed, but did not lead the struggle.

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment Support Your Community. Shop Local.

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n Lee Daniels’ The Butler, Cecil Gaines (Forest Whitaker) serves. He anticipates the needs of seven presidents before they can put thought to word. Despite harboring a deep sea of racial frustration, he says nothing. He is the “house nigger” he was hired to be, a ghostly echo from when America’s whitest of homes was built by slaves (1792 to 1800). Gaines does it all out of an almost incredulous sense of hope that things can and will be better for black Americans in the future. While ostensibly set in the White House, this film’s heart beats in the Gaines’ house, where the maelstrom of the civil rights era pits father against son. Cecil and his eldest son Louis disagree on how black Americans

August 23 – September 5, 2013 August 23 – September 5, 2013

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Nazelie’s

—Lebanese Cafe— Kabobs, Shawermas and the American Dream

August 23 – September 5, 2013

Independent And Free.

A

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by: Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

s I sat with my chicken shawerma dinner, which included flame-broiled chicken served with tahini sauce, it was apparent Nazelie’s Lebanese Cafe has become a hometown favorite. Restaurant regulars, as the clock ticks past 6 p.m.., walk through the restaurant’s entrance to chat up Jack Kassabian or his wife, the restaurant’s namesake, The Kassabian family, including Nazalie, Jack and Diana. Pictured Nazelie, after they ordered their above is hummus sauce topped with olive oil paprika and an olive. Kibbeh made with bulgur, minced onions and ground meat. Photo food. Jack is usually posted at his by Terelle Jerricks seat facing the entrance as they wait for their food. With Jack, you never know Nazelie also relayed that Jack has been toywhat the day’s conversation will be about. ing with the idea of keeping the restaurant open One recent evening, Jack was railing against an extra hour, to 10 p.m., but hasn’t decided on the inexplicable bureaucracy of attaining a beer when to do it. and wine license. Jack is full of ideas. He considered putting in “I drove all the way downtown to the beer an outside counter window through which to sell and wine people and then they tell me, ‘you know Lebanese pizza after installing a pizza oven. But the city hall building in San Pedro? Go and apply Jack may save that idea for the bakery he would there.’ So I come all the way back and went to like to open. The bakery would specialize in the city hall building. Guess what they told me,” simple bread-based foods. Jack said, expecting a real answer from his capTo Jack, opening a Lebanese bakery doesn’t tive audience. mean making bread. “They told me to go to the downtown LA “It’s the making of three angle egg rolls, which office. Aww man,” Jack said, and some other is part of a 1,000 year tradition that people could expletives not fit for print on the dining pages. have in their refrigerator for weeks,” Jack said. The frustration over the absurd on Jack’s face is “They can have it in the cars, their trucks. fleeting, before he’s back to his smiling self. Because the economy is bad, a lot of people can’t Another evening, as I ate a Lulu Kabob made afford to eat different food.” with beef, Nazelie sat with me as she relayed their Jack opened a bakery years before coming plans to roll out some new $6.99 lunch specials to the United States in Abu Dhabi in the United that would include adding kebessinaie. Kebessi- Arab Emirates. naie is a meat pie made with bulgur (a cereal food “I think it’s a beautiful idea,” Jack said, beammade from several varieties of wheat), lean meat, ing with pride. “I like to dream and do it. That’s beef or lamb, with pine nuts to the menu. the best way. As you can see, there are now flowers Whether you order a half or whole chicken, and patio seating. This is not a commercial area, skewers of chicken breast on rice pilaf, or skew- but people come by, like family. ers of beef or lamb kabobs from the full entree “Whoever says that San Pedro is a bad area, section of the menu, or items from the mini meal doesn’t know San Pedro. Everybody has an opsection, you’re still guaranteed a healthy meal at portunity to do good business in San Pedro. That’s reasonable prices. the best way.”

Awesome Brew in the Village by: Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

10 Jello Shot Recipes— Minimal Labor Required! 8) GRAPE CRUSH Boil 1 cup of water, add grape jello, 1/2 cup plain vodka, 1/2 cup chambord 9) HAWAIIAN Boil 1 cup of water, add pineapple or blueberry jello, 1 cup coconut rum 10) GIN & TONIC Boil 1 cup of tonic water, add lime jello, 1 cup gin

1) JAGER BOMB Boil 1 cup red bull (in place of water), add black cherry or orange jello, 1 cups jager.

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n Sept. 1, Alpine Village is hosting their second annual Bierfest that will feature the best brews California has to offer. The event is from 3p.m. to 10 p.m. and admission is $40, which includes 20 3 ounce beer samples with great names like the, Eye Crosser IPA and Evil Twin. And it all comes with a tasting glass. Blues and rockabilly cover band, Flattop Tom and His Jump Cats and classic rock cover band, A Lick and a Promise will have attendees on the dance floor with 1960s and 70s greatest hits. Details: http://www.alpinevillagecenter.com Venue: Alpine Village Location: 833 W Torrance Blvd, Torrance

3) RUM & COKE Boil 1 cup coke, mix in dark cherry jello add 1 cups light rum 4) MIMOSAS This one varies from the normal method since champagne isn’t as strong as liquor, cut the water out of this one. Boil one cup champagne, mix orange jello 2 min, add one more cup champagne and a splash of OJ. 5) SILK Boil one cup champagne, mix in jello for 2 minutes, add one cup champagne and splash of lychee juice from the can. 6) ORANGE TIC TAC Boil two cups red bull, mix jello two minutes, add two cups mandarin orange vodka 7) LEMON DROP Boil 1 cup water, add lemon jello, citrus vodka, top with sugar sprinkles just before its fully set up

300 Year-Old Beer Recipe Resurrected by: Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

C

raft beer enthusiasts are buzzed with the news that an Austrian brewery has a revived a 300 year old recipe found in a town’s archives. Reuters recently reported that a brewery in the town of Saint Martin, Austria recreated the “Neuhauser Herrschafts Pier” from ingredients listed in an invoice for the local Neuhaus castle in 1720--when Austria was one of Europe’s leading powers. The family-owned Hofstetten brewery used small crops of emmer and malting barley grown from ancient seed varieties that agricultural historians had preserved. The head of Hofstetten brewery, Peter Krammer, was able to reproduce the mix of barley, wheat and hops that marked the brew made three centuries ago. Krammer was quoted as saying he believed old grains have more taste. Ultimately it took him five tries before he was satisfied. The revived beer recipe breaks with tradition in its reliance on old-style French yeast from a rural brewery. The original Austrian brewers did not use yeast, but rather remnants of the previous batch of beer to help the fermentation process. The brewery, one of the oldest in Austria, made only a single 4,000-litre batch of the brew. It reportedly tastes like wheat beer. The beer was made in early August at the town’s volunteer firefighter festival.

