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PRODUCER CONNECTION

THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE TEXAS PORK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION • VOLUME 2, NUMBER 4

In this Issue Showpig Sales Trail Major Show Judges Q&A CTBR Breeder Directory A Guide to your showpig project Producer Spotlight: Rival Genetics


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start.


S huffler S how P igs

Selling litters sired by these proven boars! Berkshire Hampshire Chubby Chaser Point Proven Res. Ch. Berk ‘15 SWTC Time Traveler

Poland

Kankles

Chester

Dead End

Yorkshire DoubleTake

Duroc

Dark Meat Light ‘Em Up

Crossbred Quiver Lucky Best Man

Drive to success with SSP!

Online Sales in September and October at

showpig.com

We will be offering hogs at: Bred for the Banner Queens of the Southwest Ring of Success Fall Classic

Dusty Shuffler 254.394.4475 Kempner,TX

SS P

We will have hogs for sale by private treaty starting Septemer 12 Kayleigh Shuffler 254.630.5226 1


What’s in this issue 45

Don’t Just Dream for it, Work For it This issue’s Youth Spotlight is about Sonny Bohannon, a senior at Wellington High School. It is easy to see that Sonny works for all of his success with hogs, in the classroom and even on the football field.

66

Fall Showpig Sales Trail Anyone who plans on buying swine projects this year can’t miss out on the Sales Trail. Here is a comprehensive list of 120+ upcoming show pig sales across the state.

106

Get ‘em, Grow ‘em, Show ‘em. Taking on a show pig project can be stressful for beginners, but don’t worry, Ian Schaefer provides a guideline for getting your pigs off on the right start, training & showmanship.

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One Man’s Opinion With the announcement of the judges for this major show season, came much anticipation. In an effort to help exhibitors and those involved in the show pig culture get to know this group of judges, we asked them a few questions about their judging style.

142

On The Fast Track The Producer Spotlight features Shane and Tatum Swenhaugen of Rival Genetics, highlighting their impressive success at a young age and dedication to producing competitive show hogs. See what goes into their decision making and how they have come so far.

Check It Out 6 10 28 36 40 42 52 58 64 84 127 154 2

Market Report Texas Pork Industry Conference Youth Symposium Industry News Capitol Report Around The State Texas Pork Leadership Camp Recipes Bio-Security CTBR Rules / Forms Breeder Directory Advertisers Index

On The Cover: Photo taken by Mary Endicott, as her son, Tyler, exercises his show pigs on a beautiful West Texas night this past spring. Thank you, Mary for taking and providing this great shot! We love seeing everyone’s photos! Keep sending them in!


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A few words from Your Summer Intern...

He llo Everyone,

, I can’t help my senior year of college er on the gin be to on ny Ca to ck As I get ready to head ba t it seems. I am excited to begin my last semest On the a! ee but to think how bittersw Team and I am one step closer earning my diplom my life. of ing WTAMU Livestock Judg of the most beneficial and influential experiences e on other hand, I am leaving zine rtisements, writing maga ve ad g iniscing nin sig de of le dd in the mi dough ice cream, and rem ie ok co ip ch te ola oc ch While I write this I am of oks! pictures, downing a pint er has been one for the bo mm su s thi say to e saf articles, sorting through it’s of the past few months; on the many adventures ing that I would be city of Austin and know ird we , big the to g vin for me to realize I eptical about mo wever, it didn’t take long Ho . ve ssi gre I have to admit I was sk pro ry ve ng that is becomi working for an association to be. t an n sharpens was right where I was me sharpens iron, one perso n iro s “A , :17 27 s erb t spending a live by the verse, Prov not a doubt in my mind tha involved is ere Th r. tte be me I have always strived to ke self with people who ma ers and everyone else d so another,” and surround my dy, the Board of Directors, members, TPLC camp l standpoint. I have learne ssi summer with Brandon, Ca r, not only professionally, but also from a persona gained: tte five things I have in TPPA, has made me be ed to share a list of the top cid de I so ip, sh ern int much from my n food. ed a mutual love for Austi lop ve de I ly sad t; ea to ow Brandon likes ng traffic. 5. WEIGHT. We all kn in and out of Austin morni ing av we ile wh on -up ke ma g am a professional at puttin 4. MULTI-TASKING. I ll on this one. ers, I am talking about y’a mp Ca LC TP . CE EN TI ts at me…. 3. PA en known to throw objec be s ha n do an Br e tim to DINATION. From time 2. HAND-EYE COOR e. you learn to catch or dodg ed and exciting. Not rking for TPPA is fast-pac Wo . ice tw ng thi e sam most driven people y where I did the but Brandon is one of the le, op pe d There wasn’t a single da rte ea d-h kin st are constantly at least sweetest, mo step, which means there xt ne the only is Cassidy one of the all of for as ide d an s has a vision association is that through I have ever met; he alway on at once. What amazes me the most about this ving mo is try us ind ing It is easy to see the swine k. tas er oth e to five different projects go an tim on r e tte tak be to no is always willing t progressiveness. There tha ing tch the busyness, the office is ma is PA TP u d I can assure yo forward at rapid rates an ociation. ass get involved with this er is to do ing I learned this summ with the th e on er mb nu the y, In all sincerit ng TPPA does is in mind. Every single thi nk I played everything with others mb ing the me ers. To thi fitt ne be d an g vin ser r tte humbling. intention of be s of this summer is truly ing en pp ha the in e rol even a small erything that I do. I ve a positive mark on ev lea to d tol en be s ay alw positive TPPA left its I have mark on TPPA, but I am my t lef I t tha re su be can’t mark on me. and it seems when you’re having fun” s flie e im “T es, go ing ing for TPPA. As the old say gan my adventure intern be I en wh y rda ste ye t like it was jus

Hope to see y’all soon ,

Re 4

ice for the Texas Pork presenting a Unified Vo P.O. Box 10168

Austin, TX 78766

512.453.0615

Industry Since 1889 ♦

512.451.5536 Fax


August / September 2015

UPCOMING EVENTS AUGUST

Follow TPPA:

facebook twitter TPPA Mission Statement “The mission of the Texas Pork Producers Association is to help our members produce and market pork for a profit.” Producer Connection is the official publication of the Texas Pork Producers Association and is published by the Texas Pork Producers Association. All inquiries should be directed to the TPPA office. Advertising Information To place an ad or for advertising rates and guidelines, please contact Texas Pork Producers Association at (512) 453-0615 or communications@texaspork.org

1st ~ Major Show CTBR Certificates Available to Purchase 8th ~ Moorman’s ShowTec Feed Clinic, Canyon, TX 28th - 30th ~ NJSA Southwest Regional, Chickasha, OK 29th ~ Show Pig Short Course, Seguin, TX 29th ~ Moorman’s ShowTec Feed Clinic, Belton, TX 31st ~ TPPA Membership Expires * Don’t wait too late; Producer Connection and other updates will

not be sent to you if you do not renew

SEPTEMBER 1st ~ Major Show CTBR Litter Records Due 12th ~ Moorman’s ShowTec Feed Clinic, Santa Fe, TX 12th - 16th ~ National Barrow Show, Austin, MN 15th ~ October Producer Connection Ads Due

Texas Pork Producers Association P.O. Box 10168 Austin, Texas 78766 512-453-0615 - Local Phone 512-451-5536 - Fax tppa@texaspork.org www.texaspork.org Texas Pork Producers Association 8500 Shoal Creek Blvd. Bldg. 4, Suite 120 Austin, Texas 78757

24th -27th ~ State Fair of Texas Junior Breeding Gilt Show 24th - 27th ~ Ak-Sar-Ben, Omaha, NE 26th ~ Swine Skillathon, State Fair of Texas 28th - Oct. 1st ~ State Fair of Texas Junior Market Barrow Show

The office location will be moving to Kyle, TX in September. Please watch for updates.

Programs are made available to pork producers without regard to race, color, sex, religion or national origin. TPPA is an equal opportunity employer.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

BOARD OF DIRECTORS STAFF

President - Kyle Stephens, Amarillo

Mike Gruber, Dalhart Kurt Kelso, Seguin David Kempen, San Angelo Barret Klein, Boerne Cody McCleery, Weatherford Robert Peffley, Miami Chuck Real, Marion Ewrin Schwartz, Jr., San Angelo Josh Krohn, Lamesa Wayne Harman, Perryton Doug Schaefer, Garden City

President Elect - Jimmy Hayes, Port Lavaca Vice President - Corby Barrett, Perryton Immediate Past President - Kenneth Kensing, Fredericksburg Executive Member - Stanley Young, Lubbock Executive Member - Denny Belew, Tahoka Executive Member - Jay Winter, Lubbock

Executive Vice President Brandon R. Gunn bgunn@texaspork.org Director of Communications Cassidy Smith csmith@texaspork.org Summer Intern Bailee Wright bawright1@buffs.wtamu.edu

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Market News Wiechman Pig Company

July 21, 2015 (Daily Buying Station)

Production Agriculture Needs You! This honorable Career needs bright minds like yours so that we can continue to lead the world in food production. Texas Farm, LLC, a growing Pork Production Company, is expanding its Animal Production and Production Leadership Team.

Great Pork, Great Life! Contact us at: 4200 South Main Perryton, Texas or contact Isabel (806) 435-5935 ext. 3100; idominguez@texasfarmpork.com to start pursuing your future today. Interested Applicants must complete an application or submit a resume! 6

Top Butchers (200-300 lbs.) - $48.96/cwt. Sows (< 450 lbs.) - $0.23/lb. Sows (450 - 500 lbs.) - $0.28/lb. Sows (500 - 550 lbs.) - $0.32/lb. Sows (550 - 600 lbs.) - $0.33/lb. Sows (600+ lbs.) - $0.34/lb. Big Boars - $8.00 /cwt.

Gainesville Livestock Auction July 21, 2015

#1 Butchers (230-270 lbs.) - $0.60 - $0.80/lb. #2 Butchers (220-280 lbs.) - $0.40 - $0.60/lb. Sows (<400 lbs.) - $0.15 - $0.35/lb. Sows (400-500 lbs.) - $0.20 - $0.28/lb. Sows (500-700 lbs.) - $0.20 - $0.25/lb. Feeder Pigs (25-90 lbs.) - $0.55 - $0.60/lb. Feeder Pigs (100-175 lbs.) - $0.50 - $0.75/lb. Boars (<200 lbs.) - $0.30 - $0.40/lb. Boars (200-300 lbs.) - $0.17 - $0.20/lb. Boars (300+ lbs.) - $0.06 - $0.14/lb.

Brenham Livestock Auction July 17, 2015

Butchers 1-2 Grade (230-260 lbs.) - $0.70 - $0.75/lb. Butchers 2-3 Grade (225-275 lbs.) - $0.65 - $0.70/lb. Butchers 3-4 Grade (225-275 lbs.) - $0.55 - $0.60/lb. Packer Sows 1-2 Grade (550-700 lbs.) - $0.24 - $0.28/lb. Packer Sows 2-3 Grade (350-500 lbs.) - $0.22 - $0.26/lb. Packer Sows 3-4 Grade (250-500 lbs.) - $0.20 - $0.24/lb. Lightweight Boars - $0.25 - $0.30/lb. Feeder Pigs 1-2 Grade (40-80 lbs.) - $0.80 - $0.90/lb. Feeder Pigs 2-3 Grade (40-80 lbs.) - $0.75 - $0.85/lb.

Seguin Cattle Company July 15, 2015

#1 Butchers - $0.60 - $0.65/lb. #2 Butchers - $0.50 - $0.55/lb. Sows - $0.30 - $0.40/lb. Feeder Pigs - $0.80 - $0.90/lb. Feeder Shoats - $0.65 - $0.75/lb.


Your CONTRIBUTION can keep our LEGACY ALIVE! Honoring Our History

The Texas pork industry has a rich history filled with hardworking, passionate individuals whose dedication to the swine industry is still present today. For 27 years, these individualsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; commitment to the Texas swine industry has been recognized in the Texas Pork Hall of Honor, located in the Kleberg Animal Science building at Texas A&M University, in College Station. Within recent years, Texas A&M University dedicated the atrium of the Animal Science building to Dr. Hesby, for his dedication to the thousands of students he instructed in his lifetime. Hanging in the most visible part of the atrium, there are currently 26 inductees in the Hall of Honor, all of which have helped guide and improve the Texas pork industry. Additionally the atrium has been remodeled, providing relaxing study areas for students. All areas of the atrium have been renovated, except the Hall of Honor. Over the years, several plaques have fallen a part and become damaged. To continue this time honored tradition of showing appreciation to our associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past and present leaders, the Texas Pork Hall of Honor needs your assistance to maintain its location and prominence. TPPA requests your help to raise the necessary funds in order to restore this prestigious part of our history. Your contribution will be greatly appreciated, and recognized on a plaque at the location of the Texas Pork Hall of Honor, as well as multiple TPPA media outlets. Use the form below, or go to the TPPA website, at texaspork.org and join me in the effort to save a great part of our history.

We sincerely thank those that have contributed, but we still need help! Renovation has begun!!

Hall of Honor Plaque Restoration Donation Form Name: Company: Address: City: Bronze $100+

Zip:

State: Silver $250+

Gold $500+

Platinum $750+


F ive G ables F arm

“Your Central Texas Source for Quality Minor Breeds”          

2015 LITTERS

SW York sired by “The Journey” due 7/3 Berk sired by “King Kong” due 7/7 Duroc sired by “All Shook Up” due 8/1 SALE M R A F Spot sired by “Gunner” due 8/1 ON RD Cross sired by “Stunner” due 8/4 OCT. 3 Cross sired by “Outta Reach” due 8/6 Spot sired by “Across the Board” due 8/13 Chester sired by “Smash Hit” due 8/20 Poland sired by “Kankles” due 8/21 Spot sired by “Entourage son” due 9/3

FOLLOW

Congratulations Hopkins Family! 2014 San Angelo CTBR Gilt Show 2nd Place She’s back at our place and bred to Tippin’ Point to Farrow Aug. 20th

Jack Winterrowd 4300 West State Highway 29 Georgetown, TX 78628 512-203-3694

US ON

2014 McCulloch Co. Res. Champion Cross Tori, I miss our show days!

www.fivegablesfarm.com 5gablesfarm@gmail.com

Great job Jones Family! 2015 San Angelo CTBR Gilt Show Heavy-weight Cross Sold for $3,500 Contact Jaime Mares about this Aug. 10th litter. Bred to Hillbilly Bone

Freeman Showpigs Also bred 5th place Heavy-weight Cross barrow at the 2015 San Antonio Stock Show! We are proud of your success Fox Family!

Leon Freeman Lohn, TX 325.344.5514


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Were You Here?

In case you were unable to attend the Texas Pork Industry Conference & Youth Symposium, here’s a little recap. It was an enjoyable, fun-filled, jam-packed two days of catching up with friends and meeting new ones, increasing knowledge and plenty to eat and drink. The conference not only featured many of the top industry professionals speaking on some of latest technologies, hot topics, but still covering the basics. This truly is an event geared for everyone; whether you have two sows or two hundred. Don’t believe it? Just look through the pictures and read what others had to say... you won’t want to miss out on this opportunity next year!

“Probably the most valuable aspect of conference is the networking done with other producers; to be able to share ideas and strategies, and take away things we can implement to improve our farm.” 10


“The pork from Raider Red Meats was phenomenal; the Tech crew knows how to grill ‘‘em!” “Is Jay Winter from Louisiana? That man can boil some shrimp!”

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““Very informative; the best conference to date!”

““Being able to visit with Ashley from RHD about the future of advertising and websites, ask questions and have that one on one contact, is great and will help us take our marketing to the next level.””

““Dr. Schwab’s talk on leveraging genetic merit really opened my eyes. It’s interesting to know that those technologies are out there and being used.”” 12


““I thought the whole conference was wonderful. This was our 1st year to attend, and we even brought some friends who aren’t producers; we all really enjoyed it!””

““I enjoyed the membership meeting! It really made me feel like a part of the association to vote for new directors and hear all the updates!””

““The kids were so pumped about youth symposium that even the producers wanted in on the action!””

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““The veterinarian was very interesting to listen to. We have had sick pigs in the nursery and not know why, so the necropsy and discussion was extremely insightful.””

“The best part was the necropsy.

“The keynote presentation by

Clint Schwab really brings hope about bridging the gap of understanding between the showpig and commercial sectors for the betterment of the pork industry. His message was very encouraging for the youth to stay involved long term in the industry.”

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To have actual pigs in front of us and see how and what the vet looks for, showing us everything in detail like that, was beyond interesting.”


““The wine and moonshine tasting was a fun twist! It was another good time to casually interact with other producers and get ready for the evening festivities.””

“The Auction was one of the best we have ever had, bringing in over $20,000! A huge thank you goes out to all of those that donated all the wonderful items and to those bidders that kept their hands up!” - TPPA Directors & Staff

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Texas Pork Producers Association Awards Banquet Certified Texas Bred Registry Awards Top Breeder

Kyle Stephens Jay & Will Winter Chance Waldrip Rory Duelm Shane & Tatum Swenhaugen Weldon & Rodney Walser Kevin Thomas Shane & Tatum Swenhaugen Kevin Methvin

Reserve Champion Purebred Gilt CTBR Texas Stars Gilt Show

Reserve Grand Champion Barrow San Angelo Livestock Show

Jay & Will Winter

Grand Champion Barrow Houston Livestock Show

Mike Clay Rick & Niki Whitman Josh Krohn Lynn Hays & Mason Garner Scott Halfmann Wayne & Leslie Harman

Champion Breeder

Reserve Grand Champion Barrow State Fair of Texas

Jay & Will Winter

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Luke Lindner

Reserve Supreme Champion Gilt CTBR Texas Stars Gilt Show

Devin Blanton

Shane & Tatum Swenhaugen

Reserve Champion Crossbred Gilt CTBR Texas Stars Gilt Show

Jay & Will Winter

Grand Champion Barrow San Antonio Livestock Show

Shane & Tatum Swenhaugen

Reserve Grand Champion Barrow Houston Livestock Show

The 2015 Awards Committee

Stanley Young, Chairman Chuck Real, David Kempen, Denny Belew, Erwin Schwartz, Jr., Cody McCleery, Wayne Rode, Melton Harms, Ken Horton

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Seth Ralston

Supreme Champion Gilt CTBR Texas Stars Gilt Show

Special Thanks to...

Official 2014-2015 CTBR Sponsor

6 6 5 5 5 5

Grand Champion Barrow San Angelo Livestock Show

Kyle Stephens

Reserve Grand Champion Barrow San Antonio Livestock Show

Kyle Stephens

Reserve Grand Champion Barrow Star of Texas Livestock Show


Foundation Gilt Donor

Walser Farms / Hot Rod Genetics

Those of you that read the Breeder Spotlight in the February / March issue of the Producer Connection or were present at last year’s awards banquet when Walser Farms/Hot Rod Genetics was recognized as one of our Heritage Farms know the story. The foundation gilt donor for any one year is selected using the CTBR’s Top Ten Breeders. When I contacted Rodney this past year he was more than energetic in agreeing to bring a gilt to Angelo for the offering. The Duroc gilt sold as lot 3 was our first purebred and those of you that saw her know that she more than defines what a foundation gilt ought to represent.

Foundation Gilt Scholarship

Katherine Adams

Katie is the 18 year old daughter of Lon & Nicki Adams of Hedley. During Katie’s High School career she was actively involved as a member of the Hedley FFA and Donley County 4-H serving as Chapter President and County President. Katie is also a member of the National Honor Society. Her FFA LDE and CDE and 4-H Team Participations are quite numerous and Katie has participated on the State level in Range ID, Livestock Judging, and Beef Quiz Bowl. Kati’s projects include show barrows and gilts. Katie recently graduated from Hedley HS as class valedictorian. Katie plans to attend Clarendon College and Major in Agribusiness.

Holly Halfmann

As a recent graduate of Garden City High School, Holly conducted a rather extensive project program that included a swine breeding herd and barrows and gilts for exhibition. Holly is the 18 year old daughter of Scott and Tana Halfmann of Garden City. Holly has served in virtually every office of the Glasscock Co. 4-H including President. In addition to a successful athletic career that included state and regional qualifier status in 4 sports, Holly is a member of the National Honor Society, Student Council, and the Catholic Youth Organization. Holly will be attending Blinn College this fall and plans to transfer to Texas Tech to complete a degree in Agribusiness.

Madison Lopez-McKay

Madison is the 18 year old daughter of Rick and Shela McKay of Plainview. A recent graduate of Plainview High School, Madison was an active member of the Plainview FFA serving as Chapter President and District Secretary. As a member of numerous state qualifying FFA CDE & LDE Teams, Madison’s proudest accomplishment came as a member of the 2012 State Champion FFA Radio Broadcasting Team. Her project program included show pigs and breeding swine. Her numerous school and community activities and memberships include national swine associations and the TPPA; she was also a member of the Plainview HS Student Council. Madison Plans to attend Texas Tech University and major in Ag. Communications.

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Producer of the Year

Awarded to a producer who has shown outstanding recent achievements in production and/or leadership.

Wayne & Leslie Harman

What originally started as a sow herd numbering four has grown to 100 sows, 18 boars and a long list of show ring successes including the 2007 Houston Livestock Show Supreme Champion Gilt, Grand Champion Barrow at the 2013 San Antonio Livestock Exposition and ranking in the “Top 10 Breeders” within the Certified Texas Bred Registry Program for five consecutive years. No matter how many banners they hang and buckles they win, Wayne and Leslie find molding and teaching young people the most rewarding part of raising hogs.

Aside from being successful show pig breeders, the Harman’s are true testaments to the meaning “going above and beyond.” Since becoming members in 2005, they have not only been a valuable part to the development of the association. Wayne currently serves on the CTBR committee, while Leslie works on the Conference Planning and Youth Development & Education committees; they sponsor the Reserve Supreme Champion trophy for the Stars of Texas gilt show. Possibly more valuable than their leadership responsibilities is that the Harman’s can always be counted on to listen, consider and brainstorm new ideas to keep our association growing, and pitch in whenever and wherever to get the job done. A friend and leader to all, Wayne and Leslie are avid advocates for agriculture and the swine industry specifically; saying as agriculturalists we have to go beyond raising livestock and growing crops and educate people about our methods.

Special Recognition

Awarded to a producer who has demonstrated innovative/superior swine management and/or provided uncommon assistance to the industry for many years.

Lindner Feed & Milling

Lindner Feed & Milling is one of Texas’ oldest continually family owned and operated feed mills. Established in 1938 by Ralph Lindner’s Grand Father’s brother, the mill has remained in operation by the Lindner Family for the past four generations. During this time Lindner Feed and Milling has contributed to the success of the commercial and show pig industry by producing a high quality line of feed for all levels of production and their support of 4-H and FFA youth in the Hill County and Central Texas has been tremendous.

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Industry Service

Awarded to non-producers who make a significant contribution to the Texas pork industry and/or TPPA. Eligible individuals include those in media, education, marketing, service industries, government, etc.

Dr. Jimmy Gleason Dr. Jim Gleason was raised in Muleshoe, Texas. His father was a well respected veterinarian spending much of his childhood working around the vet clinic. Jim was also very active in 4-H and FFA. The Gleason family had a 15-20 sow showpig operation and 100 head of club calf producing cows. Jim exhibited the Champion Hampshire barrow at HLSR in 1976,a barrow that he and his family produced. Jim, along with his siblings showed numerous champion steers at Texas majors in the late 1970’s and 80’s. He was high individual at the state 4-H judging contest and propelled his team to win the contest. After high school, Jim attended Texas A&M Univerisity where he was a member of the livestock judging team,corps of cadets, & many other campus organizations. He completed vet school at Texas A&M and built West Plains Veterinary Hospital at Levelland Texas in 1988. During his career as a veterinarian, Dr. Gleason has been very instrumental in developing new procedures and protocols for show stock and performance animals as well as providing advice and consulting to the show stock industry. Dr. Gleason has been a speaker at two TPPA annual conferences and was also a keynote speaker at the PEDv conference in Amarillo last April.

Pam Kempen A familiar and welcoming face to those at the stock shows, Pam Kempen has put as much time as anyone into the Certified Texas Bred Registry. A former Agriculture Sciences Teacher of 29 years, Pam first started helping with the CTBR program in 2004 at the Houston Livestock Show because the barrow show fell on spring break. Additionally, she spent her available time assisting at the San Antonio Stock Show on weekends and at the end of the school day. Once she retired in 2009, Pam has served the producers and youth of Texas at every show but one. When asked what she enjoys most in this selfless volunteering of her time, she’s quick to reply that getting to meet and interact with all of the breeders and exhibitors, and spend time with her closest friends on the CTBR committee, is a great pleasure.

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Texas Pork Hall of Honor

A distinct honor recognizing lifetime achievements & significant contributions and leadership to the pork industry.

Melton & Mary Harms

Effective and invaluable community leaders, kind hearted and dependable individuals who are devoted towards civic service, Melton and Mary Harms have been passionate agriculturalists and ardent advocates of livestock production and farming as a noble and satisfying way of life. Raised on his family’s successful dairy farm in Springtown, Texas, Melton and Mary returned to the farm in 1969. First set of Duroc hogs were purchased in ’71; retired the dairy in’87; Beefmaster cattle were incorporated in ‘88 with the swine and farming operation. Integrity. Longevity. Stockman. A man to depend on, a friend to all, Melton uses his positive attitude and down-to-earth demeanor to bring people together and promote the advancement of the pork industry. Not only as Chairman of the TPPA Swine Health committee did he serve in an advisory role to the Texas Animal Health Commission during notable movements aimed towards regulating waste food feeding and the eradication of Pseudorabies in Texas, but his work on the Public Policy committee took him to the state and national capitols to lobby and protect pork producers’ interests. He has served on the Board of Directors of Texas Pork Producers Association for 20 years, President (2011-2012); past President of North Texas Pork Producers; Federation Council Member of National Pork Producers Council; National Pork Act Delegate; named the 1983 Texas Pork All-American. His steady leadership and commitment is further validated with his numerous roles on various important local agriculture and civic boards. A breeder of the 1991 Southwestern National Duroc Congress Champion Duroc Boar, 1999 World Pork Expo Reserve Grand Champion Duroc Boar and 2010 NSR Fall Classic Champion Berkshire Boar, Melton’s unceasing dedication to TPPA and the agriculture industry has blazed a trail full of accomplishments. With him every step of the way has been his wife. Mary, a steadfast pillar within the Springtown community where she has grown her acclaimed floral shop for 32 years, faithfully works on improving the economic development, civic and cultural prosperity of the area. In addition to serving as Board Member and 2nd Vice President of Springtown Chamber of Commerce (1984-2015) and Board Member of Neighbor to Neighbors Food Bank, Mary’s philanthropic work within the community and the Parker County Livestock Association has earned her numerous accolades. She has played an integral role on the TPPA Fun Auction committee for 20 years, raising funds to support scholarships and legislative activities. The Harms’ unselfish and constructive contributions to agriculture and 4H/FFA have been recognized by many awards of merit. As devoted Christians and parents, they diligently serve the First United Methodist Church and raise their two children, five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren in God’s word. They have dedicated their life to the betterment of livestock, efficiency in farming and improvement to the general welfare of the rural population.

