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PRODUCER CONNECTION

THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE TEXAS PORK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION • VOLUME 2, NUMBER 5


NATIONAL SWINE REGISTRY

FALL CLASSIC

Nov. 18-21, 2015

Stephens County Fairgrounds • Duncan, Okla.

ENTRY DEADLINE: Oct. 7, 2015 Farrowing Deadline for breeding stock: April 1 and after

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For more information and a full schedule, visit: nationalswine.com

Yorkshire: Larry Moore, Okla. Crossbred Boar: Mike Fischer, Texas

WEANLING SIFT JUDGES: Purebreds: Ryan Sites, Okla. Crossbreds: Willie Kirkpatrick, Okla.

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What’s in this issue 30

TAMU / China Partnership Faculty members from the Texas A&M University Vet School & College of Agriculture traveled to China to discuss potential projects in the fields of swine production and health & veterinary epidemiology.

50

Strong Roots, Bright Future We sat down with Morgan Friesenhahn of Marion, TX to hear how her story of showing livestock began and how her family’s bond strengthens her passion for the livestock industry.

54

Featured Faculty: Bryan Bernhard, Phd. A product of the youth livestock programs in Texas and strong supporter of TPPA, learn more about Dr. Bryan Bernhard, Texas Tech University’s newest faculty member in the Animal Science Department.

60

Producer Spotlight: Cargill As the world’s largest privately owned company & global leader in agriculture, Cargill provides many services. And for their pork unit, a lot of it starts in Dalhart, where Mike Gruber manages the largest sow farm in the country.

76

Fall Showpig Sales Trail Anyone who plans on buying swine projects this year can’t miss out on the Sales Trail. Here is an updated comprehensive list of the upcoming show pig sales across the state.

Check It Out 7 16 20 22 32 33 38 48 68 72 91

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Market Report Industry News Capitol Report Around The State TVMDL Update Ag Exemptions Pork Month Info & Recipes #REALPIGFARMING Youth Photos National Barrow Show, Hog College CTBR Title Sponsor Announcement Advertisers Index

On The Cover: October is National Pork Month and what a better time to celebrate everything PORK! Check out great recipes throughout this publication and if your still hungry, visit porkbeinspired.com for more great tasting treats!


THE AUSTIN FOOD & WINE ALLIANCE PRESENTS

AUTHENTIC PIG ROAST FEATURING CENTRAL TEXAS’ TOP CHEFS PREMIUM WINES • CRAFT BEERS & SPIRITS • LIVE MUSIC

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! SUNDAY NOV 8

1 - 4 pm

STAR HILL RANCH 15000 HAMILTON POOL RD AUSTIN, TX 78738

You’re invited to join us! For more information and tickets please contact Cassidy Smith at csmith@texaspork.org

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A few words from Your Executive Vice President What we’ve been up to...

led me up to ask a few r when one of our members calbusy with litter records ina sem a at ak spe to ing vel Recently I was on the road tra ms. As we were talking, he said it must be getting pretty to be input. To his surprise, questions about the CTBR forcates being ordered, and State Fair breeder logs needing e is being consumed by much coming in, major show certifi of those things are taking place, the majority of our tim arent and providing more my reply was that although all at made me realize the importance of being more transp mer events and getting time wrapping up our sum more than CTBR currently. Th ference, we spent most of our conferences with FFA and 4-H. In the past month con ter Af . you to s ate upd er ely tim ine out, in addition to a few oth the August/September magaz a lot of time on some of the following items. though, we’ve been spending , but to fit,” is one written in simplicity pro for t duc pro lity qua a e pli mbership produc effort to accom sh this. TPPA’s mission, “helping mething but. There are a multitude of issues we tackle in an ve our publication, so that carry out that promise, is any magazine comes to mind. We work to continually impro t interest grows in our Of course, promotion and the e, you can benefit from the educational materials, and tha e in what we are doing and potential buyers see your nam With that being said, THANK YOU to those who believlish and improve the quality association amongst everyone.er Connection. Your support allows us to continue to pub have advertised in the Produc with each subsequent issue. a great deal of time on priority. We’ve recently spent Foot and Mouth Disease. top a is ock est liv te’s sta our as ease outbreak such Protecting the health of event of a foreign animal dis paredness and business emergency preparedness, in thel agencies and associations, we have been working on prethe critical activities that With regional, state and federa capabilities needed to respond to an FMD outbreak and e plans being put together ivities. Th continuity plans to identify the and time-frames for these act protects public health and the ak, bre out t tha to g din pon animal health and will be involved in res gh our work and training secures the food supply, guards promote agricultural security, tegic guidance on responding to an FMD outbreak. Throu ilities and industries could environment by providing straunfortunate event this were to happen, that livestock fac e status in a timely manner. exercises, we hope that in the quickly as possible and allow the U.S. to regain FMD-fre resume normal production as preparing to fail.” –Benjamin Franklin. “By failing to prepare, we are swine s the reappointment of a state in ard tow ng rki wo n bee has PA past few years, TP ling more confident Many of you know that for thea long journey, and although not confirmed yet, we are fee l be to serve producers and n wil ty bee ori specialist whose pri extension specialist. It’s pefully in the next month, s position. The presence of a Extension’s commitment to thivaluable to each one of you and our industry in Texas. Ho help them improve, will be so to you some great news. we will be able to report back l lawmakers on . to visit with our congressiona D.C on, ngt shi Wa to trip ent thi ut our rec together; s trip serves a In this issue you will read abo k industry. We must always remember we are all in this ber of representatives we key issues of impact to the porays told that our presence makes a difference. With the num ationships. great purpose and we are alw t we work hard to establish and maintain those strong rel tha l cia have out there, it’s cru is derived from get. A large part of our budgetand this pattern is bud 6 201 the on ng rki wo n r e bee yea TPPA staff and Board too havendent on the hog market. Prices have dropped from last viable and progressive. ain dep is rem ich to wh erm ds, g-t fun lon n off pla Check TPPA expenses in the 2016, so we must strategically projected to continue throughrelocating the office from Austin to Kyle, which will reducep in and visit. One measure we’ve taken is d this, hopefully everything will be in place for you to sto long-run. By the time you rea hip for success, ieve will position our members We make decisions that we belare glad to have your support. If you ever have and the TPPA board and staff e ideas for our association, you know you can hav questions about anything, or time. Good luck to everyone with their upcoming any at l cel my or ce offi you at the farm and call the ays, I look forward to seeing sales and purchases, and as alw you. talking about what matters to Best Regards, BRG

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UPCOMING EVENTS

October / November 2015

OCTOBER

Follow TPPA:

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Sept. 28th - Oct. 1st ~ State Fair of Texas Barrow Show, Dallas, TX 8th - 10th ~ NJSA Eastern Regional, Hamburg, N.Y. 12th - 13th ~ Heart of Texas Fair - Market Pig & Breeding Gilt Show, Waco,TX 17th ~ Moorman’s ShowTec Feed Clinic, San Antonio, TX

TPPA Mission Statement “The mission of the Texas Pork Producers Association is to help our members produce and market pork for a profit.” Producer Connection is the official publication of the Texas Pork Producers Association and is published by the Texas Pork Producers Association. All inquiries should be directed to the TPPA office. Advertising Information To place an ad or for advertising rates and guidelines, please contact Texas Pork Producers Association at (512) 262-0595 or communications@texaspork.org

Texas Pork Producers Association 151-A Kirkham Circle Kyle, TX 78640 512-262-0595 - Local Phone 512-262-0582 - Fax tppa@texaspork.org www.texaspork.org

23rd - 25th ~ American Royal Barrow Show, Kansas City, MO 24th ~ Aggiefest Livestock Judging Contest, College Station, TX 28th - 31st ~ National FFA Convention, Louisville, KY

NOVEMBER 7th - 9th ~ North American International Livestock Expo Barrow Show, Louisville, KY 8th ~ 5th Annual Wine & Swine, Austin, TX 18th - 21st ~ NSR Fall Classic, Duncan, OK 26th ~ Thanksgiving, Office Closed 30th ~ Last Day to Validate Swine

THE OFFICE LOCATION HAS MOVED TO KYLE, TX. PLEASE UPDATE YOUR CONTACT INFORMATION. 151-A Kirkham Circle Kyle, TX 78640

512-262-0595 - Local Phone 512-262-0582 - Fax

Programs are made available to pork producers without regard to race, color, sex, religion or national origin. TPPA is an equal opportunity employer.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

BOARD OF DIRECTORS STAFF

President - Kyle Stephens, Amarillo

Mike Gruber, Dalhart Kurt Kelso, Seguin David Kempen, San Angelo Barret Klein, Boerne Cody McCleery, Weatherford Robert Peffley, Miami Chuck Real, Marion Ewrin Schwartz, Jr., San Angelo Josh Krohn, Lamesa Wayne Harman, Perryton Doug Schaefer, Garden City

President Elect - Jimmy Hayes, Port Lavaca Vice President - Corby Barrett, Perryton Immediate Past President - Kenneth Kensing, Fredericksburg Executive Member - Stanley Young, Lubbock Executive Member - Denny Belew, Tahoka Executive Member - Jay Winter, Lubbock

Executive Vice President Brandon R. Gunn bgunn@texaspork.org Director of Communications Cassidy Smith csmith@texaspork.org

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2015

Aggiefest L I VE

Sponsored by the Texas A&M University Livestock Judging Team.

STOCK JUDGING C

T S E ONT

October 24, 2015 • Louis Pearce Pavilion • College Station OPEN TO ALL 4-H AND FFA MEMBERS Three Age Groups - Ages as of 9/1/15 Sub-Junior: Ages 8-11 Junior: Ages 12-14 Senior: Ages 15 & Up Team Competitions: 4 members/team (Judge 4, count 3) Contest: Scantrons will be provided 3 Cattle Classes (1 Performance) 2 Swine Classes 3 Sheep/Goat Classes 15 Questions (5 questions on 1 class of each species)

Schedule: 7:30 a.m. - Registration 9:00 a.m. - Contest Begins 1:30 p.m. - Contest Awards Entries: All 4-H & FFA participants can enter at http://www.judgingcard.com. Pre-entries ($15/individual) are due October 16 Late entries ($20/individual) October 17-24 On-site registration is available. Awards: High individuals in each age division will win belt buckles! Awards will be presented to the top 10 individuals and top 2 teams in each age division!

For more information, contact Brant Poe at brant_poe@tamu.edu or call (979) 845-6059.

BUILDING Champions FOR OVER A Century!

1913 International Champions

1967 National Champions

2004 National Champions

2013 National Champions


It’s time to Fall into a New Career Production Agriculture Needs You!

This honorable Career needs bright minds like yours so that we can continue to lead the world in food production. Texas Farm, LLC, a growing Pork Production Company, is expanding its Animal Production and Production Leadership Team.

Great Pork, Great Life! Contact us at: 4200 South Main Perryton, Texas or contact Isabel (806) 435-5935 ext. 3100; idominguez@texasfarmpork.com to start pursuing your future today. Interested Applicants must complete an application or submit a resume!

Market News Wiechman Pig Company

September 16, 2015 (Daily Buying Station) Top Butchers (200-300 lbs.) - $43.77/cwt. Sows (< 450 lbs.) - $0.26/lb. Sows (450 - 500 lbs.) - $0.30/lb. Sows (500 - 550 lbs.) - $0.34/lb. Sows (550 - 600 lbs.) - $0.35/lb. Sows (600+ lbs.) - $0.36/lb. Big Boars - $8.00 /cwt.

Gainesville Livestock Auction September 15, 2015

#1 Butchers (230-270 lbs.) - $0.40 - $0.50/lb. #2 Butchers (220-280 lbs.) - $0.35 - $0.40/lb. Sows (<400 lbs.) - $0.25 - $0.35/lb. Sows (400-500 lbs.) - $0.25/lb. Sows (500-700 lbs.) - $0.25/lb. Feeder Pigs (25-90 lbs.) - $0.25 - $0.70/lb. Feeder Pigs (100-175 lbs.) - $0.50 - $0.75/lb. Boars (<200 lbs.) - $0.35 - $0.50/lb. Boars (200-300 lbs.) - $0.20 - $0.35/lb. Boars (300+ lbs.) - $0.05 - $0.20/lb.

Brenham Livestock Auction September 11, 2015

Butchers 1-2 Grade (230-260 lbs.) - $0.65 - $0.70/lb. Butchers 2-3 Grade (225-275 lbs.) - $0.60 - $0.65/lb. Butchers 3-4 Grade (225-275 lbs.) - $0.50 - $0.52/lb. Packer Sows 1-2 Grade (550-700 lbs.) - $0.35 - $0.38/lb. Packer Sows 2-3 Grade (350-500 lbs.) - $0.30 - $0.32/lb. Packer Sows 3-4 Grade (250-500 lbs.) - $0.25 - $0.30/lb. Lightweight Boars - $0.25 - $0.30/lb. Feeder Pigs 1-2 Grade (40-80 lbs.) - $0.90 - $1.20/lb. Feeder Pigs 2-3 Grade (40-80 lbs.) - $0.80 - $1.00/lb.

Seguin Cattle Company September 8, 2015

#1 Butchers - $0.55 - $0.58/lb. #2 Butchers - $0.50 - $0.52/lb. Sows - $0.28 - $0.45/lb. Feeder Shoats - $0.60 - $0.75/lb.

Watch your e-mail for the weekly Market Report 7


Remembering Don G. Brothers Past TPPA President December 25, 1935 - September 4, 2015

PADUCAH — Don G. Brothers, 79, of Paducah passed away Friday, Sept. 4, 2015. Services were held at the Church of Christ in Paducah with burial in the Garden of Memories in Paducah. Mr. Brothers was born Dec. 25, 1935, in Paducah to Arlie and Doris Sosebee Brothers. Don dedicated his life to the agriculture and ranching industries. He graduated from Texas Tech University in 1957 with a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture and Animal Husbandry. While at Texas Tech, Don was a member of the 1956 National Champion Wool Judging Team. In 1959, Don received his Master of Science in Agriculture and Applied Science from Oklahoma State University in Stillwater. In 1961, he was granted a Doctor of Philosophy in Agriculture and Applied Science from Oklahoma State University in Stillwater. Don met his wife, Gayle, in Stillwater, and they married on Dec. 16, 1960, in Ardmore, Okla. Don returned to Paducah with his new wife in 1961. Early in his career, Don was a cotton farmer and swine producer. Don served as President of the Texas Pork Producers Association (1968-1970) and the Texas Pork Producers Board during the early 1970’s. When he was elected to this position, he was in his early 30’s and was the youngest man to ever serve in this capacity. Governor Preston Smith appointed Don as a board member to the Texas Animal Health Commission. Don served in this capacity from 1971 through 1977. Don’s goal during his service was the elimination of brucellosis in the livestock population. Brucellosis was a highly controversial issue during this time with many livestock producers taking the stance that the disease should be tolerated in livestock intended for human consumption. Don adamantly disagreed and felt that the disease must be eliminated because no responsible livestock producer could “tolerate” a disease that would place the citizens of Texas at risk. Don also fought to eradicate hog cholera in Texas. On Jan. 31, 1978, United States Secretary of Agriculture, Bob Bergland, declared the United States hog cholera free during ceremonies in Washington, D.C. Don was in attendance to accept the certification that Texas was officially hog cholera free. Gayle did not attend the ceremony because she stayed home to “take care of the babies.” Don became interested in the ranching industry in the 1970’s and fell in love with Brangus Cattle. Don and Gayle began to purchase land as they could afford it in Cottle, King, Dickens and Motley Counties. This land is the PK Ranch and Don dedicated his life to making improvements to the land and to his cattle herd. The PK Ranch is a testament to Don’s work ethic. Don has served as president of the National Ranching Heritage Center of Texas Tech University. He was also a board member of Wells Fargo Bank in Lubbock. Don had great respect for the people he met while in these two positions and considered many of them to be “very smart people.” Don was very proud to be a Sosebee. He was preceded in death by his parents. Survivors include his wife, Gayle of Paducah; his daughters, Dinah Brothers of Liberty Hill and Cassie Brothers Francis of Trophy Club; and his son, John Brothers and wife Jana of Paducah; two grandchildren, Robert John Francis of Matador and Fritzi Gayle Francis of Stillwater; multiple Sosebee cousins that he dearly loved; and his beloved dog, E.B., who is full of grief. The family suggests memorials be to National Ranching Heritage Center or the Children’s Home of Lubbock.

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Pork Quality Assurance® Plus This program combines food safety and animal well-being principles into a widely-respected and used certification program. The program includes: Individual certification through education Site status through an on-farm site assessment Third-party verification for credibility Alignment of 10 Good Producation (GPPs) with the We Care® Ethical Principles • Individual testing component • Required corrective action plan for site assessment noncompliant findings • • • •

TEXAS PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION

Learn more about PQA Plus by visiting www.pork.org/certification or by calling the Pork Checkoff Service Center (800) 456-7675.

©2015 National Pork Board, Des Moines, IA USA. This message funded by America’s Pork Producers and the Pork Checkoff.

pork.org/certification • (800) 456-7675

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Learn about ...  Interdependencies

of the water, energy, food, and climate

 Technology,

planning, and policy options that promote agriculture sustainability and profitability

 Turning

climate change into opportunities for agriculture producers

Registration now open! https://agriliferegister.tamu.edu/ Nexus

Fee: $125

Navigating Agriculture through the Water-EnergyFood Nexus November 19, 2015 • Austin, Texas

For more information, contact David Smith at DWSmith@ag.tamu.edu

Who Should Attend? Extension educators Technical service providers For more information, contact Regulatory agencies David W. Smith Texas A&Minstitutions AgriLife Extension Academic College Station, TX (979) 862-1989 Agricultural commodity groups DWSmith@ag.tamu.edu Agricultural producers

By 2050 agriculture will be charged with feeding 8 to 9 billion people, while facing increased competition for limited natural resources, evolving social preferences, expanding global markets, and climate uncertainty. Join us for this unique opportunity to hear from a distinguished panel of experts as they discuss these and other issues facing agriculture and the rural communities that support this vital industry. 

What are the linkages between water, energy, and food systems?

What are the interdependencies and tradeoffs that will influence future policy and sustainability of agriculture?

How does the water-energy-food nexus function on a regional scale and can it be a useful tool for future planning?

Is agriculture prepared for climate change and does it have a voice in climate change policy?

Omni Austin Hotel Southpark 4140 Governors Row This event is sponsored by USDA-NIFA grant No. 2011-67003-30206.