Returns for an Encore Performance

August 30

Doors Open 7:00 PM Showtime is 7:30 PM $20 Advance $25 Door For more information go To

https://www.facebook.com/ events/421910327927926

Info line 866-479-5644 Previous shows have sold out get your tickets early at www.brownpapertickets.com

Sponsored by:

1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro, CA • www.AlvasShowroom.com

August 23 – September 5, 2013

• Stone Brewing bringing ’09 Old Guardian, ’09 Double Bastard, Saison du Buff, 16th Anniversary, Enjoy By 9/21/12 (Double IPA, 9.4%),’10 Imperial Russian Stout, Double Dry Hopped Ruination, Double Dry Hopped Sublimely Self-Righteous. • Firestone Walker: Double Jack, Wookie Jack, Solace Ale, XIV Anniversary Ale, Walker’s Reserve, Oktoberfest, Union Jack • Abigaile Brewing (Hermosa Beach): XPA and Wit • Alesmith Alesmith Grand Cru, Nautical Nut Brown, Speedway Stout • Angel City: Eureka Wit and Angeleno IPA • Avery: The Kaiser, The Beast and The Reverend • Ballast Point: Piper Down Scottish Ale, Smokescreen, Reef Rye • Black Market: Contraband and Liberation IPA • Bear Republic: Tartare • Bootlegger’s: Black Phoenix and Palomino Pale • Bruery: Mischief, Tradewinds Tripel, Autumn Maple and TBA specialty • Das Brew: Monkey Fist Hefe, Buxom Blonde, Eye Crosser IPA, Triple Blitz Black IPA (12%!), Red • Drake’s Brewing: Aroma Coma, Black Robusto Porter and Red Ale • Eel River: Triple Exaltation and California Blonde • Eagle Rock: Nitro Vanilla Solidarity, Revolution, Manifesto, TBD Specialty and Populist • El Segundo Brewing: CitraPale , White Dog IPA, Blue House Pale, Hyperion Stout • Golden Road: Hefeweizen, Either Side of the Hill (Double IPA? Strong Ale? It could go either way…) •Great Divide: Rumble IPA and Wolfgang Doppelbock • Hangar 24: Amber Saison, Polycot, Palmero and Helles • Heretic Brewing: Worry (Belgian Strong Ale), Evil

• Inland Empire Brewing: Victoria Strong American Ale (11%), Russian Imperial Stout (14%), Scotch Ale • Iron Fist: Uprising, Nelson the Impaler Pale Ale, Velvet Glove • Kinetic Brewing: Fusion, Ignition, White Thai and a TBA specialty • Lightning: Old Tempestuous • Lost Abbey: Witch’s Wit, 10 Commandments, Saison Blanc, Devotion, Judgement Day • Monkish: Floraison (saison flavored with hibiscus and chamomile) and Crux • New Belgium: Tripel and Red Hoptober • Ommegang: Hougemant, Hennepin, 3 Philosophers and Seduction • Pacific Brewing Laboratories: Squid Ink Black IPA, Nautilus Hibiscus Saison • Port: Mongo Double IPA, Shark Attack • Ruhstaller: 1881 California Red, Captain California’s Black IPA, Wet Hop • Samuel Adams: Dark Depths Black IPA, Oktoberfest • Strand Brewing: Black IPA and Atticus IPA

On this Labor Day, the Queen Mary will be hosting its first Delicious Chili & Brewfest, where there will be a Chili Cook-off and celebration of local breweries. Delicious Chili & Brewfest is just one of the many special events planned at the Queen Mary over the Labor Day holiday weekend. The festivities begin with the Art Deco Festival, celebrating the opulence of “The Great Gatsby” era, Aug. 30 through Sept. 2. Shoreline Jam music festival follows with Pepper, Tomorrow’s Bad Seeds and more artists performing on Aug. 31. The Delicious Chili & Brewfest will then premier on Sept. 1. More information and tickets for events at the Queen Mary can be found on queenmary.com General admission tickets for Delicious Chili & Brewfest start at just $10. VIP experiences are available beginning at $39 and include early VIP admission, a souvenir mug, five tasting tickets and access to a VIP lounge. Delicious will also offer live entertainment and a family friendly Kid’s Country where the little ones can keep busy with obstacle courses, a bounce house, games, face painting and much more. Details: www.queenmary.com, (877) 342-0742 Venue: Queen Mary Waterfront Events Park Location: 1126 Queens Highway, Long Beach

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

Partial List of Brewers and Biers at Bier Fest:

Cousin, Shallow Grave and Evil Twin

2) MARGARITA Boil 1 cup water, add 3 oz pkg lime jello, 4 oz tequila, 4 oz sweet & sour margarita mix. sprinkle with salt just before firm. (Substitute watermelon jello for lime for a melon margarita)

Reminder: Delicious Chili and Brewfest

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Entertainment August 23

Flying Squad The Flying Squad is playing rock ‘n’ roll at the San Pedro Brewing Company, 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. Aug. 23. The cover charge is $3. Details: (310) 831-5663; www.sanpedrobrewing. com Venue: San Pedro Brewing Company Location: 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro Homemade Tortillas The Homemade Tortillas are playing at Godmother’s Saloon, 9 to 10 p.m. Aug. 23. Details: (310) 833-1589; www.godmotherssaloon. com Venue: Godmother’s Saloon Location: 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro

August 24

Nick Mancini at Alva’s Showroom As a vibraphonist and a bandleader, Mancini is one of the New York’s most called-upon studio musicians. Now he will be playing at Alva’s Showroom, Aug. 24 at 8 p.m. Mancini will surely put on a show that demonstrates deep musical exploration. Details: (800) 403-3447 Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St. San Pedro Urban Classics The San Pedro Brewing Company is hosting the Urban Classics, 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. Aug. 24. The cover charge is $3. Details: (310) 831-5663; www.sanpedrobrewing. com Venue: San Pedro Brewing Company Location: 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro

August 25

Independent And Free.

The Long Run - Experience the Eagles Alvas Showroom is hosting The Long Run, 3 p.m. Aug. 25. As a tribute to the Eagles, this is an opportunity to relive the performances of: “Take it Easy,” “Witchy Woman,” “Desperado,” “Life in the Fastlane,” “Hotel California,” “New Kid in Town,” “Peaceful Easy Feeling,” “Rocky Mountain Way,” “One of these Nights,” “Tequila Sunrise,” “Heartache Tonight,” “Lyin Eyes,” “I Can’t Tell You Why” and much more performed acoustically. The cover charge is $25. Details: (800) 403-3447; www.alvasshowroom. com Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

August 28

Sean Lane Sean Lane is performing at Godmother’s Saloon, 8 to 9 p.m. Aug. 28. Details: (310) 833-1589; www.godmotherssaloon. com Venue: Godmother’s Saloon Location: 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro

August 30

August 23 – September 5, 2013

BomBón The outstanding surf rock group from San Pedro will play at Harold’s Place on Aug. 30. They will be joined by The Wild Ones, Bummer City, Dead Broad & The 87’s. The show will take place throughout the night. Details: (310) 832-5503 Venue: Harold’s Place Location: 1908 S Pacific Ave, San Pedro

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KiLR KiLR is rocking at the San Pedro Brewing Company, 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. Aug. 30. The cover charge is $3. Details: (310) 831-5663; www.sanpedrobrewing. com Venue: San Pedro Brewing Company Location: 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro Nikki Hill at Harvelle’s Nikki Hill will take the stage at Harvelle’s in Long Beach Aug. 30 at 9 p.m. Hill draws on vintage female rhythm and blues influences such as LaVern Baker, Etta James and Ruth Brown, as well as some of her favorite male singers Otis Redding and Solomon Burke, without being stuck or pigeonholed strictly as a ‘retro’ artist. Her tough vocal style fits with contemporary sensibilities yet evokes all the great blues shouters of previous decades. Tickets are $10 to $25. Two drink

minimum.

Details: (562) 239-3700 Venue: Harvelle’s Location: 201 E. Broadway,

Long Beach

Whiteboy James Whiteboy James will be at the Godmother’s Saloon, 9 to 10 p.m. Aug. 30. Details: (310) 833-1589; www.godmothersaloon.com Venue: Godmother’s Saloon Location: 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro

August 31

Down the Hatch and State of Grace Down the Hatch and State of Grace are playing at Godmother’s Saloon, 9 to 10 p.m. Aug. 31. Details: (310) 833-1589; www.godmotherssaloon. com Venue: Godmother’s Saloon Location: 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro Old Havana Band The Old Havana Band will be at Harvelle’s at 9 p.m. Aug. 31. The band performs a classic Latin/rock genre of music with the sounds of the percussion and guitar. Ticket prices range from $10 to $20. A two-drink minimum purchase will be required. Details: (562) 239-3700; www.longbeach.harvelles. com Venue: Harvelle’s Long Beach Location: 201 E. Broadway, Long Beach

September 1

Doug MacDonald and the Jazz Coalition Alvas Showroom is hosting Doug MacDonald and the Jazz Coalition at 4 p.m. Sept. 1. The Jazz Coalition is MacDonald’s 13-piece orchestra. On this night, they will feature guest vocalist Jack Wood and Laura Pursell. The cover charge is $20. Details: (800) 403-3447; www.alvasshowroom.com Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

Community/Family August 23

Banning Museum Volunteer Receptions The Banning Museum is seeking volunteers and will host two Get to Know Us receptions on Aug. 23 and Aug. Calendar to page 18.