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In Sincere Appreciation to our 2015 Conference Sponsors

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IN CASE YOU MISSED IT FROM TEXAS PORK INDUSTRY CONFERENCE

Swine Health Protocol Dr. Jeff Logue Show Pig / Sow Herd Vaccine Protocol

This is a general outline of vaccines that I recommend. Each herd is different and you should consult with your veterinarian about a program that will work in you herd. Gilts Pre-Farrowing 1. Prosystem RCE or Littergaurd LTC Two doses 4 and 2 weeks prefarrowing 2. Dectomax Injectable 5 days prior to farrowing

Sows 1. Flusure XP Whole herd every 3 months 2. Respisure One Whole herd every 3 months 3. Fostera PRRS Whole herd every 3 months 4. Farrowsure B Gold One dose at or right before weaning 5. Prosystem RCE Scour vaccine or Littergaurd LTC 2 weeks pre-farrowing unless they have never had this vaccine then it should be given 4 and 2 weeks prefarrowing. 6. Dectomax Injectable 5 days prior to farrowing

Pigs at Processing 1. Iron Injection 2. Respisure One 2cc dose 3. Draxxin 0.1cc (25mg/ml) 4. Exceed 0.2cc

Gilts Pre-Breeding 1. Flusure XP Two doses two weeks apart 2. Farrowsure B Gold Two doses two weeks apart 3. Respisure Regular Two doses two weeks apart 4. Fostera PRRS One dose 5. Dectomax

Pigs at Weaning 1. Fostera PCV HM Repeat in 2 to 3 weeks 2. Flusure XP/ER Bac Plus Repeat in 2 to 3 weeks 3. Fostera PRRS One dose 4. Draxxin 0.2cc 5. Dectomax

If your herd has specific disease conditions that exist then there are various medication that can be used to treat these. If there is a problem in your herd the best action to take is to call a veterinarian and have testing preformed to find out what the disease is and what medication and or vaccine can be used to treat the problem.

Vaccine Protocol for Purchased Show Pigs • • •

Fostera PRRS one dose * Fostera PRRS vaccine only comes in a 50 dose bottle and is only good for a few hours after it is mixed. Will not be effective if used after this. Fostera PCV HM two doses. Booster given 2 to 3 weeks after initial dose. * Foster PCV HM only comes in a 50 dose bottle and is good until the entire bottle is used as long as it is refrigerated. Flusure XP two doses. Booster given 2 to 3 weeks after initial dose.Dectomax on arrival and once monthly to control mange and intestinal parasites. * Flusure XP only comes in a 50 dose bottle and must be mixed. It is good for 30 days in the refrigerator once mixed. 23


Schwertner Helms Byrd Todd Helms 432-894-5904 Harvey Schwertner 325-895-1909 Hank Byrd 940-256-2214

Online Sale #1 9-30-15 Online Sale #2 10-21-15 showpig.com Farm Sale #1 10-7-15 Farm Sale #2 11-7-15 Miles Young Farmers Complex

shbshowpigs.com

Like us on facebook Schwertner Show Pigs

Come see us for quality show pigs. Hamps Yorks Chesters

Spinn Farms

* Litters farrowed early August - end September. * Show Pigs available starting in September. * Several high placing county and major show pigs in the last 5 years. 24

Crosses Spots Polands

Contact: Pat Spinn 254-913-6284 Kyle Spinn 254-913-8673 PeeWee 254-319-7541 David Decker 254-931-0555


Kevin Howell Hogs A Legacy of Faith, Community, & Fine Swine Show Gilts and Barrows July – September Litters Texas-Bred Certificates Available Consistently the Home of Winners: •2008 Houston Livestock Show Reserve Champion Poland •2013 CTBR Champion Berk Gilt and 3rd and 6th Place Berks

great r o f s st hog goal.” e n o “H s our i s d i k

•Numerous High Placing Gilts at 2015 Majors •4 Breed Champions and 9 Reserve Breed Champions at County Shows

Farrowing 24 Litters: •Polands, Berks, Spots, Chesters, Landrace, Yorks, Crosses

Contact: Kevin Howell (806) 570-2046 kevinhowellhogs@gmail.com

To order a shirt please contact TPPA Office at 512.453.0615.

Meet your Newly Elected Board Members Doug Schaefer

Josh Krohn

Wayne Harman

Garden City Elected to 3 year term

Lamesa Elected to 1 year term

Perryton Elected to 3 year term

Also being re-elected was Corby Barrett, Chuck Real, Erwin Schwartz, Jr. and Barret Klein. Election of officers was held July 11th in conjunction with the TPPA Annual Meeting. We welcome these new members to the Board of Directors and extend a huge thank you to Rory Duelm, Lorenzo Devora and Melton Harms for their years of service. 25


L&J STOCK FARMS All Sales Private Treaty! Call To make an Appointment ! C ROSS ES, YORKS, AN D HAMPS AVAILABLE! BORN IN JULY AN D AUGUST!

Lance, Tracey, Brittni, Barrett & Baeley Allerkamp Cell: (830) 739-5631 Home: (830) 995-2930 52210 IH-10 East Access Rd - Comfort Tx 26


Jack the Ripper

Piping Hot

27


Texas Pork Youth Symposium 2015 Exceeding the Standard

We know the youth of the Texas Pork Industry are ahead of their time; they are smart, eager to learn, and highly involved. With that being said, our goal for the youth symposium was to make it challenging, interactive, beneficial, and of course, FUN! With over 40 attendants, ages ranging from 7 to 17, we had six different hands-on skills stations with instructors from across the state who share a deep understanding and passion for the pork industry. Swine Skill-A-Thons are becoming a very popular competition through 4-H and many major stock shows; youth are even able to receive scholarships through these contests. The symposium was designed to aid in training and provide practice for these skill-a-thons. We encouraged the attendants to be competitive, uphold the values of the Texas Pork Industry and truly exceed the standard.

Kari Beth Langbein, Ag Sciences Teacher and Swine Barn Manager at James Madison High School, led “Everything but the Oink,” which focused on the primal cuts of pork, where our pork comes from, pork exportation, and by-products. There were actual cuts of pork for the attendants to identify and thoroughly evaluate.

“One of the most progressive youth progams I have been a part of” -Danny Nusser 28

“More than a Notch” was led by Sierra Stephens, former TPPA intern and a familiar face in the show barn. This station focused on a lesson in reading notches and a hands on how-to. The students were able to notch wooden piglet models with paper ears and practice reading the notches made by one another.

Chama Martin, who has grown up in the livestock industry with a successful collegiate judging career, led “The Basics.” This station covered the breeds, their strengths and weaknesses, as well as hog anatomy. The students played a matching game to help enforce breed recognition and anatomy identification.


“Makin’ Bacon” was led by former TPPA Intern, Ian Schaefer, who grew up showing and raising competitive hogs. This station covered a variety of topics such as, semen handling, the pros and cons of artificial insemination and a hands-on, life size Sow AI Demo. In addition, there was a reproductive tract that had been harvested the week prior. The attendants were able to use spirettes to AI the model sow through a clay cervix and watch the semen (colored water) fill up a cup inside the sow. After that, they AI’ed the reproductive tract, so they could visualize the actual process. Justin Hansard, Montague County Extension Agent, led “Better Safe than Sorry,” which focused on medicine handling, injection sites, injection safety and techniques. The students were able to draw medicine from bottles and practice giving different injections into fruits.

“It is cool to think that now I can be confident in AI-ing my own sows” -Madi Berry, 17

“You are What You Eat” was led by Danny Nusser, a Regional AgriLife Extension Specialist. The focus was on the importance of knowing what we are feeding our hogs and why we feed it. Not only did they practice identifying the feedstuffs and discuss their classifications, but they also learned about the nutritional value and the importance of making efficient rations.

“I know how to make food for pigs!” -Weston, 6

29


In today’s world, we find it key to offer knowledge on leadership in and out of the show ring, as well as advocating for the livestock industry. We all know there is no better professionals to impart that knowledge on our youth than Dr. Chris Boleman, Program Director of 4-H Youth Development, and Dr. Billy Zanolini, Texas Youth Livestock and Agriculture Specialist for Texas AgriLife Extension. They gave an insightful, energetic, and interactive talk on using your passions to be a leader and an advocate. We concluded the day with a Team Relay Competition that incorporated skills and questions from every station. The relay served as a way for each team to showcase their knowledge under pressure and have some good ol’ competitive fun. The top three teams all received banners for their achievements. The champion team was the “Landrace Racers.” Giving them a run for their money, was the “Terrific Tamworths” Reserve Champion Team. Coming in third place, “The Baconators.”

Congratulations to the “Landrace Racers!” 30


We consider ourselves lucky to work with and support such intelligent and dedicated youth!

31


Boars Used: Kill Shot Killer Instinct In The Moment What We Do No Hesitation Size Matters For The Love Mr. Wolf Muffin Mama’s Right Wake Up

Franckowiak Show Pigs

120 Litters Mid June - Oct.

A Grand Year

2015 Grand Champions

Bexar County Nueces County Zavala County Yoakum County Karnes County Walter Gerlach Livestock Show Res. Grand Champion

Nueces County

P.O. Box 144 St. Hedwig Texas Vince - 210-336-9428 Ryan - 210-844-7484 Home - 210-667-1522 Feed Store - 210-667-1346

Koltermann Show Pigs

Spot On!

Champion Breeding Gilt

32

High Selling Spot CTBR Gilt Show

Congratulations to the many County Champions & High Placing Major Show Exhibitors! 113 Oak Hollow Drive La Vernia, TX 78121 Ryan 210-844-7484

2015 Sires Spots:

What It Is Renaissance Bull Frog

Durocs:

Rebuild Solutions Ultra Squared Auto Pilot

Berks:

#13 Landing Gear Mr. Twister Mr. Buffet So Fly


20 LITTERS DUE JULY-OCT. 2015 SIRES USED: SHOW ME WHAT U GOT BIG GUN FUZZY SIZE MATTERS WAKE UP MUFFIN MANCHILD

FUZZY LOCATED OFF HWY 31 AN HOUR SOUTH OF DFW. DELIVERY AVAILABLE TO SOUTH TEXAS IN SOME CASES.

SHOW ME WHAT U GOT JEREMY CELL: 903-641-2055 DANA CELL: 903-654-2361

Rounsavall CTBR CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

WWW.ROUNSAVALLSHOWPIGS.COM 273 SW CR 3090 PURDON, TX 76679

SHOW PIGS

33


holland show pigs farrowing 20 litters in august Tel Holland

High Placing Cross Houston 2014

Multiple County Champions

Tel Holland

3rd Place - Heavy Weight Cross Star of Texas 2012

For Information Contact: Jimbo Holland 361.652.9183

Cade Davis

Tel Holland 361.275.0684

5th Place York Texas Bred Champion San Antonio 2015

Cade Davis

4th Place Hamp Middle Heavy Weight Star of Texas 2012

Backdrop Babies

TWISTER SHOW PIGS

Prospect Pig Sale! Saturday, October 10th (Gatesville, Texas) & Saturday, November 7th (Denison, Texas)

Crosses, Durocs and Spots Available after September 15th!

Contact: Dub Step (817) 517-4302 34

7:30 PM

Following Ring B of Central Texas Showmanship and Jackpot Series

Top breeders from all over the nation! Contact: Kip Curry Jr. (254) 592-3504 Zachary Curry (254) 592-1395


Specializing in helping select, feed and fit your family’s NEXT Champion!

Pure Boars:

Duroc Hit the Floor Off Label 15-3 Off Label 15-1

Be sure to check us out online!

Landrace Going Green

2015 Online Sale Dates:

Spots Against the Grain

September 15, 2015 September 29, 2015 October 13, 2015 October 27, 2015 November 10, 2015 Weekly SPECIALS will be displayed on Facebook!

Cross Boars:

Sting Ray Burn Notice Deliverance Skull Candy Smokin Gun Grand Mentality

Call Zachary at 254-592-1395

Kip Jr. 254-592-3504

Whitney 254-592-1309

Kip Sr. 254-592-3915

3950 County Road 249, Dublin, Texas 76446 www.currylivestock.com or “Like Us” on Facebook!

Texas Showmanship & Jackpot Series Backdrop Babies

FUTURE DATES/LOCATION: August 22, 2015 - Belton October 10-11, 2015 - Gatesville November 7, 2015 - Denison December 5-6, 2015 - Sweetwater

Prospect Pig Sale!

December 31, 2015 - January 1-2, 2016 - 2016 - Belton

Saturday, October 10th & Saturday, November 7th Approximately 7PM

Following Ring B of Central Texas Showmanship and Jackpot Series

GREAT prizes for OVERALL winners to be awarded at end of series banquet!

Top breeders from all over the nation!

2015 SERIES

GREAT KIDS—GOOD TIMES—GREAT AWARDS

DO NOT HAVE TO BE A MEMBER TO PARTICIPATE (encouraged but not required) IN SHOW, BUT MUST BE TO PARTICIAPTE IN SERIES

Exhibitors from any state are welcome --- MUST follow Texas Health Requirements! 8 BREED FORMAT

WOPB - BOPB - BERK - DUROC - HAMP - YORK - WHITE CROSS - DARK CROSS

Contact:

Kip Curry Sr. (254) 592-3915 or Dub Step (817) 517-4302 or ctsjs@hotmail.com Website: http://www.ctxjackpotseries.com/

35


News from the

National Pork Board SWINE HEALTH INFORMATION CENTER BEGINS TACKLING DISEASE RISKS

A new center will soon give pork producers good information about disease risks. The new Swine Health Information Center (SHIC) is set to open in Iowa and will be run by Dr. Paul Sundberg, a former practicing veterinarian and the former senior vice president for science and technology at the National Pork Board. The center will be located in Perry, Iowa, in office space leased from the American Association of Swine Veterinarians (AASV), one of many partners SHIC hopes to enlist to aid the effort, Sundberg said. Another partner, the National Pork Board, has provided $15 million in Pork Checkoff funding over five years. Sundberg said that SHIC is an independent organization but that it will work closely with veterinarians, pork producers, swine genetics companies, animal-health product providers and organizations including the Pork Board, AASV, the National Pork Producers Council, land-grant universities and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, among others. “The center is in its infant stages, and we want make sure we aren’t creating unrealistic expectations for our work,” Sundberg said. “We are not going to prevent another disease such as PRRS, or circovirus, or porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED). What we can do is develop better diagnostic capabilities for earlier detection of high-risk pathogens and to provide data analysis to help producers and their veterinarians improve the management of the health risks for the pigs on their farms.” Sundberg said another key role of the center will be to develop an international swine health information network to identify and prioritize high-risk pathogens worldwide. He said he will be meeting soon with veterinary schools that have contacts at universities in other countries to get ideas for forming the international network.

He said such a network could have been helpful in managing the swine industry’s most recent devastating virus, PED. He said that in March of 2013, AASV identified PED as an international threat. “Everybody said it’s a terrible thing and a good thing we didn’t have it here. Then it showed up here in May.

NEW INTERNATIONAL TRICHINAE GUIDANCE WILL HELP BOOST U.S. PORK EXPORTS

The United Nations’ food-safety standard-setting body, the Codex Alimentarius Commission, Saturday finalized global guidelines that provide a way for countries to define negligible risk for trichinae and establish methods for monitoring risk over time. NPPC and the National Pork Board provided scientific input on the international guidance, which will help increase U.S. pork exports by hundreds of millions of dollars annually. A number of countries require testing for trichinae as a precondition to accepting exports of fresh chilled U.S. pork despite the fact that the United States is at negligible risk for the parasite. Trichinae is nearly non-existent in the U.S. pork supply because of increased knowledge of risk factors, adoption of controlled management practices and thorough biosecurity protocols, but many U.S. trading partners still have concerns over trichinae because of its prevalence in their domestic swine herds, which can result in severe human health issues. Dr. Ray Gamble, past president of the International Commission on Trichinellosis, has estimated the prevalence of trichinae in the U.S. commercial swine herd at 1-in-300 million, and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention recognizes the U.S. commercial herd as low risk.

NATIONAL PORK BOARD CREATES INNOVATION TEAM FOCUSED ON FOOD CHAIN OUTREACH

Consistent with the National Pork Board’s five-year strategic plan to build consumer trust and grow consumer demand, the organization

is updating its food chain outreach structure. These changes will allow the National Pork Board to be even more effective in collaborating with channel partners in a focused effort to stimulate pork demand. “Our strategic plan defines a blueprint for industry success by addressing the changing world facing U.S. pork producers,” said Derrick Sleezer, president of the National Pork Board and a producer from Cherokee, Iowa. “Our marketing effort taps into the emotional connections consumers have with their food and will fuel a fresh dialogue about modern pork production and continuous improvement for the benefit of people, pigs and the planet.” The National Pork Board plans to expand efforts this year in product innovation to grow consumer demand. This effort will be supported by consumer research, market data analysis and channel insights, product design, market testing, channel marketing and channel communications. “We’re very excited about this new direction in leadership within our organization,” said Sleezer. “These changes will allow us to have greater focus and efficiency as we work with our foodservice and retail partners to increase pork demand.”

JBS USA PORK PURCHASES CARGILL PORK BUSINESS

JBS USA Pork has entered into an agreement with Cargill to acquire the company’s US-based pork business for $1.45 billion. Completion of the acquisition is subject to regulatory review and approval. “The announcement of our agreement to purchase the Cargill pork operations is a strategic investment in the long-term growth of our domestic and global pork business and demonstrates our continued commitment to the US livestock sector,” said Martin Dooley, president and COO of JBS USA Pork. “This transaction will strengthen our position as a producer and supplier of all major animal proteins around the world, and provide increased opportunities for our producer partners and key customers. The


strength and success of Cargill’s pork team and hog suppliers, as well as its industry leadership in areas such as animal welfare, exports, bacon production and innovation, were significant and compelling factors that led us to pursue this acquisition and enhance our ability to serve our diverse, global customer base.” Included in JBS’ acquisition of Cargill’s pork business are 2 Midwest meat processing plants, one in Ottumwa, Iowa, and the other at Beardstown, Ill. Both plants were acquired by Cargill in 1987, and in 2014 they processed a total of 9.3 million hogs. The purchase by JBS also includes 5 feed mills (2 in Missouri, and 1 each in Arkansas, Iowa and Texas), and 4 hog farms (two in Arkansas and one each in Oklahoma and Texas). JBS first entered the US pork market with the acquisition of Swift & Company in 2007 and has steadily improved performance ever since. The company has more than 6,000 team members and the total daily capacity to process more than 50,000 hogs at processing facilities in Marshalltown, Iowa; Worthington, Minn.; and Louisville, Ky. JBS USA Pork offers a wide selection of brands including Swift and Swift Premium. The announced transaction is to enhance JBS USA Pork’s ability to meet increasing global demand for high-quality, innovative fresh and frozen pork products.

LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER: PORK PRODUCTION UP SLIGHTLY FROM 2014

Commercial red meat production for the United States totaled 3.81 billion pounds in May, down 4 percent from the 3.95 billion pounds produced in May 2014. Pork production totaled 1.86 billion pounds, up slightly from the previous year. Hog slaughter totaled 8.75 million head, up 1 percent from May 2014. The average live weight was down 3 pounds from the previous year, at 284 pounds. Beef production, at 1.92 billion pounds, was 7 percent below the previous year. Cattle slaughter totaled 2.38 million head, down 10 percent from May 2014. The average live weight was up 33 pounds from the previous year, at 1,332 pounds. Veal production totaled 6.6 million

pounds, 16 percent below May a year ago. Calf slaughter totaled 33,200 head, down 29 percent from May 2014. The average live weight was up 50 pounds from last year, at 335 pounds. Lamb and mutton production, at 11.9 million pounds, was down 14 percent from May 2014. Sheep slaughter totaled 168,500 head, 13 percent below last year. The average live weight was 141 pounds, down 2 pounds from May a year ago. January to May 2015 commercial red meat production was 19.7 billion pounds, up slightly from 2014. Accumulated beef production was down 5 percent from last year, veal was down 22 percent, pork was up 6 percent from last year, and lamb and mutton production was down 5 percent.

NATIONAL PORK BOARD - ANTIBIOTICS POSITION STATEMENT, JUNE 2015

America’s pig farmers have always been dedicated to raising healthy animals to help ensure a safe food supply. The use of antibiotics as part of an overall herd health plan is important to delivering on this commitment. Pig farmers recognize the critical importance of using antibiotics responsibly in animals and humans to protect the health and well-being of both as they strive to reduce the overall need for antibiotics and maintain the efficacy of them for future generations. The National Pork Board, through its Pork Checkoff, supports objective, scientifically rigorous studies and risk assessments to help farmers make informed decisions regarding use of antibiotics in food animals and to build upon efforts to continuously improve antibiotic use best practices. The board also supports veterinarian oversight and best practices, as outlined in the long-established Pork Quality Assurance® Plus certification program, promotes education as an essential component of antibiotic stewardship and strongly encourages compliance with all regulatory requirements. America’s pig farmers are committed to advancing knowledge that benefits people, pigs and the planet. This includes addressing concerns about the emergence of antibiotic resistance in both animal and human medicine. For this reason,

the National Pork Board is expanding its collaboration with veterinarians, food-chain partners and government agencies to develop a comprehensive, fact-based approach that aligns with its farmers’ key values.

DIP IN TOP MARKETS SLOWS MAY PORK EXPORTS

After an encouraging performance in April, U.S. pork exports lost momentum in May, falling below year-ago levels in both volume and value, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation on July 8. Pork exports totaled 184,865 mt in May, down 2 percent from a year ago, while value slipped 18 percent to $489.2 million. Through the first five months of 2015, pork exports are down 6 percent in volume (910,967 mt) and 15 percent in value ($2.42 billion) from the same period last year. January-May pork exports equated to 25 percent of total production and 21 percent for muscle cuts only–down from 28 percent and 23 percent, respectively, a year ago. Pork export value per head slaughtered averaged $51.39, down 19 percent from the first five months of 2014. After a relatively strong performance in April, pork exports to Japan and Mexico took a step back in May. Export volume to Japan dipped 9 percent from a year ago to 39,340 mt, while value was down 18 percent to $152.9 million. Through the first five months of the year, exports to Japan were down 11 percent in volume (189,188 mt) and 18 percent in value ($705.2 million).

The National Pork Board has responsibility for Checkoff-funded research, promotion and consumer information projects and for communicating with pork producers and the public. Through the Pork Checkoff, U.S. pork producers and importers pay $0.40 per $100 of value when pigs are sold and when pigs or pork products are brought into the United States. The Pork Checkoff funds national and state programs in adverising, consumer information, retial and food service, marketing, production improvement, technology, swine health, pork safety and environmental management. For more information on Checkoff-funded programs, pork producers can call the Pork Checkoff Services at (800) 456-7675 or check the website at www.pork.org.


News from the

National Pork Producers Council NPPC, STATE PORK GROUPS They pointed out that Canada and URGE SENATE TO ACT ON COOL Mexico are insisting that they will The National Pork Producers Council and Texas Pork Producers Association, along with 33 other state pork producer organizations, are urging the Senate to take up legislation to repeal country of origin labeling requirements for beef, pork and poultry before Congress takes a month-long recess beginning in early August. The U.S. Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) law requires meat to be labeled with the country where the animal from which it was derived was born, raised and harvested. The World Trade Organization (WTO) in May rejected an appeal by the United States of the international trade body’s October 2014 ruling that the COOL provisions on beef and pork discriminate against Canadian and Mexican animals, which they send to the United States to be fed out and processed. The WTO decision allows Canada and Mexico to place retaliatory tariffs on U.S. goods going into their countries. In a letter sent July 20 to every member of the Senate, NPPC and the state pork associations urged lawmakers “to introduce and pass legislation to repeal country of origin labeling requirements for pork, beef and poultry before the August recess. Without swift repeal, the Congress will imperil U.S. exports and jobs.” Canada has asked the WTO to authorize $3 billion (Canadian dollars, or about $2.4 billion U.S. dollars) a year in retaliatory tariffs against U.S. imports, and Mexico is seeking $713 million in retaliation. Some senators have suggested making COOL voluntary, a proposal dismissed by the pork groups. “At this point, if Congress were to change the labeling law, the WTO would not review such changes,” the organizations said in their letter. “The only thing left for the WTO to do in the case is to determine the level of retaliation that Canada and Mexico can extract from the United States, whose day in court is over.

not remove the retaliatory tariffs on U.S. products until the meat labeling provisions of COOL are repealed. The House in June approved H.R. 2393 to amend the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946 to repeal the meat labeling provisions. NPPC and the state pork associations are urging the Senate to take up that measure.

NEW MARKET ACCESS IN PERU

Peru has agreed to eliminate trichinae testing requirements on chilled US pork based on USDA certification that the pork originated from PQA Plus farms. NPPC worked closely with US and Peruvian officials for many years to eliminate the testing, which artificially raises the cost of selling chilled pork. Peru’s US pork imports increased significantly after the US-Peru Free Trade Agreement was implemented in 2009, moving from $650,000 in 2008 to more than $6.7 million in 2014.

MEASURE TO EASE CONGESTION AT U.S. PORTS PASSES KEY COMMITTEE

A bill to help address congestion at U.S. ports was included in transportation legislation approved in late July by the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee. The “Ports Performance Act,” which the Commerce panel passed in late June, would require the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Bureau of Transportation Statistics to collect metrics of port marine terminal productivity, which would serve as an early warning system for determining when ports stop operating normally and for when the federal government needs to step in to protect the economy. The ports measure was prompted by the recent work slowdowns at West Coast ports. The slowdowns, the result of a months-long labor dispute between the Pacific Maritime Association (PMA), which represents companies that own West Coast ports, and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU),

which represents dock workers, cost the U.S. meat and poultry sectors hundreds of millions of dollars. NPPC joined more than 70 business and agricultural organizations on a July 15 letter urging the Commerce Committee to include the ports bill in the larger transportation legislation, which likely will be consolidated with a federal highway funding bill approved recently by the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee. The comprehensive sixyear transportation reauthorization measure now goes to the full Senate for consideration.