Agricultural science teachers www.animalagclimatechange.org

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SYMPOSIUM AGENDA Time 7:30 am 8:00 am

Title/speaker Registration and coffee Introductions David W. Smith, Extension Program Specialist, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension

8:10 am

Welcome & keynote address Dr. Saqib Mukhtar, Associate Dean & Ag. Program Leader, University of Florida Institute

Navigating Agriculture through the Water-Energy-Food Nexus

of Food and Agricultural Sciences; Keynote: TBD

8:30 am

Water-energy-food nexus—applications for agriculture communities Dr. Rabi Mohtar, Texas Engineering Experiment Station Endowed Professor, Texas A&M University; Founding Director of Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute

9:10 am

Water supply & demand —trends and challenges for the Southwest Dr. Robert Mace, Deputy Executive Director, Texas Water Development Board

9:50 am

Value of water to agricultural communities Jason Coleman, P.E. General Manager, High Plains Water District

10:30 am Break 10:40 am The shale boom—Impacts for agriculture production and producers Dr. Thomas Tunstall, Research Director, The University of Texas at San Antonio, Institute for Economic Development,

11:20 am The future of renewable energy and agriculture Dr. Wendell Porter, P.E., Lecturer, Agricultural & Biological Engineering Department, University of Florida

noon 1:00 pm

Lunch provided Global market impacts and implications for local farms and ranches Dr. James W. Richardson, Regents Professor & AgriLife Research Senior Faculty Fellow, Co-Director Agriculture & Food Policy Center, Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University

1:40 pm

Innovation and technology applications for agriculture production Dr. Reza Ehsani, Associate Professor of Agricultural & Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Citrus Research & Education Center

2:20 pm

Break

2:30 pm

Turning climate change into opportunities for agricultural producers Dr. John Nielsen-Gammon, Regents Professor of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A&M University, Texas State Climatologist

3:10 pm

Policy alternatives for promoting sustainable agriculture Steven Rhines, Vice President, General Council and Director of Public Affairs, The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, Oklahoma

3:50 pm

The rapidly evolving legal and regulatory framework for agriculture producers Jim Bradbury, Attorney, James D. Bradbury, PLLC, Austin & Fort Worth, Texas

4:30 pm

Panel discussion—How can ‘nexus thinking’ take root in agriculture? TBD

5:20 pm

Adjourn

*Times, speakers, and titles subject to change 11


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20 litters born July 15-Late September. Featured Sires: Stingray, Colt 45, Monumental, Fortune, Money Talks, Uno, Muscle Milk, Journey 1-8, Moonshine 26-1, No Hesitation, Head Over Heals, Infusion.

Reserve Champion Bastrop area livestock show 2014 Bred by: us

Supreme Breeding gilt Atascosa county Bred by: Armstrong genetics Service sire: infusion

Sales WFG Farm Sale

Private Treaty Bid Off Sale Starts at Noon September 18th Poteet, TX :: September 18-20

Ring of Success

Levelland, TX :: October 2-4

Major League Pig Sale Snyder, TX :: October 17-18

No hesitation x sideshow bob Service sire: stingray

No fare x Super Monster Service sire: monumental

WFG Coastal Sale La Porte, TX :: November 1

Fall Classic

Duncan, OK :: November 19-21

Online sales Coming Soon

Stingray Swagger x Mountain Man x 9 to 5 High Selling Boar sold with Nathan Ray to Showtime Sires

2771 Coble Rd Poteet, TX 78065 Shelby Sessions 713-253-0542 Morgan Wagner 830-480-8028 13


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RORY DUELM 192 Altwein Ln. New Braunfels, Tx 78130 830-608-5058 830-606-7547

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RODNEY KELSO & SONS 701 Sweet Home Rd. Seguin, Tx 78155 Kurt: 210-240-6710 Rodney: 830-305-4422 830-303-7579

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GREG / VINCE FRANCKOWIAK RYAN KOLTERMANN LUENSMANN 7 OTTO 15871 St. Hedwig Rd. 16113 New Berlin Rd. St. Hedwig, Tx 78152 St. Hedwig, Tx 78152 Vince: 210-336-9428 830-914-2507 Greg: 210-667-1325 Ryan: 210-844-8735 HOLT 8 JAMES 88 S. Camino Real GERTH HOG FARM Kyle, Tx 78640 6655 West IH 10 O: 512-398-5948 Seguin, Tx 78155 C: 512-217-6543 830-914-2593

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- Seguin Swine Breeders Association

REAL HOG FARM Chuck & Russell Real 15492 Real Rock Rd. Marion, Tx 78124 H: 830-914-2833 Chuck: 210-827-7351 Russell: 210-216-2688

10

3B SHOWPIGS TROY BROWN 5209 FM 775 Seguin, TX 78155 210-844-3044

11

ROBERT HUEBNER 251 Mt. Pleasant Kingsburry, Tx 78638 830-639-4788 830-660-7101

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VICTORY LANE SHOW PIGS 550 Wild Coyote Trail Marion, Tx 78124 Austin: 830-708-8686 Mackenzie: 830-708-8688 Jeff: 830-708-5930

13

DOEGE SHOW PIGS 3085 Kusmierz Rd. St. Hedwig, Tx 78152 210-316-9627 210-667-9627 210-342-5112

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L & H SHOW PIGS 6781 FM 236 Victoria, Tx 77905 Russell: 361-676-5453 Robert: 361-550-5579

15

FEY SHOW PIGS 2681 CR 420 Stockdale, Tx 78160 Kenneth: 830-481-3162 Keith: 830-534-3755

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DOUG ALDERSON 380 N. Santa Clara Rd. Marion, TX 78124 210-296-4479


Mark Your Calendars Now! Seguin Swine Breeders 10th Annual Prospect Show December 6, 2015

PRIZE S Cash! Buckles ! Plaques !

Guadalupe Co. Fairgrounds n Grand Champio $400

Buckles for all Breed Champions Plaques to Reserve Champions Ribbons for ALL!

SHOW FORMAT

Reserve Gran d $200

Judge: Cassidy Hayes

Weight Cards Due 9:00 am Showmanship 9:00 am: Pee Wee 8 & under, Junior 9-13, Senior 14 & Over Show follows Showmanship: Duroc, Hampshire, OPB, Yorkshire, Cross GILTS & S W O BARR THER E G O T SHOW

NO BOAR S OVER 125 LBS.

Name: Name: Address: Address: Phone Phone Number: Number: No. No. Head: Head:

Entry Entry Fee Fee ($20 ($20 per per Head): Head):

Entries Entries Must Must be be received received by by December December 44thth

Late Late Fee Fee at at Show Show $25 $25 per per Head Head

Mail Enteries to: Seguin Swine Breeders 210 E. Live Oak Seguin, TX 78155

Contact: Travis Franke 830-379-1972

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News from the

National Pork Board MOVE OVER, EL NIÑO – GIANT PORK FLAVOR FRONT TO SWEEP THE NATION

On Sept. 8, NPB launched the “Porknóstico” (Porkcast) campaign as part of its multicultural marketing efforts to reach Hispanic consumers in the U.S. “Porknóstico” is part of a broader national campaign and seeks to get Pork on Hispanic’s shopping lists in a fun and engaging way. “Porknóstico” is a word play on pork and forecast and encourages Latinos to plan ahead and create meals with pork – all while complementing a change to the fall season. To infuse additional Latin flavor into the fall campaign and connect with the target in a more culturallyrelevant way, NPB enlisted Latina celebrity chef Doreen Colondres as its chief Porkcaster. Chef Colondres is predicting a 100% delicious fall season marked by a pork flavor front phenomenon that will set a new standard for weather-related eating patterns. She also developed two pork recipes inspired by Latin American cuisines, specifically from Mexico and Peru. Visit the forecast in Spanish at PorkTeInspira.com/Porknostico. Consumers will also be able to search for recipes that fit their local, real-time weather forecast based on location.

PORK VICTORY AT THE GRILL

Summer grilling season is winding down, but NPB is still conquering America’s flavor shyness and firing up grills with pork! To-date the Grill Crashers PR program has earned nearly 30 million impressions through 437 placements. Throughout August, NPB sustained online conversation with the help of six publishers who drove the grill crash movement with their own pork chop recipes. Divine Lifestyle’s post, Island Pork Chops noted, “pork is so easy to work with and such a versatile meat,” driving readers to check out “more drool worthy recipes” at PorkBeinspired. com. This Mama Loves shared her Grilled Pork Chops with Peach Mango Salsa recipe, “the folks at the National Pork Board have tons of 16

mouth-watering chop recipes with hip, modern flavor pairings like Basil-Garlic Pork Chops and Pina Colada Ribeye Pork Chops.”

SENECA VALLEY VIRUS RETURNS TO THE MIDWEST

More cases of Senecavirus A (Seneca Valley Virus) in breeding herds are beginning to surface across the upper Midwest. Dr. Paul Sundberg, the executive director of the Swine Health Information Center, explained to Bruce Cochrane with Farmscape in recently audio update that while the virus itself is not considered to be a “production limiting infection,” its clinical signs bear similarities to foot and mouth disease (FMD) and should be a cause for increased vigilance. The Minnesota Pork Board reported in an update here that clinical signs in infected sows, nursery pigs and finishing pigs may include: Vesicles and coalescing erosions on the snouts and coronary bands; Acute lameness in a group of pigs; Ulcerative lesions on or around the hoof wall; Anorexia, lethargy and/or febrile – In the early course of the disease, fevers up to 105 degrees Fahrenheit have been reported. Sundberg urges producers reporting these conditions in their herds to act quickly “to ensure we don’t have an incursion of FMD.” “Any time that a producer sees a blister on the nose or mouth or on the feet of their pigs they should involve their veterinarian right away so that can be tested out, checked out and make sure it’s not FMD,” Sundberg advises.

WHEN FALL WEATHER HITS, THE PERFECT PORK DISH IS JUST A CLICK AWAY

Facing a rainy day? Cooling down during the dog days of summer? Trying to heat things up on a crisp afternoon? No matter the weather you’re dealt this fall, there’s a tasty pork recipe to match. The National Pork Board announced its launch of the “Daily Porkcast,” a simple, weather-inspired menu planning tool on PorkBeinspired.com. Complete with real-time weather updates based on your U.S. location,

the Porkcast serves up recipes so that rain or shine, the perfect pork dish is just a click away. “So many of us plan everything from our outfits to our activities around the weather – and we wanted to make it easy for pork fans to also be able to plan their menus to suit whatever is happening outside,” said Pamela Johnson, director of consumer communications, the National Pork Board. “The great thing about pork is that it offers so many possibilities; you can grill it outside if the weather allows, roast it if the forecast keeps you indoors, and slow cook it if you’re craving comfort on a cold day. Best of all, there’s no limit to the taste combinations you can create to complement its delicious flavor.” At PorkBeinspired.com/Porkcast, pork lovers will find recipes to fit their forecast, which will be updated daily. The National Pork Board also has teamed up with seven top chefs who have each created a weather zone-inspired recipe for the tool. These “Flavor Forecasters” aim to give fans coast to coast a little taste of the cuisine that suits their local weather. For Texas, Owner and Chef Chris Shepherd, Underbelly in Houston, worked with Pork Board.

AFRICAN SWINE FEVER DEVASTATES EASTERN EUROPE

One of the most deadly swine diseases in the world is steadily making its way across Eastern Europe, and nothing seems to stop it. African Swine Fever (ASF) was first identified in Georgia (the country) in 2007. Since that time is has spread to the Baltic region, northern Ukraine, Poland and western Russia. It is likely in Belarus as well, but that country isn’t revealing its health status, which makes the disease that much more difficult to control. ASF also is enzootic in several African countries and the Mediterranean island of Sardinia. The Baltic states have been particularly affected in recent months. ASF shares many characteristics with Classical Swine Fever (CSF): Both viruses are spread by infected or carrier pigs via discharges from


the nose and mouth and in the urine and feces, according to Managing Pig Health (Muirhead, Alexander and Carr, 2013). Both are highly contagious and are introduced to herds through carrier pigs or infected meat. ASF is also spread by soft-bodied ticks. The virus can replicate not only in domestic and wild pigs, but also the Giant Forest Hog, Wart Hog, Red River hog and the small Peccaries of the America’s. The writers note that both viruses can survive in frozen carcasses for long periods of time and can withstand curing and smoking processes, which is one of the reasons it’s such a threat to North America. One major difference is that ASF is the only member of a completely different virus family, Asfarviridae. However, because ASF so closely resembles CSF in clinical signs and post-mortem lesions, laboratory tests are required to differentiate them. “When virulent strains cross into domestic pigs they cause very serious disease,” the authors write. “Virtually all the pigs in the infected herd become ill and the majority die…There is no vaccine for it.”

NATIONAL PORK BOARD NAMES DAVE PYBURN, DVM, TO LEAD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

The National Pork Board announced that Dave Pyburn, DVM, has been named the new senior vice president of science and technology. Pyburn joined the Pork Checkoff staff in 2013 and was serving as assistant vice president in the Science and Technology department. As senior vice president of science and technology, Pyburn will report to Chief Executive Officer Chris Hodges and lead the science programs and research priorities of the National Pork Board. He will also participate in the six volunteer pork producer committees that assist in prioritizing scientific focus and will manage the on-staff team of experts. Through his more than 20 years of professional experience, Pyburn has developed a comprehensive view of all aspects of pork production. That includes specific areas of expertise including animal science, swine health and welfare, pork safety and nutrition, producer and public health and sustainability. This complete view of the swine industry is key to

address the science and technology challenges and opportunities that face the industry. Pyburn joined the National Pork Board in 2013, and previously served 13 years as the senior veterinary medical officer at the United States Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) Veterinary Services. In that role, he was responsible for setting the department’s priorities, budget and implementation of swine health programs. Pyburn was with the National Pork Producers Council from 1997 to 2000 and, prior to that, a practicing veterinarian in Iowa.

U.S. PORK DEMAND CLIMBS AS BIG PIG HERD PRESSURES PRICES

Two years after Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus (PEDv) killed nearly 10 percent of U.S. hogs, farmers who built up herds to compensate are faced with a sober realization: they’ve produced too much bacon. The aggressive ramp-up in hog production after the PEDv outbreak in 2013, which brought record profits for those whose pigs survived, has now created the greatest U.S. hog price collapse since the late 1990s. That was when overproduction sent prices plunging 75 percent to 50year lows. Benchmark lean hog futures prices on the Chicago Board of Trade have dropped 42 percent from their July 2014 record high of $133 per hundredweight (cwt). And as herds continue to grow, and the strong dollar and competition from Europe and Canada blunts export demand, hog farmers are probably facing even lower prices in the months ahead, with Decemberdelivery futures trading about 20 percent below current prices. The hog glut spells more trouble for a U.S. farm economy already struggling with the lowest grain prices in five years. With retail prices now at threeyear lows, pork is stealing market share from other proteins: U.S. pork sales in June were up 12.5 percent over the previous month, while chicken rose 3 percent and beef fell 2.2 percent, according to the most recent industry data. The number of piglets per litter hit a record high of around 10 in the spring, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA),

helped by steadily improving use of genetics and selective breeding. These animals take around six months to make their way to the meat case. And when cooler autumn weather arrives and sweet, freshly harvested corn begins filling feed troughs, reviving pig appetites, weights should climb back up to pre-summer levels.

DISINFECTANT PROVES SUCCESSFUL AGAINST PEDV

Researchers at the University of Minnesota have shown that a disinfectant is particularly effective against Porcine Epidemic Diarrhoea virus (PEDv). PEDv has caused significant losses for a number of years in the United States, China and Eastern Europe. Although it is now tapering off in the US, the status remains unchanged in China and Eastern Europe. In order to evaluate the possibilities of limiting this disease on an international level, Vitfoss decided earlier this year to have researchers look at whether Stalosan F, already known for being effective against PRRS virus as well as Salmonella and Lawsonia bacteria, has any effect against PEDv. Results from a series of lab tests at the University of Minnesota show that Stalosan has a significant effect on PEDv.”The results obtained by the researchers are extremely interesting. So it is significant that Stalosan F appears to have a particularly good effect, as it almost completely eliminated the PEDv virus in trials. According to the trials it is 99.9% effective,” said Dr Ivan Gospodinov, who oversaw trial design in cooperation with the University of Minnesota, USA.

The National Pork Board has responsibility for Checkoff-funded research, promotion and consumer information projects and for communicating with pork producers and the public. Through the Pork Checkoff, U.S. pork producers and importers pay $0.40 per $100 of value when pigs are sold and when pigs or pork products are brought into the United States. The Pork Checkoff funds national and state programs in adverising, consumer information, retial and food service, marketing, production improvement, technology, swine health, pork safety and environmental management. For more information on Checkoff-funded programs, pork producers can call the Pork Checkoff Services at (800) 456-7675 or check the website at www.pork.org. 17


News from the

National Pork Producers Council REPORTS: LOW LEVELS OF BACTERIA ON MEAT, FEW PATHOGENS RESISTANT TO ANTIBIOTICS

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration released two reports in the spring that measure antimicrobial resistance in certain bacteria found on raw meat and poultry collected through the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS). The 2012 Retail Meat Report summarized key findings in antimicrobial resistance related to raw chicken, ground turkey, ground beef and pork chops collected at retail stores; the 2013 Retail Meat Interim Report contained data from 2013, focusing only on Salmonella, a pathogen of concern in food-borne disease outbreaks. Both reports showed low levels of bacteria on meat and, where bacteria was found, few of them were resistant to any antibiotics. They also showed a trend of decreasing resistant bacteria. The findings demonstrate that farmers and veterinarians are doing their part to address the issue of antibiotic resistance, according to the National Pork Producers Council.

NPPC FIGHTING FOR TAX REVISIONS

When Congress returns in from a month-long summer recess, the National Pork Producers Council will be urging lawmakers to complete work on several tax proposals of importance to agriculture. Among the measures that need action are a bill sponsored by Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., to repeal the estate tax. In April, the U.S. House voted to abolish the socalled death tax, which is levied on the net value – less an exemption – of an owner’s assets transferred at death to an heir or heirs. Under current law, individuals with estates valued at under $5.43 million and couples with ones under $10.86 million are exempt for 2015 from paying the tax. Estates valued at more than those amounts are subject to a maximum rate of 40 18

percent on the value of assets above those levels. NPPC also will be looking for the Senate to approve a package of extenders for taxes that expired at the end of last year. Among the tax breaks are the Section 179 small business expensing and bonus depreciation provisions. Before the August recess began, the Senate Finance Committee extended the two provisions and about 50 other tax provisions for two years. The House already approved permanent extensions of some tax extenders through its “America’s Small Business Tax Relief Act of 2015,” including the Section 179 provision, with a $500,000 maximum tax deduction. Section 179 allows farmers to write off capital expenditures in the year that purchases are made rather than depreciate them over time. Under the law that expired at the end of 2014, the maximum amount a small business could immediately expense when purchasing business assets instead of depreciating them over time was $25,000 adjusted for inflation. NPPC is asking the Senate to restore the maximum amount to $500,000 as it was for the 2010 through 2014 tax years. It also requested that the expired 50 percent bonus depreciation for the purchase of new capital assets, including agricultural equipment, be reinstated.

WATERS OF THE U.S.

Implementation of the Clean Water Rule: Definition of “Waters of the United States” (usually referred to as the WOTUS rule) was set to become effective on August 28, 2015. Several lawsuits were filed by agricultural groups, among others, requesting a preliminary injunction, or order, to halt the rule’s implementation until lawsuits could be settled. Late in the afternoon on August 27, a District Court judge in North Dakota issued a preliminary injunction stopping the WOTUS rule from going into effect for thirteen states. For all other states who didn’t have preliminary injunctions issued, the rule took effect as planned on August 28.

Why were lawsuits filed against the EPA and Army Corp of Engineers (CORP) following release of the final WOTUS rule? Several lawsuits were filed following publication of the final WOTUS rule in the Federal Register. Twentyseven states, along with industries from petroleum to construction, and agricultural groups such as the American Farm Bureau Federation, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, National Corn Growers Association, and National Pork Producers Council all filed separate lawsuits. These numerous lawsuits have since been consolidated into a single lawsuit that identifies three arguments for vacating the rule. The first argument is that the finalized WOTUS rule exceeds the intended purposes of the Clean Water Act and represents an unconstitutional overreach by the federal government on land. Second, the rule-making process is designed to give the public an opportunity to comment on all aspects of a rule. In this case, EPA added items to the final rule that were not in the proposed rule. The third, and perhaps most concerning argument, is that the EPA may have inappropriately worked with environmental activists to lobby for the rule and support the agency’s agenda. If true, this represents an abuse of the federal rulemaking process by the EPA.