Random Notes:

The Night of The Perfect Musical Storm by: B. Noel Barr, Music Writer Dude

Friday night is turning out to be one of the best night for blues and rock in the Harbor Area. I can’t recall in recent years when we’ve had three high quality groups all play in one night in town at three different venues. This town has a wealth of talent and great programs presented weekly. Though most big shows around here gear toward Saturday night (It’s a working man’s world after all), the addition of a happening Friday greatly excites me . For the longest time a small group of believers in San Pedro have worked very hard toward creating a community where the arts meet the people. This is an ongoing effort on several levels of art, music and theater. There has been a push to have an open city of unique shops, cafes, galleries, theaters and hot music venues — the kind of place where tourists and locals come to gather and enjoy our beautiful port town. The Grand Annex is producing shows that are important and relevant to our town creating programs that are diverse and culturally stimulating. Alvas Music/Showroom has been doing the same. Both are bringing new audiences to music that is diverse in styles and taste. Recently, The Grand Vision jumped into

the blues nights, beginning on Oct. 25th with Kelly’s Lot. Now Godmother’s Saloon is becoming the hub of blues activity. They are delivering some of the finest blues bands in Southern California. Recently, The Jay Edwards Blues Band played the San Pedro night spot to rave reviews. Sean Lane has a weekly Juke Joint happening every Wednesday night. This is starting to take on a whole new life as Sean Lane and friends (on occasion) are ripping up the room, all the while the girls are shaking what they got. Can’t get much better than that. In other music news, Dave Widow and The Line Up will return to Alvas Music/Showroom Aug. 30 for an encore presentation of epic blues music. The show kicks off at 7:30 p.m. with James Gadson on drums laying down that funky groove he is so noted for on more than 500 gold record sessions. Widow’s CD, Waiting for The World to End is continuing to gather steam. It’s been getting regular rotation on BB King’s Bluesville Channel, Hotmix106.com’s “Lunch at The Barr”, and has been played on KJAZZ’s “Nothing But The Blues.” Dave’s CD was recently submitted into the International Blues Competition (in Memphis) Continued on page 19.

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

August 23 – September 5, 2013

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Calendar from page 16. 24 from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The receptions will take place in the conference room at the Banning Museum. Volunteers at the Banning Museum attend a training class to gain the background necessary to offer public tours and special group tours of the interior of the Museum, Stagecoach Barn and grounds. Once the training class is completed the volunteers are able to participate in a full range of Museum programs such as conservation and maintenance of antiques, participating in decorative arts exhibitions, special events, Museum Shop assistance, lecture and discussion committees, volunteer activities, Living History Program and School Program. For additional information or to RSVP for one of the receptions above, please contact the Banning Museum. Details: (310) 548-7777 Venue: Conference room at the Banning Museum Location: 401 E. “M” St., Wilmington Tour the Cabrillo Marine Aquarium The Cabrillo Marine Aquarium is offering free tours at 10:30 a.m. Aug. 20 through Aug. 30. Learn more about the aquarium’s animals and see the largest collection of Southern California marine life in the world. No reservations are required and participants are asked to arrive by 10:15 a.m. Details: (310) 548-7562; www. cabrillomarineaquarium.org Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Location: 3720 Stephen M. White Dr., San Pedro 4th Fridays Street Fair The 4th Fridays Street Fair will be hosted at the Parkview Village, 5 to 8 p.m. Aug. 23. The fair is an event where the whole family can enjoy themselves. There will be a kid’s zone with bounce houses, live music, art display and live painting, games, raffles and much more. Restaurants in the Parkview Village will be open during the fair. For more details on the event, or how to be a vendor call the number below. Details: (562) 938-7653 Venue: Parkview Village Location: 4195 Viking Way, Long Beach

Independent And Free.

August 24

Long Beach Derby Girls Roller Disco at CRAFTED Everyone is invited to join us for the Long Beach Derby Girls first ever roller disco on Aug. 24! They have partnering up with CRAFTED at the Port of Los Angeles and will now make their home at CRAFTED. Bring your own skates or rent a pair! They will be available for all ages. All participants must sign waivers. There will be two sessions. Session one will be from 4 to 7 p.m. for all ages. The second session will be from 7 to 10 p.m. and is for 21 and older. Ticket prices will be $8 and skate rentals are $5. Details: www.LongBeachDerbyGals.com; http:// craftedportla.com/ Venue: CRAFTED Location: 110 & 112 E. 22nd St., San Pedro

August 31

A Labor Day Tribute to the American Worker Aboard the USS Iowa On Aug. 31, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., game booths, community and service booths, great and live entertainment will be going on at and on the Battleship USS Iowa. Tickets purchased in advance at $10. Details: www.labattleship.com Venue: Battleship USS Iowa Location: 250 S. Harbor Blvd., San Pedro

August 23 – September 5, 2013

Friend Fest The Friendship Neighborhood continues their effort to spark relationships among neighbors with their second Friend Fest event, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 31, at Drake Park in Long Beach. Venue: Drake Park Location: Long Beach

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September 1

The San Pedro Historical Society Presents “ The Vincent Thomas Bridge” The guest speaker for their First Sunday speaker series at the Muller House Museum will be Louis Dominguez, who will begin his talk at 1:30 p.m. The museum opens 1 p.m. and tours will be given from 3 to 4 p.m. Admission is free. Donations are welcome. Details: www.sanpedrobayhistoricalsociety.org Venue: The Muller House Museum Location: 1542 S. Beacon St., San Pedro

September 4

Science Education Afternoon The Cabrillo Marine presents Science Education Afternoon, 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. Sep. 4. Join marine instructors for a hands-on, after-school, marine science adventure. Students will observe animal behavior, examine shore animals at the tide pools and more. Price of admission is $30. Pre-registration is required and all participants receive a SEA Club T-shirt. Details: (310) 548-7562; www.cabrillomarineaquarium. com Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Location: 3720 Stephen M. White Dr., San Pedro

Theater/Film August 23

POLA- Movie in San Pedro The Avengers will be screening at 8 p.m. on Aug. 23. But before the show, the family fun will begin at 6 p.m. Venue: Bloch Field Location: 1500 S. Harbor Blvd., San Pedro

August 24

The Kitchen Witches The Little Fish Theatre is showing the Kitchen Witches, 8 p.m. Aug. 24. Two cable access cooking show mavens, who have hated each other since one of them stole the other’s husband, are brought together for one program. Admission begins at $27, with packages being offered. Details: (310) 512-6030; www.littlefishtheatre.com Venue: Little Fish Theatre Location: 777 S. Centre, San Pedro

August 29

RED The International City Theatre presents RED, 8 p.m. Aug. 29. American abstract expressionist Mark Rothko, has just landed the biggest commission in the history of modern art. When his new young assistant, Ken, gains the confidence to challenge him, Rothko faces the possibility that his crowning achievement can become his wrongdoing. Admission begins at $45. Details: (562) 436-4610; www.ictlongbeach.org Venue: International City Theatre Location: 300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach

August 30

Ravens and Writing Desks The Garage Theatre hosts Ravens and Writing Desks, 8 p.m. Aug. 30. Follow Post Mortem down the rabbit hole on a journey of self discovery: examining life, love and what makes us who we are. Admission begins at $18. Details: (866) 811-4111; www.thegaragetheatre.org Venue: The Garage Theatre Location: 251 E. 7th St., Long Beach CYMBELINE The Long Beach Shakespeare Theatre presents CYMBELINE, 8 p.m. Aug. 30. The show runs through August and September. Check the website for scheduling. Details: (562) 997-1494; www.lbshakespeare.org Venue: Long Beach Shakespeare Theatre Location: 4250 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach

September 3

Artful Days: Dutch Sensibilities, Intimate and Thought Provoking The Torrance Cultural Services Division presents Artful Days, 12:10 to 1 p.m. Sept. 3. Admission is free. Details: (310) 781-7150; www.toranceca.gov Venue: George Nakano Theatre Location: 3330 Civic Center Dr., Torrance

Art August 30

Queen Mary Celebrates Art Deco The Queen Mary is hosting its 9th Annual Queen Mary Art Deco Festival, Aug. 30 to Sept. 2. Throughout the weekend, Art Deco will delve into topics ranging from architecture and automotive to musicology. For vintage movie lovers, the Queen Mary will be showing The Big Broadcast of 1939. Tickets are $15 at the door. The Queen Mary is also offering the Deco Grand Passport, which is a hotel package offering a total weekend immersion at $295. For more information call the number below. Details: (800) 437-2934; www.queenmary.com Venue: Queen Mary Location: 1126 Queens Hwy, Long Beach Calendar to page 19.

—Men of Steel— Sinks Down to the Bone by: Melina Paris, Music Columnist Show producer John McClung brought the groundbreaking Superman’s Men of Steel (Guitar) concert to Alvas Showroom, on Aug. 11. There has never been a show like this with an orchestra of pedal steel guitars, performed in Southern California. Most of these artists performed in the score for the blockbuster film, Man of Steel. After JayDee Maness opened the show with the first song they played a video clip with Man of Steel’s film score composer, Hans Zimmer and film director Zach Synder. In it, Zimmer explained he wanted to use a quintessentially American instrument used in an unconventional way. “Let’s misuse them,” said Zimmer, explaining their thought process. “Lets not think of them as country instruments because they function very similarly to cellos or violins…. We talked a lot about trying to get this spiritual optimistic American ‘thing’ that has spread culturally across the globe.” Peter Freiberfer’s set followed the screened interview with an up-tempo country ballad, “Burning Memories.” Because it was a country song, I kept waiting for the vocals to come in. But the pedal steel’s own voice came through. This phenomenon expressed itself in all the genres in which the players played. “Our goal was to showcase the steel guitarists who helped created the textural sounds and mood for the movie Man of Steel, and also show that the pedal steel guitar is an instrument without limits, capable of playing beautifully in any genre” McClung said. Bob “Boo” Bernstein, known for playing steel in the Latin music scene, followed with a really fun set. His opening piece sounded like the dramatic music you might hear at a spaghetti Western. Later, accompanied by an acoustic guitar, he played a beautiful lingering number from the Brokeback Mountain soundtrack called, “The Love That will Never Grow Old,” by Emmylou Harris, which won the 2005 Golden Globe for best original song.

Not to be outdone, Chas Smith, known as “the mad scientist of the steel guitar,” started his set with an ethereal number using his custom built pedal steel, which was made with titanium, and had a neck with 14 strings. Pedal guitars typically have eight or more strings. We were asked to just close our eyes and listen. While he played I felt rather than heard a lower and a higher frequency. The lower frequency buoyed me while vibrating my core. The higher frequency lifted me up into the cosmos, soothed me on a peaceful wave. By the response in the room it sounded as though the audience had the same energetic experience. World renowned pedal steel player, Marty Rifkin, tore down the house when he opened with Bob Dylan’s, “Make You Feel My Love,” then followed it with Fastball’s No. 1 song on the Modern Rock Tracks chart, “The Way.” The song, having a familiar ring, is an up-tempo danceable groove and Rifkin’s spin refreshingly added orchestral quality to it. After intermission, John McClung shared his nuanced talents on the pedal steel guitar. In his opening set, McClung played an interesting selection starting with, The Crusaders, “Put It Where You Want It.” He followed that with a Christian song as a duet with an acoustic guitarist, Psalm 33:2. This was followed by George Harrison’s song, “Can’t Stop Thinking About You.” Listening to this diverse selection, paired with McClung’s personal finishes on his songs, it became clear how someone could get absorbed into this instrument. Doug Livingston really changed things up when he played one of six movements, from 12 suites composed by Johann Sebastian Bach. Classical music via the pedal steel guitar is a sound to behold. Simultaneously rich and effervescent, we were transported to a Baroque period music salon. Not lacking in variety, Livingston displayed his jazz skills playing an Continued on page 19.

from page 16.

Musical Storm

Showing San Pedro What It’s All Bout Roller Derby Girls to be hosted at CRAFTED by: Cory Hooker, Editorial Intern

Continued from page 18.

Backing up and supporting all these players was a highly regarded drummer, percussionist, educator, and noted author, Maria Martinez, whose drumming talents seamlessly integrated into all the genres performed. As McClung said, playing the steel pedal guitar is a mental chess game and as an instructor of this instrument he should know. He made the observation that most of these players do not often look up. Rather, they are meticulously focused on what they are doing, managing the mechanics of two necks, knee levers that raise the chords and scales and working the pedals, all while playing beautiful music. The draw of the steel pedal guitar, regardless of genre or song, is that in a talented musician’s hands its tonalities vibrates through your body. This is an instrument you hear and feel. If you didn’t see it, you’re in luck. McClung is considering making this an annual concert at Alvas.

Men of Steel

elegant rendition of Billy Strayhorns signature composition, “Lush Life.” Skip Edwards performed some original compositions, including “Walking Through Clover,” “405 Shuffle,” and a sweet little number called, “I Sang Dixie.” “405 Shuffle” is as the name implies. With Edwards’ dexterity on the pedal steel he literally plays cars dancing, mixed up and moving to and fro, even rumbling at high speed only to yield to the vehicular two-step once again. The multi-talented Rick Schmidt followed Edwards with a jazzy number. Schmidt also sings and plays five different types of guitars and keyboards as well. He treated us to the melodies of “Doxology,” a short hymn of praises to God and a duet with McClung on “Face of an Angel.” Then he closed his set with a traditional Hawaiian-style tuning on the neck (called C6). Surprisingly, it sounded a little bit like jazz and was reminiscent of Earl Klugh’s melodic fingering style of playing. JayDee Maness returned closed the evening in great style, by playing Mel Street’s huge country hit, “Borrowed Angel.” A song Maness said pedal steel players love to play. Maness closed the set with, “Tears in Heaven,” which Maness explains he recorded with Clapton.