MARKET ACCESS IN MACEDONIA

The US recently gained market access to the Republic of Macedonia for exports of fresh and frozen pork, including minced pork meat. Macedonia will not impose restrictions on US pork related to ractopamine or the use of pathogenreduction treatments and will accept pork from any establishment deemed to be negligible risk for Trichinella. The country, just north of Greece, has a population of about 2 million, with an annual growth rate of 3.1 percent. Macedonia’s domestic pork industry is small, so the country is a net importer of pork, taking in 65 percent of its annual consumption. ISU’s economist Dermot Hayes estimates the Macedonian market for US pork at $5 million a year.

LATEST ROUND OF NEGOTIATIONS ON TTIP HELD

The 10th round of negotiations on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) was recently held in Brussels, Belgium. The TTIP is a free trade agreement between the United States and the European Union (EU) launched in July 2013. Now that Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) has passed the U.S.


Congress, there is a strong will to conclude the U.S.-EU trade deal. TPA lays out objectives for U.S. negotiators to meet in any trade agreement, which is then subject to an up or down vote – without amendment – from Congress. Unfortunately, in the TTIP talks many critical ideological rifts in agriculture remain. While the EU is willing to eliminate tariffs on nearly all goods, it announced publicly it is unwilling to eliminate them on beef, poultry and pork. It also is refusing to reconsider its stance on beef hormones and the feed additive ractopamine, which is used in beef and pork production. NPPC’s position is that tariff and non-tariff barriers should be eliminated on all products, including pork, consistent with previously concluded U.S. free trade agreements. Removal of tariff and non-tariff barriers to trade would significantly increase U.S. pork exports to the EU, creating more than 17,000 U.S. jobs, according to Iowa State University economist Dermot Hayes.

MIDWEST STATES VOTE TO INVESTIGATE HSUS FUNDRAISING TACTICS

The Midwest Legislative Conference of the Council of State Governments held in late July approved a resolution encouraging the attorneys general of its 11 states to investigate the fundraising activities of the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS). The conference passed the resolution at its annual meeting in Bismarck, N.D., noting that the animal-right group’s materials are “full of dogs and cats, giving the impression that this is the primary focus of HSUS; however, only 1 percent of the money raised by HSUS is given to pet shelters (according to its tax returns) and HSUS runs no pet shelters and according to the HSUS President, only 20 percent of the organization’s budget goes to companion animal issues …”

GMO LABELING BILL SAILS THROUGH HOUSE PANEL

The House Agriculture Committee swiftly approved a bill on July 14 that would bar states from requiring the labeling of genetically engineered foods. The Safe and Affordable Food Labeling Act (HR 1599), which was

approved on a voice vote in a brief, 15-minute meeting, could be on the House floor as soon as the end of July. Opponents of the bill on the committee, led by Rep. Jim McGovern, D-Mass., did not request a roll-call vote. The House Energy and Commerce Committee, which oversees the Food and Drug Administration, is expected to waive its right to vote on the legislation. While the administration has not taken a position on the bill, the Agriculture Department and FDA assisted with drafting it. The bill would stop states from requiring the labeling of food with genetically engineered ingredients and would set up a new certification process at USDA for foods labeled as non-GMO.

AGRICULTURE APPROPRIATIONS AMENDMENTS WOULD NIX SUSTAINABILITY LANGUAGE

Amendments in House bills to fund the Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration and the Department of Health and Human Services would prevent language on sustainability from being included in the final 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. In February, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee released a report claiming that a plant-based diet is better for the environment than an animal-based one. (The committee also recommended less consumption of red and processed meat.) NPPC supports the riders, pointing out that the advisory committee had no mandate and no expertise to address sustainability. The amendments would limit the dietary guidelines, which are being written by USDA and HHS, to “matters of diet and nutrient intake.”

SENATE RENEWS AGOA, NPPC RAISES CONCERNS ABOUT ACCESS TO SOUTH AFRICA

South Africa has a de facto ban on US pork imports and unnecessarily imposes burdensome animal health restrictions on imports, such as a time and temperature requirement for pork as a mitigation against trichinae. The US and South Africa earlier this week agreed on a path forward for resuming exports of US bone-in chicken cuts, ending a 15year trade dispute and giving hope to efforts to resolve a disagreement

over US pork exports. South Africa is a beneficiary of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), which provides beneficiary countries with duty-free access for certain products going to the US market, even though the US does not receive reciprocal benefits for pork.

TRADE ADVISORY COMMITTEE SET TO MEET IN SEPTEMBER TO LOOK AT TPP BENEFITS

The president’s Advisory Committee for Trade Policy and Negotiations (ACTPN), made up of business executives, agricultural representatives and labor leaders, among others, is set to meet Sept. 8 to begin work on a report on the economic impact of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). Former NPPC president and Illinois pork producer Jill Appell is vice chair of the advisory committee, which must send the report to President Obama, Congress and U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman within 30 days of the president notifying Congress that he intends to finalize the Asia-Pacific regional trade agreement. The TPP includes the United States, Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam, which account for nearly 40 percent of global GDP. The ACTPN will give its opinion on whether the TPP promotes U.S. economic interests and meets the objectives set by Congress in the recently approved Trade Promotion Authority legislation. The National Pork Producers Council conducts public-policy outreach on behalf of its 43 affiliated state associations, enhancing opportunities for the success of U.S. pork producers and other industry stakeholders by establishing the U.S. pork industry as a consistent and responsible supplier of high-quality pork to the domestic and world markets. The Strategic Investment Program, is the primary source of funds for the National Pork Producers Council. By enrolling in SIP, you are assured a seat at the table when decisions are made regarding the future of the U.S. pork industry. For more information or to join NPPC, visit WWW.NPPC.ORG


House Passes H.R. 1599, the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act

CAPITOL REPORT

Representative K. Michael Conaway (R-TX), Chairman of the House Agriculture Committee, issued the following statement July 23 after the House passed H.R. 1599, the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act by a vote of 275-150. The bill, authored by Rep. Mike Pompeo (R-KS) and Rep. G. K. Butterfield (D-NC) was approved by the House Agriculture Committee on July 14, 2015, by voice vote. “Advances in technology have allowed the U.S. to enjoy the safest, highest quality, most abundant, diverse and affordable supply of food and fiber mankind has ever known. With the world’s population expected to reach 10 billion by 2050, biotechnology is an essential tool for our farmers to meet this demand in an environmentally sound, sustainable, and affordable way. Unfortunately, proposed Federal and State laws threaten this innovation by generating a patchwork of differing labeling requirements, which will result in inconsistent and confusing information for consumers and interfere with interstate commerce. H.R. 1599 establishes a voluntary nation-wide marketing program that gives consumers access to consistent, reliable information while protecting advancements in food production technology and innovation,” said Conaway.

Chairman Conaway Statement on Senators’ COOL Bill July 24, Rep. K. Michael Conaway (R-TX), Chairman of the House Agriculture Committee, issued the following statement regarding legislation introduced by Senator Hoeven (R-ND) and Senator Stabenow (D-MI) that ties repeal of country of origin labeling (COOL) to both the elimination of existing market driven programs and the establishment of a so-called voluntary country of origin (COOL) labeling program for beef, pork, and chicken. This new voluntary program would operate under similar rules as the program found to violate U.S. international trade rules. “With the imminent threat of retaliation before us, I appreciate the constructive step forward by our Senate counterparts in agreeing that the House-passed language repealing mandatory COOL for beef, pork, and chicken is the appropriate direction to go. As Canadian officials said today, the so-called voluntary portion of the bill introduced today is unacceptable, as it will not bring us into compliance and will not serve to prevent billions of dollars in economic sanctions on U.S. products. I applaud the continued efforts of Chairman Roberts to address this issue and encourage the Senate to accept the language he put forward that would place the threat of retaliation behind us, just as the House did when 300 members supported H.R. 2393 nearly two months ago. Time is of the essence, and there is no excuse for the Senate to recess while the threat of economic harm hangs over nearly every industry in the U.S. If the Senate acts in a responsible manner by passing a clean repeal before recessing, I will commit to working in a bipartisan manner to try and craft a purely voluntary program that is both trade compliant and does not interfere, intentionally or not, with existing labeling programs. But, the responsible action of repeal must come first. The time to act is now. ” 40


Commissioner Miller Joins Lawsuit to Stop EPA from Enforcing Illegal Rule and Creating Massive Federal Government Overreach Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller joined Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton in a lawsuit to stop the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from its illegal attempt to greatly expand the jurisdiction of the Clean Water Act. “This move by President Obama and the EPA is a Soviet-style attempt that threatens to trample private property rights, individual freedom and economic growth in our country,” Commissioner Miller said. “By expanding the definition of what constitutes the waters of the United States, the EPA is essentially burying Texas landowners in a mountain of burdensome permitting and paperwork, all of which will be micromanaged by the federal government. Our farmers and ranchers are the original environmentalists, conservationists and stewards of the land. They know how to protect the land far better than some bureaucrat in Washington.” The Texas lawsuit follows EPA’s ruling concerning waters covered by the Clean Water Act, which will now include many puddles, ponds, ditches and dry creek beds. Commissioner Miller believes the final rule is overly broad, while also open to bureaucratic interpretation and abuse. Ultimately, the impact of this rule will mean higher production prices for agricultural producers and higher food prices at the grocery store for consumers. Additionally, the ruling will potentially have a negative environmental impact, because lands previously set aside for conservation may now be placed back into production to make up for lost revenue. According to Attorney General Paxton, the new EPA rule is unconstitutional, and Texas is suing the EPA. The argument is that the federal government is exceeding its statutory and constitutional authority by attempting to regulate areas never intended by Congress. The rule is contrary to the congressional intent of the Clean Water Act and infringes on states’ abilities to regulate their own natural resources. “While we fight this attempt by the federal government to hijack our private property rights, I encourage Congress to act swiftly to prevent this dangerous attack against landowner rights in our country,” Commissioner Miller said.

Commissioner Miller Delivers State of Agriculture Address On July 8 Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller celebrated his first six months at the helm of the Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA) and the successes achieved thus far in his tenure. In his live-streamed address, Commissioner Miller discussed topics including reducing mandates and reforming the school nutrition policy in Texas, new initiatives in consumer protection, the creation of the Office of Water and his fight against federal overreach. Commissioner Miller also laid out his vision for the future of the agency and Texas agriculture. “It’s been an honor to serve the people of Texas and our farmers and ranchers as Agriculture Commissioner,” said Commissioner Miller. “The work we’ve done so far is only the beginning. It was my goal from day one to hit the ground running, and I can honestly say that my team and I have done just that.” From the beginning, Commissioner Miller has maintained a clear goal of serving members of the agriculture community and all Texans. He has worked to give back local control to schools, prioritize water issues, re-invigorate programs to combat childhood obesity and stop the federal government from overregulating the state. During his address, Commissioner Miller also commended TDA employees for their incredible work in increasing efficiencies in agency operations, as well as their commitment to cracking down on consumer protection violators. “I couldn’t have asked for a better team to work with than the folks at TDA,” Commissioner Miller said. “The level of expertise and commitment to the needs of Texans from the TDA staff is unparalleled. We continue to look for areas to improve, while continuing to be responsive to our stakeholders and consumers. As an elected official, I’m always looking for ways to be more efficient with taxpayer dollars. Together, we must work hard to be innovative and relevant in the lives of all Texans, while also ensuring that agriculture remains a driving force in our state’s economy. I am incredibly proud of what we’ve accomplished in a mere six months, and I have high expectations for the future.” 41


Around the State TPPA Board Member Honored Lubbock, TX â&#x20AC;&#x201C; TPPA Board member Stanley Young was honored on July 16 for his dedication and commitment to the Bayer Museum of Agriculture. In recognition of his service and loyalty, the catering kitchen was named after him and will be forever known as the Stanley M. Young Catering Kitchen. Stanley goes above and beyond the usual responsibilities as a BMA Director and Executive Committee member. He has personally planned, organized and purchased items for the kitchen, and prepares and cooks for numerous events hosted at the museum. The Bayer Museum of Agriculture is a first-class facility that teaches the community the importance of agriculture through interactive exhibits where visitors can see, hear and experience life on the farm. TPPA Works with 4-H Livestock Ambassadors The Texas 4-H Livestock Ambassador program strives to provide high school aged 4-H members the opportunity to develop and practice advanced leadership skills related to mentoring other youth, and to become advocates for animal agriculture. While the Ambassadors were at Texas Tech University, TPPA Executive Brandon Gunn spoke on the successes and challenges of the pork industry and how everyone can work together to tell the positive story of the pork industry. TPPA Board member Chuck Real also spoke to the Ambassador group at Texas A&M University, giving an overview of the swine industry and how their farm operates. Dr. Owsley Hired as Department Head of Animal Science and Veterinary Technology at Tarleton State University Dr. Owsley joined the Tarleton State University faculty in July, 2015 as Professor and Department head of Animal Science and Veterinary Technology. He spent the last 24 years as an Extension specialist with Auburn University and the Alabama Cooperative Extension System, focusing on food animal quality assurance, animal care/well-being and environmental stewardship. From 1982 to 1990, he was an Extension Animal Scientist with the University of Georgia, focusing on swine production and nutrition. Dr. Owsley completed his Ph.D. at Texas Tech University, and his B.S. and M.S. at Texas A&M University. He was born in San Antonio and grew up in Copperas Cove.

Regional Producers Playing an Active Role The Seguin Swine Breeders Association had their annual summer picnic, in conjunction with one of their scheduled meetings of business on July 26, at Real Hog Farms in Marion, TX. The regional group of 20+ producers and families, is one of the few local associations still in existence; in the past, there were numerous local associations across the state. Some of the programs the Seguin Swine Breeders still organize and carry out include fund-raising efforts for the youth of Guadalupe County, a Swine Short Course (August 29), several pork promotion events, and a large prospect show in December. 42


TVMDL offers new porcine tests, welcomes new resident director in Amarillo The Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL) now offers an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test for Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus (PEDv) and a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for PEDv, Transmissible Gastroenteritis (TGE) and Porcine Delta Coronavirus (PDCoV) viral RNA in one reaction. These tests will benefit swine producers in diagnosing the major swine enteric viruses.

Are you protected against the declining livestock prices and increasing feed cost?

The Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus ELISA utilizes 1.0 mL of serum to confirm the presence of the PEDv antibody in porcine specimens. The test is run at $10.00 per sample for in-state clients and $12.00 per sample for out-of-state clients, plus an accession fee. Testing is performed Tuesday and Friday in Amarillo, with results in the same day, if the sample is in the laboratory by noon. The new multiplex offering, Porcine Enteric Coronavirus RT-qPCR (PEDv, TGE, PDCoV), utilizes feces or intestines from acutely affected pigs, preferably within the first 24 hours of onset of diarrhea. TVMDL offers this test at $35.00 per sample for in- and out-of-state clients, plus an accession fee. It is performed Monday through Friday in Amarillo, with results in 2-3 business days. The Porcine Enteric Coronavirus RT-qPCR assay allows simultaneous detection and differentiation of the three swine enteric coronaviruses and will replace the PEDv PCR currently offered at TVMDL. The multiplex qPCR assay is a real-time PCR test whereas the PEDv PCR is a conventional gel based PCR test. The multiplex PCR assay will minimize the turnaround time and provide improved sensitivity. In August, the Amarillo laboratory welcomes R. Gayman Helman, DVM, PhD, MA, as the new resident director. The hire is a result of an exhaustive, national search to fill this important vacancy in the Texas Panhandle. Dr. Helman comes to TVMDL from IDEXX Laboratories, where he served as a senior pathologist and former IDEXX head of anatomic pathology for the western and central United States. His experience in personnel and fiscal management, as well as his more than 35 years’ experience as a veterinary pathologist, will serve him well as he assumes leadership and oversight of the Amarillo laboratory’s nearly 30 employees and an annual caseload of approximately 500,000 tests. Dr. Helman’s hands-on experience in food animal diagnostics, toxicology, pathology and companion animal diagnostics make him well suited to assume the important role of resident director at the Amarillo laboratory. Please join us in welcoming Dr. Helman to the Panhandle. If you would like to contact him, call the Amarillo laboratory toll free at 1.888.646.5624. TVMDL looks forward to providing quality, affordable diagnostic results to all clients. If you have questions regarding testing, please contact our agency headquarters toll free at 1.888.646.5623.

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Innovative New Masters Program Offered at Sam Houston State University

The Master of Agriculture in Sustainable Agriculture and Food Environment* offered through the Department of Agricultural Sciences and Engineering Technology is designed to prepare working professionals for studies in agriculture that focuses on sustainable practices. Overview: • 36 credit hour program • Fully online • Non-thesis • No admissions test required • First cohort to begin Fall 2015 “We know our students have unique needs and interests in the field of agriculture. That is why we are excited to offer a fully online degree program that is relevant to modern agriculture with sustainable practices,” Department Chair Stanley Kelley said. “SHSU is a leader in online education that has received national recognition. Our faculty are ready to engage you no matter where you live.” The program’s curriculum will explore a variety of modern agricultural pursuits framed by sustainable practices that will include non-traditional and viable enterprises in agriculture, alternative value-added products, modern farming techniques, food safety, and small business marketing. It is a program ideal for small landowners, urban farmers, value-added and cottage food makers, educators, government agents, or anyone interested in local food production. The Department of Agricultural Sciences and Engineering Technology will also offer a Graduate Certificate in Sustainable Agriculture*. This 12 credit hour online program will build competencies in the most current aspects of the agricultural industry, including agricultural advocacy, alternative agricultural enterprises, entrepreneurial activities, agritourism, conservation, and innovative marketing strategies. *Pending Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board approval.

For More Information Contact: Dr. Stanley Kelley 936.294.1189 sfkelley@shsu.edu http://www.shsu.edu/agr 44

Y


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Yout

B

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lig Spot

Don’t Just Dream for it,

WORK FOR IT!

eing the youngest of four children, it’s no surprise that when it was finally his turn, Sonny made the wait worth his while. Sonny Bohannon is the son of Lloyd and Dianna Bohannon of Wellington, Texas. He grew up watching his older siblings, Bo, Brittni and Alabama, in the show ring, patiently (or not so patiently) waiting for it to be his turn. Sonny’s show career began in Dallas at the State Fair; the nervous third grader entered the ring with his big yellow pipe and after that, he

was hooked. It did not take long before the family decided to start raising some of their own. “Bama Show Pigs” began seven years ago; now with six sows, the primary focus is Hampshires and Crossbreds. It is safe to say this operation is a family affair. Sonny says his dad is the one always striving for a champion, his mom makes sure they have the prettiest, cleanest pigs going into the ring, and Alabama is Sonny’s biggest fan at every show. Outside of his immediate family is Sonny’s “show family” which includes Mike Clay, who provided the foundation to Bama Show Pigs. Their first

crossbred gilt was purchased with Mike and he still assists in matching genetics. Also, the Walser family has been with Sonny every step of the way. The Walser family hasn’t just helped Sonny out in the show ring; in fact, he recalls being four years old at the Brenham sift when Rodney Walser pulled his tooth with a pair of needle-nose pliers. Rumor has it the tooth fairy felt bad for him and left a twenty dollar bill under his pillow that night. “My favorite part of raising hogs is the anticipation of maybe a Grand Champion coming from one of our litters, or when one of our hogs does really well in the ring. As a breeder, simple success gives me satisfaction, but

“I keep pushing for the big wins!” 45


Sonny is no stranger to some pretty “big wins.” Bama Show Pigs raised the Reserve Champion Heavy-weight Division Crossbred at the Houston Barrow Show in 2010.

“To see one that we raised and put a lot of work into really compete, those are the moments that make raising hogs special.” His other proud accomplishments in the ring include a first place cross gilt at the CTBR Gilt Show in 2011 that sold for $12,000 and driving the Reserve Champion Light-weight Division Crossbred at the San Antonio Barrow Show in 2010.

It’s no coincidence that his favorite hog also happens to be his biggest win. In 2014 Sonny showed a dark cross that he called “Mr. K,” which he bought from his dad’s high school Ag Teacher, Kenneth Kensing. Sonny went on to win the Reserve Champion Dark Cross banner at the San Antonio Barrow Show with Mr. K., from which the iconic “Sonny Fist Pump” photo was born.. 46

Sonny’s competitive spirit and work ethic has led to more success than just in the ring. As a starting defensive end in just his sophomore year, Sonny helped lead the Wellington Skyrockets football team to a state championship in 2013. His big, shiny ring goes nicely with all of his big, shiny buckles. He also enjoys playing on the Wellington High School Tennis team..


Don’t let that fool you, Sonny goes beyond brawn with brains. Not only has he has been ranked number one in his high school class for the past 3 years and a member of the National Honor Society, but he also serves as the Vice President of Student Council, class President, and just received his Lone Star FFA Degree this summer.

“Get Busy Livin’ or Get Busy Dyin,” This quote from the movie Shawshank Redemption is Sonny’s favorite, and it’s easy to see Sonny is definitely “gettin’ busy livin.” With his involvement and commitment to so many different organizations and activities, his biggest challenge with raising hogs is managing his time between school, sports, work, and pigs. Although he admits cleaning pens and long nights (and early mornings) with sows during farrowing are some of the not-so-fun parts of raising hogs, Sonny says it best, “I know the value of a hard earned dollar, which is how every dollar in the pig business is earned.”

“The only thing being lazy in this business will get you… is last.” As Sonny starts his senior year his goal is nothing short of ambitious; to win the San Antonio or Houston Barrow Show. Sonny, we wish you the best of luck in and out of the show ring your senior year, as well as with your upcoming college career! We know you have a bright future ahead of you! Like your dad says,

“Show ‘em like you know how to!”

5 Things The Show Ring Does For You...

Anyone that’s ever shown an animal knows that there is nothing that compares to what we gain from being a part of the show industry, but sometimes it is hard to explain to others what exactly it is that we have gained. So, we sat down with past showmen from across the state and asked them the simple question, “What did the show ring do for you?” Here is what we got back: 1.“Helped me develop a stong work ethic,” Kristen Knight. Having a show pig means feeding every morning and every night, no matter how early or late it is, how tired you are, or how cold it is outside. 2. “It gave me selfconfidence,”Alabama Bohannon. Imagine being in a ring full of fellow competitors and knowing that there are people in the stands rooting for you. More than that, there is no better feeling than knowing you showed the best you could have and it paid off. 3. “I met my life-long friends,” Weston Wyatt. There is no way you sit in a trailer line for twelve hours and don’t become friends with those people. 4. “Taught me how to move on,” Cameron Knight. There can be many disappointments in showing hogs, but you have to load up and get ready for the next show. Its the same thing in life. 5. “It gave me a passion to educate others on the swine industry,” Peyton Hill. Once you become a part of the swine industry it is easy to see how uneducated the public is and how important it is to change that. 47


#TEXAS4HROUNDUP 2015 RESULTS

Livestock Judging

Senior Division Swine Skill-a-thon

Guadalupe County

Jessica Fischbacher - Moore County

Champion Team

Senior Division Swine Skill-a-thon

Intermediate Division Swine Skill-a-thon

Fort Bend County

Fort Bend County

1st Place Team

1st Place Team

Senior Division Swine Quiz Bowl

Intermediate Division Swine Quiz Bowl

Fort Bend County

Fort Bend County

1st Place Team

48

High Individual

1st Place Team


Texas FFA Swine Production Placement

Jonathan Martinez Taft FFA

Steele Show Hogs

Swine Production Entrepreneurship

Hailey Morgan Medina FFA

Become A Texas Animal Health Commission Insider

The TAHC Communications Department issues frequent news releases, educational brochures, announcements, etc. to inform the public of current news and/or changes pertaining to animal agriculture health issues and/or regulatory policies. To be in the know and receive pertinent information, become a TAHC Insider.

Don & Dan Steele 4896 Creek Rd. Temple, TX 76501 254-624-9708 or 254-984-2479

Sign up today to start receiving emails!

http://www.tahc.texas.gov/news/

More Information on Page 104

49


Reach for the Stars with the Professional Swine Managers Program The Professional Swine Manager program covers all aspects of swine production and managementlevel responsibilities. Community college students and current pig production employees can gain the skills, knowledge and experience needed to excel as a farm manager through education and technical training delivered by community college instructors who are experience in the pork industry.

The courses include: • Facility Maintenance (Spring 2015) • Employer/Employee Issues (Summer 2015) • Breeding Stock Management (Fall 2015) 50

• Swine Record Systems (Spring 2015) • Agribusiness Internship (Summer 2015) • Nursery and Finishing Management (Fall 2015)

For additional information visit USPorkCenter.org


Connect with a Mentor

www.PorkSquare.com at aBlog glance...

Connect PorkSquare is on Facebook and Twitter, helping connect and promote young professionals and the pork industry.

Discover Surprising Careers in the Pork Industry

“Scholarships and Internships are posted!!!for students Applying PorkSquare.com is available ages 15for to Scholarships 25 interested in a http://t.co future inGo thetopork industry. PorkSquare is an interactive, social media-driven /Tk6B0cchRS to find November 7, 2013 website more for career information in the pork industry. It serves as the industry’s opportunities!”

one-stop shop for internships, scholarships and college information.

It’s not what you think Occupational Profiles

Internships, Scholarships, & Companies

From production managers to human resources professionals, there are ample opportunities in the pork industry.

Unlock the Opportunities of the Pork Industry Welcome to PorkSquare SM – your town square for information about internships, scholarships, college and career information in the swine industry. It’s easy to sign up for an account and link up with companies looking for quality young professionals like yourself.

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Videos show interested youth that careers in the pork industry encompass more than they might expect as they hear directly from industry professionals and experts.

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Internships, Scholarships, Contributing bloggers from all aspects the & of Companies pork industry post blogs that benefit young professionals interested in a career revolving Search around pork.

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Sponsors In addition to the Pork Checkoff, PorkSquare was developed with the support of AgStar Financial Services, Indiana Pork, the Iowa Pork Producers Association and the North Carolina Pork Council.