PORK EXPORT VOLUMES STRONG TO MEXICO, KOREA

Pork export volume to Mexico remained strong through July, up 6 percent from a year ago to 411,425 mt. Export value was down 19 percent to $717.6 million, reflecting significantly lower prices for hams and other items commonly shipped to Mexico. The market has also seen an infusion of Canadian pork due to the closure of Russia (formerly Canada’s third-largest market) and weakness of the Canadian dollar.


January-July exports to Korea were up 39 percent in volume (115,892 mt) and 31 percent in value ($338.3 million). July exports were still up sharply from a year ago but were the lowest since September, as the market may be cooling due to growing pork inventories. Exports to Central and South America continued to gain momentum in July, as demand strengthened in key destinations Colombia, Honduras and Chile. January-July exports to the region increased 4 percent from a year ago to 70,731 mt, while value was down 4 percent to $180.4 million. Japan remains the leading value market for U.S. pork, but exports continued to reflect sluggish demand, with large inventories lingering from the huge imports of European pork last year. January-July exports fell 13 percent from a year ago in volume (254,251 mt) and 19 percent in value ($972.8 million). Through the first seven months of the year, pork exports accounted for 25 percent of total production and 21 percent for muscle cuts only (down from 28 percent and 23 percent, respectively, in the same period last year). Export value averaged $47.14 per head slaughtered, down 30 percent year-over-year and 15 percent lower than in 2013.

CHANGES COMING TO ANTIBIOTIC USE IN PORK

A new U.S. Food and Drug Administration ruling goes into effect Oct. 1 that contains several important changes for pork producers. “Traditionally, pork producers have used antibiotics for three purposes: treatment of illnesses, control or prevention of diseases, and to improve nutritional efficiency. However, due to the concern about antibioticresistant bacteria, the FDA has issued a new ruling to ensure the continued responsible use of these products in food animals,” said Bob Thaler, Professor and South Dakota State University Extension swine specialist, referencing FDA Guidance #213. With a full implementation date of Dec. 31, 2016, guidance #213 will now require that a veterinarian write a Veterinary Feed Directive or prescription for all antibiotics used in feed.

“Like a human prescription, the VFD will specify the antibiotic used, the dosage approved, animals to be treated, and how long the treatment is approved for,” Thaler said. “The FDA is working to make sure that the rules won’t place an undue burden on producers, veterinarians, and feed suppliers.” In addition, Thaler explained that the guidance requires that the veterinarian writing the VFD must has a valid Veterinary-Client-Patient relationship with the producer, something that is the backbone of the National Pork Board’s Pork Quality Assurance program. Under guidance #213, antibiotics can no longer be used to improve nutritional efficiency. “Once Guidance #213 is fully implemented in December 2016, it will be illegal to use medically important antibiotics for production purposes,” Thaler said. “Again, the VFD will only be written for the prevention, control, or treatment of specifically identified diseases.” Thaler added that record keeping will increase under the new rules. The veterinarian writing the VFD, the feed mill or distributor receiving the VFD, and the producer receiving the medicated feed must all keep a copy of the VFD on file for two years. “Guidance #213 and the new VFD rules will help ensure that medically important antibiotics will still be efficacious in human use, and that pork producers and veterinarians are working together to provide the very best medical care for their animals as possible,” he said.

PORK EXPORTERS EXPECT DECADE-LONG JAPANESE TARIFF REDUCTION IN TPP

Officials in the U.S. pork industry expect the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) will mean greater access for their products to the Japanese market, but they say it may be years before exporters feel big results. In a conference call from Tokyo, National Pork Board CEO Chris Hodges said he expects Japan to reduce tariffs for the meat, but the cuts will probably be a “metered reduction over a 10 year period.” Japan’s current tariff is 482 yen per kilogram (about $1.81 per pound). Hodges said any reduction likely

wouldn’t have much of an impact in the first three years, but “over time, that price spread that we’ve got now is going to be diminished.” “Japanese prices are going to be a lot closer to U.S. prices,” Hodges said, adding that tariff cuts could also lead to “a greater range of products” going into Japan. According to the National Pork Producers Council, Japan is the top export market for U.S. pork with $1.93 billion in export value in 2014. Hodges said importers in Japan are in favor of tariff reduction, but pork producers in the island nation “are not real excited about that.” John Anderson, deputy chief economist with the American Farm Bureau Federation, said achieving a balance between those interests will be a key challenge for negotiators involved in the 12-nation discussions. “Consumer interests aren’t unimportant, certainly, but I think the real challenge for the government of Japan and for any other country negotiating these kind of deals is how you balance the interests of the different producing sectors,” Anderson said from Tokyo. Hodges said politics will probably play a role in speeding up the talks, now in their fifth year. National elections will be held in Canada next month and in November 2016 in the U.S., and Hodges said that “the Japanese want to get this thing concluded this fall for fear that either one of those elections could really slow this down, if not stop it.” The National Pork Producers Council conducts public-policy outreach on behalf of its 43 affiliated state associations, enhancing opportunities for the success of U.S. pork producers and other industry stakeholders by establishing the U.S. pork industry as a consistent and responsible supplier of high-quality pork to the domestic and world markets. The Strategic Investment Program, is the primary source of funds for the National Pork Producers Council. By enrolling in SIP, you are assured a seat at the table when decisions are made regarding the future of the U.S. pork industry. For more information or to join NPPC, visit WWW.NPPC.ORG 19


CAPITOL REPORT If you don’t tell your story, then someone else will. Leaders from the Texas Pork Producers Association (TPPA) traveled to Washington, D.C. to meet with the Texas members of Congress. They were participating in the Fall Legislative Action Conference – September 15-17 – sponsored by the National Pork Producers Council (NPPC). The biannual “fly-in” draws pork producers from across the country. Producers and Capitol Hill staff and lawmakers also attended NPPC’s Capitol Hill-famous “Rack of Pork” congressional reception. Those attending from Texas were: Corby Barrett, Jimmy Hayes, Robert Peffley, Peter Baumert, and Brandon Gunn. “This trip is important to educate our congressional lawmakers on issues of importance to the U.S. pork industry,” said Brandon Gunn, TPPA Executive Director. “We have met with Senator Cornyn and Senator Cruz’s office and also met with our 36 offices of the Texas Congressional delegation. This has been an excellent opportunity to connect with our new and returning members of Congress.” Efforts were focused on talking to lawmakers about five main issues: – Negative impact of the Waters of the U.S. (WOTUS) rule – Repeal of Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) – Childhood nutrition reauthorization – Reauthorization of Mandatory Price Reporting (MPR) – Tax extenders “An emergency vote was to be held on MPR on September 17,” said Corby Barrett, Chairman of TPPA’s Public Policy committee. “We urged Congress to approve this reauthorization, which would amend the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946 to extend and improve livestock mandatory price reporting requirements. This legislation would continue to provide essential marketing information used every day by pork producers and meat packers to price the products they sell and buy.” Without Congressional action, the mandatory price reporting provision would expire Sept. 30, 2015. Peter Baumert, with Cargill in Dalhart, is the newest Texas producer to be selected for the National Pork Producers Council / National Pork Board’s Pork Leadership Institute (PLI). PLI is a comprehensive training curriculum designed to develop future leaders for the pork industry. Upon graduation, participants will understand the roles of the two organizations and will have developed the skills necessary to help lead an ever-changing pork industry and to tell the pork industry’s story from Main Street to the nation’s capital.

TPPA Crew working hard on Capitol Hill. Peter Baumert, Corby Barrett, Jimmy Hayes, Robert Peffley Here they are pictured with U.S. Representative Blake Farenthold, TX-27. 20


The Freshmen members of the House were very eager to learn about the TPPA & understand our industryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needs. Clockwise: Rep. John Ratcliffe, TX-4, Rep. Will Hurd, TX-23, and Rep. Brian Babin, TX-36.

Six term Congressman Henry Cuellar, TX-28, has always been a strong supporter of the pork industry, previously serving on the Agriculture Committee.

Rep. Roger Williams, TX-25, lets everyone know heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a supporter of Ag when they walk through the door and see his pork portrait. 21


Around the State Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that time of year again! Show pig clinics are starting to pop up around the state as families get excited about the upcoming major show season and bringing home their new youth swine project. The popular Show Pig Short Course, organized by the Seguin Swine Breeders Association, was well attended with over 120 youth and adults learning about all aspects of selection, feeding, management, training and showmanship. Speakers included TPPA members Cassidy Hayes of HF Genetics, Chuck Real of Real Hog Farms, and Moormans ShowTec rep. and fellow clubpig producer, Tadd Knight. Moormans ShowTec also puts on four, free show feed clinics this fall all over the state, covering everything you need to know to be successful with your next show pig project.

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On September 9th, The FMD (Foot and Mouth Disease) Cross-Species Communications Team held a table-top crisis exercise at Texas Tech University. With participants representing all areas of agriculture and livestock health, the exercise focused on government and industry response in the event of a Food-and-Mouth disease outbreak, and featured a real-life simulation using a miniature town, farms and large scale livestock feeding operations. Participants had the opportunity to ask questions, interact with industry and government crisis response communicators, and see, first-hand, the effects of response decisions. The exercise demonstrated the ongoing collaborative efforts between various stakeholders to enhance FMD crisis response preparedness. The FMD Cross-Species Communications Team includes representatives from Dairy Management Inc., the National Pork Board, National Cattlemenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Beef Association, a contractor to the beef checkoff, and the American Sheep Industry. The teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal is to ensure consumer confidence in meat and milk safety in the event of an outbreak. TPPA, along with the Texas Cattle Feeders Association and Texas Association of Dairymen, have also been working together with federal government officials and the Texas Animal Health Commission on foreign disease preparedness and business continuity plans for the past 18 months, to specifically facilitate a related simulation later in the fall; in the spring of 2016, these Texas groups will carry out a full scale exercise.

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CELEBRATING

Dan Hunter (left), Asst. Commissioner for Water & Rural Affairs, presents a Certificate of Congratulations for 20 Years of Business from the Texas Commissioner of Agriculture, Sid Miller; to Texas Farm President Sam Nakada, Greg Good, General Manager, and Corby Barett, Human Resource/ General Affairs Manager.


In conjunction with the Perryton-Ochiltree County 96th Wheatheart of the Nation Celebration, Texas Farm enjoyed their 20th anniversary. During the month of August, the great citizens of this community were living high on the hog as festivities and events filled the calendar. In addition to many of the local businesses and charitable groups expressing their gratitude to the community, Texas Farm and its team members showed their appreciation by sponsoring and organizing a variety of fun-filled activities, including: * Drive to Feed the Kids * Veterans BBQ * Rodeo Dance * Cameron Nelson concert * Pork Burgers, Brats & Toncatsu at the block party

Can you guess who this is? See answer on page 91

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20 Litters sired by the industries most EXCITING boars! Best Man Rule 51 Hot Route Stingray Wardog First Cousin Bout that Base

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tob at 1 0pm ow c O w h :3 Sho at 2 ock S t e S l n a o o S l i e l s i g v ink n r a d A P & n e od l o a f S Sa to sell ll

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Contact Info: Clint Halfmann - 402-429-4946 Frankie Schwartz - 325-234-5206

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Farm Sale #1 – Garden City, TX | September 19 Ring of Success – Levelland, TX | October 4 Farm Sale #2 – Garden City, TX | October 10

2901 CR  130   Garden  City,  TX  79739   Online Sale Doug:  432-­‐517-­‐0352   Ian:  432-­‐213-­‐3623   www.schaeferlivestock.com

– Showpig.com | November 10

ALL BREEDS AVAILABLE | ALL CERTIFIED TEXAS BRED

Champion York Barrow - 2015

Congratulations Kaylee Martin!

Daddy Says x Super Monster | Bred to

OH 55

White Trash sow | Bred to Mr Wolf

- Littermate to Ch York Barrow ‘15 San Antonio -

- Pictured at 5 years old – Still powerful with look-

Daddy Says x Super Monster | Bred to Rule 51

Super Monster x White Trash | Bred to Best Man

- Littermate to Ch York Barrow ‘15 San Antonio -

Dam of Ch York ‘15 San Antonio & Res Grand ‘14 Austin

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Texas A&M, Chinese Agriculture Experts Establish Global One Health Exchange

College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University (CAU), Beijing, P.R. China Purpose: Discuss swine and parasitic diseases in the P.R. China and the U.S. (Photo courtesy RC Krecek)

A team of faculty members from the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM) and College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (COALS) left for China on July 11 to participate in the USDA-FAS and China Ministry of Agriculture supported U.S.–China Scientific Cooperation One Health Exchange Program. The objective of the collaborative effort was to provide an opportunity for leading researchers from both countries to establish new and strengthen existing collaborations between Texas A&M and institutions in China, which will lead to the development of future mutually beneficial projects in the fields of veterinary epidemiology and swine production and health.

“It was a great trip to establish new international colleagues. China provides a great opportunity for increasing U.S. pork exports. This made it an exciting time to visit and discuss pork markets and research areas of interest. In addition, discussions pertaining to the importance of biosecurity across all sizes of swine production farms were a popular topic. We are excited to see how we can continue to advance our relationships while benefiting the swine industry.” ~ Chad Paulk

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As a result of China’s expanding economy, the production and export of pork and pork products have become an area of increased focus. With increased production comes the opportunity for pathogens to enter the food supply. Participants in the program had the opportunity to share experiences related to effective surveillance, prevention, and control of these pathogens, particularly those of a One Health and zoonotic nature—meaning they have the potential to adversely impact both human and animal health. “We are ‘oceans a part, but one world together’ when transboundary and zoonotic diseases cross boundaries and threaten our animal health and human health. This visit to China was a great first step to leverage our mutual strengths in these areas,” said Dr. R. C. (Tammi) Krecek, visiting professor at the CVM and interim Dean for One Health.


Other representatives from Texas A&M included Christine M. Budke, DVM, PhD, associate professor of epidemiology at the CVM; Clay Ashley, DVM, director of the Veterinary Medical Park and chair of the International Program Advisory Committee at the CVM; Brandon Dominguez, DVM, MS, clinical assistant professor of large animal medicine at the CVM; and Chad Paulk, MS, PhD, assistant professor of swine nutrition at COALS. Meetings were held at the following institutions: College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University (Beijing); School of Public Health, Peking University (Beijing); Lanzhou Veterinary Research Institute (Lanzhou); College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University (Chengdu); Sichuan Center for Disease Control and Prevention (Chengdu); and Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (Beijing).

“It was a good trip in the sense that we saw similarities and differences between our swine operations and those in China. The lessons learned regarding their disease control plans and biosecurity will help to improve our own plans for farms. ~ Brandon Dominguez

College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University (SAU), Chengdu, P.R. China Purpose: Discuss animal epidemic diseases in the P.R. China and the U.S. (Photo courtesy RC Krecek)

We are oceans apart, but one world together!

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TVMDL offers new porcine test options

There are a number of viruses threatening the United States swine industry and show pig community. To aid producers, animal owners and veterinarians in identifying those viruses affecting our hoof stock, the Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL) has reevaluated our porcine test offerings. Whether screening a herd for swine Influenza, or diagnosing clinical signs of potential coronavirus infection, TVMDL has a test offering to help you. Remember, it is best practice to consult your veterinarian when considering diagnostic testing. Swine Influenza Virus Swine Influenza Matrix, qPCR One of more of the following: respiratory swabs (tracheal), 1.0g fresh tissue (trachea, lung), 1-2mL tracheal wash. The test is $36.00 per specimen and is performed Monday-Friday in Amarillo and Tuesday-Friday in College Station, with results in 1-4 business days. Swine Influenza virus, ELISA This test utilizes at least 1.0mL serum submitted in plastic or glass tube. The test is $7.00 per specimen and is performed on Wednesday in Amarillo, with results in 1-7 business days. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus (PEDv) PEDv, ELISA This test utilizes 1.0mL serum in a plastic or glass tube. The test is $12.00 per specimen and is performed Tuesday and Friday in Amarillo, with results in 1-4 business days. Porcine Circovirus Type 2, ELISA This test utilizes at least 1.0mL of serum submitted in a plastic or glass tube. The test is $8.50 per specimen and is performed Monday and Thursday in Amarillo, with results in 1 business days. Porcine Reproductive & Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) PRRS, ELISA This test utilizes at least 1.0mL serum submitted in a plastic or glass tube. The test is $5.00 per specimen and is performed Tuesday and Friday in Amarillo, with results in 1 business day. PRRS, qPCR This test utilizes body fluids (semen, oral fluid), serum, EDTA whole blood, lung or fetal tissue. The test is $25.00 per specimen and is performed Monday- Friday in Amarillo, with results in 2-5 business days. Porcine Enteric Coronavirus Multiplex, qPCR This multiplex test utilizes feces or intestines from acutely infected pigs submitted in a plastic, leak-proof container. The test is $35.00 per specimen and is performed Monday-Friday in Amarillo, with results in 3-5 business days. Parvovirus-Porcine (PPV), HI This test utilizes at least 1.0mL serum submitted in a plastic or glass tube. The test is $5.00 per specimen and is performed Thursday in Amarillo, with results in 3 business days. All submissions are subject to an accession charge of $6.00; this charge is per submission package and not per sample. TVMDL routinely revises tests based on industry needs. The most up to date test information can be found on tvmdl.tamu.edu in the Test Search. As the diagnostic laboratory agency for the State, TVMDL works with veterinarians to ensure animal health through diagnostics. This extends to producers and animal owners. If the laboratory can assist with specific test needs, please contact agency headquarters in College Station at 1.888.646.5623. We look forward to providing you with timely, accurate and affordable diagnostic test services. 32


TEXAS AGRICULTURAL SALES TAX EXEMPTIONS Glenn Hegar Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts

ALWAYS EXEMPT These items are always exempt, and do not require an exemption certificate or an Ag/Timber Registration Number.

• Horses, mules and work animals commonly used in agricultural production;

• Feed, such as oats, hay, chicken scratch, wild bird seed and deer corn for livestock and wild game (pet food is not exempt); and

• Animal life, the products of which ordinarily constitute food for human consumption, such as cattle, goats, sheep, chickens, turkeys and hogs;

• Seeds and annual plants, the products of which are commonly recognized as food for humans or animals, such as corn, oats and soybeans or for fiber, such as cotton seed.

EXEMPT These items are exempt from sales tax when used exclusively on a farm or ranch to produce agricultural products for sale and purchased by a person with a current Ag/Timber Number. Air tanks Augers Bale transportation equipment Baler twine Baler wrap Balers Binders Branding irons Brush hogs Bulk milk coolers Bulk milk tanks Calf weaners and feeders Cattle currying and oiling machines Cattle feeders Chain saws used for clearing fence lines or pruning orchards Choppers Combines Conveyors Corn pickers Corral panels Cotton pickers, strippers Crawlers – tractors Crushers Cultipackers Discs

Drags Dryers Dusters Egg handling equipment Ensilage cutters Farm machinery and repair or replacement parts Farm tractors Farm wagons Farrowing houses (portable and crates) Feed carts Feed grinders Feeders Fertilizer Fertilizer distributors Floats for water troughs Foggers Forage boxes Forage harvesters Fruit graters Fruit harvesters Grain binders Grain bins Grain drills Grain handling equipment

Greases, lubricants and oils for qualifying farm machinery and equipment Harrows Head gates Hoists Husking machines Hydraulic fluid Hydro-coolers Implements of husbandry Incubators Irrigation equipment Manure handling equipment Manure spreaders Milking equipment Mowers (hay and rotary blade) Pesticides Pickers Planters Poultry feeders Poultry house equipment Pruning equipment Rollbar equipment Rollers Root vegetable harvesters Rotary hoes

Salt stands Seed cleaners Shellers Silo unloaders Soilmovers used to grade farmland Sorters Sowers Sprayers Spreaders Squeeze chutes Stalls Stanchions Subsoilers Telecommunications services used to navigate farm machinery and equipment* Threshing machines Tillers Tires for exempt equipment Troughs, feed and water Vacuum coolers Vegetable graders Vegetable washers Vegetable waxers

* As of Sept. 1, 2015, telecommunications services used to navigate farm machinery and equipment are exempt.