On Saturday night the blues and rock continues with sounds from the New Blues Revolution who will kick out the jams at Godmother’s Saloon. The New Blues Revolution brings a very accessible way to the blues for the non purist. The mix of pop, rock and blues with layered with the guitar playing virtuosity of Chap Cooper. Cooper brings the Satriani/Vai feel to his playing, check out “Pink 7” on the group’s self titled CD. I have been playing different versions of the group’s material on Lunch at the Barr (On Tuesday and Thursday’s at 11 a.m.). The songs that are the best, really are much more pop oriented. “The Blue Cafe’” and “Lately” are a couple of the strongest songs of their original material. Their overall performance is dynamic. I wonder if the room is a little small for a band that plays the bigger stages around the Southland. Though no stranger to the blues bar circuit, the energy and panache of front man Bill Grisolia, who is returning from two solo gigs in Spain, is over the top. Expect to be entertained. One final note, The Buffalo Fire Department in Torrance is putting on some great shows. Kirk Makin and Patti Orbeck are playing on Wednesdays until the beginning of September from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. I first met and heard the duo at The Annual Dylan Festival, which is produced and fronted by Andy Hill and Rene Safier. Makin is the lead guitarist in Hard Rain (Hill and Safier’s band) and Orbeck is an independent recording artist and is one of the featured singers every year. It is an evening of mainly covers and originals played with sublime deft and skill. They are really having loads of fun playing with the audience and taking requests. They are filling in for Andy Hill and Rene Safier who are currently touring in the Pacific Northwest. Hill and Safier will be back in a couple of weeks to take back the Wednesday night spot that they have been filling every week. Venue: Buffalo Fire Department Location: 1261 Cabrillo Ave, Torrance

Architecture For Dogs Architecture for Dogs presents a conceptual exhibition curated by the Tokyo-based designer Kenya Hara. The exhibition was a collaboration of worldrenowned architects and designers who examined the relationships between dogs and humans to design and build habitats for man’s best friend. The exhibition launched at Miami Art Basel in 2012 and will have its worldwide museum debut at LBMA before an international exhibition schedule. Closes September 1, 2013. Detail: (562) 439.2119; lbma.org Venue: Long Beach Museum of Art Location: 2300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach

August 23 – September 5, 2013

love what it did for me when I first joined and how it changed me in all the best ways.” The Long Beach Roller Derby is also featuring a classic roller disco, the first in San Pedro for a few decades, on Aug. 24 from 4 to 7 p.m. Families and children of all ages will be able to skate around the warehouse. Starting at 7 p.m., the adult session begins. Beer will be available with ID. Tickets are $5 and they will have rentals for those who do not own skates. Though now retired from skating, Villa has always been focused on the production and management side. “No. I don’t play roller derby, but I create some of the most entertaining and hard working roller derby around. I’ve produced 11 roller derby events and eight of them were sellout events with over 2,000 people in attendance. Not a lot of leagues have done that.” With events planned well into 2014, the Long Beach Roller Derby is looking to stay in San Pedro.

by The Ventura County Blues Society and placed into the top of 5 out of 1,700 entries. Dave can be seen at The House of Blues in Anaheim as well as The Lighthouse Cafe’ in Hermosa Beach. Check out the August issue of Southland Blues Magazine, and find out more about Dave Widow. Chuck Alvarez and his band will be kicking off at 9 p.m. at T.C. on 9th and Gaffey. Then White Boy James and the Blues Express will be at Godmother’s Saloon at a 9 p.m. downbeat. This is a night when you can catch three of the top shows all in one night within a mile of each gig. Dave Widow and Line Up 7:30 p.m. at Alvas Music/Showroom. Chuck Alvarez 9 p.m. TC’s 9th & Gaffey. White Boy James and The Blues Express 9 p.m. at Godmothers’ Saloon, 7th & Centre.

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

CRAFTED goers beware! The Long Beach Roller Derby Girls are in town. After a long stint at the Queen Mary Dome, they will be breaking in their new home starting Sept. 14, with their first bout, “Momma’s Gonna Knock You Bout.” Occupying the adjacent warehouse next to CRAFTED, the Long Beach Roller Derby is looking forward to a mutually beneficial relationship that will help both CRAFTED and the roller derby team grow. For those who don’t know, bouts are competitions between teams that are incredibly physical and very fast pace. Fans seated around the rink get “in-your-face” action as skaters fly by or are slammed down on the floor next to them. Following their first bout, the Derby Girls are planning for bouts in October and November. After winter break, they will kick off the 2014 season with nine bouts. When the 2014 season arrives, a San Pedro themed team will be added. “We are recruiting all of the time!” said Jamie Villa, general manager and co-founder of the Long Beach Roller Derby. “I love roller derby. I

Calendar from page 18.

19

The Expendables

How the Temps Who Power Corporate Giants Are Getting Crushed By Michael Grabell, ProPublica

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

It’s 4:18 a.m. and the strip mall is deserted. But tucked in back, next to a closed-down video store, an employment agency is already filling up. Rosa Ramirez walks in, as she has done nearly every morning for the past six months. She signs in and sits down in one of the 100 or so blue plastic chairs that fill the office. Over the next three hours, dispatchers will bark out the names of who will work today. Rosa waits, wondering if she will make her rent. In cities all across the country, workers stand on street corners, line up in alleys, or wait in a neon-lit beauty salon for rickety vans to whisk them off to warehouses miles away. Some vans are so packed that to get to work, people must squat on milk crates, sit on the laps of passengers they do not know or sometimes lie on the floor with the other workers’ feet on top of them. This is not Mexico. It is not Guatemala or Honduras. This is Chicago, New Jersey, Boston. The people here are not day laborers looking for an odd job from a passing contractor. They are regular employees of temporary agencies working in the supply chain of many of America’s largest companies—Walmart, Macy’s, Nike, Frito-Lay. They make our frozen pizzas, sort the recycling from our trash, cut our vegetables and clean our imported fish. They unload clothing and toys made overseas and pack them to fill our store shelves. They are as important to the global economy as shipping containers and Asian garment workers. Many get by on minimum wage, renting rooms in rundown houses, eating dinners of beans and potatoes, and surviving on food banks and taxpayer-funded health care. They almost never get benefits and have little opportunity for

1990s,” according to the staffing association. The overwhelming majority of that growth has come in blue-collar work in factories and warehouses, as the temp industry sheds the Kelly Girl image of the past. Last year, more than one in every 20 blue-collar workers was a temp. Several temp agencies, such as Adecco and Manpower, are now among the largest employers in the United States. One list put Kelly Services as second only to Walmart. “We’re seeing just more and more industries using business models that attempt to change the employment relationship or obscure the employment relationship,” said Mary Beth Maxwell, a top official in the Labor Department’s Wage and Hour Division. “While it’s certainly not a new phenomenon, it’s rapidly escalating. In the last

Allred Offers Empowerment Lessons By Lyn Jensen, Contributing Writer

Aug. 26 is observed as Women’s Equality Day, the day that, 93 years ago, the 19th Amendment was ratified and women gained the right to vote everywhere in the United States. With a prominent sexual harassment case in San Diego and reproductive rights under attack in Texas and elsewhere, women’s equality is once again making news. Some observers have likened current conservative campaigns to curtail women’s equality to a War on Women. To find out how any woman may fight back against this War on Women, we asked one of America’s most prominent attorneys who specializes in women’s rights. She is Gloria Allred, a partner in the law firm Allred, Maroko & Goldberg for 27 years. She is currently representing Irene McCormack Jackson, one of the women who have accused the mayor of San Diego, Bob Filner, of sexual harassment. Allred is also the author of Fight Back and Win, a book about the many cases she has handled over decades and how the results have empowered women. She talked to Random Lengths about 20 women’s empowerment and equality during