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51


Texas Pork Leadership Camp 2015

1 Bus, 5 Days, 15 Campers & A Whole Lotta’ Pork! T

he Texas Pork Leadership Camp is designed to give select youth from across the state, the opportunity to get an inside look at all aspects of the pork industry, from farm to fork. The campers get a hands-on experience at every stage of production, and are able to ask questions and have one-on-one time with industry professionals. The goal of this camp is to give the students the knowledge and skills needed to become passionate and effective advocates for the pork industry and of course, to have plenty of fun along the way. This year 15 students, ages 16 to 18, were selected to attend camp and we truly cannot speak highly enough on these individuals; they were eager to learn and dedicated to bettering our industry. We all concluded camp with a deeper understanding and appreciation for the impact of the Texas and United States Pork Industry.

The adventure began at the Extension center in Amarillo with an overview of the pork industry and TPPA given by Stanley Young and Brandon Gunn.

Shalin Lawson interviewed with Mr. Hunt on her showing experience and her future career interests in agriculture.

The next stop was Canyon, where we learned how to utilize different types of media to send a positive message and “tell our story,” from James Hunt of KGNC Radio Station. We also discussed why it is important to tell our story; “If you don’t tell your story someone else will.” We all know the pork industry has a story worth telling. 52

“I am thankful to have met so many industry professionals.” –Madi Berry


We concluded the first night of camp eating a delicious pulled pork dinner with the West Texas A&M Agricultural Sciences Department Staff. The campers gained some valuable “College Do’s and Do Not’s.” The next morning started bright and early at Cargill in Dalhart, with General Manager, Mike Gruber. We were able to tour their sow facilities, and see the different phases, such as breeding, gestation and farrowing. The campers witnessed efficient practices where animal care is always the number one goal. This shower in/ shower out facility served as an eye-opening and unique experience for the campers.

“A once in a lifetime learning experience.” –Bailey Garrett We headed even further north to Guymon, Oklahoma to visit the Seaboard Harvesting Facility. After a discussion on quality control and safety, we were then right in the middle of all of the hustle n’ bustle. We followed the process as a hog enters the plant all the way to when the meat is shipped to distribution. The campers were thoroughly impressed with how detail oriented the workers were in such a fast-paced environment.

Before calling it a night, the campers were eager to hear from two of our top breeders, Leslie & Wayne Harman, on their ever growing show pig operation and the challenges that they face on their path to success.

Next was a busy day spent at Texas Tech University working with their highly esteemed Animal and Meat Science Programs evaluating market hogs, harvesting, exploring the reproductive and digestive tract, and learning about swine welfare.

“Intense, but way fun.” –Mayson Schulze Utilizing Technology

“Behind the scenes like many aren’t able to see.” –Hagan Wright

The evening ended with a driving tour of Texas Farm, LLC by Corby and Ryan. The campers were able to gain knowledge on where Texas hogs are being exported and the astonishing amount that get shipped each week. Although we witnessed different management techniques, the goals remain the same; caring for pigs, people and the planet.

We all know today’s youth love social media and honestly, it is one of the quickest and most efficient ways to spread a message. Throughout the week the TPPA Interns worked with the campers on how to use social media to positively promote the pork industry and educate the public.

53


st trying y hogs; ying to better.” nter

All of the campers were pumped to get to see all the boars at Wintex Farms and learn about the thought process behind the banners. Will and Jay discussed the benefits of choosing a barn layout to fit your operation, their marketing techniques and production flow.

ning started in Vernon at the Tyson-Wright Brand y. Not only did we get to taste test all the different t also received a full tour from further processing the . It was quite impressive to see how many different e chopped, made into different products, and sold to The varieties of bacon and bellies were surprising. With all of this pork, what do we do with it? We don’t often think about the importance of distribution and retail. We visited the United Super Markets Distribution Center, in Lubbock, to put into perspective just how much pork is hitting the shelves.

We stopped by a United Super Market to check out retail and marketing techniques.

“it’s cool to know pork is the global protein of choice.” –Tyler Endicott

After generously being fed various, delicious pork dishes all week and discovering the versatility and nutritional value, the campers put their culinary skills to the test in a “Pork Wars” competition. Each team prepared their own pork inspired dish and pork inspired side. The winning team served a pork tenderloin wrapped in bacon and a side of smothered brussel sprouts topped with bacon.

Check out all of the Pork Wars dishes & recipes in the Food Section. Page 58 & 59

We aren’t just trying to multiply hogs; we’re trying to make ‘em better.” -Will Winter

All of the campers were pumped to get to see all the boars at Wintex Farms and learn about the thought process behind the banners. Will and Jay discussed the benefits of choosing a barn layout to fit your operation, their marketing techniques and production flow.

Another early morning started in Vernon at the Tyson-Wright Brand Foods Bacon Facility. Not only did we get to taste test all the different flavors of bacon, but also received a full tour from further processing the bellies to packaging. It was quite impressive to see how many different ways a belly can be chopped, made into different products, and sold to different customers. The varieties of bacon and bellies were surprising. With all of this pork, what do we do with it? We don’t often think about the importance of distribution and retail. We visited the United Super Markets Distribution Center, in Lubbock, to put into perspective just how much pork is hitting the shelves. 54

We stopped by a United Super Market to check out retail and marketing techniques.

“it’s cool to know pork is the global protein of choice.” –Tyler Endicott

After generously being fed various, delicious pork dishes all week and discovering the versatility and nutritional value, the campers put their culinary skills to the test in a “Pork Wars” competition. Each team prepared their own pork inspired dish and pork inspired side. The winning team served a pork tenderloin wrapped in bacon and a side of smothered brussel sprouts topped with bacon.

Check out all of the Pork Wars dishes & recipes in the Food Section. Page 58 & 59


“If you are interested in the swine industry, you don’t want to miss out on this camp.” –Morgan Friesenhahn

Another hands-on morning was spent at Texas Tech. The campers participated in carcass fabrication and a sausage making demo.

Answering the Tough Questions

The top scholarship winner, Shalin Lawson, just graduated from Plainview High School and will begin studying Agricultural Media and Communications at West Texas A&M in the fall. Her eagerness to learn and positive attitude is impossible to miss.

I am thankful to be a part of an industry that is backed by passion and hard work.” -Kaylee Musgrove The fun came to an end after many days of knowledge gained, relationship built, and passions deepened. We wrapped the camp up with an intense game of Family Feud “Pork Style.” Throughout the week the teams competed in various challenges and were awarded prizes, as well as individuals were recognized for their accomplishments. This was truly one of the best groups of students TPPA has had the pleasure to work with in the 25 year existence of TPLC; the bar has been set high for next summer. The highest level of recognition went to three campers based on their work ethic, devotion to self-growth, and ability to grasp the various concepts presented.

“A Lot of learning and a lot of laughs.” -Rafe Royall

The campers were broken up into four teams and given real-life scenarios that are challenging pork producers around the state and nation. The scenarios were all based on the misperception the public sometimes has of the pork industry. Throughout the week the teams worked closely with their leaders on how to best handle these challenges. Media training was covered daily with many lessons on how to be effective communicators. At the end of the week the campers underwent an intense interview with Media Specialist, Kay Ledbetter. The campers were able to watch their interviews to see their strengths and weaknesses, and catch some good pointers on interviews! We are all faced with the challenge of being responsible advocates for agriculture.

The next scholarship recipient is Chase Heffernan, a senior at Georgetown High School. He grew up in a family that is passionate about the industry and it certainly showed during camp.

The third scholarship winner is Rafe Royall, a senior at Garden City High School. Rafe is as hard working and competitive as they come. He is motivated to make his mark on the industry.

TPLC wouldn’t be the same without Mr. Stanley Young. Stanley has been on 13 camps and keeps coming back. Not only does he serve as a group leader and mentor, he also gave quite the cooking demonstration this year. Thank you for your many years of dedication to youth and the efforts of our association. 55


56


1,462 miles Thank you to all who contributed & helped make TPLC 2015 the best one yet!

57


Pork Wars ~ From Our Kitchen to Yours

This year at Texas Pork Camp the teams competed in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pork Warsâ&#x20AC;? challenge. Campers gained knowledge on the nutritional value of pork and food safety throughout camp. At the end of the week they were asked to create a pork inspired dish and side dish with a time limit of one hour. The teams spent all week discussing creative recipes and strategizing cooking methods. The judges were truly shocked at how delicious and creative the meals were! All of the following recipes are dishes made by the campers; we hope you enjoy them as much as we did!

Bacon loin e s e e h C Cream- d Pork Tender Wrappeces of bacon 8 - 10 sli k Tenderloin 1 lb. Porepper e Salt & P e Cream Chees g a k le c p a p p a 1 ced Pine 1 Can sli live oil o 1 tbsp

loin with son porkerfly down a e S . F 375 butt hrough. oven to t g, then Preheatvorite seasonin g all the way loin back n fa k r tti cu po your g tooth dle not se, fold the midith cream-cheebacon slices, ustinpan and Stuff w nd wrap with Put into roas ainder of in half a hold bacon. ple, pour rem our or till picks toh sliced pineap. Bake for an h F. top wit le juice on top re reaches 145 pineapprnal temperatu the inte

Bacon Wrapped Jalepeno Poppers

Bacon Wrappe d

Po

rk Tenderloin 8 - 10 slices of 1 lb. Pork Tend Maple or Applewood bacon Salt & Pepper erloin 1 tbsp olive oil Brown Sugar G ze 1/2 cup dark la br 1 tablespoon floown sugar ur 1 tablespoon ap pl 1/4 teaspoon H e cider vinegar oney Mustard Preheat oven oven proof skillto 350F. Season the pork Wrap the loin et over high heat. Sear thwith salt and pepper. Heat the oil in an small saucepanin the bacon then transfere pork on all sides until nice ba un ck de r in m to ed the roaster. M ly browned. brown sugar, ium heat, co eanwhile, in a dissolved. Drizzflour, cider vinegar, and hombine the ingredients for th minutes longer le glaze over top of pork ro ney mustard. Simmer until e glaze - the 10 minutes an , or until internal tempera ast and continue to roast fo the sugar is ture d then slice into r ab 1 inch thick po has reached 145F. Let rest out 25-35 rtions. for about 58

Sauteed Cinnamon Apples With Bacon


derloin

rk Ten o P d e t s u r esan C

Parm

nderloin lb) pork te crumbs /2 1 -1 (1 1 dded nko bread 3⁄4 cup Pa rmesan cheese, shres of choice a g 1⁄4 cup P pepper & seasonin salt, black ten 1 Egg, bea Milk gs in a d seasoninaside. Olive Oil n a , se e e h rmesan c g and milk and set crumbs, Pa eg Mix bread l and set aside. Mix h until w o b ll a dium to hig e sm m t a e h rn up the illet and tu Put oil in sky. ture, liquid mix! Cook to ready to fr in s n io in medallding mix. Time to Fry a d tenderlo ickness of Place slicned then dredge in bres, depending on th remove a de for a few minute5F. on each sia temperature of 14 meat, to

Best Dessert

Bacon Stuffed Cinnamon Roll

Grilled Baco Medallions n Wrapped Pork

1 pork tende 8-10 slices o rloin f bacon Enough for 2 you want bu slabs. Cut in half to ha ve t I save it fo r next time. less left over if 8 T (1/2 cup 3 T Kosher sa) Brown sugar 1 T chili pow lt 1 t black pepder 1 t onion po per 1 t garlic powwder der Clean and o 450 degrees.il your grill. Adjust to a simpler sa Mix your seasoning. get a consistent surf pork tenderllt, pepper and garlic coI’m using a 8:3:1:1 maixce temperature of ab out 4 strips ooin of any lose fat, membo (like my 7:2:2) w ture (wife’s request) out but trimmed te f bacon side by side mbranes and silvers ould also be good. Trim n. On a cutti a and lay besinderloin on the baconwaith a little gap betweeki n g board over the ten de that end of the ten nd trim off the skinnyn (about 8 inches). Lay lay the piece a derloin then cut betw derloin to make a th tail end of the tende the oin with a toothbout the same thickneeen bacon. Lay flat andicker part. Roll the barlco them a goodpick and use two in thess as the bacon. Now smash the meat to m n ake minutes unti coating of your spice piece with the tail en pin the end of the baco d to keep it to l internal te . Place over n before servin m d ge perature of ir g. 145 degressect heat and flip abouther. Give t . Allow to re st 5 to 10 mevery 5 inutes

Smothered Brussell Sprouts topped with bacon Best Overall Dish

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New Names, New Recognition by Stephen Gerike National Pork Board

Porterhouse pork chops are increasingly being featured on foodservice restaurant menus, such as at Outback steakhouse. Names have power. That’s why the meat industry is literally rewriting the book, with new pork cut names becoming the industry standard being offered to restaurant operators and their guests. Terms such as “porterhouse pork chops” appear in latest edition of The Meat Buyer’s Guide®, which represents a breakthrough achievement for the North American meat trade. The newly revised edition, published by the North American Meat Institute, is the first universal meat cut reference for the United States, Canada and Mexico. It’s also endorsed by 33 industry and foodservice associations. Why is this such a big deal? Since 1961, The Meat Buyer’s Guide has been the premier resource for foodservice professionals who buy, sell, cut, cook, eat and enjoy meat. With trusted information and color photography, the guide remains the foodservice industry standard for authoritative guidance on meat nomenclature. Pork Checkoff staff have served on the revisions committee for The Meat Buyer’s Guide for the past 10 years. The new pork cut names in the eighth edition of the guide, which debuted in December, reflect changes that started taking shape in 2011. Nearly two years of consumer research found that consumers often are confused by different names for similar cuts of meat. As a result, they didn’t know how to cook many cuts available in the meatcase. The Checkoff began revamping pork cut names to help consumers understand what they’re buying and how to cook it. The new names evolved from common meat names that consumers already were familiar with from other livestock species. Now when people talk about a pork porterhouse chop (formerly the bone-in pork loin), they relate it to a porterhouse steak. This suggests that the cut is good for grilling, as well as tender and high quality. Adding Value to Pork The latest edition of this important foodservice reference includes the Pork Checkoff’s new pork cut names, such as the T-bone pork chop. The updated guide aligns the new pork cut names being used by retailers with foodservice. Now restaurants can use the distinctive names to differentiate pork chops on the menu in a way people recognize. The new pork cut names are changing the way retailers talk about meat. And instead of featuring “assorted pork chop” packages in the meatcase, retailers can promote specific cuts of pork to help drive demand and add value to loin chops. To keep the momentum going, the Pork Checkoff has showcased the new pork cut names in recent consumer promotions and will highlight the new chop names this summer. The Checkoff also is working with top U.S. retailers who are at various stages of adopting the new names. The buzz continues to build now that the latest edition of The Meat Buyer’s Guide includes revised names for all bone-in and boneless pork chops cut from the pork loin. From T-bone pork chops to ribeye pork chops, we’re building awareness and demand with consumers. REPRINTED from PORK CHECKOFF

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Pina Colada Ribeye Bone-in Pork Chops

©2015 National Pork Board, Des Moines, IA USA. This message funded by America’s Pork Producers and the Pork Checkoff.

Bacon BBQ New York Pork Chops

PorkBeInspired.com/GrillCrashers

Basil-Garlic Porterhouse Pork Chops

State Logo


Bohemian Farms Sale #1 September 26, 2015 Starts at 9 am at the Farm

Offering Litters born end of July through late September Some litters are Registered

Sale #2 October 24, 2015 Starts at 9 am at the Farm

Grand Champion Barrow Tomball County 2015

Breakfast & Drinks are provided

Selling Approximately 60 Pigs Hamps, Durocs, Spots, Yorks, Chesters & Crosses

Mike Schneider

All Certified Texas Bred Registered Bohemianfarms@yahoo.com Cell - 254-721-4162

High Placing Cross Houston 2015

19702 Cyclone Branch Road

Burlington, TX 76519

www.texasshowpigs.com

“The Finest Pigs at The Fairest Prices”

taggart farms Featured Sires:

YORKSHIRE - Slow Ride, Skull BERKSHIRE - Chubby Chaser, Slash DUROC - Built Right, No Rules CHESTER - Dead Center, D-E-A-D DEAD CROSS - Black Knight, 8 Ball, Sky Rocket

Reserve Grand Champion & Champion Yorkshire Breeding Gilt 2014 Bell County Bred & Exhibited by Samuel Taggart Also 9th Place at San Antonio

Watt Taggart 254.760.4900 Amy Taggart 254.760.4901 Samuel Taggart 254.598.0357

Congratulations To:

autumn beard Reserve Market Duroc Hays County maggie conlon 2nd Place Heavy Market Duroc Bell County lexie mccall 4th Place Duroc Gilt World Pork Expo

Class Winning Berkshire Gilt 2015 Southwest Type Conference Bred & Exhibited by Samuel Taggart

All Certified Texas Bred Eligible Pigs

Sales Begin Labor Day Weekend www.taggartfarms.com


Crossbred Chester Hampshire Purebred York Doug Alderson ~ Marion, TX 210-296-4479

Mote Farms benny@mote farms.com www.motefarms.com

CTBR Registered Spots 806-627-8211 ~ Darryl

7325 CR F 515-509-8313 ~ Benny Tulia, TX 79088

Rafter

9H Showpigs Breeds Represented

Frankie & Kelli Hyles Cross Plains

Hamps Durocs Spots Crosses

325-669-9348 325-669-9349

Where success is a tradition. Sanchez Show Pigs Fritch, Texas

Registered Spots CTBR Certificates Available Andrew â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sandyâ&#x20AC;? Sanchez 806-857-0122 sanchezshowpigs@gmail.com

Attention!

Alderson Farms

The TPPA office will be moving to a new location in Kyle at the end of September. We will be sending out our new address and contact info soon!

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Biosecurity Recommendations for Showpig Operations and Those Traveling Between Farms and Sales It’s time for Fall pig sales, so special attention needs to be paid to biosecurity & protecting the health of your pig farm and others. We all need to be held accountable and help minimize disease exposure. Anytime there is traffic with people coming onto swine operations, especially when traveling from farm to farm, there is an increased risk for the spread of diseases, such as PEDv, among others. PEDv transfers via feces and survives in manure for extended periods of time. Anything that is contaminated with pig manure can be a source of infection for pigs. Everyone should be aware of the role they may play in the spread of PEDv and other swine diseases. Establishing and following sound biosecurity practices is the cornerstone for reducing the risk of spreading these diseases. EVERYONE needs to be accountable for maintaining a high standard of biosecurity practices because the spread of swine diseases as a result of irresponsible behavior on our part is poor animal husbandry, a poor reflection on those responsible, and brings negativity towards the industry as a whole. With showpig-buying season upon us, the following guidelines are some considerations for families, Ag Teachers and County Agents along with swine owners to consider that will help minimize disease exposure.

Recommended Supplies for Use at Swine Farms:  BE PREPARED by having the proper supplies. Here is a checklist of supplies that should be used by farms and/or those visiting swine farms:  Disposable Boots – have enough for everyone to double boot at each location in case it is necessary; purchase boots with a min. of 4 ml thickness  Disinfectants - Tek-Trol (comes in both a liquid and an aerosol), 1Stroke, Environ, Virkon S, Synergize, or Chlorox; it is recommended to have both wipes and sprays  Clean Tote Box – this box should house all of the “clean” supplies (plastic boots, coveralls, trash bags, sanitizer, etc.) so that they are kept separate and are sealed away from a potentially contaminated environment  Trash Bags – for use in throwing away disposable items after completion of the visit

For Potential Buyers Visiting Swine Farms: 1. COMMUNICATE with the breeder/owner prior to arriving at their farm as to their expectations. Establish what direction to enter the farm, where to park, and what to wear. Follow the wishes of what each farm owner wants. Some will have specific instructions and different requirements that may be more detailed. Just because something is suitable for one, doesn’t mean that will work for everyone. Ask the owner to detail any farm-specific biosecurity protocols that you will need to follow during the visit. Ask about the current herd health status. If the farm is undergoing a disease outbreak, it is recommended to NOT visit this farm due to the increased risk of spread to other farms that will be potentially visited. 2. PARK in the designated parking area for the farm. Obey all signage regarding access to specific areas. If no parking area exists, park as far away from the livestock barn as possible on the gravel or hard surface, or park on the edge of the public road close to the location. Avoid parking/driving in muddy areas on the farm. 64


3. LEAVE ALL PERSONAL ITEMS in the vehicle and do not bring them onto the farm; this should include, but not be limited to pig whips/bats, ball caps, jewelry, etc. (anything that manure or infected dust particles can be transported on should be avoided). If it is necessary to wear a ball cap at multiple farms then you should apply an aerosol disinfectant on it between farms. 4. Respect the LINE OF SEPERATION at each farm. The Line of Separation is defined as the line between the area that is to be used by the visitor and the area to be used by farm personnel. 5. DO NOT TOUCH any pigs while on the farm if you do not have to. People that touch hogs need to sanitize hands upon departure before getting back into the vehicle. 6. When leaving REMOVE DIRTY BOOTS next to your vehicle but before you enter the vehicle. Put trash into a garbage bag and place in a location designated by the farm or away from clean supplies. Everyone should clean hands with sanitizer or wipes before entering the vehicle. Note that you should try to keep the inside of the vehicle as sanitary as possible. 7. WASH/DISINFECT VEHICLES AND TRAILERS in between each road trip. Pay special attention to the wheel wells and undercarriage. A high temperature wash is critical. Be sure to thoroughly disinfect the inside of the vehicle between road trips. Each night during a road trip spray the inside of the vehicle with an aerosol disinfectant and wipe down the steering wheel. 8. Shoes should be sanitized daily when traveling to farms and sales with one of the recommended disinfectants. If you are stopping at multiple farms in the same day then you should use an aerosol disinfectant (ie. Tek-trol) to spray down everyone’s shoes, clothes, and ball caps in between farms.

For Swine Farm Operators: 1. Maintain a log of visitors. 2. Establish a clear line of separation at the farm. This is a line dividing the area that is to be used by the farm for live animals (often referred to as the clean area) and the area that is outside of the live animal area (the dirty area). Only the owner goes into the pens and has contact with the pigs. Enforce no reaching into pens and zero contact with pigs by visitors. It is recommended that a separate area be used to show/view pigs. 3. Designate a parking area for visitors. 4. Traffic flow – utilize a single direction traffic flow by designating a single entrance / exit point for vehicles. 5. Foot baths – If managed correctly, provide and encourage the use of foot bath stations as people enter the farm. Refresh the solution periodically depending on level of use. However, bear in mind that a contaminated foot bath could be more detrimental than helpful. Do not rely solely on the use of a foot bath. 6. Establish a designated area away from all swine for disposable items, such as boot covers and other trash, to be collected for removal.