TAXABLE These items DO NOT qualify for sales and use tax exemption for agricultural production.

• Automotive parts, such as tires, for vehicles licensed for highway use, even if the vehicle has farm plates

• Clothing, including work clothing, safety apparel and shoes • Computers and computer software used for any purposes other than agricultural production

• Furniture, home furnishings and housewares • Golf carts, dirt bikes, dune buggies and go-carts • Guns, ammunition, traps and similar items

• Materials used to construct roads or buildings used for shelter, housing, storage or work space (examples include general storage barns, sheds or shelters)

• Motor vehicles and trailers* • Pet food • Taxable services such as nonresidential real property repairs or remodeling, security services and waste removal

* See comptroller.texas.gov/taxinfo/agriculture.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT OUR WEBSITE COMPTROLLER.TEXAS.GOV/TAXINFO/AGRICULTURE OR CALL 1-800-252-5555. Publication #96-1112 • Revised July 2015


                          To order a shirt please contact TPPA Office at 512.262.0595

 

Curtis Houy Hog Farm We will be offering Duroc, Hamp, Berk, Poland, Spot & Cross born in July, August & September 64 Litters

Boars used Duroc z Crown Royal x Royal Crown Spot z Son of “Off the Chart” Duroc Females out of boars from Shipley z Red Angus z Red Bull z MoJo

The BEST pigs and the BEST year we’ve ever had! What are you waiting for, your time is running out! Don’t forget us at: Gillespie County Swine Breeders Sale October 17th ON- FARM Private Treaty Starting September 1ST

Curtis Houy 643 Houy Rd • Fredericksburg, TX 78624 • 830-997-8457 Home • 830-889-8457 Cell 34


Like What You See? become a member!

Only $35.00

Endless Opportunities Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in it for you? u All TPPA Publications u Updates on the Swine Industry u Opportunities to become involved u Networking experiences with other producers

texas pork producers assoc. texaspork.org 512-262-0595

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Specializing in helping select, feed and fit your family’s NEXT Champion!

Pure Boars:

Duroc Hit the Floor Off Label 15-3 Off Label 15-1

Be sure to check us out online!

Landrace Going Green

2015 Online Sale Dates:

Spots Against the Grain

September 15, 2015 September 29, 2015 October 13, 2015 October 27, 2015 November 10, 2015

Cross Boars:

Sting Ray Burn Notice Deliverance Skull Candy Smokin Gun Grand Mentality

Weekly SPECIALS will be displayed on Facebook!

Call Zachary at 254-592-1395 Kip Jr. 254-592-3504

Whitney 254-592-1309

Kip Sr. 254-592-3915

3950 County Road 249, Dublin, Texas 76446 www.currylivestock.com or “Like Us” on Facebook!

HOLLAND SHOW PIGS FARROWING 20 LITTERS IN AUGUST Tel Holland

High Placing Cross Houston 2014

Multiple County Champions

Tel Holland

3rd Place - Heavy Weight Cross Star of Texas 2012

For Information Contact: Jimbo Holland 361.652.9183

Cade Davis

5th Place York Texas Bred Champion San Antonio 2015

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Tel Holland 361.275.0684

Cade Davis

4th Place Hamp Middle Heavy Weight Star of Texas 2012


Central Texas

Showmanship & Jackpot Series DO NOT HAVE TO BE A MEMBER TO PARTICIPATE IN SHOWS

Great Kids - Good JudGes - Great awards - Good times

more info: CheCK out website www.ctxjackpotseries.com or faCebooK for updates! RINGS A & C—EARLY ENTRIES $25—AWARDS: BANNERS TOP 5 OVERALL $200 GRAND OVERALL—$100 RESERVE OVERALL MUST SHOW IN RINGS A OR C TO SHOW IN RINGS B OR D.

RINGS B & D—EARLY ENTRIES $35—AWARDS: BANNERS TOP 5 OVERALL & TOP 3 IN EA. BREED $250 GRAND OVERALL—$150 RESERVE OVERALL—$75 THIRD OVERALL BELT BUCKLES TO GRAND AND RESERVE OVERALL SHOWMANSHIP $5 @ GATE --- LATE FEES $5 PER PIG

8 BREED FORMAT

WOPB—BOPB—BERK—DUROC—HAMP—YORK—WHITE CROSS—DARK CROSS

OCTOBER 10th & 11th

TRICK-OR-TREAT SHOW GATESVILLE CIVIC CENTER GATESVILLE, TEXAS EARLY ENTRY DEADLINE: OCT. 3RD Saturday 10th RING A: TBD RING B: BRANT SMITH, IL

NOVEMBER 7th

DECEMBER 5th & 6th

EARLY ENTRY DEADLINE: OCT. 31ST

EARLY ENTRY DEADLINE: NOV. 28TH

FALL HARVEST SHOW LOY LAKE SHOW ARENA DENISON, TEXAS

Saturday 7th

HOLIDAY CLASSIC NOLAN COUNTY EXPO SWEETWATER, TEXAS

Saturday 5th

RING A: TBD RING A: TBD RING B: BRAD MORTENSON, MI RING B: TBD

7 PM BACKDROP BABIES PIG SALE # 1

7 PM BACKDROP BABIES PIG SALE # 2

SHOWMANSHIP CLINIC & SOCIAL (FOLLOWING RING B)

Sunday 11th

Schedule

Sunday 6th

RING C: TBD RING D: DAVID AMMANN, IL

SCHEDULE BOTH DAYS 7 AM—9 AM regiStration 10 AM ring a Followed By ShowmanShip Followed By ring B 11 AM Backdrop BaBieS pig SiFt

(Brant Smith)

7 AM—9 AM regiStration 10 AM ring a Followed By ShowmanShip Followed By ring B 11 AM Backdrop BaBieS pig SiFt (Brad Mortenson) 7 PM Backdrop BaBieS pig Sale #2

RING C: TBD RING D: TBD SCHEDULE BOTH DAYS 7 AM—9 AM regiStration 10 AM ring a Followed By ShowmanShip Followed By ring B Ring B & D DouBle SeRieS PointS 37


October is

National Pork Month

Although every month is pork month for us, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s increase our efforts now in telling our story to those unaware. Strike up a conversation with someone at the store or doctors office, order pork at the restaurant, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get their attention & have everyone showing #PORKLUV! 38


Rain-or-Shine Pulled Pork and Pimiento Cheese

Hot and Sweet Cubano Sandwich

Smoky Hot Chops with Cool Cucumber-Tomato Salad

Perfect Day Pork and Black Bean Nachos

Easy, Breezy Honey-Chipotle Pork Kabobs

Rain or shine, get your daily recipe Porkcast at PorkBeInspired.com/Porkcast

©2015 National Pork Board, Des Moines, IA USA. This message funded by America’s Pork Producers and the Pork Checkoff.

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Hunt for the Perfect Barbecue

ER: OC TOB al Nation Pork Month

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Frankie is in charge of collecting following foods for a healthy family barbecue and he needs your help. Start at any number 1 (Lean Pork Chops) and follow the numbers in order through 10 to help him. Remember that bees, bears, ants and thunderstorms can wreck a good barbecue, so keep away from them. Here are the foods that Frankie needs to get: 1. Lean Pork Chops

6. Apples

2. Barbecue Sauce

7. Potato Salad

3. Corn-on-the-Cob

8. Cold Drinks

4. Low-Fat Potato Chips

9. Ice Cream

5. Garden Salad

10. Watermelon

Š2014 National Pork Board, Des Moines, IA USA. This message funded by Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pork Producers and the Pork Checkoff.


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bacon cook delicious farmer grill ham healthy nutritious oink pig pork pork chop ribs sausage tasty tender tenderloin

October is National Pork Month. Check out these simple ways to celebrate! * Have a Pork & Pizza party with all your friends! Make sure to share what pizza toppings are pork!

©2014 National Pork Board, Des Moines, IA USA. This message funded by America’s Pork Producers and the Pork Checkoff.

* It’s story time! Share with your friends why you raise pigs, what you enjoy and where their pork comes from! * Serve some pork snacks to your 4-H and FFA Clubs! Visit Porkbeinspired.com for some ideas! * Help cook a pork dish for your family! Make sure your parents assist in this fun activity!

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Pork Continues to be the FastestGrowing Protein in Foodservice

Annual Growth Rate of Pork Outpaces Other Proteins With a growth rate out-pacing all other meats, pork continues to be the fastest-growing protein in food-service since 2011. According to Technomic, Inc.’s 2015 Volumetric Assessment of Pork in Food-service, pork’s popularity in the food industry continues to grow. The study showed that total pork sold through foodservice outlets reached a record 9.8 billion pounds, reflecting a volume increase of 533 million pounds over 2013 when the survey was last conducted. Gaining momentum, this number is slightly higher than the 462 million-pound growth experienced from 2011 to 2013. The 2.6 percent pork category increase in 2015 outpaced the protein growth average of 0.7 percent and the total foodservice industry growth of 1.2 percent. “We are pleased to see the continued growth of pork in foodservice,” said Derrick Sleezer, president of the National Pork Board and a producer from Cherokee, Iowa. “The volumetric study shows that even during a time period when we saw record-high pork prices and low inventories, pork continued to be the strongest performer in the foodservice industry, underscoring pork’s growing popularity.”

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Since 2013, processed pork has driven growth of the total pork category, increasing by 2.8 percent on an annual basis and making up 78 percent of the total volume. Sales of fresh pork grew 2.0 percent. The four largest categories driving the pork category growth were bacon, processed ham, breakfast sausage and ribs. Sales of these products represented 65 percent of the carcassweight equivalent. Other study highlights include: • In categories where both uncooked and pre-cooked pork offerings exist, uncooked pork grew at a slightly faster rate than precooked pork over the past two years – 3.4 percent and 3.2 percent, respectively. • In categories where bone-in and boneless pork were available, sales of both versions increased since 2013, with boneless pork growing at a slightly faster rate.


Meet Your Consumer Marketing Team The Consumer Marketing Team is responsible for national marketing programs including: advertising, multicultural marketing, nutrition, and marketing research. Their goal is to increase consumer pork expenditures and the frequency of pork consumption. “Pork is a versatile protein that is being leveraged around the country by foodservice operators who want to deliver flavor, inspiration and innovation across their menus,” Sleezer said. “Pork producers are proud to provide safe, wholesome products that can fit into any menu.” The study also showed that of the 28 pork product categories reviewed, 19 demonstrated positive sales growth. Carnita meat and pulled pork were the fastest growing categories, with a compound annual growth rate of 13.2 percent and 13.1 percent, respectively. Both of these categories almost doubled since 2013. Notable growth also was seen in Canadian bacon, bratwurst, shoulder/butt, prosciutto, pork hocks/ shanks and chops. Bacon and processed ham use grew from 2013 to 2015 by 195 million pounds and 93 million pounds, respectively, and were the highest volume among all categories. “When it comes to the three major foodservice day-parts, breakfast leads the way with pork gaining popularity at lunch and dinner,” Sleezer said. “It’s clear that pork is on the menu across all foodservice segments. Full-service and limited-service restaurants represent about twothirds of all pork volume sold.

Ceci Snyder

Vice President, Consumer & Domestic Marketing

Laurie Bever

Director, Consumer Advertising & Marketing

Jose de Jesus

Director, Multicultural Marketing

Adria Huseth

Manager, Nutrition Communications & Research

Pamela Johnson

Director, Consumer Communications

Carma Rogers

Pork Information Specialist

Stacie Schafer

Director, State Marketing & Consumer Insight

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Tailgating treats Ingredients * 2 pounds boneless pork chops, cut into 1-inch cubes * 1 cup Italian dressing * 2 tablespoons red pepper flakes, crushed * 1 tablespoon fennel seed * 1 large red bell pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces * 1 large green bell pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces * 1 large onion, cut into 1-inch pieces * 24 6-inch wooden skewers, (soak in water for 30 minutes before using) Directions

Kick-off Kabobs

Place pork cubes in resealable plastic bag; add salad dressing, red pepper flakes and fennel seed. Seal bag; refrigerate for at least 1 hour to overnight to marinate pork. When ready to cook, thread pork, peppers and onion on skewers. Discard marinade. Place kabobs on greased broiler pan and broil 5 inches from heat, or grill over medium-hot coals, for about 5 minutes per side.

Bacon Wrapped Cheese Hot Dogs Ingredients

* 8 hot dogs * 1/2 cup shredded cheese * 16 slices bacon, pre-cooked * 8 hot dog buns, toasted Directions Preheat oven to 450ยบ. Slice each hot dog lengthwise down the middle almost, but not all the way through. Fill the pocket with a little shredded cheese. Wrap the hot dog with two slices of thin-sliced, pre-cooked bacon. Secure bacon with toothpicks if necessary. Bake approximately 10 minutes until cheese is melted and bacon and hot dog are hot.

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bacon Cheeseburger bombs Ingredients

* 1 can (16.3 oz) Pillsbury™ Grands!™ Flaky Layers refrigerated original or buttermilk biscuits * 1 lb ground Pork, cooked or 16 frozen (thawed) cooked meatballs * 1 block (8 oz) Cheddar cheese, cut into 16 cubes * 16 slices bacon * Long toothpicks or skewers * Canola oil for frying Directions Separate dough into 8 biscuits. Cut each biscuit in half; press with hands into circle about 3 inches in diameter. In center of each biscuit round, place 2 tablespoons cooked ground pork and 1 cube of cheese. Wrap dough to completely enclose pork and cheese; pinch seams to seal. For the Fried Version: Wrap each stuffed “bomb” with 1 bacon slice; gently secure loose bacon with toothpick by inserting it through bacon and halfway into “bomb.” In 3-quart heavy saucepan or deep fryer, heat oil to 350°F. Fry stuffed “bombs” 4 to 5 minutes or until dough is golden brown on all sides. Place on paper towels to cool. Repeat with remaining “bombs”. Serve warm with ketchup and mustard, if desired. For the Baked Version: Heat oven to 400°F. Place bacon on foil-lined cookie sheet with sides. Bake about 8 minutes to partially cook bacon. Wrap each stuffed “bomb” with 1 slice partially cooked bacon slice. Place bacon wrapped dough 2-inches apart on two foil-lined cookie sheets with dough seam side down. Bake 13 to 15 minutes or until golden brown. Serve warm with ketchup and mustard, if desired.

Double Pork Party Sliders Ingredients * 4 thin pork loin chops, boneless, 1/4 to 1/2-inch thick * 2 slices bacon * 8 cocktail buns, OR 4 hamburger buns * 2 tablespoons butter, softened * To taste, salt and black pepper * 4 tablespoons steak sauce Directions Slice buns in half horizontally. If desired, toast or warm through. Spread cut sides of buns with butter. In a large skillet, cook bacon over medium heat for 1 minute or until there is enough bacon fat released to coat the bottom of the pan, stirring occasionally. Push bacon to side of the skillet and add the chops. Sprinkle chops with salt and pepper. Cook chops for 3 to10 minutes or until lightly browned and internal temperature on a thermometer 145 degrees F., turning once halfway through. Remove chops and bacon, draining bacon on paper towels and resting chops for a minimum of 3 minutes. For cocktail buns, cut each chop in half so you have 8 pieces. Place chops in buns. Top chops with steak sauce and bacon strips. These bacon-infused sandwiches are ideal for tailgating and cocktail parties.

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Thanksgiving Planning? How about adding Pork to your plate!

Honey and Sage-Roasted Rack of Pork Ingredients * 2 8-rib rack of pork, center cut, chine bone off (Frenched) * To taste, salt and black pepper * 1/2 cup honey * 2 tablespoons fresh sage, snipped

Directions Season pork racks with salt and pepper. Place each rack in roasting pans with bones facing up and sides not touching. Roast at 350 degrees F. for 1 to 1 1/2 hours (20 minutes per pound) until internal temperature on a thermometer reads 145 degrees F. Remove roast from oven; let rest about 10 minutes. Stir together honey and sage. Brush honey mixture onto roast after removing from oven.

Homestyle Sausage Stuffing Ingredients * 12 ounce pork breakfast sausage roll * 3/4 cup diced yellow onion * 1/2 cup diced celery * 1 (14 ounce) package herb seasoned stuffing * 2 (14 ounce) cans low-sodium chicken broth * 3 tablespoons melted butter, plus more for greasing pan and dotting the top

Directions Set a large skillet over medium heat and brown the sausage, breaking it apart as it cooks into small crumbles. Once itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cooked remove to large mixing bowl. If thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of grease drain some of it off leaving about a tablespoon in the pan. Add the onion and celery, season with salt and pepper and cook until tender, stirring often. Add it to the bowl with the sausage. Add the stuffing to the bowl and mix it with the sausage, onion and celery. Pour cans of chicken broth over it and mix well. Drizzle the butter over it and mix well. Cover the bowl with plastic and let sit 5-10 minutes. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. and grease an 8x8 casserole or baking pan with deep sides. Taste the stuffing and season with salt and pepper if needed. Stir well again and then spoon into pan. Cut a tablespoon of butter into small pieces and dot the top with it. Bake for 25 minutes, uncovered for a crunchy top or cover with aluminum foil for a soft top. 46


Slow Cooker Ham and Scalloped Potatoes Ingredients * 1 1/2 lbs 98% fat-free ham, cut into 8 pieces * 8-10 medium sized potatoes, thinly sliced * 2 onions, peeled and thinly sliced * 1/2 tsp salt * 1/4 tsp black pepper, or more according to taste * 1 cup fat-free shredded cheddar cheese * 10 3/4 oz can 98% fat-free cream of celery soup * paprika

Directions Layer half of ham, potatoes, and onions in slow cooker. Sprinkle with half the salt and pepper, and then half the shredded cheese. Repeat layers. Spoon undiluted soup over ingredients. Cook on low 8-10 hour or high 4 hours.

Crock Pot Collard Greens and HamIngredients * 1 smoked ham hock * 4-6 slices thick bacon (optional) * 8 cups collard greens, tough ribs and stems removed, torn into thin strips (kale may also be used) * 1 teaspoon salt * 1/2 teaspoon black pepper * 4 cups water

Directions Note: Be sure to rinse collards thoroughly before using. Remove any thick stems and tear or chop leaves into strips. Cook bacon in a skillet until the fat renders and bacon becomes translucent. Place bacon, with its drippings, into the bottom of the crock pot. Add the greens, ham hock, salt, pepper, and water into crock pot. Cover and cook on low for 6 hours or on high for 3 hours. Remove ham hock, discard skin and shred meat, returning meat to crock pot. Serve greens with minced onion, vinegar and Tabasco, if desired.

Maple Bacon Crunch Ice Cream Ingredients

* 10 slices bacon * 1 (14 ounce) can sweetened condensed milk * 1/2 teaspoon maple extract * 1/2 cup toffee bits * 2 (8 ounce) containers Cool Whip

Directions Cook the bacon until crisp but not burnt. Drain and cool on paper towels. Crumble. Place the sweetened condescend milk in a large bowl. Stir in the maple extract and toffee bits. Fold in the Cool Whip and the crumbled bacon. Place ice cream mixture in an up right container . Freeze for at least 4 hours or overnight. 47


#REALPIGFARMING

#PIGLUV

#HELPINGHANDS

#HAMMINITUP

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#BARNLIFE

#STARTEMYOUNG

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Youth Spotlight

Strong Roots Roots Strong Bright Future Future Bright Morgan Friesenhahn Dedication, drive, and determination accurately describe seventeen-year-old Morgan Friesenhahn who is no stranger to the swine industry. In fact, Morganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passion for showing hogs runs deep within her roots. It all started more than 50 years ago when her grandfather, Otto Luensmann, laid the foundation for her familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s show pig operation. Morganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother Lisa and aunt grew up showing the hogs they had raised and her grandfather continued to market show pigs even after they had graduated. Once Morgan began showing, their operation grew as they started to add more sows and broaden their genetic background. Today, Coyote Creek Genetics has approximately 25 litters on the ground ranging from Hampshires to Yorkshires and from Crossbreds to Spots. Morgan and her younger brother Nathan primarily show all of their own hogs and then market the rest to other exhibitors.