August 23 - September 5, 2013

advancement. Across America, temporary work has become a mainstay of the economy, leading to the proliferation of what researchers have begun to call “temp towns.” They are often dense Latino neighborhoods teeming with temp agencies. Or they are cities where it has become nearly impossible, even for whites and African-Americans with vocational training, to find factory and warehouse work without first being directed to a temp firm. In June, the Labor Department reported that the nation had more temp workers than ever before: 2.7 million. Overall, almost one-fifth of the total job growth since the recession ended in mid-2009 has been in the temp sector, federal data shows. But according to the American Staffing Association, the temp industry’s trade group, the pool is even larger: Every year, a tenth of all U.S. workers finds a job at a staffing agency. The proportion of temp workers in the labor force reached its peak in early 2000 before the 2001 slump and then the Great Recession. But as the economy continues its slow, uneven recovery, temp work is roaring back 10 times faster than private-sector employment as a whole – a pace “exceeding even the dramatic run-up of the early

a recent visit to her office on Wilshire Blvd. Random Lengths: How do you respond to criticism that you’re extremely focused on getting media attention? Gloria Allred: We do not think that women should have to suffer in silence. In an appropriate case, the victim should be able to have a voice. They should be able to present their point of view. RL: How do you, as a private attorney, work with the government agencies that are charged with enforcing anti-discrimination law? The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is at the federal level and the Department of Fair Employment and Housing enforces California law. GA: Sometimes it’s a violation of state law and sometimes it’s a violation of federal law. For example, if a person is a victim of sexual harassment, there are prerequisites for filing a lawsuit. A prerequisite to filing a lawsuit is to file a claim first with either the EEOC or the DFEH. RL: Was your San Diego sexual harassment case one such example? GA: We represent the only person who’s

filed a lawsuit [as of this interview] and her name is Irene McCormack Jackson. Before we filed the lawsuit, we filed first a claim, a complaint; actually we call it a charge, with the Department of Fair Employment and Housing, to get a rightto-sue letter. We first got the right-to-sue letter and then we file the lawsuit. There are so many charges of discrimination filed with the DFEH and the EEOC that they don’t have enough staff to investigate everything. So when a lawyer asks for a right-to-sue letter for their client, they’re happy to provide it. RL: How do you think we can make people more aware of women’s rights and sex discrimination under the law? GA: That’s an excellent question. Teach women in school what their rights are, and assert their rights. In many ways [that’s] what I’m doing when I help my victims become empowered, to speak out, when my cases are those who’ve been the victims of injustice. I was a teacher before I was a lawyer, so in a way I’m still teaching lessons of empowerment. RL: What inspired you to write your book (in 2007) Fight Back and Win: My Thirty-year Allred Empowers/ to p. 24

10 to 15 years, there’s just a big shift to this for a lot more workers – which makes them a lot more vulnerable.” The temp system insulates the host companies from workers’ compensation claims, unemployment taxes, union drives and the duty to ensure that their workers are citizens or legal immigrants. In turn, the temps suffer high injury rates, according to federal officials and academic studies, and many of them endure hours of unpaid waiting and face fees that depress their pay below minimum wage. The rise of the blue-collar permatemp helps explain one of the most troubling aspects of the phlegmatic recovery. Despite a soaring stock market and steady economic growth, many workers are returning to temporary or part-time jobs. This trend is intensifying America’s decades-long rise in income inequality, in which low- and middleincome workers have seen their real wages stagnate or decline. On average, temps earn 25 percent less than permanent workers. Many economists predict the growth of temp work will continue beyond the recession, in part because of health-care reform, which some economists say will lead employers to hire temps to avoid the costs of covering full-time workers.

The Rise of ‘Temp Towns’

Rosa, a 49-year-old Mexican immigrant with thin glasses and a curly bob of brown hair, has been a temp worker for the better part of 12 years. She has packed free samples for Walmart, put together displays for Sony, printed ads for Marlboro, made air filters for the Navy and boxed textbooks for elite colleges and universities. None of the work led to a full-time job. Even though some assignments last months, such as her recent job packaging razors for Philips Norelco, every day is a crapshoot for Rosa. She must first check in at the temp agency in Hanover Park, Ill., by 4:30 a.m. and wait. If she is lucky enough to be called, she must then take a van or bus to the worksite. And even though the agency, Staffing Network, is her legal employer, she is not paid until she gets to the assembly line at 6 a.m. In Kane County, Ill., where Rosa lives, one in every 14 workers is a temp. Such high concentrations of temp workers exist in Grand Rapids, Mich.; Middlesex County, N.J.; Memphis, Tenn.; the Inland Empire of California; and Lehigh County, Pa. In New Jersey, white vans zip through an old Hungarian neighborhood in New Brunswick, picking up workers at temp agencies along French Street. In Joliet, Ill., one temp agency operated out of a motel meeting room once a week, supplying labor to the layers of logistics contractors at one of Walmart’s biggest warehouses. In Greenville County, S.C., near BMW’s U.S. manufacturing plant, one in 12 workers was a temp in 2012. A decade before, it was one in 22. In temp towns, it is not uncommon to find warehouses with virtually no employees of their own. Many temp workers say they have worked in the same factory day-in-and-day-out for years. José Miguel Rojo, for example, packed frozen pizzas for a Walmart supplier every day for eight years as a temp until he was injured last summer and lost his job. (Walmart said Rojo wasn’t its employee and that it wants its suppliers to treat their workers well.) In some lines of work, huge numbers of fulltime workers have been replaced by temps. One continued on following page

Temps from previous page

Temp worker, Rosa waits at the agency for her next assignment. File photo.

Shame,” documenting the plight of migrant farmworkers. Temp workers today face many similar conditions in how they get hired, how they get to work, how they live and what they can afford from p. 6

Three-Way in LB

situation in Long Beach as an unusual opportunity for those who are displeased with the status quo to effect a change, considering that, along with the mayoralty, five council seats—those in the odd-numbered districts—are up for grabs, with Garcia, DeLong, and Schipske termed-out, while Steven Neal (9th District) is running for the 64th Assembly District. “From a community perspective, I think [having so many open seats] is a great opportunity for change in the city,” she says. “Anyone who has a concern about the city working or not working, [this situation presents] a good opportunity to get involved politically, get the vote out, and run candidates who are really understanding of [the voters’] issues. […] Everyone who complains about Long Beach, this is their time. Jump in and find a candidate that reflects your values or some of the issues you care about, and go after them and get them elected. That’s what I’ve been telling people. [The voters] can possibly change the entire face of Long Beach.” But Uranga also recognizes the potential

to eat. Adjusted for inflation, those farmworkers earned roughly the same 50 years ago as many of today’s temp workers, including Rosa. In fact, some of the same farm towns featured in Murproblems such a busy election season presents. “I think this [situation] has the potential to [cause] a stalemate or freeze the council,” she says. “Usually you don’t get a lot of things passed anyway during an election year, but it’s going to be even worse when you have people positioning. It’s going to be harder to get five votes—or six, [which is] veto-proof. The hardest part of governing is to have everyone in campaign mode. Priorities are elsewhere. But that’s how it is.” Uranga says that part of “campaign mode” is also public image-shaping. “It shouldn’t be about getting credit,” she says of governing. “It should be about getting things done for the community. But politics is politics. And like I said, election years are terrible for getting anything done. You don’t want to offend anyone that you have to work with or you need a vote from. So it’s just tough. [… A]ll nine [council members] should be looking at what the city as a whole needs. But in reality, when you have three [council members] running for mayor, certain constituencies are going to be given a little bit more [attention] than others based on how they support [the candidates], unfortunately.” Fourth District Councilman Patrick O’Donnell says that although he has no problem

with his council mates’ quest to lead Long Beach, he understands the potential for the scenario to turn problematic—and that if it does, he will not hesitate to note it publicly. “I think what you’re asking me is whether [the mayoral race] is impacting the [council] meetings. Stand by for further updates,” he chuckles. “It’s early. I’m not afraid to call someone out if they’re grandstanding on an issue. Have I seen a lot of it so far? No. Do I think I’ve seen some of it? Yes. […] If it’s going to become a hindrance, you can be sure I’ll call anyone out on it. […] We have an obligation to the office we hold [as council members], and if someone seeking another office hinders that obligation, I will note it publicly. But I think they’ve been pretty good thus far. It’s challenging for them, too. We have a duty to balance [the Fiscal Year 2014] budget; we have a duty to provide services to the people; we don’t have a duty to politic for another office from the dais.” The consensus so far seems to be something along the lines of: Hope for the best, but be ready for the worst. What actually unfolds in this drama will be up to the political players themselves. In early 2014, we’ll catch up with our interviewees to get their takes on how the game is playing out.