65


2015 FALL SHOWPIG SALES TRAIL DCB Showpigs - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

August 20 Call for Appointment 3288 FM 101, Ranger, TX 90 head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Hamp All Heath Draper 254-488-0607 Tooter Draper 254-433-2677

Senterfitt Farms - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

August 29-30 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 318 W. Senterfitt St., Lometa, TX 5 litters ~ Berk, Duroc, Spot All John Hines 512-734-5126 Carlos Garcia 512-734-2178 john@areawidelocksmith.com

Michou Chester Whites - Silent Bid Auction Date: Time:

Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

Duelm’s Prevailing Genetics Sale #1 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

Bo & Pat Caraway - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 1 - October 31 Call for Appointment 2918 HWY 2563, Eastland, TX 20+ litters ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Poland, Spot, York All Bo Caraway 254-639-2545 Pat Caraway 254-674-5700 www.carawayshowpig.com September 1 Call for Appointment Comfort, TX 12 litters ~ Berk, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Spot All Tommy Lambert 830-459-3407 Holly Lambert 830-370-1125 Kimberleigh Geistweidt 210-865-0078 raschel03@yahoo.com

HF Genetics - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Contact:

September 1 Call for Appointment 400 Kemper Rd. Port Lavaca, TX Cassidy Hayes 361-920-1015 Jimmy Hayes 361-920-0964 www.hfgenetics.com

Sister Creek Farm - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 1 Call for Appointment Boerne, TX 25 litters ~ Chester, Cross, Landrace, York All Larry Langbein 830-285-1949 830-324-6742

RW Genetics - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact: 66

September 4 Call for Appointment Anderson, TX 150+ litters ~ Cross, Duroc, York All Rick Whitman 512-540-1119 Niki Whitman 512-540-1490 rwgenetics@gmail.com

September 5 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. New Braunfels, TX 150 Head ~ Chester, Cross, Hamp, York All Rory Duelm 830-608-5058 Matt Lee 830-708-4274 duelmhog@yahoo.com www.duelmsprevailinggenetics.com

Powell Livestock Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

TGH Showpigs - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 5 Bids Open at 8 a.m, Bids Close at 12 p.m. Preview prior by appointment only 4682 Dennis Rd, Weatherford, TX 20 head ~ Chester All Ray Michou 817-304-2335 raymichou@yahoo.com

September 5 9:00 a.m. 13053 FM 536, Pleasanton, TX 50 Head ~ Cross, Duroc, Spot, York All Josh Powell 830-214-4138 Jack Powell 210-336-4091 LeeAnn Powell 830-480-3351 powelllivestock@yahoo.com www.powelllivestock.com

Ressmann Showpigs Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 5 Barn Opens 9:00 a.m. Refugio, TX York All Darryl Ressmann Derek Ressmann

361-349-0511 361-349-0513

Kneese Show Pigs - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

September 5 Call for Appointment 935 Upper Liveoak Rd, Fredericksburg, TX 50+ litters ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Hamp, Poland, Spot, York All Russell Kneese 830-456-3298 rdkneese@hotmail.com www.kneeseshowpigs.com

Taggart Farms Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 5 Call for Appointment Bell County; Call for Location 15 litters ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, York All Watt Taggart 254-760-4900 Sam Taggart 254-598-0357 Amy Taggart 254-760-4901 watt@taggartfarms.com www.taggartfarms.com


DL Showpigs - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 5 Call for Appointment 2101 CR 24, Lamesa, TX 160+ litters ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, York All Josh Krohn 806-759-7735 Bridgette Krohn 806-438-2916 dlshowpigs@gmail.com www.dlshowpigs.com

Senterfitt Farms Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 5-6 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 318 W Senterfitt St. Lometa, TX 5 litters ~ Berk, Duroc, Spot All John Hines 512-734-5126 Carlos Garcia 512-734-2178 john@areawidelocksmith.com

BK Genetics - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

S&W Swine Productions - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

River Ridge Show Pigs & Shuffler Show Pigs Date: Time: Location: Contact:

September 12 1:00 pm 846 River Ridge Rd., Killeen, TX Doug Shuffler 254-394-4475 Doug Aldrich 254-289-5909

Edwards Family Genetics, Fast Pitch Showpigs, Blazin 7’s Farm Sale Date: Time: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

September 12 1:00 p.m. Perrin ISD Ag Barn, 216 North Benson, Perrin, TX 30-40 head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Spot, York All Blake Edwards 254-223-2479 Brad Massey 940-682-6355 Casey Burton 940-452-1806 Brad Hutton 817-657-8700 blake@edwardsfamilygenetics.com

Heffernan Genetics Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 12 6:00 p.m. 885 Yow Road, Poteet, TX 80 head ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace All Scott Heffernan 830-570-7540 scott@heffernangenetics.com www.heffernangenetics.com

Doege Show Pigs - Farm Sale #1 Date: Time: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

September 12 6:30 p.m. 3085 Kusmierz Rd, St. Hedwig, TX Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Spot, York All Tim Doege 210-316-9627 Kathy Doege 210-667-9627 doegeshowpigs@gmail.com

Jonetics Show Pigs - Layne Jones Farms Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 12 Call for Appointment 7751 Mission Ave. Canyon, TX 2 litters ~ Duroc All Layne Jones 806-676-1527 Kerry Jones 806-676-9698 joneticshowpigs@gmail.com www.joneticshowpigs.com

September 12 Call for Appointment 825 Elm Pass Rd., Center Point, TX 10 litters ~ Cross, Hamp, York All Glenn Kaiser 830-739-3338 Beau Kaiser 830-928-6555 kaiser@hctc.net September 12 Call for Appointment Take HWY 44 west out of Robstown, Take a right on CR 83, Then take a right on CR 42, It will be the first house on the left 300 head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Spot, York All Scot Sullivan 361-960-6725 Becky Sullivan 361-960-6882 Casey Sullivan 361-946-1130 ssullivan@hsconstructors.com www.S-Wswine.com

Kelso Hog Farm - Kelso Genetiks - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

September 12 Call for Appointment 701 Sweet Home Rd. Seguin, TX 400+ head ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Poland, Spot, York All Kurt Kelso 210-240-6710 Rodney Kelso 830-305-4422 Kyle Kelso 830-481-7519 stepheny@waterparkexcite.com

Harman Farms - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 12 Call for Appointment 12498 CR 16, Perryton, TX Chester, Cross, Duroc, Spot, Poland All Wayne Harman 806-202-2175 Leslie Harman 806-202-2176 www.harman-farms.com

RB2 Showpigs - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 12 Call for Appointment 1526 Nixon Lane, Kerrville,TX 100+ head ~ Cross, Duroc, Hamp, York All Bobby Balser 830-739-6593 830-257-6331 Ryan Balser 830-739-6331 balser@ktc.com

U4 Farm - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 12 Call for Appointment 1009 Oak Drive, Blanco, TX 10 litters ~ Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Spot All Will Wallace 830-833-5335 210-872-8101 u4farm@texas-skies.com

4P Show Pigs - Cream of the Crop Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 13 The Farm Hamps, Yorks, Crosses All Dale Partin

325-966-3783 325-451-0370 67


Elrod Showpigs - Online Sale #1 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 13 showpig.com 2 litters ~ Cross, Duroc All Diane Elrod Nathan Elrod diane@elrodshowpigs.com nathan@elrodshowpigs.com www.elrodshowpigs.com

Grand Slam Swine Genetics & High Demand Swine Genetics

210-601-6164 210-382-5112

Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

Curry Livestock - Online Sale #1 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 15 showpig.com 30+ head ~ Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Spot, York Part Zachary Curry 254-592-1395 Kip Curry Jr. 254-592-3504 Whitney Curry 254-592-1309 Kip Curry Sr. 254-592-3915 currylivestock@hotmail.com www.currylivestock.com

Coyote Creek Genetics - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 15 Call for Appointment 16113 New Berlin Rd, St. Hedwig, TX 25 litters ~ Cross, Hamp, Spot, York All Otto Luensmann 210-315-8999 Mike Friesenhahn 210-508-6539 Wade Pape 210-723-3896 Morgan Friesenhahn 830-305-5231 mfriesenhahn@yahoo.com

Twister Show Pigs Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 15 Call for Appointment 2229 East FM 916, Cleburne,TX Berk, Cross, Duroc, Spot All Dub Stepp 817-517-4302 dubstepp@hughes.net

Meyer Showpigs - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

Mid September Call for Appointment Harper, TX 20 litters ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Poland, Spot, York All Grant Meyer 830-459-8645 Tyler Meyer 830-928-8648 Kyzar Meyer 830-928-8644

Wagner Family Genetics Showpig Sale Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 17 Barns Open 9:00 a.m. Ponder, TX 15 litters All Scott McKamie

Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

68

September 17 www.showpig.com Most Breeds All Brandon Biggs Ethan Biggs Todd Beyers

September 19-20 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 318 W Senterfitt St. Lometa,TX 5 litters ~ Berk, Duroc All John Hines 512-734-5126 Carlos Garcia 512-734-2178 john@areawidelocksmith.com

SCS Show Pigs & Wild Card Show Pigs Open House Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 19 9:00 a.m. 3701 HWY 84 E. Early, TX 30-40 head ~ Cross, Duroc, Hamp, York Part Jake Senkirik 325-642-5949 Bryan Senkirik 325-203- 6133 Jerry Walters 325-642-6092 Phillip Cochran 325-642-6099 senkirikjake@yahoo.com

Schaefer Livestock - Farm Sale #1 Date: Time: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

September 19 10:00 a.m. 2901 CR 130, Garden City, TX 40 head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Spot, York All Doug Schaefer 432-517-0352 Ian Schaefer 432-213-3623 Levi Schaefer 432-213-6002 ianschaefer11@yahoo.com www.schaeferlivestock.com

Fey Show Pigs 940-390-9578

Biggs Livestock & Beyers Farms - Online Sale Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 19 8:00 a.m. 2771 Coble Rd., Poteet, TX 75 Head ~ Cross, Chester, Hamp, York All Morgan Wagner 830-480-8028 Shelby Sessions 713-253-0542 wagnerfamilygenetics@yahoo.com

Senterfitt Farms

McKamie Livestock Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 18 Viewing 5:00-7:30 p.m.; Sale 8:00 p.m. 18945 Babcock Rd. San Antonio, TX 30+ head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp Part Edmund Meier Jr. 210-355-3216 Ralph Stock 210-430-4175 Todd Fleming 210-254-0646 Willie Frantzen 210-683-7048 kerrknife@gmail.com www.grandslamswinegenetics.com

806-292-6670 806-685-0700 806-252-5204

Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 19 2:00 p.m. 2681 CR 420, Stockdale, TX 60 Head ~ Cross, Duroc, Hamp, York All Kenneth Fey 830-481-3162 Keith Fey 830-534-3755 kennethfey@gmail.com www.feyshowpigs.com


GNC Genetics Showpig Sale #1 Date: Time: Location:

Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 19 3:00 p.m. 3 miles West of Gruver on HWY 15 and 1.25 miles North on CR 10 44 litters ~ Berk, Cross, Duroc, Poland, Spot, York All Greg Slough 806-736-8788 Charles Slough 806-736-0002 Nicholas Slough 806-736-0106

Blount Farms Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 19 Preview 4:00 p.m.; Sale 6:00 p.m. Kerr County Fair Grounds, Kerrville, TX 25 litters All Glen Blount 903-814-4900 Zac Blount 903-624-5660

Kelley Showpigs Date: Time: Location:

Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 19 Viewing 5:00-7:00 p.m.; Sale 7:00 p.m. San Patricio County Fairgrounds Event Center 219 W 5th St. Sinton, TX 50 Head ~ Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Spot, York All Gary Kelley 361-222-0284 Ross Kelley 361-437-9898 gary@jcarrollweaverinc.com

Tounget Farms Show Pigs - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 19 Call for Appointment Bronte, TX 15 litters ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, York All Doug Tounget 325-656-9874 Dawn Tounget 325-650-6289 dtounget@verizon.net

Priddy FFA Pig Sale Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 20 Judging 10:00 a.m.; Sale 1:00 p.m. Priddy School Bus Barn, Just off Hwy 16

All Dale Partin Jake Senkirik

325-966-3783 325-451-0370 325-642-5949

Floyd Family Hog Farm Barn Opening & Online Sale Preview Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 21-25 Call for Appointment 2334 CR 252, Bertram, TX 78605 50 Head ~ Duroc, York All Kellen Floyd 830-613-1334 Afton Floyd 641-891-0162 floydfamilyshowpigs@gmail.com www.floydfamilyshowpigs.com

Harman Farms - Elite Online Gilt Sale #1 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 22 All Day showpig.com Chester, Cross, Duroc, Spot, Poland All Wayne Harman 806-202-2175 Leslie Harman 806-202-2176 www.harman-farms.com

Cornerstone Ventures - Online Sale #1 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 23 showpig.com All Breeds All Chance Waldrip 806-341-5764 www.cornerstoneventuresllc.com

DL Showpigs - Online Gilt Sale Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 24 showpig.com 160+ litters ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, York All Josh Krohn 806-759-7735 Bridgette Krohn 806-438-2916 dlshowpigs@gmail.com www.dlshowpigs.com

Meyer Show Pigs - Online Sale #1 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 24 showpig.com Most Breeds Most Grant Meyer Tyler Meyer Kyzar Meyer

830-459-8645 830-928-8648 830-928-8644

Grand Slam Swine Genetics & High Demand Swine Genetics

Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 25-26 Friday the 25th, 6:00 p.m. Saturday the 26th, 11 a.m. 10409 CR 177, Bullard, TX 5+ litters ~ Berk, Cross Part Edmund Meier Jr 210-355-3216 Ralph Stock 210-430-4175 Todd Fleming 210-254-0646 Willie Frantzen 210-683-7048 kerrknife@gmail.com www.grandslamswinegenetics.com

Senterfitt Farms Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 26-27 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 318 W Senterfitt St. Lometa, TX Berk, Duroc All John Hines 512-734-5126 Carlos Garcia 512-734-2178 john@areawidelocksmith.com

Bohemian Farms - Sale #1 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 26 9:00 a.m. 19702 Cyclone Branch Rd., Burlington, TX 60 head ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Spot, York All Mike Schneider 254-721-4162 bohemianfarms@yahoo.com

Duelm’s Prevailing Genetics Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 26 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. New Braunfels, TX 150 Head ~ Chester, Cross, Hamp, York All Rory Duelm 830-608-5058 Matt Lee 830-708-4274 duelmhog@yahoo.com www.duelmsprevailinggenetics.com

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Spinn Farms Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 26 10:00 a.m. 18599 Romberg Rd, Holland, TX 40-50 head ~ Chester, Cross, Hamp, Spot, York All Patrick Spinn 254-913-6284 Kyle Spinn 254-913-8673 PeeWee 254-319-7451

Gary Patterson Livestock Date: Time: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

Rocking L Showpigs Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 26 10:00 a.m. First come, First Serve 580 CR 4517, Hondo, TX 10 litters ~ Cross, Spot, York All Richard Lewis 210-365-7716 James Decock 210-445-9212

September 27 5:00 p.m. 1849 CR 518, Dimmitt, TX 50-75 head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Hamp, Poland, Spot, York All Gary Patterson 806-418-0759 Randy Huseman 806-346-4852 Darren Haseloff 575-309-5662 gary.patterson@capitalfarmcredit.com www.pattersonlivestock.com

Curry Livestock - Online Sale #2 Date: Location: Offering:

September 29 showpig.com 30+ head ~ Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Spot, York Part Zachary Curry 254-592-1395 Kip Curry Jr 254-592-3504 Whitney Curry 254-592-1309 Kip Curry Sr 254-592-3915 currylivestock@hotmail.com www.currylivestock.com

Doege Show Pigs - Farm Sale #2

CTB Cert: Contact:

CTB Cert: Contact:

Harman Farms - Cream of the Crop Online Sale #1

Date: Time: Location: Offering:

September 26 10:30 a.m. 3085 Kusmierz Rd, St. Hedwig, TX Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Spot, York All Tim Doege 210-316-9627 Kathy Doege 210-667-9627 doegeshowpigs@gmail.com

Steele Show Hogs Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 26 1:30 p.m. 4896 Creek Rd. Temple, TX Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Spot, York All Don Steele 254-984-2479 Dan Steele 254-624-9708

Jonetics Show Pigs - Layne Jones Farms Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 26 Call for Appointment 7751 Mission Ave. Canyon, TX 2 litter ~ Duroc All Layne Jones 806-676-1527 Kerry Jones 806-676-9698 joneticshowpigs@gmail.com www.joneticshowpigs.com

Miles FFA - Sale #1 Date: Time: Location: Contact:

September 27 Judging at 12:00 p.m. Sale at 2:00 p.m. Miles Young Farmers Complex, Miles, TX Glen Heard 325-895-1793

Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

Hill Country Showpigs Online Sale Floyd Family Hog Farm, Five Gables Farm & Charlie Hoppe Date: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 27 1:00 p.m. Lampasas County Show Barn; 283 N HWY 183, Lampasas, TX 10 litters ~ Cross All Bobby Carroll 512-525-1540 Chad Hopson 512-734-2122

Heart of the Hill Show Pig Sale #1 Date: Time: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

70

September 27 3:00 p.m. Comfort ISD FFA Barn, Comfort, TX 100 head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Poland, Spot, York Part Bobby Balser 830-739-6593 Larry Langbein 830-285-0401 balser@ktc.com

September 29 pigplanet.com 25 head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Poland, Spot, York Part Kellen Floyd 830-613-1334 Jack Winterrowd 512-203-3694 Charlie Hoppe 512-986-9149 floydfamilyshowpigs@gmail.com www.floydfamilyhogfarms.com

Schwertner, Helms, Byrd - Online Sale #1 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

Carroll & Hopson Farms Date: Time: Location:

September 29 All Day showpig.com Chester, Cross, Duroc, Spot, Poland All Wayne Harman 806-202-2175 Leslie Harman 806-202-2176 www.harman-farms.com

September 30 showpig.com 45 litters ~ Berk, Cross, Duroc, Hamp All Harvey Schwertner 325-895-1909 Hank Byrd 940-256-2214 Todd Helms 432-894-5904 shbshowpigs.com

Campbell Farms - Online Sale Date: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

September 30 showpig.com Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Poland, Spot, York All Kenny Campbell 806-787-9663 Jason Campbell 806-787-9664 www.kcampbellfarms.com

Shannon Barbee Showpigs - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

Late September Call for Appointment At the Farm Cross, Hamp All Shannon Barbee 325-370-4503 www.shannonbarbeeshowpigs.com


Mote Farms & Harkey Farms Online Sale Date: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

October 1 showpig.com 15-30 head ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Poland, Spot, York All Benny Mote 515-509-8313 Robbie Harkey 806-778-7810 benny@motefarm.com www.motefarms.com

Doege Show Pigs - Online Sale Date: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

October 1 showpig.com Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Spot, York All Tim Doege 210-316-9627 Kathy Doege 210-667-9627 doegeshowpigs@gmail.com

Ring of Succuss Pig Sale - Grand Slam Swine Genetics & High Demand Swine Genetics Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 2-4 Mallet Event Center, Levelland, TX 10-15 litters ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp All Edmund Meier Jr 210-355-3216 Ralph Stock 210-430-4175 Todd Fleming 210-254-0646 Willie Frantzen 210-683-7048 kerrknife@gmail.com www.grandslamswinegenetics.com

Five Gables Farm - Private Treaty Sale Date: Time: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

October 3 Viewing 8:00 a.m; Sale 10:00 a.m. Temple, TX; 5 miles SW of Georgetown on SH 29 Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Poland, Spot, York Part Jack Winterrowd 512-203-3694 Charlie Hoppe 512-986-9149

Harkey Farms Date: Time: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

October 3 9:30 a.m. 1611 FM 2337, Hale Center, TX Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Poland, Spot, York All Robbie Harkey 806-778-7810

Belew Farms - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 3 Call for Appointment Tahoka, TX Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Spot, York All Denny Belew 806-470-0969 806-998-4046 Jason Belew 254-413-3848 mbelew@valornet.com

Link Show Pigs - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 3 Call for Appointment 872 CR F, Tahoka, TX 15 litters ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Spot All Heath Link 806-241-4750 Gene Link 806-241-4748 heathalink@yahoo.com

WinTex Farms #1 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 3 Sale Starts at 7:00 p.m. Viewing 7: 00 p.m. 10/2 Roosevelt School Barn Most breeds All Jay Winter 806-438-2986 Will Winter 806-239-5859 www.wintexfarms.com

2nd Annual Mullin FFA Pig Sale Date: Time:

Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 4 Check-in 8:00 a.m.; Judging 10:00 a.m.; Lunch 12:00 p.m.; Sale 1:00 p.m. Mullin ISD, 403 W. Bulldog Drive, Mullin, TX Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Poland, Spot, York All Bud Day 325-938-0634 Kyle Cook 325-514-0281

Cornerstone Ventures - Online Sale #2 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 7 showpig.com All Breeds All Chance Waldrip 806-341-5764 www.cornerstoneventuresllc.com

Schwertner, Helms, Byrd Farm Sale # 1

Underdog Genetics - Silent Auction Sale #1

Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

Twister Show Pigs

Powell Livestock Sale #2

Date: Time: Location: Contact:

Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 3 Barns Open at 2:30 p.m. Final Bidding at 5:00 p.m. At the Farm; 108 Wimberly Rd, Merkel, TX Lynn Hays 325-260-5968 Mason Garner 325-439-0699

October 3 Call for Appointment 2229 East FM 916, Cleburne,TX Berk, Cross, Duroc, Spot All Dub Stepp 817-517-4302 dubstepp@hughes.net

KMW Show Pigs - Sale #1 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 3 All Day 4375 East FM 389, Burton, TX 77835 20 litters ~ Chester, Cross, Hamp, Spot, York All Walt Fehrle 281-682-6868 wfehrle@yahoo.com

Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 7 Miles Young Farmers Complex, Miles, TX 45 litters ~ Berk, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, All Harvey Schwertner 325-895-1909 Todd Helms 432-894-5904 Hank Byrd 940-256-2214 www.shbshowpigs.com October 10 9:00 a.m. 13053 FM 536, Pleasanton, TX 50 head ~ Cross, Duroc, Spot, York All Josh Powell 830-214-4138 Jack Powell 210-336-4091 LeeAnn Powell 830-480-3351 powelllivestock@yahoo.com www.powelllivestock.com

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Red Diamond Show Hogs - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 10 9:00 a.m.; Call for Appointment for other dates 3224 Cen-Tex Loop, Temple, TX 6 litters ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Poland, Spot All Rex Cook 254-493-8340 Denise Cook 254-493-8330 rcook@farm-market.net www.reddiamondshowhogs.com

J.T. & Kelli Naron Silent Auction Pig Sale Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 10 9:30 am - 11;00 am 1139 CR 401, Merkel, TX 20+ litters ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp All J.T. Naron 325-660-2183

Spinn Farms Sale Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 10 10:00 am 18599 Romberg Rd. Holland, TX 30-40 Head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Hamp, Spot All Patrick Spinn 254-913-6284 Kyle Spinn 254-913-8673 Peewee 254-319-7541 pspinn@hotmail.com

DL Showpigs - Farm Sale Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 10 2101 CR 24, Lamesa, TX 160+ litters ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, York All Josh Krohn 806-759-7735 Bridgette Krohn 806-438-2916 dlshowpigs@gmail.com www.dlshowpigs.com

Doege Show Pigs - Farm Sale #3 Date: Time: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

October 10 10:30 a.m. 3085 Kusmierz Rd, St. Hedwig, TX Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Spot, York All Tim Doege 210-316-9627 Kathy Doege 210-667-9627 doegeshowpigs@gmail.com

GO Genetics - Farm Sale Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 10 Lamesa, TX Most Breeds All Todd Gregory Kelley O’Brien

Allen Farms - Sale #1 Date: Time: Location: Contact:

CTB Cert: Contact:

72

325-370-6924 325-668-0532

GNC Genetics Showpig Sale #2 Date: Time: Location:

Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 10 3:00 p.m. Gruver, TX; 3 miles West of Gruver on HWY 15 and 1.25 miles North on CR 10 44 litters ~ Berk, Cross, Duroc, Poland, Spot, York All Greg Slough 806-736-8788 Charles Slough 806-736-0002 Nicholas Slough 806-736-0106

Backdrop Babies #1 Date: Time: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

October 10 7:30 p.m. Gatesville, TX 75-100 head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Poland, Spot, York Part Kip Curry Jr 254-592-3504 Zachary Curry 254-592-1395 ctsjs@hotmail.com www.ctxjackpotseries.com

Floyd Family Hog Farm - August Litters Private Treaty Sale Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 10 - November 14 Call for Appointment 2334 CR 252, Bertram, TX; Call/text for directions 50 head ~ Berk, Chester, Duroc, York All Kellen Floyd 830-613-1334 Afton Floyd 641-891-0162 floydfamilyshowpigs@gmail.com www.floydfamilyhogfarms.com

Harman Farms - Farm Sale #1 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 11 10:30 a.m. 12498 CR 16, Perryton, TX Chester, Cross, Duroc, Spot, Poland All Wayne Harman 806-202-2175 Leslie Harman 806-202-2176 www.harman-farms.com

Elrod Showpigs - Online Sale #2

806-577-2400 806-759-4420

Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

Schaefer Livestock - Farm Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering:

October 10 Final Bidding at 2:00 pm 1525 CR 159, Ovalo Matt Allen Curry Allen

October 10 12:00 p.m. 2901 CR 130, Garden City, TX 75 head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Spot, York All Doug Schaefer 432-517-0352 Ian Schaefer 432-213-3623 Levi Schaefer 432-213-6002 ianschaefer11@yahoo.com www.schaeferlivestock.com

October 12 showpig.com 3 litters ~ Berk, Cross All Diane Elrod Nathan Elrod diane@elrodshowpigs.com www.elrodshowpigs.com

Curry Livestock - Online Sale # 3 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

210-601-6164 210-382-5112

October 13 showpig.com 30+ hd ~ Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Spot, York Part Zachary Curry 254-592-1395 Kip Curry Jr 254-592-3504 Whitney Curry 254-592-1309 Kip Curry Sr 254-592-3915 currylivestock@hotmail.com www.currylivestock.com


Belew Farms - Farm Sale #1 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 14 6:30 p.m. Tahoka, TX Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Spot, York All Denny Belew 806-470-0969 Jason Belew 254-413-3848 mbelew@valornet.com

DL Showpig - Online Barrow Sale Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 15 showpig.com 160+ head ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, York All Josh Krohn 806-759-7735 Bridgette Krohn 806-438-2916 dlshowpigs@gmail.com www.dlshowpigs.com

Best of the Best Sale - Duelm’s Prevailing Genetics Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 16 & 17 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. New Braunfels, TX 300 Head ~ Chester, Cross, Hamp, York All Rory Duelm 830-608-5058 Matt Lee 830-708-4274 duelmhog@yahoo.com www.duelmsprevailinggenetics.com

Rains Livestock Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 17 Preview 10:30 a.m.; Bids Close 1:00 p.m. Roscoe, TX 30 head ~ Cross, Hamp, Poland, Spot, York All Cory Rains 325-236-0593 laceyrains@yahoo.com www.rainslivestock.com

Campbell Farms - Farm Sale #1 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 17 10:00 a.m. Take Exit 37 at Hale Center, TX, Off of I-27 go north on half of a mile, there will be a big tent on the east side. Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Poland, Spot, York All Kenny Campbell 806-787-9663 Jason Campbell 806-787-9664 www.kcampbellfarms.com

W-2 Showpigs Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 17 Preview 10:30 a.m.; Final Bidding 1:00 p.m. 2801 CR 105; Roscoe, TX 26 litters ~ Cross, Duroc, Hamp, York All Jenni Wann 325-829-8528

Major League Pig Sale - Grand Slam Swine Genetics & High Demand Swine Genetics Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 17-18 1:00 p.m. Scurry County Coliseum, Snyder, TX Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp Part Edmund Meier Jr 210-355-3216 Ralph Stock 210-430-4175 Todd Fleming 210-254-0646 Willie Frantzen 210-683-7048 kerrknife@gmail.com www.grandslamswinegenetics.com

Gillespie County Swine Breeders Show Pig Sale Date: Time: Location: Contact:

October 17 1:30 p.m. Gillespie County Show Barn, Fredericksburg, TX Kenneth Kensing 830-928-4845 Russell Kneese 830-456-3298 Wayne Rode 830-456-6176

Heart of the Hills Show Pig Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 17 6:00 p.m. Hill Country Youth Event Center, 3785 HWY 27 Kerrville, TX 140 head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Poland, Spot, York Part Bobby Balser 830-739-6593 Larry Langbein 830-285-0401 balser@ktc.com

Kerby Knaupp Showpigs - Open House Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 18 All Day 767 Knuapp-Mohr Rd. Fredericksburg, TX Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, York Part Kerby Knaupp 830-685-3355 830-459-4826

Harman Farms - Elite Gilt Online Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 20 All Day showpig.com Chester, Cross, Duroc, Spot, Poland All Wayne Harman 806-202-2175 Leslie Harman 806-202-2176 www.harman-farms.com

Schwertner, Helms, Byrd - Online Sale #2 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 21 showpig.com 45 litters ~ Berk, Cross, Duroc, Hamp All Harvey Schwertner 325-895-1909 Todd Helms 432-894-5904 Hank Byrd 940-256-2214 www.shbshowpigs.com

Cornerstone Ventures - Online Sale #3 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 21 showpig.com All Breeds All Chance Waldrip 806-341-5764 www.cornerstoneventuresllc.com

Meyer Show Pigs - Online Sale #2 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 22 showpig.com Most Breeds Most Grant Tyler Kyzar

830-459-8645 830-928-8648 830-928-8644

Bohemian Farms - Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 24 9:00 a.m. 19702 Cyclone Branch Rd., Burlington, TX 60 head ~ Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Spot, York All Mike Schneider 254-721-4162 bohemianfarms@yahoo.com 73


Underdog Genetics - Silent Auction Sale #2

Carroll & Hopson Farms

Hofer’s Farm - Sale #1

Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

Date: Time: Location: Contact:

Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 24 Barns Open at 2:30 p.m. Final Bid at 5:00 p.m. 108 Wimberly Rd, Merkel, TX Lynn Hays 325-260-5968 Mason Garner 325-439-0699