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Family is no doubt the center of Morgan’s success in the show ring. “I have the most supportive family you will ever meet, but there are three men in particular that have as much passion for the livestock industry as I do,” she states. Referring to them as her “main three,” Morgan says that her father Mike, her grandpa “Opie,” and her uncle Wade have been with her every step of the way. Detailing the strong willed personalities that they all possess, herself included, Morgan says that although they disagree from time to time, ultimately they make a great team. “I always know that with these three men by my side, I am the luckiest showman out there and I don’t know how to thank them enough,” she said. Thinking back to the first time she entered the show ring, Morgan describes it as the moment that sparked her passion for the show industry and taught her a lesson she will never forget. She tells a story of her first steer “Buddy,” who ironically was not so friendly and was often too stubborn to lead. With tears rolling down her face only moments before she was supposed to walk into the ring, eight-year-old Morgan had decided she was not going to show her first steer. Morgan’s father, who has always pushed her to succeed, made it clear to her that if she were to quit before she ever began she was not going to have the opportunity to step foot in a show ring again. “I couldn’t tell you what place I came in that day, but I do know that it was in that moment that I realized how much passion I have for showing livestock,” she recalled. “Quitting would never be an option in my mind again.”

Being involved in production agriculture has taught Morgan that nothing goes as planned, particularly when describing a typical day in the barn. She explains that sometimes you have to “just go with it” because when working with livestock, you never know what is going to happen or how they are going to act. “Everyday in the barn brings new challenges, much like life,” she says. “That is simply what I love and even sometimes hate about the industry, but if you accept it and “go with it,” there is nothing that can stop you.”

“Everyday in the barn brings new challenges, much like life.”

Over the course of her ten-year showing career, Morgan has experienced a great deal of success and is extremely proud of what she has accomplished. Among these achievements include winning the Grand Champion and Reserve Champion Market Hog at the Guadalupe County Youth Show, exhibiting a 2nd, 3rd and 4th place steer at San Antonio, a class winning steer at Austin and a 4th place steer at Houston. She also drove a 5th place barrow at San Antonio along with several 1st place gilts.


Sticking to her roots, Morgan’s favorite show is the Guadalupe County Youth Show. Although she is driven by her competiveness and will to succeed, she explains what she values most about this show is the support the exhibitors give one another. “It’s still a competition, but I love that you can pass on a meaningful ‘good luck’ or receive a reassuring ‘good job’ from the showman penned next you,” says Morgan.“Everyone knows one another there; we’re like a family.” Morgan’s definition of success doesn’t always entail coming in first place. She loves all aspects of the show world and treasures the opportunity her family has given her by getting her involved in this industry. Although it requires hard work on a daily basis, it is those special moments on show day that keep her going and gives her assurance that her work is paying off. “A simple ‘you did great’ or ‘he looked awesome’ from the people I look up to is all it takes for me to continue to work harder and chase the next banner,” Morgan states. Her success also reaches far beyond the show ring. Aside from being a member of the National Honor Society and ranking as one of the top five students in her senior class, Morgan recently obtained a notable achievement in her livestock judging career. Her and her teammates won the 2015 State Roundup Livestock Judging Contest in College Station, TX. “The overwhelming amount of stress and countless hours of practice were worth it when we heard our names announced on stage and saw Mr. Real grinning from from ear-to-ear with pride,” said Morgan as she reflected on her most memorable experience. 52

From the day she began showing, Morgan has had her sights set on receiving a scholarship from the San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo. With one shot left, she will be working twice as hard this year to achieve that goal. Morgan plans to attend Texas Tech University next fall and hopes to pursue a career in physical therapy. As she wraps up her senior year and enters the show ring one last time, she doesn’t plan on straying too far from the pig barn. Morgan says she dreams of one day owning a large show pig operation, and she plans on continuing to build off of her grandfather’s herd in order to one day reach that goal. “The best advice I have ever been given is to never give up on something that once made you happy,” says Morgan. “Needless to say, I am very passionate about showing livestock and my involvement within in this industry is not nearing an end.”

Texas Pork Producers Association wishes you the best of luck on your future endeavors!


Get to know Morgan! Nickname: Mo, MoMo, Mosifus, and Mozilla School: Marion High School 4H/ FFA Chapter: New Berlin 4-H / Marion FFA Extra-curricular activities: National Honor Society, EDGE Youth Group, Cross Country and Track, and Photography Club I always make sure I …. have a can of hairspray in every show box. I would never go to a show without … a case of Big Red. If I could be one person I would be … Sandra Bullock. I am currently jamming to … Cody Johnson. I have always looked up to… my brother. The biggest thrill would be … for my team to win the National 4-H Livestock Judging Contest at Louisville this fall. 53


Featured Faculty Meet Bryan Bernhard

Hometown: Seguin, TX

Hobbies: Judging Livestock Shows, hunting,

Making an Impact as a Young Professional What is your role in the Animal and Food Science Department?

I have both a teaching and research appointment at Texas Tech. I teach two classes related to nutrition â&#x20AC;&#x201C;a principles of nutrition class for animal science majors and an applied animal nutrition class for non-animal Family science students. I serve on the College of Agricultural Sciences and Bryan is married to his wife LJ, and they had Natural Resources Undergraduate Recruitment, Retention, and Career their first son, Brigham, this past July. Placement Council and the Animal and Food Sciences Undergraduate Involvement with Youth and Texas Pork Curriculum Committee. Over the past year, I have focused on establishing This past summer, Bryan was an instructor and advising the departmental Undergraduate Research Program and for the Texas Pork Leadership Camp; he Academic Quadrathlon Team. I also conduct research in the areas of beef too served as a presenter for the State 4-H cattle feedlot nutrition and confined cow/calf production systems. Livestock Ambassador Program. In addition,

fishing and spending time with his family

he has been the referee judge or committee member for numerous state and national livestock judging contests.

Where it all started Bryan Bernhard was active in 4-H and FFA exhibiting lambs, goats and hogs across the state. His family bred a few sows each year in attempt to raise their own show pigs. Under the coaching and mentorship of his youth livestock judging coach, Chuck Real, Bryan developed a passion and knowledge of the livestock industry. He went to Blinn Junior College in Brenham on a livestock judging scholarship. Bryan chose to continue his undergraduate education at Texas Tech University, where he was on the 2008 National Champion Livestock Judging Team and was high individual overall at Louisville. While at Texas Tech, Bryan enjoyed studying nutrition and continued his education by pursing his masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree at Texas Tech. After completion of his masters, he moved to Oklahoma to obtain a doctorate degree in Ruminant Nutrition at Oklahoma State University. Bryan began his role as an assistant professor at Texas Tech University in August of 2014. 54

What made you want to teach at Texas Tech?

During my undergraduate career at Texas Tech University, I had professors invest in me and see more potential in me than I did in myself. Their leadership and encouragement was what led me to purse a doctorate degree and ultimately want to be a college professor. After the completion of my Ph. D., I knew that my passion was to be in the classroom educating future industry leaders. I never dreamed the opportunity would arise to teach at my undergraduate Alma Mater. Coming to Texas Tech was an easy decision for me because of the familylike environment and selfless culture that the faculty and staff create.


What do you recommend high school students focus on when choosing a university or major?

Choosing a university and major can be overwhelming. Try not to get frustrated and stay focused on trying to find the “right fit” for you. I usually have students answer three questions for me: (1) What do you enjoy doing? (2) What are your past experiences? and (3) What are you good at? Spend some time thinking about these, and then put your answers into a Venn diagram. Usually there will be some similar responses that overlap in the middle of this Venn diagram. I believe these similarities will help direct a student toward their passion. Once you have identified your passion, try to shadow someone in that field of work to confirm your interest. Finally, I would visit as many universities as possible that have a strong program in your interest area and try to find the “right fit.” For me, it was finding the university with the people I enjoyed being around the most and could help make me the most successful.

What should every student make sure they accomplish in college?

High on my priority list would be internships. I recommend students complete at least two internships during college. This will expose them to careers they did not even know were possible, help identify their true passion, and increase their marketability to employers.

What is the most fulfilling part of your job?

The most fulfilling part for me is witnessing student success. That success may be earning an “A” in class, landing a dream job, or being accepted into professional school. As an advisor and mentor, I gain just as much satisfaction as my students when they accomplish their goals.

Getting involved in extracurricular activities helps develop life skills and gives students a stronger sense of purpose (e.g. judging teams, undergraduate research, organizations, etc.) Establish a network with the people around you. The people around them are going to be friends, colleagues, or bosses in the future, so establishing those relationships is important.

I knew my passion was to be in the classroom educating future leaders.

“ 55


Schwertner Helms Byrd Todd Helms 432-894-5904 Harvey Schwertner 325-895-1909 Hank Byrd 940-256-2214

Online Sale #1 9-30-15 Online Sale #2 10-21-15 showpig.com Farm Sale #1 10-7-15 Farm Sale #2 11-7-15 Miles Young Farmers Complex

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Come see us for quality show pigs. Hamps Yorks Chesters

Spinn Farms

* Litters farrowed early August - end September. * Show Pigs available starting in September. * Several high placing county and major show pigs in the last 5 years. 56

Crosses Spots Polands

Contact: Pat Spinn 254-913-6284 Kyle Spinn 254-913-8673 PeeWee 254-319-7541 David Decker 254-931-0555


Meyer Show Pigs

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In Case You Missed the Deadline... Renew Your Membership Now! What We Do...

Membership Driven!

At TPPA we strive to: Provide a structure for cooperation of pork producers in Texas Encourage efficient production and marketing methods Promote the consumption of quality pork products Provide educational and networking opportunities Represent producers in legislative and regulatory matters

Est. 1889

Participate in Texas Pork Industry Conference and other TPPA sponsored events Networking opportunities to learn the most efficient practices and new concepts Our goal is to improve & increase the quality & production of the Texas swine industry.

TEXAS PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION

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Scholarship opportunities Develop & enhance leadership skills through activities: ◆Texas Pork Leadership Camp ◆TPPA Internships ◆Texas Pork Youth Symposium Connect with influential industry leaders

Stay current by receiving timely updates on: ◆Stock Shows ◆Important Issues ◆Market Reports ◆Activities & Events ◆Certified Texas Bred Registry Information Subscription to Producer Connection Receive Spring Buyers Guide and Fall Sales Trail

Representing the Voice of Texas Swine Breeders & Agriculturalists Join Texas Pork Producers Association TODAY Annual Membership Sept. 1st - Aug. 31st

Name: Name of Business: Address: Phone: Youth $10 58

Email: Producer $35

Professional $35

TPPA Office ◆ 151-A Kirkham Circle ◆ Kyle, TX 78640 ◆ 512-262-0595 ◆ www.texaspork.org

Associate $125


What a Pretty Piggy!

Our summer intern ,Bailee Wright, has now left TPPA, to fulfill her acting career, stunt doubling for her littermate!

Texas Pork Producer Association has moved to Kyle, TX! Address: Phone #: Fax #: 151-A Kirkham Circle Kyle, TX 78640

512.262.0595

512.262.0582

Our emails will stay the same! 59


r e c u d Pro ight Spotl

Dalhart, Texas

W

here livestock greatly outnumber people and beautiful sunsets are an everyday occurrence, Cargill Pork manages its largest sow operation. The man that makes one of America’s largest swine facilities run like clock work is Mike Gruber, General Manager for Cargill, Dalhart. Mike, and the 330 employees he supervises, rise and shine early and go to bed late, caring for their hogs and producing wholesome pork every minute of the day. This farrow-to-wean hog farm is located on 22,000 acres that are divided into three farms, with multiple sites. Between the farms: Stateline, Longview and Panhandle, the Dalhart farm houses a total of 65,000 sows. The target is for each sow to wean 27 pigs per year, which results in this one operation producing approximately 1.7 million pigs annually. When baby pigs are between 19 and 21 days of age, they are weaned and transported to Cargill Pork’s contract farmers, whose farms are typically located within a 100-mile radius of Cargill’s two processing facilities in Beardstown, Ill., and Ottumwa, Iowa. Ultimately, these hogs end up providing protein to consumers across the country. So what genetics are in that delicious pork chop you are having for dinner? Cargill’s geneticists continuously study various genotypes, to maximize the performance potential of these pigs long before they are even farrowed. To fully understand the genetic profile of these hogs, there are a few points to keep in mind. First, there are no purebreds; all of the hogs are composites. These crosses are built upon a maternal sow line primarily consisting of Landrace and Large White genetics. This cross results in the most maternal female possible, to give each piglet 60

born the greatest opportunity possible to start off strong and healthy. Cargill uses terminal sires, but the targeted end point always dictates that final mating decision. For example, for pork that will be marketed under a premium brand, a higher percentage of Duroc genetics are found in those sires, due to their increased marbling and tenderness qualities. For higher yielding carcasses, a greater percentage of Pietran genetics are utilized. You might be wondering how a farm of this magnitude runs. Well the answer is quite simple. “The bottom line is that we care,” said Mike. “We are really just like any other hog operation. Our team comes to work everyday excited to care for these animals and produce a good product.” The Dalhart crew works like a well-oiled machine, utilizing modern farm technology. All sow houses are climate controlled, keeping pigs cool in the extreme summer heat and warm in the bitter winter. The climatecontrolled barns also provide fresh, clean air for the hogs to breath 24/7. These pigs are also fed using an automatic feeding system, ensuring that every pig gets the proper nutrition necessary. All these technological practices guarantee healthy hogs, and in return, healthy pork. With a farm of this size, biosecurity is of the utmost importance. Due to this, Cargill does a great deal of their work in-house. On the Dalhart farm there is a feed mill and boar stud. This farm doesn’t grow their feedstuffs due to the amount of water it requires, but the majority of feedstuffs are bought locally and feed mill employees keep two weeks of feed on hand at all times. Cargill purchases boars from a genetics company and currently has 300 boars on hand. Additionally, Cargill retains around 40,000 gilts each year as replacements, never bringing in outside females. The Dalhart team isn’t just running the leading hog farm in the country; they are also involved in the farming and beef industries. On the 22,000 acres, team members also grow out around 6,000 head of stocker cattle annually and farm triticale, wheat, forage sorghum and Bermuda grass, making this agriculture operation highly diversified.


Meet the Manager | Mike Gruber Family: Wife Danita and daughter, Marissa Background: Growing up on a ranch in Abilene gave him his love for animals. Previous Work: Extension Agent, nine years; Geneticist, 20 years Cargill: May 2011- Present Main Job Responsibilities: Resource management: people, time, water and finances. I am responsible for all operations, personnel, and business functions related to our company-owned business enterprise, including pig production, cattle and crops. Who has influenced you in your career? Ollie and Eul Liner. Ollie was a CEA in Plainview; Eul formed DeKalb with Roy Poage, and are the source of modern swine production. They renewed my interest in pork production. Industry Involvement: TPPA Swine Health committee and Public Policy committee, 2013-Present; Illinois Pork Producers Association, 1992-2002; 21st Century Pork Club; 21st Century Crops Club; National Pork Producers Council; Texas and Illinois Farm Bureaus; American Meat Institute; North Plains Groundwater Conservation District; Dalhart Chamber of Commerce; Local 4-H and FFA chapters and the National FFA Organization Favorite Part of Your Job: Having presented at hundreds of industry-related meetings (local, regional, national) over my career and worked with small and large producers from coast to coast, I would say that I have been privileged to see our industry at all levels and appreciate the diversity and work ethic of producers across the country. I have often worked all day on a farm, driven all afternoon to speak at a meeting, and then driven into the night to be at my next farm in the morning; and I enjoyed every minute of it. My goal in all my professional endeavors is to make those who I serve and work with, better and more effective in their roles.

Of course, running a 65,000 head sow operation comes with its own set of unique challenges. Mike names health, sustainable workforce, water and biosecurity as the main challenges he faces on a daily basis. “It’s simple; you have to have good health to raise good animals,” explained Mike. “Availability to a good, skilled work force is necessary. We are always looking for bright individuals to be a part of our team. Water is also a big issue for us. With the drought and so many productive farms in the area, we work to conserve as much as we can.” Without a doubt the number one priority for hog farmers is health and correspondingly, biosecurity. This farm pays very close attention to its biosecurity practices and the welfare of its animals. All visitors must check-in at the main office before entering the farm and no one is allowed on the property if they have had contact with any other hogs within 72 hours. Everyone, including employees are required to shower in and shower out before and after visiting each barn. Extra precautions are taken when transporting hogs because shipping pigs from a farm runs the risk of potentially bringing in disease from the transporting truck to those pigs remaining on the farm. “We keep a clear line of separation between our farm (considered the clean side) and outside of the farm (considered the dirty side),” explained Mike. “To send hogs out or bring hogs in, a transfer station is used. The weaned pigs we ship daily are loaded and taken to the transfer station, where transporting trucks are backed up to the station on the outside. The team member from the clean side only walks the pigs to the loading area, but never crosses the line to the transport truck, just like our haulers never come into the ‘clean’ side of the 61


By the Numbers Cargill Dalhart

65,000 Total number of sows at the Dalhart farms.

27 Average number of pigs weaned per sow per year.

1.7 million Average number of pigs weaned annually.

330 Total number of employees at Dalhart facilities.

1st Large-scale producer to go 100% group housing.

62

transfer station.” The Dalhart facility also has its own truck wash, where after being used, every truck is cleaned out, washed, disinfected and sits for the remainder of the day. Additionally, Mike works very closely with a highly respected veterinarian, Scanlon Daniels of Circle H Animal Health. Daniels consults the Dalhart team on all herd health practices and inspects all trucks off site upon their arrival in Dalhart. There too is a truck washing facility in town. There are also numerous other detailed biosecurity steps taken to keep herd health at the highest level possible. An example of another precaution is that each site has their own semen storage station where they pick up their order for the day’s breeding. This is so boar stud employees don’t travel from barn to barn dropping off semen. Another challenge, or should we say opportunity, is the ever-curious consumer. “As the general manager of one of America’s largest and most visible pork production companies, I am challenged almost daily on different production practices from an emotional or social point of view,” said Mike. “Retailers call me on a regular basis asking questions and wanting to come to the farm and see how we care for our hogs in a respectful manner. I consider this a great chance for me to educate just one more person about swine production and agriculture.” Cargill employees are also involved in Operation Main Street (OMS). This is a Pork Checkoff sponsored, educational program that focuses on speakers traveling to community events across the country, teaching people about swine production and where their pork comes from.

Cargill considers biosecurity a top priority, and follows strict guidelines to insure the health and productivity of their pigs.