The Local Publication You Actually Read

in five manual laborers who move and pack merchandise is now a temp. As is one in six assemblers who work in a team, such as those at auto plants. To be sure, many temp assignments serve a legitimate and beneficial purpose. Temp agencies help companies weather sudden or seasonal upswings and provide flexibility for uncertain times. Employees try out jobs, gain skills and transition to full-time work. “I think our industry has been good for North America, as far as keeping people working,” said Randall Hatcher, president of MAU Workforce Solutions, which supplies temps to BMW. “I get laid off by Employer A and go over here to Employer B, and maybe they have a job for me. People get a lot of different experiences. An employee can work at four to five different companies and then maybe decide this is what I want to do.” Companies like the “flexibility,” he added. “To be able to call someone and say, ‘I need 100 people’ is very powerful. It allows them to meet orders that they might not otherwise.” But over the years, many companies have upended that model and stretched the definition of “temporary work.” At least 840,000 temp workers are like Rosa: working blue-collar jobs and earning less than $25,000 a year, a ProPublica analysis of federal labor data found. Only about 30 percent of industrial temp jobs will become permanent, according to a survey by Staffing Industry Analysts. By 4:52 a.m., the chairs at Rosa’s temp agency are filled, and workers line the walls, clutching plastic bags that contain their lunches. From behind the tall white counter, the voice of an unseen dispatcher booms like a game-show host, calling out the first batch of workers: Mendoza, Rosales, Centeno, Martinez, ... It is a practice that George Gonos, a sociologist at SUNY-Potsdam who has spent his career studying the temp industry, calls the modern version of the “shape-up”—a practice in which longshoremen would line up in front of a boss, who would pick them one by one for work on the docks. The day after Thanksgiving 1960, Edward R. Murrow broadcast a report called “Harvest of

row’s report have now been built up with warehouses filled with temps. As before, the products change by the season. But now, instead of picking strawberries, tomatoes and corn, the temp workers pack chocolates for Valentine’s Day, barbecue grills for Memorial Day, turkey pans for Thanksgiving, clothing and toys for Christmas. African-Americans make up 11 percent of the overall workforce but more than 20 percent of temp workers. Willie Pearson, who is AfricanAmerican, has been a full-time worker at BMW's South Carolina plant for 14 years. But since at least 2005, he said, he hasn't seen anyone who’s “been hired straight on. It’s all been through temporary agencies.” The company says “after six months they can hire them,” he said, “but I’d say it’s only one out of five” who actually lands a full-time job. BMW did not return calls for this story. Latinos make up about 20 percent of all temp workers. In many temp towns, agencies have flocked to neighborhoods full of undocumented immigrants, finding labor that is kept cheap in part by these workers’ legal vulnerability: They cannot complain without risking deportation.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FILINGS

08/08/13, 08/22/13, 09/03/13, 09/17/13

07/11/13, 07/25/13, 08/08/13,08/22/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013116707 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Land’s End Properties, 2515 S. Wstern Ave., Suite 15. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) R. Clinton Miller, 1373 W. 7th Street, San Pedro, CA 90732. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ R. Clinton Miller, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on June 6, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing):

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013123135 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Rain Gutter Service, 1310 W. D St. #1, Wilmington, CA, 90744. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Francisco Lopez, 1310 W. D St. #1, Wilmington, CA, 90744. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Francisco Lopez. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on June 13, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 07/11/13,

06/27/13, 07/11/13, 07/25/13, 08/08/13

07/25/13, 08/08/13,08/22/13

Redondo each, Ca 90278. Business was conducted by a corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. ( A registant who declares as true informaiton which he or she knows tobe falseis guilty of a crime.) Body DS/ Beth Hurewitz, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles County on July 11, 2013. 07/25/13, 08/08/13, 08/22/13, 09/03/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013123855 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Point Fermin Marine, 2275 W. 25th Street #58, San Pedro, CA, 90732. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Daniel Mead Fees Jr., 2275 W. 25th Street #58, San Pedro, CA, 90732. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Daniel Mead Fees Jr.,. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on June 14, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing):

07/11/13, 07/25/13, 08/08/13,08/22/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013134123 The following person(s) is (are)

doing business as:  Fantasy Spa Mobile Pet Grooming, 2671 S. Cabrillo Avenue, San Pedro, CA 90732. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Adrian Garcia, 2671 S. Cabrillo Avenue, San Pedro, CA 90732. Erica Garcia, 2671 S. Cabrillo Avenue, San Pedro, CA 90732. This business is conducted by a married couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Adrian Garcia. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on June 27, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 07/11/13, 07/25/13, 08/08/13,08/22/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013135288 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Affordable PC Repair, 961 W. 21st Street,

San Pedro, CA 90732. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) James Frances Sandor, 961 W. 21st Street, San Pedro, CA 90732. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ James Frances Sandor. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on June 28, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 07/11/13, 07/25/13, 08/08/13,08/22/13

Statement of Abandoment of Use of Fictitious Business Name File No. 2012220894 Date Filed 11/05/2012 Seaside Healing Arts, 615 W. 9th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731 Registered Owner(s): Body Shop Day Spa, Inc., 4001 Inglewood Ave., 101-639,

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013143691 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Housewife on Wheels, 3470 S. Leland St., San Pedo Ca 90731. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Diane Taylor Carbone, 3470 S. Leland St., San Pedo Ca 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Diane Taylor Carbone. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on July 11, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 07/25/13, 08/08/13, 08/22/13, 09/03/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013143692 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Victory Property Investments, 100 Aquarium Way, #2, Long Beach, CA 90802. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Luz Victoria Osuna, 723 N. Leland Ave., San Pedro, CA 90732. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to

be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Luz Victoria Osuna. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on July 11, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 07/25/13, 08/08/13, 08/22/13, 09/03/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013139431 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Soulera, 510 Shepard St., San Pedro, CA 90731. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Andrew Jonathan Soto, 510 Shepard St., San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Andrew Jonathan Soto. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on July 5, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 07/25/13, 08/08/13, 08/22/13, 09/03/13

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August 23 - September 5, 2013

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013135287 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Original Concrete Stone, 363 W. 12th St., San Pedo Ca 90731. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Kasey Alexander Diaz, 791 W. 6th Strert, Apt #2, San Pedro, Ca 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Kasey Alexander Diaz. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on June 28, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing):

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013143691 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Level 2 Languages, 1374 W. 37th Street, San Pedo CA 90731. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Mark Sanden, 1374 W. 37th Street, San Pedo Ca 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in 07/24/13. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Mark Sanden. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on July 24, 2013. Notice- In acxcordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing):

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from p. 20

Allred Empowers Fight Against Injustice and How You Can Win Your Own Battles? GA: I was asked by the publisher [but] at the end of each chapter I had little empowerment lessons. What can you learn from that famous case that I talked about that can help you in your own life? The book was written for women who are not lawyers. RL: One of those cases your book discusses is the one against seven priests at the St. Philomena Church in Carson, in the 80s. Was it basically a paternity suit? GA: That was [only] one aspect. It went on for 23 years until they finally settled it. That was Rita Milla, who was sexually abused by seven Catholic priests and had a baby by one of them. As I said in the book, the day that we filed, all seven priests suddenly disappeared. It’s a very long story but it’s in my book. Ultimately we did find one of the priests. We were able to obtain a court order ordering him to take a [paternity] test. He did take the test and on the basis of that test, it did establish that he was, in fact, the father [of Milla’s child].