October 24 4:00 p.m. 313 Bennet Dr, Auroro, TX 76078 6 litters ~ Berk, Spot All Steven Hofer 817-875-7269 hofersh34@yahoo.com

Ressmann Showpigs Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 24 Call for Appointment Refugio, TX Cross, Duroc, Hamp, York All Darryl Ressmann Derek Ressmann

361-349-0511 361-349-0513

Miles FFA - Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Contact:

October 25 Judging at 12:00 p.m. Sale at 2:00 p.m. Miles Young Farmers Complex, Miles, TX Glen Heard 325-895-1793

Curry Livestock - Online Sale #4 Date: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

October 27 showpig.com 30+ head ~ Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Spot, York Part Zachary Curry 254-592-1395 Kip Curry Jr 254-592-3504 Whitney Curry 254-592-1309 Kip Curry Sr 254-592-3915 currylivestock@hotmail.com www.currylivestock.com

Duelm’s Prevailing Genetics Sale #4 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 31 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. New Braunfels, TX 150 Head ~ Chester, Cross, Hamp, York All Rory Duelm 830-608-5058 Matt Lee 830-708-4274 duelmhog@yahoo.com www.duelmsprevailinggenetics.com

Harman Farms - Farm Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

October 31 12:00 pm (noon) 12498 CR 16 Perryton, TX Chester, Cross, Duroc, Spot, Poland All Wayne Harman 806-202-2175 Leslie Harman 806-202-2176 www.harman-farms.com

GNC Genetics Showpig Sale #3 Date: Time: Location:

Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

74

October 31 3:00 p.m. Gruver, TX; 3 miles West of Gruver on HWY 15 and 1.25 miles North on CR 10 44 litters ~ Berk, Cross, Duroc, Poland, Spot, York All Greg Slough 806-736-8788 Charles Slough 806-736-0002 Nicholas Slough 806-736-0106

Date: Time: Location:

November 1 1:00 p.m. Lampasas County Show Barn, 283 N HWY 183, Lampasas, TX 7-8 litters ~ Cross All Bobby Carroll 512-525-1540 Chad Hopson 512-734-2122

Belew Farms - Farm Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 1 5:30 p.m. Tahoka, TX Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Spot, York All Denny Belew 806-470-0969 806-998-4046 Jason Belew 254-413-3848 mbelew@valornet.com

WinTex Farms #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 1 Sale Starts at 2: p.m. Farm Most breeds All Jay Winter Will Winter www.wintexfarms.com

806-438-2986 806-239-5859

Neill Farms - Farm Sale Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 3 12:00 p.m. (Noon) 302 Cr 425, Stockdale, TX 78160 18 litters ~ Cross, Duroc All Rickey Neill 830-534-2400 Susan 830-534-9226 rneill_2000@yahoo.com

Allen Farms - Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Contact:

November 7 Final Bidding at 2:00 pm 1525 CR 159, Ovalo, TX Matt Allen Curry Allen

325-370-6924 325-668-0532

Campbell Farms - Farm Sale #2

Date: November 7 Time: 3:00 p.m. Location: Exit 37 at Hale Center, go north on service road 1/2 mi., There will be a big tent on east side. Offering: All Breeds CTB Cert: All Contact: Kenny Campbell 806-787-9663 Jason Campbell 806-787-9664 www.kcampbellfarms.com

Hofer’s Farm - Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 7 4:00 p.m. 313 Bennet Drive, Auroro, TX 6 litters ~ Berk, Spot All Steven Hofer hofersh34@yahoo.com

817-875-7269


Schwertner, Helms, Byrd - Farm Sale #2 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 7 Miles Young Farmers Complex, Miles, TX 45 litters ~ Berk, Cross, Duroc, Hamp All Harvey Schwertner 325-895-1909 Todd Helms 432-894-5904 Hank Byrd 940-256-2214 www.shbshowpigs.com

Backdrop Babies - #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

November 7 7:30 p.m. Loy Lake Show Barn, Denison, TX 75-100 head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Poland, Spot, York Part Kip Curry Jr 254-592-3504 Zachary Curry 254-592-1395 ctsjs@hotmail.com www.ctxjackpotseries.com

Curry Livestock - Online Sale #5 Date: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

November 10 showpig.com 30+ head ~ Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Landrace, Spot, York Part Zachary Curry 254-592-1395 Kip Curry Jr 254-592-3504 Kip Curry Sr 254-592-3915 currylivestock@hotmail.com www.currylivestock.com

Schaefer Livestock - Online Sale Date: Location: Offering:

CTB Cert: Contact:

November 10 showpig.com 25 head ~ Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Spot, York All Doug Schaefer 432-517-0352 Ian Schaefer 432-213-3623 ianschaefer11@yahoo.com www.schaeferlivestock.com

Cornerstone Ventures - Online Sale #3 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 11 showpig.com All Breeds All Chance Waldrip 806-341-5764 www.cornerstoneventuresllc.com

Duelm’s Prevailing Genetics Sale Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 14 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. New Braunfels, TX 150 Head ~ Chester, Cross, Hamp, York All Rory Duelm 830-608-5058 Matt Lee 830-708-4274 duelmhog@yahoo.com www.duelmsprevailinggenetics.com

Twister Show Pigs Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

September 15 Call for Appointment 2229 East FM 916, Cleburne,TX Berk, Cross, Duroc, Spot All Dub Stepp 817-517-4302 dubstepp@hughes.net

KMW Show Pigs - Sale #2 Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 14 All Day 4375 East FM 389, Burton, TX 20 litters ~ Chester, Cross, Hamp, Spot, York All Walt Fehrle 281-682-6868 wfehrle@yahoo.com

Elrod Showpigs - Online Sale #3 Date: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 15 showpig.com 3 litters ~ Berk All Diane Elrod Nathan Elrod diane@elrodshowpigs.com nathan@elrodshowpigs.com www.elrodshowpigs.com

210-601-6164 210-382-5112

McKamie Livestock Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 24 Barns Open 9:00 a.m. Ponder, TX 15 litters All Scott McKamie

940-390-9578

Duelm’s Prevailing Genetics Sale Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

November 28 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. New Braunfels, TX 150 Head ~ Chester, Cross, Hamp, York All Rory Duelm 830-608-5058 Matt Lee 830-708-4274 duelmhog@yahoo.com www.duelmsprevailinggenetics.com

Chad Hill Durocs - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

All Year Call for Appointment 1916 CR 6000, Lubbock, TX 90 litters ~ Chester, Duroc, Spot All Misty Hill 936-715-7470 misty@chadhilldurocs.com www.chadhilldurocs.com

JMH Showpigs - Private Treaty Date: Time: Location: Offering: CTB Cert: Contact:

All Year Call for Appointment 910 CR 333, Rockdale, TX 30 litters ~ Cross, Hamp All Lee Hafley 512-415-2118 leehafley@gmail.com www.jmhshowpigs.webs.com

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Wi n n e r s a re b re d . . . C h a m p i o n s a re fe d . S M

2015

Texas Show Feed Clinics August 8 Canyon: West TX A&M University – Randall County Ext Office in morning followed by afternoon session after lunch at Nance Ranch Facility RSVP by July 31 Speakers: Tadd Knight and Josh Elkins

August 29 Belton: Bell Co Expo Center RSVP by Aug. 21 Speakers Tadd Knight and Josh Elkins

September 12 Santa Fe: Santa Fe High School RSVP by Sept. 4 Speakers Tadd Knight and Josh Elkins

October 17 San Antonio: James Madison School Farm RSVP by Oct. 9 Speakers: Tadd Knight, Josh Elkins, and Rory Duelm www.admani.com/MoorMansShowTec 866-666-7626 • AN_ShowFeedHelp@adm.com ADM Alliance Nutrition, Inc., 1000 N 30th St, PO Box C1, Quincy, IL 62305-3115

Clinics are free! Clinic Schedule

Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. followed by clinic at 10 a.m. Lunch will be provided.

Topics:

Selection of show pigs Feeds and feeding Daily management practices Showmanship To reserve your spot, RSVP Tadd or Josh at: Tadd Knight: 217-653-0528 or Tadd.Knight@adm.com Josh Elkins: 979-255-8309 or Joshua.Elkins@adm.com


Contact your local dealer to take advantage of FFA/4-H discounts!

www.exiss.com to find your local dealer!

www.exiss.com sales@exiss.com 1.877.553.9477 Find us on Facebook!

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2015 Show Pig Short Course

August 29

Guadalupe County Extension Office 210 East Live Oak Seguin, Texas

Selection - Nutrition - Health -Facilities - Show Preparation

The Seguin Swine Breeders are proud to present to you a group of widely respected pork producers and swine industry professionals as speakers. If a swine project is in your future, this clinic will cover all of the various aspects of selecting, feeding, and showing a pig.

Limited Seating , Register Early!

8:00 a.m.

Schedule of Events

Registration

9:00 a.m.

“Welcome” - Chuck Real

9:05 a.m.

“Showmanship and Show Pig Management” - Reagan Langemeier, Morgan Friesenhahn, & Kaylee Musgrove

10:05 a.m.

“Show Pig Selection Tips” - Chuck Real, Cassidy Hayes, & Kurt Kelso

11:05 a.m.

Break

11:15 a.m.

“Gilt Management, Breed CHaracteristics, & ClassificaTion.” - Chuck Real.

11:45 a.m.

“Quality CounTs & Program Management” - Jeff Hanselka

12:15 p.m.

Lunch

12:45 p.m.

“Facilities”- Travis Franke

1:15 p.m.

“What You Need In Your HeAlth care Toolbox” - Kurt Kelso & Chuck Real.

2:00 p.m.

“Feeding & Nutrition For Today’s Showpig” - Tadd Knight

3:00 p.m.

Closing

--------------------------------

2015 Show Pig Short Course Registration

Make checks payable to: Seguin Swine Breeders Registration Fee - $15.00 per person (includes lunch) Registration Deadline - August 26th Late Registration - $20.00 per person

Mail this form and checks to: Show Pig Short Course 210 East Live Oak Seguin, TX 78155

Names:____________________________________________________ Address:_____________________ Phone #:_______________________ Total # Attending:________ Total Amount Enclosed: $__________ 80


CHAMPIONS STAND ALONE! Champion after champion, StandAlone is honored to be part of the journey that helps exhibitors reach their ultimate goal.

RESERVE CHAMPION MARKET HOG 2015 Fort Worth Stock Show Tyler Kelly

GRAND CHAMPION MARKET HOG 2015 San Antonio Stock Show Tyler Endicott

CHAMPION BERKSHIRE BARROW 2015 Houston Livestock Show Devin McBryde

RESERVE CHAMPION HEAVYWEIGHT CROSSBRED MARKET HOG 2015 Fort Worth Stock Show Zach May

Visit our website to see all of our champions and to learn how you can stand alone! 855-598-0678 • info@standalonefeed.com • standalonefeed.com marked by

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WWW.BRSHOGFARM.COM

Sept. 27, 2015

4th Annual Open House Sale Meal at noon, sale at 2 pm

35 litters

start farrowing July 20th

Berk, Chester, Cross, Hamp, Spot, Duroc Ronnie Allen 940.655.8081

Stacy Henry 940.655.4747

Visit website for future sale info!

Attention!

The TPPA office will be moving to a new location in Kyle at the end of September. We will be sending out our new address and contact info soon!

Our Responsibility. Our Promise. Get Certified. A voluntary, industry-driven program, PQA Plus® combines food safety and animal well-being principles into a widely-respected and used certification program. By becoming PQA Plus certified, pork producers demonstrate commitment to provide high quality, responsibly produced products. The program includes: • Individual certification through producer education • Site status through an on-farm site assessment • Opportunity for third-party verification to give the system credibility

Learn more about PQA Plus by visiting www.pork.org/certification or by calling the Pork Service Center at 800-456-7675.

©2013 National Pork Board. Des Moines, IA  USA. This message funded by America’s Pork Producers and the Pork Checkoff.

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27th Annual

Priddy FFA Pig Sale Sunday, September 20, 2015 Judging at 10:00 AM - Sale at 1:00 PM Priddy School Bus Barn, just off Highway 16 Numerous county and major show winners purchased at this sale!! Priddy

Consignors:

Consignors: Rode Merryman Silver Valley Show Pigs RW Genetics Tarleton State University Abbey & McDougal Show Pigs Cunningham Show Pigs

Clarence Schaefer Frankie Hyles Dale Partin Frank Valdez 2 Ton Show Pigs

IL L LASS W

SENIOR C MEAL FROM RA SPONSO 1:00. 11:30 TO Jake Senkirik (325) 642-5949

have Many Pigs will tificates! Texas Bred Cer

Contact Information

We will h ave som e registere d gilts! Dale Partin (325) 966-3783 (325) 451-0370

4P Show Pigs aughter D e n o B Hillbilly ys The Limit Sk Bred to

• • • •

PIGS AVAILABLE: Private Treaty Priddy FFA Pig Sale Comanche County Pig Sale Cream of the Crop Pig Sale at the Farm September 13, 2015

Hamps, Yorks, & Crosses Registered Gilts Congratulations Alicia Salinas!

Supreme Champion Cross Gilt 2009 Fort Worth

Grand Champion Market Hog Mills County Stock Show

2014 WINNERS:

• 3 out of 5 Breed Champions at Mills County • Grand & Reserve Grand Champion Mills County • Champions at county and major shows • Reserve Hampshire Gilt CTBR Texas Stars Show San Angelo • Class Winning York Gilt at Fort Worth

Congratulations to all youth on your success in 2014-15. 4P Show Pigs are looking forward to your success in 2015-2016! Contact: Dale Partin (325) 966-3783 or (325) 451- 0370

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Of�icial Rules

Certified Texas Bred Registry A Program of the Texas Pork Producers Association, Inc. 2015 - 2016 Season Title Sponsor: ADM / MoorMan’s ShowTec, Quincy, IL

Purpose

The purpose of the Certified Texas Bred Registry is to promote Texas bred and produced show pigs and to support the 4-H and FFA club members of Texas. DEFINITIONS CTB Class Champion(s) - The highest placing CTB Pig in each For the purposes of these rules the following words and weight class of each breed division at each of the shows. The phrases are defined to provide a better understanding of the judge determines the placing and the placing must be an Certified Texas Bred Registry: official placing listed or recorded by the show. Certified Texas Bred Registry (CTB) – A program created by the Texas Pork Producers Association (TPPA) in which youth and producer members of TPPA may participate. The purpose is to promote Texas bred and produced show pigs and to support 4-H and FFA club members of Texas. CTB Certificate – A form published by TPPA that is used by breeders, the breeder provides their name and address, the breed, ear notches and sex of the pig being identified. The breeder then provides the buyer or exhibitor with the CTB Certificate. The exhibitor will present the CTB certificate to individuals representing CTB at the show. Breeders are NOT allowed to make any copies of the CTB Certificate. CTB Pig –A pig that has satisfied the requirements of eligibility of the CTBR Program. CTBR Replacement Certificate – a certificate that will be issued in lieu of an original CTBR Certificate issued by a CTBR Breeder. The CTBR Replacement Certificate will be available at the show. CTB Breeder Log (Breeder Log) – A form furnished by TPPA to breeders to record the breed, and ear notches of a specific pig. The breeder is required to mail, fax or email a copy of the Breeder Log by January 1, 2016. If the Breeder Log is faxed, please call the office to verify that the fax was received. CTB Litter Record – A record of the number of litters farrowed and litter notches assigned to those litters furnished to the TPPA CTBR Program prior to September 1, 2015. The TPPA strongly encourages breeders to notch litters in sequence starting with the litter 1 notch. Breeders that do not use this method will furnish litter numbers as part of the CTB Litter Record. Show or Shows – CTB only participates in the following market barrow shows: Southwestern Exposition & Livestock Show (Fort Worth); San Antonio Livestock Exposition; Houston Livestock Show; San Angelo Stock Show; State Fair of Texas; Star of Texas Livestock Show (Austin). CTB also participates in the Texas Stars Gilt Show at San Angelo Stock Show. A CTB Certificate is valid only at these shows.

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BREEDER ELIGIBILITY 1. A breeder must be actively engaged in the production of porcine animals within the state of Texas. “Actively engaged” is defined as an owner, operator, contract operator, manager, or employee who is committed to, occupied with, and involved in the production of porcine animals. 2. A breeder must be an active member of the Texas Pork Producers Association. In the case of partnerships, each breeder listed on the CTBR Certificate must be a member of the Texas Pork Producers Association. 3. A breeder must pay all fees for properly registering pigs in CTB. Failure to comply will result in the breeder becoming ineligible to participate in CTB and all CTB Numbers purchased by the breeder will be invalid. 4. A breeder may be requested to provide the CTB with information that validates the authenticity of breeding, farrowing, raising and registering pigs as Texas bred as defined by CTB. This may include a farm visit from representatives of the CTB. Failure to comply may result in the breeder becoming ineligible to participate in CTB. 5. A breeder must submit a CTB Litter Record to the TPPA prior to September 1, 2015 to be eligible to purchase CTBR Certificates. The Litter Record must include the number of litters farrowed and a record of the litter notches assigned to those litters. If past deadline September 1, 2015 and before December 15, 2015: To be considered for eligibility a breeder must submit to TPPA in writing a Litter Record with the number of litters farrowed and an explanation of their litter notches assigned to those litters; breeder will pay a monetary fee of $100.00 and will be subject to record and herd inspection. The deadline for submitting a Litter Record is December 15, 2015, after which a breeder will not be eligible to purchase CTBR certificates. PIG ELIGIBILITY 1. Each pig must be conceived in Texas. 2. Each pig must be farrowed and raised in Texas by the breeder registering the pig. 3. Each pig must be properly ear-notched by the breeder for litter number and pig number.


Of�icial Rules

Certified Texas Bred Registry

-continued-

PIG REGISTRATION Breeder must: 1. Purchase an official CTB Certificate for each pig to be registered for the participating shows. 2. Accurately complete all of the breeder information requested on the CTB certificate. 3. Give the completed CTB certificate to the purchaser or exhibitor of the pig. 4. Record the pig’s ear notches, breed, and sex next to the corresponding CTB Certificate Number on the Breeder Log. 5. Breeder Logs must be faxed, mailed or emailed to the TPPA by January 1, 2016. Additions or corrections to the Breeder Logs may be submitted at any time after the deadline without penalty. A late fee of $25.00 must be submitted with all Breeder Logs received or postmarked after January 1, 2016. In the event that a breeder does not submit a Breeder Log, all certificates will be rendered invalid until a log is submitted. Breeder Logs will be accepted at the show, accompanied with the late fee payment. Changes and additions to Breeder Logs will be accepted at the show. If the Breeder Log is faxed please call the office to verify that the fax was received. 6. Keep the original Breeder Log for your records.

TERMS AND FEES 1. An official CTB Certificate will be valid for the spring 2016 shows or until invalidated by CTB. A separate Certificate must be purchased for the State Fair of Texas. 2. For first orders (If breeder has met eligibility requirements.): CTB Certificates are $7.00 each if purchased on or before December 15, 2015. CTB Certificates are $14.00 each if purchased between December 16, 2015 and January 15, 2016. CTB Certificates may be purchased after January 15, 2016 for $35.00 each. Post mark date is required to qualify. Allow 7 to 10 days for processing orders after TPPA receives the order and payment. CTB Certificates will be sent to breeders by regular mail of the U.S Postal Service. 3. For Orders of Additional CTB Certificates: Breeders that order more than 50 CTB Certificates by the first order deadline of December 15, 2015 can purchase additional CTB Certificates for $7.00 each. Breeders that order less than 50 CTB Certificates by the first order deadline of December 15, 2015 can purchase additional CTB Certificates for $14.00 each. 4. Payment of all fees and charges must be received before CTB Certificates will be mailed. 5. CTB Certificates are non-transferable between breeders. 6. Lost CTB Certificates must be reported to TPPA and will be replaced if requested. 7. Breeders may send a written request for a refund of unused CTB Certificates along with the unused CTB Certificates to TPPA postmarked by December 15, 2015. All CTB Certificates will be refunded at the rate of $4.00 each.

SHOW PREMIUMS & REQUIREMENTS 1. TPPA will pay a premium to the highest placing CTB pig in each weight class of the market barrow shows at the following livestock exhibitions: Southwestern Exposition & Livestock Show (Fort Worth); San Antonio Livestock Exposition; Houston Livestock Show, the State Fair of Texas, and the Star of Texas Livestock Show (Austin). CTB Registry will contribute additional premium money to the San Angelo Junior Market Barrow Show to be distributed to all placing barrows. CTB Registry will also provide trophy buckles to all San Angelo Junior Market Barrow Show Breed Champion and Reserve Breed Champion Barrows and trophies to the Grand & Reserve Grand Champion of the Show. In addition to providing additional scholarship monies, the CTB Registry will also provide trophy buckles to the Grand & Reserve Grand Champion Purebred and Crossbred Gilts and trophies to the Supreme and Reserve Supreme Champion Gilts at the CTBR Texas Stars Gilt Show. 2. Premiums will be paid to the exhibitor by mail following the official placing at each show. CTB Premiums at the San Angelo Livestock Show will be paid by the San Angelo Livestock Show. 3. The exhibitor must present the CTB Certificate when requested by the individual representing CTB at the show. 4. A designated representative of the TPPA will be present at each show in order to verify the qualifications of each barrow or gilt and collect CTBR Certificates. These representatives will also provide breeders and exhibitors with CTBR Replacement Certificates. PROTESTS & PENALTIES 1. All protests of these rules and regulations, or of the Certified Texas Bred Registry, must be made in writing to TPPA. TPPA and/or the CTB Committee will settle all protests and disputes. 2. Failure to properly register pigs sold as CTB, or registration of ineligible pigs as CTB, or the misuse of CTB Certificates will subject the individual to penalties set forth by TPPA. 3. Any violation of these rules or regulations may result in disqualification of eligibility of pig registration and/or disqualification for premiums and/or suspension from the Certified Texas Bred Registry. 4. In the event that CTB Certificates are invalidated or if a breeder is disqualified from participating in the Certified Texas Bred Registry all fees and penalties paid by the breeder are forfeited to TPPA. 5. The validity of the Certified Texas Bred Registry is wholly dependent on the honesty and integrity of the breeders participating in the Registry and the reliability of pig registration. 6. Cases of CTB Pig Eligibility will be determined by CTBR Committee members.

You can order CTBR Certificates and sign-up for membership online at the secure TPPA website at www.texaspork.org

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Texas Pork Producers Association Certified Texas Bred Registry

LITTER RECORD for 2016 Major Shows

All breeders must submit a CTBR Litter Record to the TPPA office prior to September 1, 2015 to be eligible to purchase CTBR Certificates for the 2015 Major Shows. The litter record must include the information requested below. TPPA strongly encourages breeders to notch litters in sequence starting with litter 1 notch. Breeders that do not use this method must furnish litter numbers as part of the CTBR Litter Record. If you plan to purchase CTBR certificates under more than one business/partnership name then you MUST file a Litter Record for each business/partnership name. Example: “John Smith Show Pigs” and also “Ricky & John Smith Show Pigs.”

Name of Breeder: Farm/Business/Partnership as it will appear on CTBR Certificates: Phone Number: Number of Litters Farrowed, Expected (Current Season) Check one of the following: I will notch litters in sequence starting with litter notch 1. I will notch litters in sequence starting with litter notch

.

I will notch litters as described below. (Must describe in detail ear notching system.)

The TPPA encourages members to contact the office if you have questions in regard to the CTBR Litter Record for your farm. Once the CTBR Litter Record is submitted only those litter notches that you have provided will be valid on CTBR Certificates. CTBR Litter Records that are received after September 1, 2015 deadline will be invalid pending CTBR Committee approval. A late fee of $100 must accompany all CTBR Litter Records submitted after September 1, 2015 and before or up to December 15, 2015. CTBR Litter Records will not be accepted after December 15, 2015. I have read and understand the requirements for participation in the TPPA CTBR Program. Print Name:

Signature:

NOTE: IF YOU FAX OR EMAIL THIS DOCUMENT PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE TO VERIFY DELIVERY. (512) 453-0615. Office Use  Date Received:        Mail to: Fax to: E-Mail to: Current Member:        TPPA (512) 451-5536 tppa@texaspork.org Processed by:         P.O. Box 10168 (512) 451-5537 Austin, Texas 78766


MAJOR SHOW ORDER FORM

For pigs to be exhibited at Fort Worth, San Antonio, San Angelo or Houston and San Angelo Texas Stars Gilt Show. STEP 1: Membership

Breeder must be a member of the Texas Pork Producers Association, in good standing. Annual Producer Membership is $35 and is due September 1st of each year. Youth Membership, under the age of 18, is $10 and is due September 1st of each year. Only one name per membership. All individual names appearing on a CTBR Certificate MUST be a member of TPPA in good standing.

STEP 2: Litter Record

Litter Record MUST be submitted to TPPA by September 1, 2015 and before you can purchase CTBR Certificates. See Official CTBR Rules or contact the TPPA office if not submitted by September 1, 2015. See www.texaspork.org for Official CTBR Rules and Litter Record form.

STEP 3: CTBR Certificate Request Number of CTBR Certificates Requested (On or before December 15, 2015)

X $7.00 =

STEP 4: Payment Total

$

If you need to renew your membership add Membership Fee here:

$

Total:

$

STEP 5: Information Required

*All individual names appearing on a CTBR Certificate MUST be a member of TPPA in good standing.* Individual Member’s Name:

Check if you want this name to appear on CTBR Certificates.

Name of Farm/Business/Partnership:

Check if you want this name to appear on CTBR Certificates.

Mailing Address City

State

Home Telephone

TX

Zip

Cell/Daytime phone

Fax

E-mail

Signature

Date

STEP 6: Mail form and payment to:

TPPA P.O. Box 10168 Austin, TX 78766

Contact your tax consultant to determine if your contribution is deductible as a business expense. It is not deductible as a charitable contribution. TPPA is classified by the US Treasury as a 501c.5 organization.