After you get past the vastness of Cargill’s operation, you realize that these people are a family. They are very passionate about what they do and are always striving to go above and beyond. The farm has recognition programs to award extra deserving team members. Dalhart’s specialized PEDv team was awarded the CRISP award for diligence and promptness during the PEDv crisis. Once PEDv broke out, the virus ultimately hit every sow within Dalhart’s system, but the PEDv Intervention Team stepped up and handled the situation to the best of their abilities and now has health and production back going strong. The entire Cargill team is dedicated to helping their employees accomplish their goals, and for some, it starts out with their internships. There are currently three internships offered annually at the Dalhart farm. The internship positions are targeted for college juniors and last 12 weeks. Mike is always looking for good people to become valued team members. For most individuals hired, they are placed in a two-year training program. This program gives new employees the chance to learn about the workings of the company and decide what area they are most interested in. After the two years of training is completed, the new employee works with management to decide what area of the operation will benefit from their knowledge. The internship and employment positions provide real life experience in commercial pork production and allow these individuals a chance to learn about all facets of the system.

Above is an aerial view of the Longview farm. Below are images of a hog barn and the feed mill.

Cargill’s care extends past the hogs that depend upon them; it reaches the community. Among the numerous philanthropic activities, this past year Dalhart’s employees raised a little over $14,000 for the American Cancer Society and Relay for Life. Employees also volunteered at the XIT Rodeo and Reunion, where they fed a delicious pork dinner to approximately 7,000 people in an astonishing two hours! The Dalhart swine farm also sponsors several local charities and are constant supporters of 4-H and FFA at the Dallam/Hartley Bi-County Stock Show. These actions are proof that Cargill cares not only for its employees, but also the community where they live. That is evident by the great deal of attention they dedicate to their environmental stewardship. To do their part in conserving the environment’s natural resources, 63


Mike and his crew have implemented several practices to decrease the amount of resources their facilities use. Specifically they use no-till farming, are very diligent about soil sampling, use as minimal irrigation as possible and fertilize the crops with nutrients from the hog manure. Everyday manure is flushed from each hog barn and the solids are separated from the liquids. From there the solids are mixed with vegetation to make compost. Part of Cargill’s mission is to help their customers succeed through collaboration and innovation. Cargill works continuously to ensure their customers are receiving the products they desire and deserve. David MacLennan, Chief Executive Officer for Cargill stated, “Our responsibility also extends to our customers, who rely on us for quality and, increasingly, for the assurance that we can monitor the environmental and social impact of our products and services through the supply chain.” Cargill Pork listens to the questions and concerns consumers have and do their best to educate consumers on certain methods. One recent example of this type of collaboration is when the Dalhart sow farm became the first large-scale producer

to transfer to 100 percent group sow housing. “It is more labor intensive and requires more skill in management, but it fulfilled the consumers’ requests,” explained Mike. The Cargill team considers humane and respectful treatment of animals a moral obligation and do not tolerate any mistreatment. Cargill’s policies are based on the American Meat Institute (AMI) animal welfare and handling guidelines and have designed their practices to keep animals calm, resulting in tender pork. The Dalhart farms goes above and beyond to guarantee the welfare of the animals in their care. For the past two years, Cargill scored 100 percent in third-party Professional Animal Auditor Certification Organization (PAACO). The Dalhart farm is also PQA Plus Site Assessed, and Transport Quality Assurance (TQA) certified. Even though the Cargill Pork business unit recently sold to JBS, the Dalhart farm will continue to operate as normal and be a mainstay in pork production. Mike also gave insight to what he feels like the future will hold for the pork industry. “Consumer knowledge will only continue to grow and the public will want to know

Happy, healthy pigs result in nutritious, delicious pork!

64


more about their food,â&#x20AC;? said Mike. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Also, as consumer groups have demands and preferences, producers will capitalize on it and meet those requests, resulting in more niche programs. The livestock industry, and agriculture in general, has a bright future. The demand of high quality protein will continue to grow as the population grows, as countries and different populations become more developed, and economies strengthen. As an industry we will certainly have to face some challenges, but new opportunities are waiting to be taken.â&#x20AC;? After visiting with Mike and his team, I realized that whether you own a small show pig operation or a run a massive commercial hog farm, the goal is the same. Both passionate groups work day in and day out, caring for animals the best way possible, being stewards of the environment and producing a quality pork product for our consumers.

Cargill team members pride themselves on running efficient operations and providing the highest quality facilities for their animals, like this cool cell (above) to keep temperatures down. To the right is the transfer station.

Cargill team members are passionate about swine production and caring for the hogs that depend on them. Here is Tag, Lead Production Manager for Dalhart.

One of the semen drop off stations. 65


l l i g Car

The Big Picture The Dalhart swine facility operates within Cargill Pork, one of the six protein business units in the Cargill system. The Cargill family founded Cargill, headquartered in Minneapolis, Minn., in 1865, and is currently the largest privately owned company in the world. In its 150 years of being in business Cargill has grown to operate 1,200 facilities in 67 countries worldwide. Cargill’s 142,000 employees take great pride in being an international producer of food, agricultural, financial and industrial products and services. Cargill Pork was established after entering the hog business in 1971 and is also headquartered in Wichita, Kan., along with the remaining protein businesses that belong to Cargill Animal Protein and Salt (CAPS). Cargill Pork owns and operates 24 facilities specializing in genetics, nutrition, production, processing, research and sales both nationally and internationally. Additionally, Cargill Pork works with their contract farmers in the wean-to-finish phase of pork production. When most people think of commercial hog farmers, the vision of employees caring for growing, healthy hogs instantly come to mind. However, in Cargill’s case you should add images of environmental and construction specialists to that visual. Aside from the production group, Cargill Pork employs highly trained individuals in their land resource, environmental waste and construction groups. All these groups work together harmoniously to insure the efficiency and quality of Cargill’s total pork chain. Cargill Pork is committed to providing wholesome pork products for their valued customers, and have been frontrunners in industry leading production and processing practices, as well as, innovative in their product and brand offerings. Cargill Pork markets their high quality products on a customer-centered platform and listens to the needs of their potential and existing customers to deliver nutritious pork to their customer’s tables. Today, Cargill Pork offers five branded and private labeled programs to stores in the U.S. and internationally. The Cargill Pork brands include Sterling Silver, Tender Choice, Good Nature, Rumba and Excel.

Thank you Cargill!

66


We Care About Quality...And So Much More People love the way pork tastes. We pig farmers tend to agree: no matter what cut you prefer or how you prepare it, there’s nothing better than a juicy, tender and flavorful bite of pork. Quality pork comes from doing things right. We care about the health and safety of our animals, the happiness and well-being of our employees, the contributions we make to the community, and the impact our farming operations have on the environment.

TexasPork.org

We care so you and your family can enjoy pork to the fullest, tastiest extent possible. See how we care by visiting www.porkcares.org.

©2015. Funded by America’s Pork Producers and the Pork Checkoff.


McCleery Family Durocs Honored on Hog College® Row The McCleery family, Poolville, Texas, natives, were honored to have their Duroc boar selected to represent the red breed as part of the National Barrow Show® (NBS®) Hog College® Row, which was held Sept. 12-16 in Austin, Minnesota. Hog College® Row is a tradition which has lasted more than a half a century as part of the NBS® sponsored by Hormel Foods and sanctioned by the National Swine Registry (NSR), Certified Purebred Swine (CPS) and American Berkshire Association. The Hog College® consists of one boar and one gilt from each of the eight major breeds of swine – Berkshire, Chester White, Duroc, Hampshire, Landrace, Poland, Spotted and Yorkshire. Recently the respective breed associations added the Hog College® Home Run Drive to the event. During the Hog College® Home Run Drive, all eight breed representatives drive for Chairmen’s Choice and College Choice honors. Three hog breeders are selected as the “chairmen,” and they rank each animal according to how they feel it represents its breed. At the same time, members of junior college and university livestock judging teams rank which animal they feel best represents the industry. Special honors were awarded to the breeder of the Chairmen’s and College Choice as well as the judging team that best matches the chairmen’s official placing. McCleery’s boar was exhibited during the drive. These breeding animals are selected by industry experts as an excellent representative of that breed and its strengths in the modern market place. All of the Hog College® animals were offered for sale during their respected breed sale during NBS®. McCleery’s boar was purchased by Duane and Brian Martin family of Iowa. For more highlights from summer shows please visit nationalswine.com.

Let us E-Blast your sales Only $50 68


Producing Champions EVERYDAY! Sale #1 th Wed., October 14

Offering: Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, York, Spot

6:30 pm August Barrows

Kissing Cousins X Dirty Sanchez

Barns Open October 3rd Two Socks

Big Monster X Bone Collector

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Bad Habit

SPOT| BERK| YORK| CROSS|

w.b ele wfar m s.c o m

Need SUPERIOR

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Other Boars Used:

Southern Regal Designs

livestock marketing?

Videography

Sun., Novem ber 1st 5:30 pm September F arrowed

Gunner, First Out Red Chip, Skinny Legs, Chubby Chaser FG1 Double Vision, Cankles, Border Patrol, R U My Sister, 2 Socks, Bad Habit DUROC| Sure Thing, Dark Meat CHESTER| Hooligan

Denny Belew 806.470.0969 Cell 806.998.4046 Home mbelew@valornet.com Jason 254.413.3848 Cell

Graphic Design Photography

Sale #2

The Mentalsit

Judgmental X Super Monster X Super Monster Stress Negative | $150/Dose Bred By: Austin Kindschi, Real Time Genetics

We’re beyond excited about the impact The Mentalist could make! Watch for his first litters for sale starting in May. Selling March litters online showpig.com | May 28th

ts! e Do

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6 SPEED

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SHOW PIGS

TRUST

ROOSTER

The Duke x Prestige

‘15 SALE Open Show Sired by: The Duke

Certified Texas Bred Registry

Automatic x Aisa Owned with McCleery Family Durocs

BrewHouse

Some of sows our need an extra push for bone, turn to their forerib, and stoutness from behind. Brewhouse is the boar that can make this happen! He is made like a keg in his center body and an outlier for stoutness EVERYWHERE!

Established to promote and support the breeders & exhibitors of Texas bred and raised show pigs.

Supreme Champion Gilt

Specimen X Black Oynx X Hillbilly Bone Stress Negative | $150/Dose Bred By: John Huinker, Iowa

‘14 CTBR Stars of Texas Sired by: Papi Grande

How CTBR benefits YOU

◆ We award a $100 premium to every CTBR Class Champion barrow at the Texas majors and State Fair of Texas. ◆ Over $46,000 was awarded to 4-H and FFA exhibitors last year. ◆ Since 2011, $35,000 in scholarships has been awarded to Texas youth; three $2,500 scholarships were provided last year. ◆ Opportunity to exhibit at the San Angelo Barrow Show and Texas Stars Gilt Show. Exclusive to CTBR pigs only. Additional premiums, buckles and trophies awarded. ◆ The 2015 CTBR Texas Stars Gilt Sale averaged $2,600.

Champion Hampshire Gilt ‘15 Guadalupe Co. Sired by: Black Magic

Thank

Popular Barrow

Champion Yorkshire Barrow ‘15 SALE

You too can have a year

Grand

Texas Pork Producers Association

Reserve Champion Yorkshire Gilt

‘15 HLSR Sired by: Pimlico

you!

$4,000 Crossbred Gilt ‘15 CTBR Gilt Sale Kaylee Martin

$3,500 Crossbred Gilt ‘15 CTBR Gilt Sale

Our NEW CTBR sponsor for the 2016-2017 show seasons!

Res. Champion Chester Gilt ‘15 SALE Open Gilt Show

JOURNEY’S END The Journey x True Grit

Justin Glass Fulgham Family Aaron Metcalf

Doug and Karen Schaefer 432.517.0352 doug@schaeferlivestock.com 2901 County Road 130 Garden City, TX 79739

Ian Schaefer 432.213.3623 ianschaefer11@yahoo.com schaeferlivestock.com

HILLBILLY WILLIE

Hillbilly Bone grandson

www.realhogfarms.com 15492 Real Rock Rd Marion, TX

Contact us at anytime! Chuck: 210.827.7351 Russell: 210.216.2688 Home: 830.914.2833

Checkout texaspork.org to view our Breeder Directory & Texas Sales Trail to find your next winner.

Join TPPA Today- Countless Opportunities Support & Promotion Educational Programs

Subscription to Producer Connection New, easy to navigate website

P.O. Box 10168 Austin, TX 78766 Office: 512.453.0615 Fax: 512.451.5536

Cassie Godwin | 870.703.9484 | cassiegodwin007@gmail.com Like Southern Regal Designs on Facebook!

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MoorMan’s ShowTec Becomes the Official Title Sponsor of the Certified Texas Bred Registry

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c® as the new ’s MoorMan’s® ShowTe M AD ce un no an to ud ongoing Association (TPPA) is pro sorship is part of ADM’s on ers sp uc od ear Pr o-y rk tw Po is s Th xa . Te R) e Th try (CTB ing Championship Certified Texas Bred Regis of show pig feeds, provid cer du pro g official title sponsor of the din lea n’s tio twentieth anniversary ock industry as the na partnership kicks off the commitment to the livest SM. The announcement of this conjunction ed Technology xas bred and raised pigs, in Te the ng fiti ne be PA Performance through Fe TP of the program, an integral aspect k shows in the state. celebration of the CTBR se hogs at major livestoc the it hib ex o wh ers mb me A and has with the Texas 4-H and FF g back to the late 1800s tin da y tor his ing tur fac a feed manu technology. ADM’s estock feed industry with t development and feed ien red ing , ion ADM is a leader in the liv trit nu al Tec line of t advancements in anim in their MoorMan’s Show nt ide ev is s cer du pro pioneered many significan pig across and ine clinics and seminars and FFA youth exhibitors sw uth 4-H s yo g xa Te rin so to t on en sp itm to comm ss. In addition smallest producer in ents engineered for succe ailable to assist even the av are ff sta ld show feeds and supplem fie d an rs an’s ShowTec ambassado the state, ADM’s MoorM duction. our national all phases of show pig pro s long been a key state in ha as ex “T ted sta r, ge na ma PA and itment and respect for TP rMan’s ShowTec business oo mm M co r n, ou lai cC ow M sh e to uc s Br thi . Dr way than producers achieve uld not think of a better and products to help show le op pe g vin show feed program. I co ha on s lve young people s state. We pride ourse d we recognize the role of an nt, me seg ess sin the pork producers in thi bu k oc that comes ustry is an important livest g lessons in responsibility lon life the ls— de mo e their goals. The show ind er rol honored to be the CTBR ts and grandparents and oth level. We are pleased and h hig a at learning—from their paren ete mp co d an k ed to care for livestoc from the dedication need ll as the trophy and title sponsor.” CTBR Title Sponsor as we the es ass mp co en o, ag ows. For the gram, founded 10 years CTBR Texas Stars Gilt Sh d an w rro Ba et ark M ’s The CTBR Sponsorship pro rrow Show of the Grand Champion Ba the San Angelo Livestock ip at rsh ted so on sen sp pre s ed ard lud aw inc s le buck program ha rous support of the CTBR past decade, ADM’s gene Livestock Show. respective groups Trophy at the San Angelo existing relationship our the ng wi gro to rd wa for k s an incredibly rking with ADM and loo ers Association. “There’ uc od Pr rk Po s xa Te “We’re thrilled to be wo nt, nities eside ustry and providing opportu Gunn, Executive Vice Pr ind n do pig an ow Br sh ins the g pla tin ex ,” mo ve ha mises to pro our two organizations’ pro strong alignment between youth.” exhibitors within to both its producers and in premiums to Texas youth 0 ,00 00 $6 er ov ed ard aw en awarded over BR programs, TPPA has scholarships that have be in 00 5,0 $3 the m Since inception of the CT fro d nefite y, Texas students have be the program. Additionall ustry leader the past five years. rMan’s ShowTec is an ind oo M . cts du pro M AD are o ve feed MoorMan’s ShowTec log orates the latest innovati the orp r inc de un m gra ted pro rke g ma din ts uc fee c Prod ShowTe als reach their peak . The proven MoorMan’s ients to help show anim red ing ry eta pri in show livestock nutrition pro d an highly acclaimed many patented processes owTec feeds from their Sh ’s an rM oo M technologies along with of ay arr d dealers tial. ADM offers a vast cts are available from fee ten du po pro c ion Te tat ow sen Sh pre ’s an tic rM ne ge ats. Moo on at d for cattle, sheep and go grams and products, log pro c Te ow Sh show pig feeds to show fee ’s an rM oo M an’s ShowTec. re information about liance Nutrition – MoorM Al M AD at k throughout Texas. For mo oo ceb Fa ansshowtec or connect on www.admani.com/moorm


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Certified Texas Bred Registry Important Dates for Texas Major Shows Major Show CTBR Certificates can be purchased

August 1, 2015

* Must submit a Litter Record * Must be a paid TPPA Member in “Good Standing”

September 1, 2015

Litter Record Due to TPPA Office * $100 Fee for Litter Record Submitted after September 1, 2015

December 15, 201

5

Major Show CTBR Certificate prices increase to $14 each

No Litter Records Accepted after December 15th

December 16, 2015

* Unless 50 or more certificates purchased before December 15th

January 1, 2016

Major Show Breeder Logs Due to TPPA Office * Encouraged to turn in earlier

* $25 Fee for Late Breeder Logs submitted after Jan. 1st * Breeder Logs are mailed with purchased CTBR Certificates

Major Show CTBR Certificate prices increase to $35 each

January 15, 2016

* If a first time purchase

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Your Search

for the

Begins & Ends Here

BEST

Texas Pork Producers Association

Certified Texas Bred Registry The Certified Texas Bred Registry program was established to promote Texas bred and raised pigs and support both the breeders and the 4-H / FFA youth of Texas who raise & show Certified Texas Bred pigs.

How does participation benefit you? Additional Premiums

• $100 premium is awarded to individuals exhibiting a CTBR Class Champion in each class of the barrow shows at the State Fair of Texas, Fort Worth Stock Show, San Antonio Livestock Exposition, Star of Texas and the Houston Livestock Show. • Premium money is distributed to all placing barrows at the San Angelo Stock Show in addition to buckles and trophies awarded to exhibitors of Champion and Reserve Champion breeds. • $46,000+ was awarded during the 2014-2015 show season to Texas 4-H and FFA students.

Participate in the San Angelo Stock Show

• The CTBR Texas Stars Gilt Show & Select Sale and the San Angelo Barrow Show is only open to youth exhibiting pigs registered in the Certified Texas Bred Registry program. • Gilts selected for the sale brought an average of nearly $2,600 back to each exhibitor in 2015.

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Scholarship Opportunities

• $35,000 has been awarded to Texas students since 2011 through the CTBR program. • In 2015, three scholarships were awarded at $2,500 each.

Production Grant Program

• Provide financial assistance to deserving 4-H and FFA students at a minimum amount of $2,500 who are continuing their involvement in swine production through establishing their own breeding program.

How to participate? • Buy your showpigs from a CTBR breeder! • Exhibit your CTBR pig at a Texas Major Show or the State Fair of Texas! • Become a TPPA member for additional benefits!