August 23 - September 5, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

RL: Your book also addresses a less significant case that got much media attention, against a restaurant that gave men a menu with prices and women one without prices. Looking at the legal basis, though, although an act may constitute discrimination, sex discrimination, in the eyes of the law, isn’t there a need to show harm? GA: The harm is the discrimination. Under the Unruh Civil Rights Act, men and women cannot be treated differently by businesses on account of their gender. We sued under the Unruh Civil Rights Act and were successful in getting them to change their policy.

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RL: With the War on Women going on, gains we’ve made are under attack. GA: If they’re attacking us it must mean we’re doing something right and something important. I do think it is a war. I feel like every day I need the courage to work through the system to fight injustice. A lot of women have had the courage to be my clients and I’m just very proud of them. We haven’t had a woman president of the United States. We haven’t had a woman governor of the State of California. We haven’t won, yet, passage of the Equal Rights Amendment. I’m very fortunate to have a wonderful daughter. She’s an attorney. My granddaughter’s in law school. Three generations of women lawyers, but we need more women helping women. RL: What are your plans for the future? Another book? GA: Absolutely not! I enjoyed writing this one but I’m completely committed to my cases and I am working all the time, weekends, holidays, on my cases. This is what I’m committed to doing. This is what I love doing. Lyn Jensen serves on the Women’s Issues Commission for the City of Carson. She is also the Carson reporter for this paper.

from p. 5

Adamic

to all. My point is that San Pedrans are held captive to too small a slice of the San Pedro experience. We’re held too captive to think bigger, explore broader, and include more into what it means to be a San Pedran. Adamic, in an essay he published in his book, From Many Lands, noted: Most of us, old-stock and new Americans, are not aware of the human resources we have here, and of the opportunity before us to create a great culture on this continent; a culture which could approach being

Writer Louis Adamic

universal or pan-human and more satisfying to the human make up than any culture has yet appeared under the sun. Nor are we aware of the dangers ahead of us if we fail to take advantage of this opportunity.

To my mind, Adamic’s prophetic words about the future of the United States speaks just as truly about the future of San Pedro. Towns, states and nations celebrate their anniversaries by telling and retelling stories of the their founding, and passing down narratives that have been passed on from one generation to the next in either oral or written histories. In San Pedro, we remember George Peck and his children through park and street names. We remember the longshore, canning and fishing industries that sustained immigrant families with monuments and family stories passed on over family dinners. And some still recall the waves of migrant and immigrant communities and the continued on following page

more than the pieces being offered by business to celebrate 125 years. We do have the rest of this year or perhaps the next five to get it right. But let’s start by ensuring there are copies of his book in the San Pedro Library. And, once they are there, let’s make sure they are read.

DESIGNS

circumstances that brought them here with novels such as The Grapes of Wrath. Louis Adamic should be among those we remember and acknowledge as a significant part of this San Pedro story. There should be an embrace of his vision of diversity that accepts the new without sacrificing the old. For to some great extent we are living in the town, the America, that he wrote about some 85 years ago. This takes in

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25

The Long Reach of LA Labor: Bakersfield Photos and text by Slobodan Dimitrov, Guest Columnist

August 23 - September 5, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

On Aug. 14, the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO, led a car caravan that eventually merged with others, from about 30 cities, from across the state, at the City of Bakersfield. Reminiscent of 2011, when Los Angeles led a California Labor contingent to the capital of Wisconsin, spirits were high among the union members. Labor wanted to send a message to House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy (R-Bakersfield) to support and advocate for a vote on immigration reform with a path to citizenship. The caravan from Los Angeles and Orange Counties met at Dodger Stadium’s parking lot 13, at 6 a.m.. By 7 a.m., cars were streaming out of the parking lot, each with an American flag on its window, signifying the vehicle as part of the caravan. The Service Employees International Union, provided buses for its membership. According to the professional musician’s union organizer at Local 47, Ethan Harris, “We are participating in the citizenship caravan because we support the path to citizenship,” Harris said. “This is about human rights and human dignity. This is a workers’ movement. We need to stand together. The future will show that supporting immigrant workers is the right side of the immigration issue.” The theme of the caravan was to project Bakersfield as ground zero as the “gateway to naturalization.” By early afternoon, all the vehicles converged on Yokuts Park, in Bakersfield. There, they joined up with members of the United Farm Workers, to host a rally, in an open field, in spite of the

26

Central Valley summer heat. The offices of House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy (R-Bakersfield) were a block away. A wave of petitioners, descended on the office, where an aid, valiantly handled each protester at the counter. Standing to the side were a number of supporters of the congressman, holding their signs for immigration law enforcement, high in the air. It was a very mixed crowd, reflecting virtually every group working in the Central Valley, and of those from outlying communities. While the summer has been relatively quiet, labor-wise, in Los Angeles, the port drivers will be hosting a rally on Aug. 29, at the Port of Los Angeles. Shortly afterward, on Sept. 2, a Labor Day parade and picnic will take place in Wilmington. This will be followed by the AFLCIO International convention in Los Angeles, the following week.

from p. 6 Manning will be able to subtract almost threeand-a-half years off of his sentence, for both the time he had already served without a trial and the 112 days he was credited, while enduring torture for 9 months when he was detained at the Quantico Marine Brig. Manning will eligible to reduce his sentence by 10 percent for good behavior. David Coombs, Manning’s lawyer, is applying for a presidential pardon but President Barack Obama had already declared Manning guilty in April 2011, more than two years before his trial began. Coombs also plans to bring the case to the Army Court of Criminal Appeals to address the absence of Manning’s due process rights. According to Coombs, parole will become a possibility after seven years of confinement, and will be eligible to plead his case every year after. In the statement read by his attorney on the day of sentencing, Manning wrote: “It was not until I was in Iraq and reading secret military reports on a daily basis that I started to question the morality of what we were doing…. There is not a flag large enough to cover the shame of killing innocent people. Whenever we kill innocent civilians...we elect to hide behind the veil of national security and classified information in order to avoid any public accountability.”

Sailors International Union Reaches Agreement with Matson

From top, activists gather in Bakersfield, the “ground zero” of immigration reform. Labor activist next to AFL-CIO Executive Vice President Maria Elena Durazo, speaking to thousands at the Aug. 14 rally outside the offices of House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy (R-Bakersfield) Labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta (center picture) co-founder with Cesar Chavez of what later became the United Farm Workers. Above, Korean-American delegates from Los Angeles sent to the AFL-CIO rally in Bakersfield.

The Sailors International Union Pacific District reached an agreement with Matson to revise the unions’ work rules and maintenance agreement. The agreement seeks to touch base on workers’ demands for higher wages and improved pension. It also negates Matson’s ability to kickback or make concessions in the Aloha-Class vessels slated for delivery in 2016 and 2017. Dealing with the financial aspect of the agreement, in the 4 years that follow, union workers’ wage rates will rise 2.75 percent, 3 percent, 2.75 percent and then 2.5 percent. The cost of living allowance will be increased based on the comparison of the May 2014 Consumer Price Index for urban consumers and the May 2013 CPI. Also, pensions will be increased $200 a month for those retiring after July 1, 2013 and a 2 percent cost of living increase for current pensioners who qualify for long-term basic pension.

Benefits to Merchant Mariners from World War II

Rep. Janice Hahn recently sponsored a bill to provide benefits to merchant mariners who served during World War II. The bill, H.R. 1936, has the Secretary of Veteran Affairs establish a Merchant Mariner Equity Fund to provide them $1,000 a month. The World War II Merchant Marine Service Act of 2013 would extend burial benefits and the list of documentation accepted by the Department of Homeland Security to establish seagoing service in World War II.

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August 23 - September 5, 2013

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28

August 23 - September 5, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area


Rl 08 22 13 edition