For additional information: (512) 453-0615 You can purchase CTBR Certificates online on the secure TPPA web site at www.texaspork.org


Certified Texas Bred Registry Important Dates for Texas Major Shows Major Show CTBR Certificates can be purchased

August 1, 2015

* Must submit a Litter Record * Must be a paid TPPA Member in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good Standingâ&#x20AC;? * Order form available on Page 87

Litter Record Due to TPPA Office

September 1, 2015

* $100 Fee for Litter Record Submitted after September 1, 2015 * Litter Record available on Page 86

December 15, 201

5

Major Show CTBR Certificate prices increase to $14 each

No Litter Records Accepted after December 15th

December 16, 2015

* Unless 50 or more certificates purchased before December 15th

January 1, 2016

Major Show Breeder Logs Due to TPPA Office * Encouraged to turn in earlier

* $25 Fee for Late Breeder Logs submited after Jan. 1st * Breeder Logs are mailed with purchased CTBR Certificates

Major Show CTBR Certificate prices increase to $35 each * If a first time purchase

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January 15, 2016


Why Wait? Renew Your Membership Now! All memberships expire Aug. 31st!

What We Do...

Membership Driven!

At TPPA we strive to: Provide a structure for cooperation of pork producers in Texas Encourage efficient production and marketing methods Promote the consumption of quality pork products Provide educational and networking opportunities Represent producers in legislative and regulatory matters

Est. 1889

Participate in Texas Pork Industry Conference and other TPPA sponsored events Networking opportunities to learn the most efficient practices and new concepts Our goal is to improve & increase the quality & production of the Texas swine industry.

Follow Us

TEXAS PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION

Youth Support!

Get Informed!

Scholarship opportunities Develop & enhance leadership skills through activities: ◆Texas Pork Leadership Camp ◆TPPA Internships ◆Texas Pork Youth Symposium Connect with influential industry leaders

Stay current by receiving timely updates on: ◆Stock Shows ◆Important Issues ◆Market Reports ◆Activities & Events ◆Certified Texas Bred Registry Information Subscription to Producer Connection Receive Spring Buyers Guide and Fall Sales Trail

Representing the Voice of Texas Swine Breeders & Agriculturalists Join Texas Pork Producers Association TODAY Annual Membership Sept. 1st - Aug. 31st

Name: Name of Business: Address: Phone: Youth $10

On

Email: Producer $35

Professional $35

TPPA Office ◆ P.O. Box 10168 Austin, TX 78766 ◆ 512-453-0615 ◆ www.texaspork.org

Associate $125


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New Boars, New Champions We are constantly growing our breeding selection. Check out our new boars and champions.

HACOT2 TCG Untouchable 1-4 X RIY3 Ricochet

CRE4 Red Light 32-5

We selected this popular Thomas Crome boar at the STC in Louisville. He is powerful with a great look and an excellent set of feet and legs. With the genetics behind him, he should be a great one to use.

We are retaining this outstanding Light Em Up son to put in our boar stud. He is out of a powerful litter and has that great look to go along with tremendous width, a bold rib, and excellent muscle shape. He is very athletic and flexible on the move. His mother is one of our top proven Duroc sows (Beast X Square D).

Class winning Yorkshire Gilt

2nd Place (behind the Reserve Champion)

Summer Type Conference in Louisville shown by Kyle Real. Thanks to Tim King of West Virginia for his purchase of this outstanding gilt.

NJSA Summer Spectacular in Louisville shown by Campbell Real. Good Luck to Levi and Lea Kimley of Ohio with this great female.

These two gilts are bred much like our Champion York Boar and Reserve Open York Gilt at San Antonio (APRL The Duke [True Grit] X CDO Prestige [Mighty One]).

Contact us for your next Purebred Gilt or Show Pig.

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Build YourDreams

with

Spike

Utley Farms

Crazybone 152-5 X Spud

Bred by: Utley Farms Housed at Cornerstone Ventures

Boars Used From: Stephens Farms Wintex Connerstone Ventures Upperhand Genetics Brinning Genetics Purple Power Boar Stud

Utley Farms

Terry, Jennifer, John Cross and Grayson Utley

Knox City, Texas | 940.256.3288

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Our Future is

Bright YOUTH SPOTLIGHT ON TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY PORK SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

Austin Adams

Austin Adams is a junior Animal Science major at Texas Tech University and a recent graduate of Clarendon College where he was on the Clarendon College Livestock Judging Team. While there he received the Knorpp Award, which is awarded to students based on overall academic excellence. He also served as president of the Clarendon College Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa National Honor Society. Austin graduated as valedictorian from Hedley High School where he served at National Honor Society president. Austin was very active in FFA and 4-H all through high school showing barrows, gilts, and steers. He was also a member of the state qualifying livestock judging teams through both FFA and 4-H. Austin will be on the Texas Tech Livestock Judging Team this fall. After graduating with his bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree from Tech, he will pursue a masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree at either Texas Tech or Texas A&M.

Madison Langmeier

Madison Langemeier is the daughter of Jeff and Ellen Langemeier from Marion, Texas. She is currently a junior at Texas Tech University majoring in Animal Science. She has been a part of the wool judging team and is currently on the meat judging team for Texas Tech University. She was involved in 4-H and FFA in high school and grew up showing livestock. She was a member of TJLA, NJSA and Team Purebred. She served as a junior board director for Team Purebred for two years, assisting in organizing the shows and events sponsored by Team Purebred.

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“Knowledge is power. Knowledge shared is power multipled.”

Robert, N. Noyce

Chama Martin

Chama Martin is a junior Animal Science major at Texas Tech University. She grew up in Mason, Texas, where her family raises club calves, sheep, and goats. She was extremely active in 4-H, exhibiting pigs, cattle, lambs and goats across the nation. She was also involved in livestock judging through which she was a member of the 2012 Reserve National Champion 4-H Team. She recently graduated Summa Cum Laude with her Associate of Science in Agriculture from Blinn College, where she was inducted into three different honor societies. While at Blinn, Chama was a member of the National Champion Livestock Judging Team, earning top individual honors at the San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo contest, and was named to the Jr. College Livestock Judging All American list, all while actively participating in Blinn’s Ag Club. Chama will be a member of the 2016 Livestock Judging Team at Texas Tech and hopes to pursue a career in agribusiness finance upon graduation.

Dakota Crissman

Dakota Crissman is a junior Animal Science major at Texas Tech University. He graduated from Bells High school and Blinn College where he was extremely involved in agriculture. In high school, he showed swine all over Texas, as well as the United States. During his two years at Blinn, he competed on a national winning livestock judging team, was a member of Phi Theta Kappa, and was an active member in the Blinn College Ag Club. He will be a member of the 2016 Livestock Judging Team and plans to attend graduate school following the completion of his undergraduate degree.

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SHOW THEM weCARE. Many consumers see U.S. pork production as one unified industry. That means everyone involved in pork production – from farm owners to animal caretakers to the drivers who transport our pigs – must do his or her part to use best practices in raising and caring for animals.

TexasPork.org

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Don't Sweat It

The majority of us have a love-hate relationship with summertime in Texas. Sunny days, a perfect time for backyard gatherings and the only snow you have to worry about is making sure your snowcone doesn’t melt; but it also means extreme temperatures & heat that extends well into the night, which results in hot, uncomfortable hogs. Heat tends to make hogs less feed efficient, puts more stress on them, and it makes farrowing harder on sows, all of which can be serious problems.

But don’t sweat it! There are some simple ways to beat the heat! *Of course we know how important it is to keep a steady water supply, but it is equally as important to make sure the water is cool. If your water pipes are underground make sure they are buried deep enough to stay cool. It is best for above ground pipes to be insulated and out of direct sun. If you are watering out of a barrel make sure the water is always fresh. If it feels hot, dump it out and refill. *When hauling hogs in the summer, all trailer vents should be open, and you might try putting a bag of ice in each pen. This will allow the pigs a cool place to roll over on and will reduce the number of times you need to stop and spray them down. *Feed in the coolest parts of the day, if possible. Hogs eat better when they are cool; early morning & late evening is usually the best option. *Enough cannot be said for air flow and ventilation. This can make a world of difference when trying to keep hogs cool. In addition to Fans, misters and dripppers are a simple solution to providing a cooler temperature. *Electrolytes are a must for summer show pigs! Electrolytes help keep hogs’ energy and appetite up!

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Sow Hoof & Claw Trimming Gains Momentum A University of Georgia associate professor, Robert Dove, foresees a day when claw trimming for swine becomes as routine as hoof trimming is for bovine, ovine or equine farm and ranch animals. “If you look at cattle, sheep and horses - their feet are trimmed on a routine basis as a standard management practice,” Dove says. “I believe we’re going to move in that direction with pigs as well.” Dove cites a recent UGA study that demonstrates sound evidence for the need to trim sow claws. The study, “The Effect of Corrective Claw Trimming on Gait Analysis of Sows,” was presented at the 2015 Midwest American Society of Animal Science meeting in Des Moines, Iowa. “In our study, we were looking at sows that had long claws, and what effect trimming those claws had on their locomotion,” notes Dove, a co-author. “We were able to show some significant changes in how she increased locomotion down the track after we trimmed her, versus before we trimmed her.” To accurately analyze a sow’s gait and locomotion, the researchers set up two high-speed cameras, synchronized from each side, and one from the rear, to video record sows walking around a semi-circular track. “We were filming at 60 to 70 frames per second,” Dove says. “When we broke that down to look at it frame-by-frame, we could really look at exactly (within one hundredth of a centimeter) what she was doing within each step.” Compared to traditional locomotion scoring methods that identify lameness by watching animals move with the naked eye, the high-speed cameras allowed researchers to record extremely minute differences in movement. “We’re measuring very precise numbers,” Dove says. “Consequently, we can detect differences as little as five centimeters in her step length as being a significant change.” The researchers recorded and assessed sows immediately before claw trimming, an hour after trimming and 48 hours after trimming. “We could see positive changes within that hour, in how she walked,” Dove says. “By 48 hours later, there were significant [positive] changes in the way she moved.” The improvements in sow locomotion included a decreased stride duration, a shortening in time spent standing on each foot, and a decreased swing time in foot movement. In addition, the study showed promise in both increasing the animal’s walking speed and decreasing the time handlers spent trying to move animals after trimming claws. “On average, she’s probably moving another meter and a half per minute faster,” Dove says. “So we’re moving her down the hall that much quicker, but more importantly ... she appeared much more comfortable, much happier moving, and was much easier to move, much easier to handle - after we got her feet trimmed.” Longevity lift From a management perspective, sows that demonstrate greater locomotion and ease in movement are sows that will last longer in the herd and boost profitability. “We know that lameness and feet and leg problems are some of the leading causes of culling in most of our commercial herds,” Dove says. “If we can improve that, if we can fix it, so those sows stay in the herd longer, or hit those more productive parities and keep producing - then we don’t have to buy replacement gilts; we don’t have to be turning the herd over as quickly.” Sow lameness issues often originate from animals walking incorrectly on their claws due to uneven or excessive claw growth, which trimming can correct, Dove notes. “Whether the claws have gotten overgrown, whether she bruised one and it’s misshapen - by trimming those up and bringing them back to the proper shape, we allow her to walk properly,” he says. If left untrimmed, long claws are likely to cause sows to become more vulnerable to illness and injury, particularly in group housing. “Anytime a sow is lame, her locomotion is decreased,” Dove says. “Anytime she’s uncomfortable on her feet, 102


The most common claw lesions within a sow herd can vary based on several factors including management, nutrition and genetics. she doesn’t want to move. Anytime she’s not moving, she’s not going to the feeder; she’s not eating; she’s not drinking; she’s a bigger target for that dominant sow - and it becomes an issue for her longevity and her welfare.” Although corrective claw trimming adds to short-term labor costs, routine claw trimming has the potential to develop into a profitable, long-term management tool. “I think it’s going to be a practice that would pay for itself, given the number of gilts or sows that we’re going to save back and avoid having to replace,” Dove says. “It means we don’t have to manage as many gilts. It means we’re getting more productivity out of the sows that we have and we decrease our culling rate.” In addition to its potential to increase productivity, corrective claw trimming is also the right thing to do for the animal’s well-being, Dove adds. When done correctly, claw trimming helps to reduce stress on feet, legs, hips and shoulders, and possibly aids in reducing joint disease. Swine chute success To ensure adequate safety and convenience when trimming claws, the researchers relied on an innovative sow lift chute from Zinpro Corp., called the Feet First Chute. See Feet First Update, Issue 11, “Feet First Chute Makes Claw Trimming Safer, Easier.” Unlike traditional methods used to restrain sows for claw trimming, such as snout snaring, the Feet First Chute helps keep animals calm and their feet elevated for claw trimmers to work with ease. “You have to get those feet up where you can get to them, and the Feet First Chute works very well for doing that,” Dove says. “Most of the sows will walk right in; it’s just like walking into any other chute - like a feeding crate - when she’s walking into it.” Still, trimming a swine claw differs significantly from trimming a cattle hoof. “On cows, you are concerned about getting things shortened down,” Dove says. “When trimming sows, it’s much more important that we get the claws balanced to each other and maintain the shape of that claw.” Just how often sows will need their claws trimmed will likely vary by facility, Dove says. “When you start getting claws out to 6½ to 7 centimeters, you need to really start thinking about trimming,” he says. “If you start seeing claws curling over the top of each other, or you start noticing that she’s walking on only the medial (inner) claw, and the lateral (outside) claw’s not receiving any weight, all of those are indicators that there’s going to be an issue down the road.” To help avoid problems later on, claw trimming management should begin by examining the gilts. “We have to start looking at gilts when they come into the herd and monitor them pretty closely from there on,” Dove says. “I don’t think we can wait until she’s a second- or third-parity sow to decide that we need to do something.” Today’s swine production facilities may be moving the industry toward a greater awareness for lameness prevention. “I don’t think it’s a matter that we’ve changed the amount of lameness we have in the industry,” Dove says. “I think it’s a matter that we’re observing locomotion more, because those sows are out of stalls, in areas where we can see them move on a daily basis.” * Reprinted from National Hog Farmer 103


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GET ’EM GROW ’EM SHOW ’EM A simplified overview of showpig management from start to finish to help you be successful with your swine project.

Written by Ian Schaefer Ian Schaefer and his siblings, of Schaefer Livestock in Garden City, TX, are no strangers to success in the showpig world. Ian’s family runs approximately 65 sows, producing competitive barrows and gilts. In addition to many class winners and breed champions at the county and state level, they have bred, raised and shown the Grand Champion barrow at the Houston Livestock Show and the Reserve Grand Champion barrow at Rodeo Austin, in just the past few years. Ian, who was the TPPA intern in 2014 and has a long list of accolades from collegiate livestock judging, recently graduated from Texas Tech University with his Animal Science degree and is currently pursuing a Master’s of Business Administration, also at TTU. The time to shop for show pigs for the Texas majors is upon us! For breeders and feeders alike, this is an extremely exciting time of year, maybe the most exciting. We get to see how breeding decisions worked out, if your go-to breeder’s best sow hit again this year, or if the hottest sire will keep his reputation. The cool thing is, regardless of how last year’s set turned out, this group will have the chance to be the ones you always dreamed of feeding. We know there are so many challenges associated with finding quality show pigs that fit your budget, come from breeders that you trust, and are at a farm within a reasonable distance from you. Once those obstacles are out of the way, there can still be a ton of questions about how to correctly manage your project. Our goal is to hopefully help you take as much guess work out of getting your pig ready as possible by providing you with some insight as to what to do on a daily basis at home. We will not delve into the complexities of what to actually feed pigs here, but just about everything else will be covered. If you’ve got the drive to put in the extra hours at home to make your show pigs the absolute best they can be, but aren’t quite sure where to start, this will give you a good idea about some of the things that should be taken care of. There are many great feeders and showmen and women across the entire nation, but this article will focus on what we have found to work best for us. It’s funny: my family had a barn full of barrows every year for more than fifteen years and learned something every time we hauled hogs to a show, yet here we are now with empty pens and some knowledge under our belts that we cannot even put to use. I say this to make the point that if you have questions that are not answered here, you should take advantage of the fact that experienced hog guys would love to share their knowledge with you. We would never claim to know every secret in the book, but over the years, we’ve developed quite a few habits that we put into effect when raising our hogs to be shown. One thing to keep in mind: Never, ever stop learning. The most important piece of advice I would give is to “do your homework.” I know that’s something that isn’t always a joy to get fired up about, but when the time comes to get your pig shown, having completed your “homework” is the position you want to be in, because it’s the position you’ll have to be in to win, most of the time. These topics are broad, yet they form the basis of what we believe you should be doing to put yourself in the best possible position to win.

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ur Homework?” What is “Doing Yo following: To us, it means the ment to grow the proper environ  Giving your pig tion to health Paying careful atten  hair for the ring Preparing skin and  and nutrition Managing weight  showing Mastering the art of 


We’ve broken the entire process down into three parts in a timeline:

(1) The Receiving Phase

(2) “Life as a Show Pig”

(3) The Training Phase

The Receiving Phase - Getting Started This portion includes everything that should happen in the first month that you have the hog. Typically, the pigs that you buy will be 8-10 weeks of age, a time in their life where stress can be fairly high, and where they can be quite sensitive to factors like weather and potential illnesses. Getting the pigs from their old home to their new one can be tough on them. I think we have all purchased hogs that we get home and are disappointed to find don’t look as “fluffy” or “happy” as when we bought them. It’s important to consider that while in transit, they need to stay as warm as possible in the winter and cool in the summer. Temperature extremes and swine in general are not a great mix, so taking pigs out of a heated barn and into a trailer in the freezing cold can be a shock to them. This is something to keep in mind. Once getting the hogs home, we recommend focusing on keeping them warm and dry, while making sure their appetite is satisfied. This includes proper bedding, not putting hogs that are variable in size in the same pen, and providing fresh feed and water. If you hand-feed early on, it’s easier to tell whether or not they are eating their fill and it helps hold you accountable for checking on them, not just making sure “the self-feeder is full.” During this stage, health is crucial and any signs of discomfort need to be addressed as soon as they are discovered. In our experience, when a pig isn’t completely healthy, their willingness to chow down at the trough is the first thing to go. In addition to being sensitive to the environment, baby pigs are at a crucial stage in their lives nutritionally. It is very important to make sure that your pigs get all of those needs met. Typically, as long as you are feeding a starter feed that has been formulated for piglets, you are good to go. You do not want to leave them on these rations for too long as most show pigs out there right now have enough muscle that leaving them on these elevated protein and lysine levels will result in them being too “raw” in their look. It is important to transition to lower protein levels at some point or move away from “hot” feed, as we say. Starter feeds are expensive, so it is pragmatic to transition away from them economically, This time of the year barns are too. My advice would be to not make any drastic feeding changes overnight filling up fast with new projects. in order to avoid hiccups that changing feeds too quickly could cause, such as scours and loss of appetite. With any feeding move, patience is key. The Prior to bringing your new project nice thing is that pigs change more rapidly from diet changes than other home, make certain that you ask the species, so we already have that to be thankful for.

TRANSITIONING FEEDS

We also like to get show whips, strings, water bottles, or anything else that the pigs are interested in and let them “play” with it so they know you’re not something that is trying to harm them. Getting in the pen with your pigs while they eat just to let them adjust to your presence is never a bad idea, and we also like to play the radio in our barn 24/7 so human voices are something they’re used to. This might be especially important if you only feed a couple of hogs because you do not want them to go from a quiet barn where they are the only thing that moves, to a barrow show with 2,500 hogs and experience a pretty big “culture shock.” If you do only feed a couple of hogs, we would strongly recommend hauling them to a jackpot or your county prospect show to get them acclimated to seeing other hogs. The pens in our barn were 6’ x 12’ which is definitely large enough for two pigs until they both weigh about 100 pounds. In a perfect world we would prefer one pig per pen, but if it is not possible and you must combine hogs in this way, be careful to make sure that one doesn’t “hog” all the feed (no pun intended). We get a lot of questions about whether or not outside runs are necessary for feeding hogs, and we would say “no” as long as you exercise enough. Still, just because they have a big pen does not mean they’ll walk themselves to exercise, so you will still need to get them out. We used outside pens (any size is fine) with a slide up door made out of plywood to help get our dark pigs’ skin darkened before shows and when we had beautiful West Texas fall weather to let them just relax outside. Fresh air for show pigs is always a good idea if you have a totally enclosed barn.

seller what kind of feed the animal has been on. To transition between different feeds, the following method is recommended for your showpig project.

No matter what size of animal you have, transitioning from one feed to another works best if done over a series of days. For example, it’s suggested doing feed changes over a period of 7 days. Start by mixing 3/4 of current ration to 1/4 of new feed, then on day 3 mix feed at a 50:50 ratio. Finally on day 5, you can go 3/4 of new feed to 1/4 of old ration and conclude on day 7 with the complete transition to the new ration.

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Daily Care – “Life as a Show Pig” About a month after arrival or when your pigs are close to 100 pounds, we suggest that you begin weighing and washing your hogs weekly. We always chose to do this every Sunday, but feel free to pick any day of the week and stick to it, that way you know when you last weighed and you can track gain effectively. During this time, we brush three times a week with products like Purple Oil or Champions Choice, and let the pig out of their pen to walk around in a larger area on the days that we do not brush them. This is the time in a hog’s life where you will figure out how easy or difficult you predict them to be to train. If they take off running every time you let them out, you might have your hands full. It’s important to know this early on, rather than finding out they’re a “runner” as you chase your pig up and down the aisle at, let’s say, San Antonio, where there are too many people to navigate through. Dealing with the situation at home on a random afternoon is much less stressful than doing so at a stock show with hundreds of hogs and people around to spectate. We understand that you never really know how your pigs will behave at the show, but if they know you and trust you, they’ll typically let you guide them wherever it is you want them to go. This is another reason why hauling to a show before their endpoint is a good idea. Teaching them that you’re the one who takes care of them makes this entire process easier as well. Between now and December, we would expect health to be the most significant challenge to your project. Things happen and your pigs Exercising done as a team is always more enjoyable. can get sick, but it is our responsibility as pork producers to treat any illnesses that come about, and your success as a showman depends on it. Depending what area of Texas you live in, the weather and temperature could start changing often, and this will create challenges for keeping your animals healthy. This is something we can deal with, but we must be aware of what we have to do for our livestock and their well-being. Currently keeping them cool and comfortable will be your top priority, but when the rain and cooler temperatures come, I would consider keeping pigs dry to be more important than extra bedding, but neither can be ignored. By December at the latest, you will need to have started making ground getting your pigs conditioned to being around people and being in and out of their pen. The good news is: as long as you’ve done your part to keep your hog warm, dry, and healthy until then, it is definitely not too late to start working towards getting your show pig ready to hit the ring. The Training Phase We have already talked about “The Receiving Phase” and “Life as a Show Pig.” Of course, those will be imperative to your success, but the next step is the MOST IMPORTANT when it comes to showmanship itself and actually driving in the ring. You can do everything else right, but if you fail here the whole project could be jeopardized. You don’t have to have 15 years of experience or a million dollars to make this happen; you just need the determination to dedicate your time to your project. A common misstep that we see showmen make is waiting too long to begin training their hogs to show. In retrospect, it’s something I would certainly do a better job of if I were still showing. We recommend beginning two months out from your target show at the latest, or whenever they weigh about 150 pounds. One important concept to remember is that there is a distinction between training and exercise. Training is teaching your hogs to drive with a pipe or show whip, while exercise is simply letting them out of the pen to stretch their legs. You need to have been weighing them periodically by Thanksgiving so they should know what a show whip is and know that you will be in control. The beginning of the training phase cannot be the first time that your pigs are out of the pen. That is too late to start. The following are three key objectives we outline when training show pigs:

 “Get ‘em moving” in a straight line  Teach them that you will steer them where they need to go  Tap their head up We spend a week on step 1, then a week on step 2, and then move on to step 3. Getting their head up looks great, and I find driving a pig that will do that one of the neatest feelings involved in showing, BUT it cannot be considered more important than the pig walking. Really slow-moving hogs or those standing still with their head up will very rarely get along in the show ring successfully. One of the most frustrating things for a judge is when they find a hog they believe they like, but can’t get a true read on because the showman is coming up short. It’s the responsibility of the person driving the hog to have done the preparation at home to be ready to showcase the hog on the big day. 108


Let’s talk about training in week 1. By now, the pig should be used to being out of their pen, but getting them out of the barn itself may actually be a challenge. Keep in mind, the first day you try to really train your hog it’s very possible that just getting them outside is a win! Don’t overwork the pigs; they’ll remember better than you think the next time you try and it won’t be fun for anybody. When we do get the barrows outside we walk them in a big pen (about 20’ x 40’), but there isn’t anything wrong with no pen as long as you have plenty of space. For the surface, we use recycled bedding from the barn, which emulates the show ring at a major show fairly well. Watch for sharp rocks, wire, and other objects that could hurt a hog’s foot. To accomplish the first of our three major tasks to get them to drive like champions we must “get ‘em moving.” The most effective way that we’ve Teach them to walk in a straight line found to do so is to use the show whip to steer and keep them moving. them, while patting their back with the free hand to get them to drive. A lot of pigs (some breeds more than others, we’ve found) tend to go in reverse. The best way that we’ve found to cope with this is to make sure that when they do go in reverse they simply go backwards in a straight line and don’t get the chance to turn around. If they do manage to turn around after backing up, they’ll figure out that that is their opportunity to get away from your control and will make a habit of doing it often. By ONLY letting them back straight up and moving backwards with them, they’ll learn that it isn’t going to get them out of being worked. We haven’t ever had a hog that we haven’t been able to break of the walkingbackward-trick, but it is a challenge that takes patience to overcome.

While training, visualize the situations you’ll face at the show.

As mentioned, our pen is 20’ x 40’. To start, we just walk them the length of the pen, turn around, and walk it again until the pig gets fairly tired. For the first week, it may only last 7-8 minutes before they get tired and need to be put up until the next day.