A Sincere Appreciation to our Title Sponsor Moorman’s ShowTec, and our individual sponsors of trophies and buckles at the San Angelo Stock Show. 151-A Kirkham circle

*

Kyle, Texas 78640

*

512-262-0595

*

512-262-0582 - Fax 75


2015 FALL SHOWPIG SALES TRAIL Mote Farms & Harkey Farms Online Sale Date: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

October 1 showpig.com 15-30 head ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Poland, Spot, York All Benny Mote 515-509-8313 Robbie Harkey 806-778-7810 benny@motefarm.com www.motefarms.com

Doege Show Pigs - Online Sale Date: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

October 1 showpig.com Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Spot, York All Tim Doege 210-316-9627 Kathy Doege 210-667-9627 doegeshowpigs@gmail.com

Ring of Success Pig Sale - Grand Slam Swine Genetics & High Demand Swine Genetics Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 2-4 Mallet Event Center, Levelland, TX 10-15 litters ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp All Edmund Meier Jr 210-355-3216 Ralph Stock 210-430-4175 Todd Fleming 210-254-0646 Willie Frantzen 210-683-7048 kerrknife@gmail.com www.grandslamswinegenetics.com

Five Gables Farm - Private Treaty Sale Date: Time: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

October 3 Viewing 8:00 a.m; Sale 10:00 a.m. Temple, TX; 5 miles SW of Georgetown on SH 29 Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Poland, Spot, York Part Jack Winterrowd 512-203-3694 Charlie Hoppe 512-986-9149

Harkey Farms Date: Time: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

October 3 9:30 a.m. 1611 FM 2337, Hale Center, TX Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Poland, Spot, York All Robbie Harkey 806-778-7810

Twister Show Pigs Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

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October 3 Call for Appointment 2229 East FM 916, Cleburne,TX Berk, Cross, Duroc, Spot All Dub Stepp 817-517-4302 dubstepp@hughes.net

KMW Show Pigs - Sale #1 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 3 All Day 4375 East FM 389, Burton, TX 77835 20 litters ~ Chester, Cross, Hamp, Spot, York All Walt Fehrle 281-682-6868 wfehrle@yahoo.com

Belew Farms - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 3 Call for Appointment Tahoka, TX Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Spot, York All Denny Belew 806-470-0969 806-998-4046 Jason Belew 254-413-3848 mbelew@valornet.com

Link Show Pigs - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 3 Call for Appointment 872 CR F, Tahoka, TX 15 litters ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Spot All Heath Link 806-241-4750 Gene Link 806-241-4748 heathalink@yahoo.com

WinTex Farms #1 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 3 Sale Starts at 7:00 p.m. Viewing 7: 00 p.m. 10/2 Roosevelt School Barn Most breeds All Jay Winter 806-438-2986 Will Winter 806-239-5859 www.wintexfarms.com

2nd Annual Mullin FFA Pig Sale Date: Time:

Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 4 Check-in 8:00 a.m.; Judging 10:00 a.m.; Lunch 12:00 p.m.; Sale 1:00 p.m. Mullin ISD, 403 W. Bulldog Drive, Mullin, TX Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Poland, Spot, York All Bud Day 325-938-0634 Kyle Cook 325-514-0281

Cornerstone Ventures - Online Sale #2 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 7 showpig.com All Breeds All Chance Waldrip 806-341-5764 www.cornerstoneventuresllc.com


Schwertner, Helms, Byrd Farm Sale # 1 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 7 Miles Young Farmers Complex, Miles, TX 45 litters ~ Berk, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, All Harvey Schwertner 325-895-1909 Todd Helms 432-894-5904 Hank Byrd 940-256-2214 www.shbshowpigs.com

Powell Livestock Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 10 9:00 a.m. 13053 FM 536, Pleasanton, TX 50 head ~ Cross, Duroc, Spot, York All Josh Powell 830-214-4138 Jack Powell 210-336-4091 LeeAnn Powell 830-480-3351 powelllivestock@yahoo.com www.powelllivestock.com

Doege Show Pigs - Farm Sale #3 Date: Time: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

Schaefer Livestock - Farm Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

Underdog Genetics - Silent Auction Sale #1 Date: Time: Location: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 10 Barns Open at 2:30 p.m. Final Bidding at 5:00 p.m. At the Farm; 108 Wimberly Rd, Merkel, TX All Lynn Hays 325-260-5968 Mason Garner 325-439-0699

GO Genetics - Farm Sale Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 10 Lamesa, TX Most Breeds All Todd Gregory Kelley Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien

806-577-2400 806-759-4420

October 10 SALE CANCELED; By Appointment Only 3224 Cen-Tex Loop, Temple, TX 6 litters ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Poland, Spot All Rex Cook 254-493-8340 Denise Cook 254-493-8330 rcook@farm-market.net www.reddiamondshowhogs.com

J.T. & Kelli Naron Silent Auction Pig Sale Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 10 9:30 am - 11;00 am 1139 CR 401, Merkel, TX 20+ litters ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp All J.T. Naron 325-660-2183

Spinn Farms Sale Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 10 10:00 am 18599 Romberg Rd. Holland, TX 30-40 Head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Hamp, Spot All Patrick Spinn 254-913-6284 Kyle Spinn 254-913-8673 Peewee 254-319-7541 pspinn@hotmail.com

DL Showpigs - Farm Sale Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 10 12:00 p.m. 2901 CR 130, Garden City, TX 75 head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Spot, York All Doug Schaefer 432-517-0352 Ian Schaefer 432-213-3623 Levi Schaefer 432-213-6002 ianschaefer11@yahoo.com www.schaeferlivestock.com

Allen Farms - Sale #1 Date: Time: Location: Contact:

October 10 Final Bidding at 2:00 pm 1525 CR 159, Ovalo Matt Allen Curry Allen

325-370-6924 325-668-0532

GNC Genetics Showpig Sale #2

Red Diamond Show Hogs - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 10 10:30 a.m. 3085 Kusmierz Rd, St. Hedwig, TX Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Spot, York All Tim Doege 210-316-9627 Kathy Doege 210-667-9627 doegeshowpigs@gmail.com

October 10 2101 CR 24, Lamesa, TX 160+ litters ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, York All Josh Krohn 806-759-7735 Bridgette Krohn 806-438-2916 dlshowpigs@gmail.com www.dlshowpigs.com

Date: Time: Location:

Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 10 3:00 p.m. Gruver, TX; 3 miles West of Gruver on HWY 15 and 1.25 miles North on CR 10 44 litters ~ Berk, Cross, Duroc, Poland, Spot, York All Greg Slough 806-736-8788 Charles Slough 806-736-0002 Nicholas Slough 806-736-0106

Backdrop Babies #1 Date: Time: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

October 10 7:30 p.m. Gatesville, TX 75-100 head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Poland, Spot, York Part Kip Curry Jr 254-592-3504 Zachary Curry 254-592-1395 ctsjs@hotmail.com www.ctxjackpotseries.com

Floyd Family Hog Farm - August Litters Private Treaty Sale Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 10 - November 14 Call for Appointment 2334 CR 252, Bertram, TX; Call/text for directions 50 head ~ Berk, Chester, Duroc, York All Kellen Floyd 830-613-1334 Afton Floyd 641-891-0162 floydfamilyshowpigs@gmail.com www.floydfamilyhogfarms.com

Harman Farms - Farm Sale #1 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 11 10:30 a.m. 12498 CR 16, Perryton, TX Chester, Cross, Duroc, Spot, Poland All Wayne Harman 806-202-2175 Leslie Harman 806-202-2176 www.harman-farms.com 77


Wall Swine Breeders Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 11 Show at Noon; Sale at 2:30 p.m. San Angelo Fairgrounds, San Angelo, TX All Breeds All Clint Halfmann 4024294946

Elrod Showpigs - Online Sale #2 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 12 showpig.com 3 litters ~ Berk, Cross All Diane Elrod Nathan Elrod diane@elrodshowpigs.com www.elrodshowpigs.com

Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

210-601-6164 210-382-5112

Curry Livestock - Online Sale # 3 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

Campbell Farms - Farm Sale #1

October 13 showpig.com 30+ hd ~ Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Spot, York Part Zachary Curry 254-592-1395 Kip Curry Jr 254-592-3504 Whitney Curry 254-592-1309 Kip Curry Sr 254-592-3915 currylivestock@hotmail.com www.currylivestock.com

W-2 Showpigs Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 14 6:30 p.m. Tahoka, TX Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Spot, York All Denny Belew 806-470-0969 Jason Belew 254-413-3848 mbelew@valornet.com

DL Showpig - Online Barrow Sale Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 15 showpig.com 160+ head ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, York All Josh Krohn 806-759-7735 Bridgette Krohn 806-438-2916 dlshowpigs@gmail.com www.dlshowpigs.com

Best of the Best Sale - Duelmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Prevailing Genetics Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 16 & 17 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. New Braunfels, TX 300 Head ~ Chester, Cross, Hamp, York All Rory Duelm 830-608-5058 Matt Lee 830-708-4274 duelmhog@yahoo.com www.duelmsprevailinggenetics.com

Rains Livestock Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

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October 17 Preview 11 a.m.; Bids Close 1 p.m. At the Farm; 30 head ~ Cross, Hamp, Poland, Spot, York All Cory Rains 325-236-0593 laceyrains@yahoo.com www.rainslivestock.com

October 17 Preview 10:30 a.m.; Final Bidding 1:00 p.m. 2801 CR 105; Roscoe, TX 26 litters ~ Cross, Duroc, Hamp, York All Jenni Wann 325-829-8528

Major League Pig Sale - Grand Slam Swine Genetics & High Demand Swine Genetics Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

Belew Farms - Farm Sale #1 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 17 10:00 a.m. Take Exit 37 at Hale Center, TX, Off of I-27 go north on half of a mile, there will be a big tent on the east side. Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Poland, Spot, York All Kenny Campbell 806-787-9663 Jason Campbell 806-787-9664 www.kcampbellfarms.com

October 17-18 1:00 p.m. Scurry County Coliseum, Snyder, TX Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp Part Edmund Meier Jr 210-355-3216 Ralph Stock 210-430-4175 Todd Fleming 210-254-0646 Willie Frantzen 210-683-7048 kerrknife@gmail.com www.grandslamswinegenetics.com

Gillespie County Swine Breeders Show Pig Sale Date: Time: Location: Contact:

October 17 1:30 p.m. Gillespie County Show Barn, Fredericksburg, TX Kenneth Kensing 830-928-4845 Russell Kneese 830-456-3298 Wayne Rode 830-456-6176

Heart of the Hills Show Pig Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 17 6:00 p.m. Hill Country Youth Event Center, 3785 HWY 27 Kerrville, TX 140 head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Poland, Spot, York Part Bobby Balser 830-739-6593 Larry Langbein 830-285-0401 balser@ktc.com

Kerby Knaupp Showpigs - Open House Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 18 All Day 767 Knuapp-Mohr Rd. Fredericksburg, TX Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, York Part Kerby Knaupp 830-685-3355 830-459-4826

W. Rode & Sons Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 18 Viewing 8:30 a.m. Sale 10:00 a.m. Fredericksburg, TX 40 head ~ Cross, Duroc, Hamp All Wayne Rode 830-456-6176 wrode@austin.rr.com


Harman Farms - Elite Gilt Online Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 20 All Day showpig.com Chester, Cross, Duroc, Spot, Poland All Wayne Harman 806-202-2175 Leslie Harman 806-202-2176 www.harman-farms.com

West Texas Genetics Online Sale Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 20 8:00 p.m. showpig.com Chester, Cross, Duroc, Spot, York All Clint Halfmann 402-429-4946 www.westtexasgenetics.com

Schwertner, Helms, Byrd - Online Sale #2 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 21 showpig.com 45 litters ~ Berk, Cross, Duroc, Hamp All Harvey Schwertner 325-895-1909 Todd Helms 432-894-5904 Hank Byrd 940-256-2214 www.shbshowpigs.com

Cornerstone Ventures - Online Sale #3 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 21 showpig.com All Breeds All Chance Waldrip 806-341-5764 www.cornerstoneventuresllc.com

Meyer Show Pigs - Online Sale #2 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 22 showpig.com Most Breeds Most Grant Tyler Kyzar

830-459-8645 830-928-8648 830-928-8644

October 24 9:00 a.m. 19702 Cyclone Branch Rd., Burlington, TX 60 head ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Spot, York All Mike Schneider 254-721-4162 bohemianfarms@yahoo.com

Underdog Genetics - Silent Auction Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Contact:

October 24 Barns Open at 2:30 p.m. Final Bid at 5:00 p.m. 108 Wimberly Rd, Merkel, TX Lynn Hays 325-260-5968 Mason Garner 325-439-0699

Hofer’s Farm - Sale #1 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 24 Call for Appointment Refugio, TX Cross, Duroc, Hamp, York All Darryl Ressmann Derek Ressmann

361-349-0511 361-349-0513

Miles FFA - Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Contact:

October 25 Judging at 12:00 p.m. Sale at 2:00 p.m. Miles Young Farmers Complex, Miles, TX Glen Heard 325-895-1793

Curry Livestock - Online Sale #4 Date: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

October 27 showpig.com 30+ head ~ Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Spot, York Part Zachary Curry 254-592-1395 Kip Curry Jr 254-592-3504 Whitney Curry 254-592-1309 Kip Curry Sr 254-592-3915 currylivestock@hotmail.com www.currylivestock.com

Rains Livestock Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 29 All Day Showpig.com 30 head ~ Cross, Hamp, Poland, Spot, York All Cory Rains 325-236-0593 laceyrains@yahoo.com www.rainslivestock.com

Duelm’s Prevailing Genetics Sale #4

Bohemian Farms - Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

Ressmann Showpigs

October 24 4:00 p.m. 313 Bennet Dr, Auroro, TX 76078 6 litters ~ Berk, Spot All Steven Hofer 817-875-7269 hofersh34@yahoo.com

Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 31 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. New Braunfels, TX 150 Head ~ Chester, Cross, Hamp, York All Rory Duelm 830-608-5058 Matt Lee 830-708-4274 duelmhog@yahoo.com www.duelmsprevailinggenetics.com

Harman Farms - Farm Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 31 12:00 pm (noon) 12498 CR 16 Perryton, TX Chester, Cross, Duroc, Spot, Poland All Wayne Harman 806-202-2175 Leslie Harman 806-202-2176 www.harman-farms.com

GNC Genetics Showpig Sale #3 Date: Time: Location:

Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 31 3:00 p.m. Gruver, TX; 3 miles West of Gruver on HWY 15 and 1.25 miles North on CR 10 44 litters ~ Berk, Cross, Duroc, Poland, Spot, York All Greg Slough 806-736-8788 Charles Slough 806-736-0002 Nicholas Slough 806-736-0106

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McKamie Livestock

Date: November 1 Time: Barns Open 9:00 a.m. Location: Ponder, TX Offering: 15 litters CTB Cert: All Contact: Scott McKamie

Hoferâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Farm - Sale #2

940-390-9578

Carroll & Hopson Farms Date: Time: Location:

Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 1 1:00 p.m. Lampasas County Show Barn, 283 N HWY 183, Lampasas, TX 7-8 litters ~ Cross All Bobby Carroll 512-525-1540 Chad Hopson 512-734-2122

Belew Farms - Farm Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 1 5:30 p.m. Tahoka, TX Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Spot, York All Denny Belew 806-470-0969 806-998-4046 Jason Belew 254-413-3848 mbelew@valornet.com

Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 1 Sale Starts at 2: p.m. Farm Most breeds All Jay Winter Will Winter www.wintexfarms.com

Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 1 La Porte, TX 20 Litters ~ Most Breeds All Morgan Wagner Shelby Sessions

806-438-2986 806-239-5859

Backdrop Babies - #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

830-480-8028 713-253-0542

November 3 8:00 p.m. showpig.com Chester, Cross, Duroc, Spot, York All Clint Halfmann 402-429-4946 www.westtexasgenetics.com

Allen Farms - Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Contact:

November 7 Final Bidding at 2:00 pm 1525 CR 159, Ovalo, TX Matt Allen Curry Allen

Campbell Farms - Farm Sale #2 Date: Time: Location:

Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

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November 7 7:30 p.m. Loy Lake Show Barn, Denison, TX 75-100 head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Poland, Spot, York Part Kip Curry Jr 254-592-3504 Zachary Curry 254-592-1395 ctsjs@hotmail.com www.ctxjackpotseries.com

Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 8 Viewing 8:30 a.m. Sale 10:00 a.m. Fredericksburg, TX 40 head ~ Cross, Duroc, Hamp, York All Wayne Rode 830-456-6176 wrode@austin.rr.com

Curry Livestock - Online Sale #5

West Texas Genetics Online Sale Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 7 Miles Young Farmers Complex, Miles, TX 45 litters ~ Berk, Cross, Duroc, Hamp All Harvey Schwertner 325-895-1909 Todd Helms 432-894-5904 Hank Byrd 940-256-2214 www.shbshowpigs.com

W. Rode & Sons

Wagner Family Showpigs Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

817-875-7269

Schwertner, Helms, Byrd - Farm Sale #2

WinTex Farms #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 7 4:00 p.m. 313 Bennet Drive, Auroro, TX 6 litters ~ Berk, Spot All Steven Hofer hofersh34@yahoo.com

Date: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

Schaefer Livestock - Online Sale Date: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact: 325-370-6924 325-668-0532

November 7 3:00 p.m. Exit 37 at Hale Center, go north on service road 1/2 mi., There will be a big tent on east side. All Breeds All Kenny Campbell 806-787-9663 Jason Campbell 806-787-9664 www.kcampbellfarms.com

November 10 showpig.com 30+ head ~ Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Spot, York Part Zachary Curry 254-592-1395 Kip Curry Jr 254-592-3504 Kip Curry Sr 254-592-3915 currylivestock@hotmail.com www.currylivestock.com November 10 showpig.com 25 head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Spot, York All Doug Schaefer 432-517-0352 Ian Schaefer 432-213-3623 ianschaefer11@yahoo.com www.schaeferlivestock.com

Cornerstone Ventures - Online Sale #3 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 11 showpig.com All Breeds All Chance Waldrip 806-341-5764 www.cornerstoneventuresllc.com


Rains Livestock Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 11 Preview 10:30 a.m.; Bids Close 1:00 p.m. Roscoe, TX 30 head ~ Cross, Hamp, Poland, Spot, York All Cory Rains 325-236-0593 laceyrains@yahoo.com www.rainslivestock.com

Duelm’s Prevailing Genetics Sale Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 14 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. New Braunfels, TX 150 Head ~ Chester, Cross, Hamp, York All Rory Duelm 830-608-5058 Matt Lee 830-708-4274 duelmhog@yahoo.com www.duelmsprevailinggenetics.com

KMW Show Pigs - Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 14 All Day 4375 East FM 389, Burton, TX 20 litters ~ Chester, Cross, Hamp, Spot, York All Walt Fehrle 281-682-6868 wfehrle@yahoo.com

TPPA has moved to Kyle, TX! Address: 151-A Kirkham Circle Kyle, TX 78640

Elrod Showpigs - Online Sale #3 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 15 showpig.com 3 litters ~ Berk All Diane Elrod Nathan Elrod diane@elrodshowpigs.com nathan@elrodshowpigs.com www.elrodshowpigs.com

210-601-6164 210-382-5112

Duelm’s Prevailing Genetics Sale Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 28 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. New Braunfels, TX 150 Head ~ Chester, Cross, Hamp, York All Rory Duelm 830-608-5058 Matt Lee 830-708-4274 duelmhog@yahoo.com www.duelmsprevailinggenetics.com

Chad Hill Durocs - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

All Year Call for Appointment 1916 CR 6000, Lubbock, TX 90 litters ~ Chester, Duroc, Spot All Misty Hill 936-715-7470 misty@chadhilldurocs.com www.chadhilldurocs.com

JMH Showpigs - Private Treaty

Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

All Year Call for Appointment 910 CR 333, Rockdale, TX 30 litters ~ Cross, Hamp All Lee Hafley 512-415-2118 leehafley@gmail.com www.jmhshowpigs.webs.com

Phone #: 512-262-0595

Fax #:

512-262-0582

Stop in anytime to visit! 81


A WINNING TRADITION

Year after Year

HIGH PLACING DUROC BARROW

CHAMPION BOPB BARROW

CLASS CHAMPION CROSS BARROW

CLASS CHAMPION SPOT GILT

CLASS CHAMPION CROSS BARROW

CLASS CHAMPION DUROC BARROW

Denver :: Congratulations Flaharity Family

Houston :: Congratulations Olfers Family

Austin :: Congratulations Rasco Family

San Angelo :: Congratulations Perez Family

State Fair of TX :: Congratulations Bevins Family

San Angelo :: Congratulations Reed Family

Fall Sale Schedule SEPTEMBER 12 Farm Opens for Private Treaty Sales of July Barrows & Gilts SEPTEMBER 22 Elite Gilt Online Sale at Showpig.com SEPTEMBER 29 Cream of the Crop Online Sale at Showpig.com OCTOBER 11 On the Farm Sale #1 - 10:30 AM at the farm OCTOBER 20 Elite Gilt Online Sale at Showpig.com OCTOBER 31 On the Farm Sale #2 - 12:00 noon at the farm NOVEMBER 10 Cream of the Crop Online Sale at Showpig.com

plus

SELECT SALES - For more info follow us on Facebook & our new website

GILTS for sale by private treaty everyday off the farm. New groups out every 2 weeks. TEXAS BRED CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

WWW.HARMAN-FARMS.COM 90 LITTERS

Spots, Durocs, Crosses, Polands, Chesters & Berks

S

MAN FARM R A H

HF Focused on Success 82

Wayne and Leslie Harman 12498 Co Rd 16

Perryton, TX 79070

Wayne 806-202-2175

Leslie 806-202-2176


Boars Used: Kill Shot Killer Instinct In The Moment What We Do No Hesitation Size Matters For The Love Mr. Wolf Muffin Mamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Right Wake Up

Franckowiak Show Pigs

120 Litters Mid June - Oct.

A Grand Year

2015 Grand Champions

Bexar County Nueces County Zavala County Yoakum County Karnes County Walter Gerlach Livestock Show Res. Grand Champion

Nueces County

P.O. Box 144 St. Hedwig Texas Vince - 210-336-9428 Ryan - 210-844-7484 Home - 210-667-1522 Feed Store - 210-667-1346

Koltermann Show Pigs

Spot On!

Champion Breeding Gilt

High Selling Spot CTBR Gilt Show

Congratulations to the many County Champions & High Placing Major Show Exhibitors! 113 Oak Hollow Drive La Vernia, TX 78121 Ryan 210-844-7484

2015 Sires Spots:

What It Is Renaissance Bull Frog

Durocs:

Rebuild Solutions Ultra Squared Auto Pilot

Berks:

#13 Landing Gear Mr. Twister Mr. Buffet So Fly

83


Build YourDreams

with

Spike

Utley Farms

Crazybone 152-5 X Spud

Bred by: Utley Farms Housed at Cornerstone Ventures

Boars Used From: Stephens Farms Wintex Connerstone Ventures Upperhand Genetics Brinning Genetics Purple Power Boar Stud

Utley Farms

Terry, Jennifer, John Cross and Grayson Utley

84

Knox City, Texas | 940.256.3288


85


PRODUCER CONNECTION

THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE TEXAS PORK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION

Advertising Rate & Specifications

The Producer Connection is a bi-monthly publication sent to active members of the Texas Pork Producers Association. This publication includes information on current pork related events and youth programs and news & updates on issues in our industry, not only in Texas but nationwide. Scheduled publication months include February, April, June, August, October and December.

Advertisement Rates All ads will be in full color. Prices are for completed Camera Ready advertisements; layout and designing of ads is available at an additional cost. Premium pages available as First Come, First Serve, please call for availability and pricing.

Full Page Two-Thirds Page Half Page Third Page Fourth Page Business Card

$400 $325 $275 $200 $150 $75

* 10% discount on 4 or more continuous issues

Advertisement Dimensions Take the worry out of advertisement design; we can design your ads for you.

FULL PAGE Bleed Size: 8.75”w x 11.25”h Trim Size: 8.5”w x 11”h

BACK PAGE/ 2/3 PAGE HALF-PAGE HORIZONTAL THIRD-PAGE VERTICAL FOURTH-PAGE VERTICAL Bleed Size: 8.75”w x 7”h Bleed Size: 8.75”w x 5.5”h Trim Size: 2.75”w x 11”h Trim Size: 3.75”w x 5”h Trim Size: 8.5”w x 7”h Trim Size: 8.5”w x 5.5”h Changes in Certified Texas Bred Registry For 2013 Shows

Changes in Certified Texas Bred Registry For 2013 Shows

Changes in Certified Texas Bred Registry For 2013 Shows

The TPPA Board of Directors have adopted rule changes submitted by the Committee that oversees the Certified Texas Bred Registry. These new rules will impact producers participating in the CTBR program shows next year, including Fort Worth, San Angelo Barrow Show, Stars of Texas Gilt Show & Sale in San Angelo, San Antonio, Houston and the 2013 State Fair.

The TPPA Board of Directors have adopted rule changes submitted by the Committee that oversees the Certified Texas Bred Registry. These new rules will impact producers participating in the CTBR program shows next year, including Fort Worth, San Angelo Barrow Show, Stars of Texas Gilt Show & Sale in San Angelo, San Antonio, Houston and the 2013 State Fair.

The TPPA Board of Directors have adopted rule changes submitted by the Committee that oversees the Certified Texas Bred Registry. These new rules will impact producers participating in the CTBR program shows next year, including Fort Worth, San Angelo Barrow Show, Stars of Texas Gilt Show & Sale in San Angelo, San Antonio, Houston and the 2013 State Fair.

During the Texas Pork Industry Conference in San Angelo, CTBR Committee Chairman, David Kempen, explained the rule changes and the purpose for the changes. Kempen said that over the years, the CTBR program has provided thousands of 4-H & FFA students with additional premium money, prizes, awards and scholarships, provided by the hundreds of Texas breeders participating in CTBR. He said that these Texas breeders have been rewarded with significant recognition and increased market demand for their pigs. Kempen explained that all of this has been accomplished based on the last statement in the CTBR rules: “The validity of the Certified Texas Bred Registry is wholly dependent on the honesty and integrity of the breeders participating in the Registry and the reliability of pig registration.”

During the Texas Pork Industry Conference in San Angelo, CTBR Committee Chairman, David Kempen, explained the rule changes and the purpose for the changes. Kempen said that over the years, the CTBR program has provided thousands of 4-H & FFA students with additional premium money, prizes, awards and scholarships, provided by the hundreds of Texas breeders participating in CTBR. He said that these Texas breeders have been rewarded with significant recognition and increased market demand for their pigs. Kempen explained that all of this has been accomplished based on the last statement in the CTBR rules: “The validity of the Certified Texas Bred Registry is wholly dependent on the honesty and integrity of the breeders participating in the Registry and the reliability of pig registration.” Kempen said that the integrity and honesty of a small number of breeders have come into question by the CTBR Committee and that they felt it important to provide some increased requirements for the CTBR program. They proposed the new rule changes that were adopted by the Board members on July 6, 2012. The most significant rule change is that producers will now have to provide TPPA with the number of litters farrowed at their farm and the ear notching system that they use for identifying their litters. (See CTBR rules in this issue and on the texaspork.org web site.) Prior to October 1, 2012, producers that will want to purchase CTBR certificates for pigs showing in 2013 must

During the Texas Pork Industry Conference in San Angelo, CTBR Committee Chairman, David Kempen, explained the rule changes and the purpose for the changes. Kempen said that over the years, the CTBR program has provided thousands of 4-H & FFA students with additional premium money, prizes, awards and scholarships, provided by the hundreds of Texas breeders participating in CTBR. He said that these Texas breeders have been rewarded with significant recognition and increased market demand for their pigs. Kempen explained that all of this has been accomplished based on the last statement in the CTBR rules: “The validity of the Certified Texas Bred Registry is wholly dependent on the honesty and integrity of the breeders participating in the Registry and the reliability of pig registration.” Kempen said that the integrity and honesty of a small number of breeders have come into question by the CTBR Committee and that they felt it important to provide some increased requirements for the CTBR program. They proposed the new rule changes that were adopted by the Board members on July 6, 2012. The most significant rule change is that producers will now have to provide TPPA with the number of litters farrowed at their farm and the ear notching system that they use for identifying their litters. (See CTBR rules in this issue and on the texaspork.org web site.) Prior to October 1, 2012, producers that will want to purchase CTBR certificates for pigs showing in 2013 must have submitted to TPPA a “CTB Litter Record”. A CTB Litter Record will be an official document to tell TPPA how many litters are farrowed at the farm and litter ear notches assigned to those litters. This will include an explanation of the litter notching system used by the producer. TPPA will strongly encourage breeders to notch litters in sequence starting with the litter “1” notch. However, if producers use a different sequence and numbering system they must provide an explanation of that system. Kempen explained that most producers will be able to comply with this new requirement easily because they identify their litters in sequence each year starting with the litter “1” notch. He said that when looking through all of the CTBR pig registrations at the shows most producer’s litters can be followed with little effort. However, Kempen said that the Committee becomes very concerned when you know that a farm only farrowed 25 litters and most of their pigs have litter notches of 1 through 25, then a few have litter notches with 50’s or 80’s. He said that seems difficult to understand and puts into question the integrity of that breeders pig registrations. He and the CTBR Committee believe that the new “CTB Litter Record” will give them a better understanding of a breeders notching system and allow them to ef-

BUSINESS CARD Trim Size: 3.5”w x 2”h

Changes in Certified Texas Bred Registry For 2013 Shows

Changes in Certified Texas Bred Registry For 2013 Shows

The TPPA Board of Directors have adopted rule changes submitted by the Committee that oversees the Certified Texas Bred Registry. These new rules will impact producers participating in the CTBR program shows next year, including Fort Worth, San Angelo Barrow Show, Stars of Texas Gilt Show & Sale in San Angelo, San Antonio, Houston and the 2013 State Fair.

The TPPA Board of Directors have adopted rule changes submitted by the Committee that oversees the Certified Texas Bred Registry. These new rules will impact producers participating in the CTBR program shows next year, including Fort Worth, San Angelo Barrow Show, Stars of Texas Gilt Show & Sale in San Angelo, San Antonio, Houston and the 2013 State Fair.

During the Texas Pork Industry Conference in San Angelo, CTBR Committee Chairman, David Kempen, explained the rule changes and the purpose for the changes. Kempen said that over the years, the CTBR program has provided thousands of 4-H & FFA students with additional premium money, prizes, awards and scholarships, provided by the hundreds of Texas breeders participating in CTBR. He said that these Texas breeders have been rewarded with significant recognition and increased market demand for their pigs. Kempen explained that all of this has been accomplished based on the last statement in the CTBR rules: “The validity of the Certified Texas Bred Registry is wholly dependent on the honesty and integrity of the breeders participating in the Registry and the reliability of pig registration.”

During the Texas Pork Industry Conference in San Angelo, CTBR Committee Chairman, David Kempen, explained the rule changes and the purpose for the changes. Kempen said that over the years, the CTBR program has provided thousands of 4-H & FFA students with additional premium money, prizes, awards and scholarships, provided by the hundreds of Texas breeders participating in CTBR. He said that these Texas breeders have been rewarded with significant recognition and increased market demand for their pigs. Kempen explained that all of this has been accomplished based on the last statement in the CTBR rules: “The validity of the Certified Texas Bred Registry is wholly dependent on the honesty and integrity of the breeders participating in the Registry and the reliability of pig registration.”

Kempen said that the integrity and honesty of a small number of breeders have come into question by the CTBR Committee and that they felt it important to provide some increased requirements for the CTBR program. They proposed the new rule changes that were adopted by the Board members on July 6, 2012. The most significant rule change is that producers will now have to provide TPPA with the number of litters farrowed at their farm and the ear notching system that they use for identifying their litters. (See CTBR rules in this issue and on the texaspork.org web site.)

Kempen said that the integrity and honesty of a small number of breeders have come into question by the CTBR Committee and that they felt it important to provide some increased requirements for the CTBR program. They proposed the new rule changes that were adopted by the Board members on July 6, 2012. The most significant rule change is that producers will now have to provide TPPA with the number of litters farrowed at their farm and the ear notching system that they use for identifying their litters. (See CTBR rules in this issue and on the texaspork.org web site.)

Prior to October 1, 2012, producers that will want to purchase CTBR certificates for pigs showing in 2013 must have submitted to TPPA a “CTB Litter Record”. A CTB Litter Record will be an official document to tell TPPA how many litters are farrowed at the farm and litter ear notches assigned to those litters. This will include an explanation of the litter notching system used by the producer. TPPA will strongly encourage breeders to notch litters in sequence starting with the litter “1” notch. However, if producers use a different sequence and numbering system they must provide an explanation of that system.

Prior to October 1, 2012, producers that will want to purchase CTBR certificates for pigs showing in 2013 must have submitted to TPPA a “CTB Litter Record”. A CTB Litter Record will be an official document to tell TPPA how many litters are farrowed at the farm and litter ear notches assigned to those litters. This will include an explanation of the litter notching system used by the producer. TPPA will strongly encourage breeders to notch litters in sequence starting with the litter “1” notch. However, if producers use a different sequence and numbering system they must provide an explanation of that system.

Kempen explained that most producers will be able to comply with this new requirement easily because they identify their litters in sequence each year starting with the litter “1” notch. He said that when looking through all of the CTBR pig registrations at the shows most producer’s litters can be followed with little effort. However, Kempen said that the Committee becomes very concerned when you know that a farm only farrowed 25 litters and most of their pigs have litter notches of 1 through 25, then a few have litter notches with 50’s or 80’s. He said that seems difficult to understand and puts into question the integrity of that breeders pig registrations. He and the CTBR Committee believe that the new “CTB Litter Record” will give them a better understanding of a breeders notching system and allow them to effectively visit with breeders about their pig registrations when necessary.

Kempen explained that most producers will be able to comply with this new requirement easily because they identify their litters in sequence each year starting with the litter “1” notch. He said that when looking through all of the CTBR pig registrations at the shows most producer’s litters can be followed with little effort. However, Kempen said that the Committee becomes very concerned when you know that a farm only farrowed 25 litters and most of their pigs have litter notches of 1 through 25, then a few have litter notches with 50’s or 80’s. He said that seems difficult to understand and puts into question the integrity of that breeders pig registrations. He and the CTBR Committee believe that the new “CTB Litter Record” will give them a better understanding of a breeders notching system and allow them to effectively visit with breeders about their pig registrations when necessary. The CTBR Committee wants breeders to know that this year the October 1, 2012 deadline for submitting a CTB Litter Record in order to be allowed to purchased CTBR certificates is very firm with one small exception: if a breeder does not meet the deadline this first year of the new rule, they can still submit the CTB Litter Record but they will be charged a monetary fee to be eligible to participate in the CTBR program. (See CTBR Rules in this magazine and on the texaspork.org web site.)

* Please leave a 1/2 inch margin on all sides free of pictures and text to insure your information is seen.

Promote your farm or sale instantly with an E-Blast! E-blast sent to all TPPA members & County Agents We can schedule to e-mail any day, any time. Only $50 per E-blast!

86


Publishing Schedule / Ad Deadlines February / March

Stock Show In Full Swing Advertising Due: January 15, 2016 Mail Date: February 1, 2016

April / May

Spring Buyers Guide & Stock Show Results Advertising Due: March 25, 2016 Mail Date: April 10, 2016

Distribution: TPPA Members, All Texas Major Stock Shows, and various events throughout Texas.

Distribution: TPPA Members, Texas Ag Teacher, County Extension Agents, and various events throughout Texas.

June / July

August / September

Conference Information

Show Pig Sales & TPPA Event Wrap-ups

Advertising Due: May 15, 2016 Mail Date: June 1, 2016

Advertising Due: July 25, 2015 Mail Date: August 10, 2015

Distribution: TPPA Members, Texas Pork Industry Conference, summer shows, clinics, and various events throughout Texas.

Distribution: TPPA Members, Texas Ag Teachers, County Extension Agents, some pig sales and various events throughout Texas.

October / November

December / January

National Pork Month

Advertising Due: September 11, 2015 Mail Date: October 1, 2015

Distribution: TPPA Members, State Fair of Texas Livestock Show, some pig sales and various events throughout Texas.

Holiday Season

Advertising Due: November 15, 2015 Mail Date: December 1, 2015

Distribution: TPPA Members, some jackpot shows, clinics, and various events throughout Texas.

Layout and Design Charges If a camera-ready ad is not provided, advertiser will be responsible for layout fees. The ad design rate is determined by the size and scope of the advertisement. Please call for pricing on ad design rates.

Want more information or book your advertisement? Cassidy Smith â&#x20AC;˘ 512-262-0595 â&#x20AC;˘ csmith@texaspork.org.

Texas Pork Producers Association 151-A Kirkham Circle Kyle, TX 78640 512-262-0595 www.texaspork.org

TEXAS PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION 87


Unbelievable. Unstoppable.

Untouchable.

Hacot2 TCG Untouchable 1-4 X RIY3 Ricochet Purchased at ’15 STC. Here’s finally the one that’s got the power, squareness and ultra-cool look, with athleticism on a strong set of pasterns. With this kind of build and the dominant genetics backing him, he will undeniably take barrows and seedstock to the next level! 2nd Place (behind the Reserve Champion) NJSA Summer Spectacular in Louisville. Congratulations to Campbell Real. Good luck to Levi and Lea Kimley of Ohio with this great female. Class Winning Yorkshire Gilt Summer Type Conference in Louisville. Congratulations to Kyle Real. Thanks to Tim King of West Virginia for purchasing this outstanding female.

This just in. . . ‘15 Hog College Berkshire Gilt Man Hunt X Black Thunder Bred by: Wippel, OH Balance. Power. Function. Countless champions in her pedigree. We are excited about the potential in this unique female & can’t wait for her first litter.

Chuck Real | 210.827.7351 Marion, Texas

National barrow show

‘15 Hog College Hampshire Boar

Mudslide X McRib National barrow show Bred by: Iverson Farms, IA He blends a great design and correct skeleton with extra mass and stoutness of feature. He’s the kind that excites both purebred & crossbred breeders.

Russell Real | 210.216.2688 realhogfarms.com


90


Producer Connection

Advertisers Index Allen Farms...........................................................56 Belew Farms.......................................................122 Central Texas Jackpot Series.................................35 Curry Livestock......................................................35 Curtis Houy Hog Farm.........................................138 D. Felger Photography.............................................2 DL Showpigs.......................................................153 Duelm’s Prevailing Genetics.................................IBC Franckowiak Show Pigs........................................32 Harman Farms.....................................................141 Hilton Farms..........................................................45 Holland Show Pigs................................................34 Kerby Knaupp Show Pigs....................................115 Koltermann Show Pigs..........................................32 McKamie Livestock.................................................9 Meyer Show Pigs................................................114 Moorman’s ShowTec........................................... IFC NSR Fall Classic.................................................. FIC Rains Livestock.....................................................77 Real Hog Farm......................................................92 RW Genetics.......................................................117 Schaefer Livestock..............................................116 Schwertner, Helms, Bryd Showpigs.......................24 Seguin Swine Breeders Prospect Show.................15 Shannon Barbee Show Pigs..................................90 Show Pig Alley.....................................................112 Southern Regal Designs........................................69 Spinn Farms..........................................................24

YOU GOT IT! It’s Brandon Gunn, TPPA Executive Vice President!

Texas Farm..............................................................6 Underdog Genetics.............................................105 Utley Farms...........................................................93 W. Rode & Sons....................................................58 Wagner Family Genetics........................................45 Wall Swine Breeders..............................................35

TEXAS PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION

West Texas Genetics............................................BC 91


92


Texas Pork Producers Association 151-A Kirkham Circle Kyle, TX 78640

WEST TEXAS GENETICS “TAKING TEXAS BY STORM”

Clint Halfmann - 402-429-4946 cmhalf@yahoo.com Julie Halfmann - 325-340-0232 San Angelo, Texas westtexasgenetics.com

Producers Connection October November  
Producers Connection October November