We spend the second week of training barrows and gilts getting them used to steering. By now, they know to go in a straight line and typically will do so until they come to the fence or some other object that stops them. In our pen, we’d use a sort of zigzagging pattern from one end to the other, or we would choose different items around the pen and act like they’re the judge… We would show these fake “judges” a chest, rear, profile, front three-quarter, and rear three-quarter shot. What’s also helpful is if you have your brother, Practicing all situations, such as coming out of the holding pen, will pay off when it counts. sister, parent, ag teacher, or county agent there to help you and they can be the pretend judge for you. Whoever helps you with your pigs can also tell you which angles look the best and which angles you should showcase to the judge. It’s a completely different vantage point to be looking at the pig while showing it than it is to see it from 15 feet away like the judge often will. The third week and every week after can be more focused towards getting that hog’s nose up in the air like we all want to do. This is usually accomplished just by tapping under the barrow or gilt’s chin. Most of the time, because they already know that they’re supposed to go in a straight line, they’ll continue to walk forward even when their chin is being tapped with the show whip and they’ll drive up-headed. During this time, keep in mind that patting them on the back with your free hand at the same time as tapping their chin will encourage them to walk forward with their heads up. Next, we’re going to cover what you should actually do in the show ring. We’ve been talking about doing your homework. In school, if you want to do well on test day for your math class, you should have a pencil, calculator and scratch paper. With the show ring as your classroom, you better have the right tools to ace this test. That means having a brush, a towel, your show whip and whatever paperwork is needed, such as a CTBR certificate. Use your driving device to teach them where to go and to keep that heads up cocky look. 109


It’s SHOW TIME! Judge’s form first impressions about pigs, and at times, it can be hard for them to change what their initial thoughts were. That’s why you need to Make sure the first look is right, or else it’s going to be an uphill fight. You and your pig need to be ready to go, so when you enter the sift pen or the big ring for the first time and those judge’s eyes are dialed in, you better start showing and presenting your pig. Too often when that gate opens, exhibitors or their pigs are not ready. Those first three seconds are crucial and can be the difference between a ribbon or never getting another serious look. That’s really the only time you can be assured that the judge’s eyes are solely on your pig; my advice is to not waste it. Along with your pig looking its best, let’s not forget about ourselves and the judge’s first impression of you too! You have to look the part, which means dressing appropriately and looking sharp; no holes in the jeans, tennis shoes, untucked shirts, etc. Boys- be clean cut, fix your hair and wear a collared shirt. Girls- avoid the excessive jewelry and accessories. No doubt there are some that have turned the stock show into a fashion show, but you want to be remembered for doing an awesome job showing that great pig, rather than that distracting outfit. Putting yourself in position for success is about being seen. If your pig is not seen by the judge, how can it do well? In order to be seen, you need to have ring awareness. You’ll need to not only stay out of the pack and separate yourself from the congestion of other pigs, but you also need stay out of the corners and avoid riding the rail. The other important part to being seen is to position yourself the right distance away from the judge. The judge cannot see your pig or get the best view if you’re driving it right underneath him. There will be times when the judge wants you to drive your pig towards him or he’ll get up close for the view he wants, but staying approximately 10-15 feet away provides for a great view as that is where he will typically be surveying the ring. You must anticipate where the judge will be headed, where the pack of the other pigs are, and find space. Great examples of distance and position!

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Showmanship is about putting your pig’s best attributes on display for the judge. Everything previously mentioned will help with that effort. For the pig to look its best, you want the pace to which it’s walking to be natural, not too fast, not too slow and certainly not stopping (typically happens when focused too much on keeping the head up or making it too high). Which brings us to the point of Keep ‘em on the go, if you want to win the show. When the judge’s eyes are on your pig, you need to keep driving. At the same time, you can overdrive your pig which can create a problem and get them too tired out to where they break down on you. You definitely want to avoid that if you’re going to have a chance at the end of the class. When you’re in the holding pen, you need to keep your pig cool and relaxed; spray water on it and do not let it fight with other pigs. If you’re out in the ring while the judge is still in the sift pen, let your pig take a breather. Be a student of the game. Watch earlier classes so that you know the sequence Let your pig take a breather when the of events and can see this particular judge’s tendencies and how the ring staff judge is not in the ring. operates. Since you did your homework at home, you now won’t have to focus so much on your pig; you can now focus on the judge and the situation, and put yourself in the best position. A difference seen in showmen with experience- is focus, intensity and confidence. While you want to enjoy yourself and have fun, because that’s what showing is all about, you need to show the ‘will to win’ in the ring, not show off every tooth in your mouth from the world’s biggest smile (reserve that for after you win). When you drive your hog, you need to convey to the judge that you’re the best and your hog is the best. If you show that way, the judge will definitely take notice in a good way.

These showman have the

determined look of a Champion.

Preparation = Confidence

But there is a difference between being confident and being cocky. Showing livestock is a tremendous tool for youth development and I feel there’s no better activity out there. It’s sad to see any instance when that objective and sportsmanship is lost. So it’s important to know that If you want to win the banners, you must learn to show with manners. Stay humble in winning and gracious in defeat. Shaking the hand of the judge and your fellow competitors, and being sincere about it, is important. Remember, there’s always another show and everyone will have their day. This is also in reference to how you treat your pig. NEVER beat on your project or overuse the whip, at any time; have patience and keep your cool. While pigs are one of the smartest animals out there, it takes a lot of time to train them properly; and even then, things don’t want always go as planned. Success is where preparation and opportunity meet. Remember to “do your homework” and you’ll ace the test!

Make sure to thank the judge and congratulate other competitors.

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Show Pig Alley 3

♦ Over 200 years of Combined Experience ♦ Functional Pigs that WIN ♦ All breeds available in one area

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FDF Genetics 1918 CR 676 Dayton, Tx 77535 Roy: 979-583-8282 Lesleigh: 936-391-5045 Rory Duelm 192 Altwein Ln. New Braunfels, Tx 78130 830-608-5058 830-606-7547 Greg / Vince Franckowiak Ryan Koltermann 15871 St. Hedwig Rd. St. Hedwig, Tx 78152 Vince: 210-336-9428 Greg: 210-667-1325 Ryan: 210-844-8735 Gerth Hog Farm 6655 West IH 10 Seguin, Tx 78155 830-914-2593

VICTORIA UPPER VALLEY MISSION RD

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Warren Lampmann 16065 New Berlin Rd. St. Hedwig, Tx 78152 830-914-2961 210-748-6239

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Rodney Kelso & Sons 701 Sweet Home Rd. Seguin, Tx 78155 Kurt: 210-240-6710 Rodney: 830-305-4422 830-303-7579

7

Otto Luensmann 16113 New Berlin Rd. St. Hedwig, Tx 78152 830-914-2507

8

James Holt 88 S. Camino Real Kyle, Tx 78640 O: 512-398-5948 C: 512-217-6543

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Real Hog Farm Chuck & Russell Real 15492 Real Rock Rd. Marion, Tx 78124 H: 830-914-2833 Chuck: 210-827-7351 Russell: 210-216-2688 3B Showpigs Troy Brown 5209 FM 775 Seguin, TX 78155 210-844-3044

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Robert Huebner 251 Mt. Pleasant Kingsburry, Tx 78638 830-639-4788 830-660-7101

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Victory Lane Show Pigs 550 Wild Coyote Trail Marion, Tx 78124 Austin: 830-708-8686 Mackenzie: 830-708-8688 Jeff: 830-708-5930

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Doege Show Pigs 3085 Kusmierz Rd. St. Hedwig, Tx 78152 210-316-9627 210-667-9627 210-342-5112

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L & H Show Pigs 6781 FM 236 Victoria, Tx 77905 Russell: 361-676-5453 Robert: 361-550-5579

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Fey Show Pigs 2681 CR 420 Stockdale, Tx 78160 Kenneth: 830-481-3162 Keith: 830-534-3755

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Doug Alderson 380 N. Santa Clara Rd. Marion, TX 78124 210-296-4479


Mark Your Calendars Now! Seguin Swine Breeders 10th Annual Prospect Show December 6, 2015

PRIZE S Cash! Buckles ! Plaques !

Guadalupe Co. Fairgrounds n Grand Champio $400

Buckles for all Breed Champions Plaques to Reserve Champions Ribbons for ALL!

SHOW FORMAT

Reserve Gran d $200

Judge: Cassidy Hayes

Weight Cards Due 9:00 am Showmanship 9:00 am: Pee Wee 8 & under, Junior 9-13, Senior 14 & Over Show follows Showmanship: Duroc, Hampshire, OPB, Yorkshire, Cross GILTS & S W O BARR THER E G O T SHOW

NO BOAR S OVER 125 LBS.

Name: Address: Phone Number: No. Head:

Entry Fee ($20 per Head):

Entries Must be received by December 4th

Late Fee at Show $25 per Head

Mail Enteries to: Seguin Swine Breeders 210 E. Live Oak Seguin, TX 78155

Contact: Travis Franke 830-379-1972

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The best is yet to come... S&W Swine Productions More Winners: Grand Champion Freer Show - Gilbert Rodriquez Champion Spot Nueces County - Joseph Riddle Res. Champion Duroc Rio Grande Livestock Show - Amanda Frias Reserve Champion Chester Nueces County - Madelynn Meyer 4th Place San Diego County - Gilbert Rodriquez Reserve Grand Champion of Brooks County Congratulations to Cooper Wildman!

Popular 4th Place Class 33 Durocs San Antonio

Scot Sullivan Robstown,TX Home: 361-387-9686 Cell: 361-960-6725

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Grant Meyer Tyler Meyer 830.459.8645 830.928.8648 Kyzar Meyer 830.928.8644


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Farm Sale #1 – Garden City, TX | September 19 Ring of Success – Levelland, TX | October 4 Farm Sale #2 – Garden City, TX | October 10

2901 CR  130   Garden  City,  TX  79739   Online Sale Doug:  432-­‐517-­‐0352   Ian:  432-­‐213-­‐3623   www.schaeferlivestock.com

– Showpig.com | November 10

ALL BREEDS AVAILABLE | ALL CERTIFIED TEXAS BRED

Champion York Barrow - 2015

Congratulations Kaylee Martin!

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- Pictured at 5 years old – Still powerful with look-

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Super Monster x White Trash | Bred to Best Man

- Littermate to Ch York Barrow ‘15 San Antonio -

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White Trash sow | Bred to Mr Wolf

- Littermate to Ch York Barrow ‘15 San Antonio -

Dam of Ch York ‘15 San Antonio & Res Grand ‘14 Austin


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One Man’s Opinion

By Bailee Wright

Growing up showing livestock, I can’t even count how many times I have been told the old saying, “it’s one man’s opinion on one day.” We all know there is a lot that goes into being successful in the show ring; a good animal, a good showman, some luck, endless hours of preparation, hard work, etc., but part of the trick is trying to decide what you think the opinion of “that man” is going to be on that “one day.” To help you out, I sat down with the judges of the major shows for this show season and got the scoop.

Texas State Fair

Barrow Show

Gilt show

Kent Bennington.

Maverick Squires.

Hometown: Monticello, Indiana Colleges: Black Hawk East & Western Illinois Degrees: Animal Science Likes: Hogs that get out & go. I sift based on feet & legs.

Hometown: Kingfisher, Oklahoma Colleges: Butler Community College & Oklahoma State Degrees: Animal Science Likes: Good built hogs with a lot of bone, ribcage & spread up high.

What would you label as your “kind” of hog? Really sound ones; they have to be able to move.

What kind of hogs do you hate to see? I am not a fan of fat ones.

What is your showmanship pet peeve? Not driving hogs & letting them stop.

What is your initial 3 sec. sift based on? Skeletal correctness and range of motion. I like them comfortable on the move. 118

What is your initial 3 sec. sift based on? The priorities; Build, power and look

What gets you hooked on a hog? I love a hog that has a good build in terms of feet and legs.

What is your showmanship pet peeve? Not making eye-contact. I like a showman who can find the open spots.

What would you label as your “kind of hog? I like all kinds, as long as it’s a good kind.


Fort worth stock show & Rodeo

Rodeo Austin Fair & Rodeo

Barrow Show

Barrow Show

Kane Causemaker.

Miles Toenyes.

Hometown: Atkinson, Illinois Colleges: Black Hawk East & Oklahoma State University Degrees: B.S. in Animal Science & Master’s in Ag Education Likes: Hogs with balance of proportions.

Hometown: Highland, Illinois Colleges: Lakeland Junior College & Western Illinois Degrees: Animal Science & AgriBusiness Likes: Cool looking, sound, square built hogs.

What makes a Texas Major unique?

Why are you excited to judge this show? The barrows in Texas are always incredible, but I truly enjoy meeting the kids who drive What’s your philosophy in raising hogs? them. 1. Breed good to good. I don’t believe in using What gets you hooked on a hog? Texas has a tradition of excellence. There is a history of a high level of competition deep in numbers.

boars to overcompensate in an area that a sow may be lacking, or vice versa. 2. Eliminate low-quality females, regardless of pedigree. 3. Keep or cull without emotion.

I love those tall shouldered, square, heavy boned, sound ones.

What is your pet peeve when it comes to showmanship?

What’s going through your mind when you’re judging a show?

Overworking a pig. A good showman has the ability to remain cool and collected.

What’s your philosophy in raising hogs? Raise the kind you love and sell the kind you’d feed.

Just really focusing on my priorities, along with some AC/DC. 119


San ANtonio Stock Show Barrow Show

Clint Schwab. Hometown: O’Fallan, Illinois Colleges: Colorado State & Iowa State University Degrees: B.S. in Animal Science & Genetics PhD. Likes: A combination hog.

Barrow Show

Andy Rash. Hometown: Kewanee, Illinois Colleges: Black Hawk East & Western Illinois Degrees: B.S. & Master’s in Animal Science Likes: Flexible hogs that can get out and go.

What makes you the most excited to judge this show?

What makes you the most excited to judge this show?

Aside from the tremendous quality of San Antonio, getting to work with so many youth in that environment is definitely something to look forward to.

San Antonio is one that makes the hair on your neck stand up to think about sorting! Game faces aren’t a problem at the Texas Majors.

What is your initial 3 sec. sift based on?

Are they true and comfortable. I look to see if their feet, pastern, knee/hock and stifle/ shoulder read to be true, and that their joint work is comfortable.

Skeletal correctness first, then a combination of balance and power.

What is your initial 3 sec. sift based on?

What would you label as your “kind” of What gets you hooked on a hog? hog? I will always prioritize combination hogs that are built correctly.

Natural flexibility. If they can go and grab gears, carry their head high and reach off both ends, that hits me hard.

What do you think makes a Texas Major What’s going through your mind when Show unique? It’s a different level of intensity. Part of that is you’re judging a show? due to the numbers, but it also has to do with the atmosphere and level of competition. 120

Focusing on each hog that comes through the gate and where I’d like to change them.


Houston livestock Show Barrow Show

Brian Arnold. Hometown: West Lafayette, Indiana Colleges: Black Hawk East & Purdue University Degrees: Animal Agribusiness Likes: Balanced, complete hogs. What do you think makes a good showman? First impressions are important, so being on your A-game is a must.

What is your initial 3 sec. sift based on? Squareness, structure, balance.

What gets you hooked on a hog? Balanced hogs win shows. It’s a combinations of how everything “fits.”

What makes you the most excited to judge this show? Everything about this show is first class. Houston was the first major show that gave me a chance to judge and I look forward to coming back.

What’s going through your mind when you’re judging a show?

“The spirit, the will to win, and the will to excel... These are the things that will endure and these are the qualities that are so much more important than any of the events themselves.” - Vince lombardi

Although I was unable to include every single major show judge, I hope this has given you some direction to go wtih your show pig projects. I think it is truly humbling to hear how much Texas is revered around the country for our youth livestock programs. We want to wish all of the exhibitors good luck this show season and safe travels! We will see you down the road! Thank you to all of the judges who took the time out of their busy schedule to be a part of this article; it truly exemplifies their commitment to youth development! We will see y’all in Texas, where everything is bigger and better!

Before the first class, I make sure I have a clear vision of setting the standard for what I am looking for and I try to maintain that mindset. 121


Producing Champions EVERYDAY! Sale #1 th Wed., October 14 6:30 pm August Barrows

Offering: Berk, Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, York, Spot

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BREEDERS

ASSOCIATION

2015 SHOW PIG SALES October 17th

September 27th Judging @ 11:00 am Sale @ 3:00 pm

Judging @ 12:30 pm Sale @ 6:00 pm

Comfort FFA Ag Barns Hwy 87, Comfort, TX

Kerr Co. Hill Country Youth Event Center Hwy 27, Kerrville, TX

Offering Top Quality Texas Bred Gilts and Market Barrows

Offering Major Show Barrows and Select Breeding Gilts

Middle Weight Champion Cross Gilt 2015 Hill Co. District Jr. Livestock Show C-C SHOW PIGS

CONSIGNORS

RB2 SHOWPIGS C-C SHOWPIGS CULVER SHOWPIGS VOGT’S 3C SHOWPIGS SONY SCHMIDT BILLY GASS LARRY LANGBEIN DAVID SPENRATH TOMMY LAMBERT JAMES MARQUARDT

Champion Poland Barrow 2015 San Antonio Livestock Show VOGT’S 3C SHOWPIGS

1st, 2nd & 4th Place Yorkshire Gilts 2015 Houston Livestock Show C-C SHOW PIGS

GUEST CONSIGNORS

BLAZIN 7’S STEPHEN’S FARMS RW GENETICS MICHAEL WOERNDEL LUKE LINDNER DAVID ESSER WHISKEY CREEK SHOW PIGS MAPPES SHOW PIGS LAZY OAKS GENETICS GRAND SLAM SWINE GENETICS

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Your Search for the

BEST

Begins & Ends

TEXAS PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION

HERE

Texas Pork Producers Association

Certified Texas Bred Registry

The Certified Texas Bred Registry program was established to promote Texas bred and raised pigs and support both the breeders and the 4-H / FFA youth of Texas who raise & show Certified Texas Bred pigs.

How does participation benefit you?

✓ Additional Premiums

• $100 premium is awarded to individuals exhibiting a CTBR Class Champion in each class of the barrow shows at the State Fair of Texas, Fort Worth Stock Show, San Antonio Livestock Exposition, Star of Texas and the Houston Livestock Show. • Premium money is distributed to all placing barrows at the San Angelo Stock Show in addition to buckles and trophies awarded to exhibitors of Champion and Reserve Champion breeds. • $46,000+ was awarded during the 2014-2015 show season to Texas 4-H and FFA students.

✓ Scholarship Opportunities

• $35,000 has been awarded to Texas students since 2011 through the CTBR program. • In 2015, three scholarships were awarded at $2,500 each.

✓ Production Grant Program

• Provide financial assistance to deserving 4-H and FFA students at a minimum amount of $2,500 who are continuing their involvement in swine production through establishing their own breeding program.

✓ Participate in the San Angelo Stock Show

• The CTBR Texas Stars Gilt Show & Select Sale and the San Angelo Barrow Show is only open to youth exhibiting pigs registered in the Certified Texas Bred Registry program. • Gilts selected for the sale brought an average of nearly $2,600 back to each exhibitor in 2015.

How to participate?

✓ Buy your showpigs from a CTBR breeder! ✓ Exhibit your CTBR pig at a Texas Major Show or the State Fair of Texas! ✓ Become a TPPA member for additional benefits!

Visit texaspork.org to view our Breeder Directory, & the Fall Show Pigs Sales Trail. P.O. Box 10168

126

*

Austin, TX 78766

*

512.453.0615

*

512.451.5536 Fax


Certified Texas Bred Registry

Breeders Directory

The Certified Texas Bred Program was established to promote Texas Bred pigs, breeders and youth of Texas. In the 2014-2015 show season, over $46,000 was awarded to Texas 4-H and FFA members who exhibited CTBR pigs at a major show in Texas.

Look to these breeders when purchasing your next showpig and request a CTBR Certificate!

Northern High Plains North Texas

East Texas

Southern High Plains Far West Texas

West Texas South Texas

South East Texas Heart of Texas

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NORTHERN HIGH PLAINS Ross Baird B&B Livestock Hereford (806) 364-5216 (806) 346-1120 Garrett & Cooper Bennett Shamrock (806) 334-1528 Tony Black Berkshires Dalhart (806) 333-2531 Chris & Tiffany Blount High Plains Genetics Wildorado (806) 681-4246 Jimmie Boatwright Boatwright-Petersen Show Swine Canyon (806) 570-2725 (806) 655-3884 Alabama Bohannon Bama Show Pigs Wellington (806) 205-0630 (806) 447-2806

Joe Couts Joe Couts Showpigs Pampa (806) 663-1630 (806) 669-6278 Greg Curry Canyon (806) 674-8788

Seth Horn M Bar M Dorpers Claude (806) 944-5218

Jonathan Dietrich Keystone Genetics Hartley (570) 412-3315

Lance Horsford Horsford Show Pigs Stratford (806) 930-3299 (806) 366-2219

Chris Fischbacher Fischbacher Showpigs Wildorado (806) 336-2162 Jace Francis Francis Farms Silverton (806) 292-1848 Chad & Tamara Githens DT Show Swine Perryton (806) 228-6593 Veronica Gray G-O Show Pigs Wellington (806) 681-5328 (806) 447-5062 Kammie Guest Dumas (806)935-3587

Bill Brigham Farwell (575) 714-0590

Brad Haiduk 3C Show Pigs White Deer (806) 669-8549

Bert Byrd Byrd Family Farms, LLC. Happy (806) 292-3373 (806) 764-3343

Levon Harman Doubleheart Hogs of Happy Happy (806) 558-4081

Levi Canales LC Genetics & Co. Amarillo (806) 676-7173

Wayne & Leslie Harman Harman Farms Perryton (806) 435-2222 (806) 202-2176

Mike Clay Clay Farms White Deer (806) 883-4831 (806) 595-4831

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Andy & Lishelle Hefley A&L Livestock Shamrock (806) 681-7217

Darren Haseloff Darren Haseloff Farms Farwell (806) 481-2038 (575) 309-5662

Kevin Howell Kevin Howell Hogs White Deer (806) 570-2046 Chris Hunt Chris Hunt Farms Friona (806) 346-1843 (806) 250-3151 Scott Huseman Huseman Genetics Nazareth (806) 647-9435 Hannah Johnson Happy (806) 683-0551 Layne Jones Jonetics Canyon (806) 676-1527 Rod Karlin Karlin Livestock Gruver (806) 338-0266 Russel Keown Clarendon (806) 662-4655 Bryan Kirk 4-K Showpigs Darrouzett (806) 886-8340 (806) 624-2199 Jimmy Maddox MTM Genetics Briscoe (806) 375-2277

Mel Manhart Pampa (806) 595-0942 Carlee Metcalf Stratford (806) 366-2035 Jason Miller MVB Genetics Sunray (806) 922-3595 Benny Mote Mote Farms Tulia (806) 627-8211 (806) 764-3513 (806) 451-1949 Danny Nusser Nusser Livestock Canyon (806) 376-0051 Jerry Owen Farwell (575) 714-0577 (806) 481-3436 Gary Patterson Gary Patterson Livestock Dimmitt (806) 418-0759 Ann Pipkin BP Showpigs Spearman (214) 733-2466 Ryan Potts BCD Showpigs Friona (806) 265-5624 (575) 309-8104 Seth Ralston Ralston Hog Farm Dalhart (806) 384-3059 (806) 773-6989 Greg Ramsey Ramsey Farms Quitaque (806) 269-1335 Andrew C. Sanchez Sanchez Show Pigs Fritch (806) 857-0122


Johnny Schaef Schaef Farms Amarillo (806) 206-5063 (806) 383-7900 Greg & Charles Slough GNC Genetics Gruver (806) 736-8788 Kip Smith Kip Smith Show Pigs Hereford (806) 206-2482 Kyle Stephens Stephens Farms Amarillo (806) 654-5667 (806) 381-4582 Kaleb & Kenny Street S&R Showpigs Dumas (806) 674-9283 (806) 935-4363 Jack L. Swain Swain Farms Stratford (806) 753-7579 (806) 396-5839 (806) 396-5579 Shane & Tatum Swenhaugen Rival Genetics Canadian (806) 202-4789 (806) 217-1093 Cory Swinford Triple Creek Show Pigs Borger (806) 683-6647 Mike Thomas 4T Farms Valle De Oro (806) 676-3138 (806) 675-3138

Ronnie Ward Doe Creek Show Pigs Wellington (806) 898-3015

Devin Blanton Ransom Canyon (806) 773-0090 (806) 829-2732

Jason Foote Foote Farms Seminole (432) 290-1020

Clay Wheeler C&C Livestock Stratford (806) 930-4894

Tanner Blount Plains (806) 777-0871

Averi Gilbert Gilbertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Show Pigs Paducah (806) 269-0715

Billy Wiggs Clarendon (806) 290-3774

Chris Cabler Rafter C Show Pigs Memphis (806) 204-0439

Burt Williams Williams Livestock Spearman (806) 676-4334 (806) 683-9890 (806) 659-3680

Jeremy Cabler Cabler Farms Spur (806) 284-2150 (806) 269-9998

Gary Woodward Woodward Farms Skellytown (806) 662-0486 (806) 279-0019

SOUTHERN HIGH PLAINS Mark Bearden T&M Show Pigs Brownfield (806) 759-8046 Denny Belew Belew Farms Tahoka (806) 470-0969 (806) 998-4046

Kenny Campbell Campbell Farms Hale Center (806) 839-3160 (806) 787-9663 Sarah & Karis Cartensen Lockney (806) 494-1280 (806) 652-3459 Mateo Cavazos Ralls (806) 253-0520 (806) 632-9168 Bryan Childers Smyer (806) 577-0287 Geoff Cooper Cooper & Cudd Showpigs Brownfield (806) 891-3388 (806) 637-7071

Todd & Moriah Beyers Abernathy (806) 252-5204

Kristi Culp TKC Show Pigs Lamesa (806) 759-9329 (806) 497-6731

Chance Waldrip Cornerstone Ventures, LLC. Dalhart (806)-341-5764

Brandon & Ethan Biggs Biggs Livestock Plainview (806) 292-6670

Jerry Diaz 3D Showpigs Ralls (806) 620-0109

Weldon Walser Walser Farms/Hot Rod Genetics Canadian (806) 323-2290 (806) 323-6006

Tabetha Bigham Lockney (806) 983-1058

Rusty Ferguson Ferguson Show Pigs Levelland (806) 297-3389 (806) 781-7616 (806) 777-7424

Dennis Givens Olton (806) 292-3002 (806) 285-2068 Braden & Heston Graves Floydada (806) 983-6207 Todd Gregory GO Genetics Lamesa (806) 577-2400 Shayne Griffiths BTD Show Pigs Plains (806) 456-7301 Robbie Harkey Harkey Farms Hale Center (806) 778-7810 Curtis Harkey New Deal (806) 777-0575 Randy Hathorn Hathorn Farms Shallowater (806) 778-7801 Luther Hill Littlefield (806) 385-5308 (806) 729-6781 Chad Hill Chad Hill Durocs Lubbock (806) 433-7787 Jonathan Hisey Hisey & Sons Genetics Wolfforth (806) 778-8242 Brian Hubbard Hubner Farms Levelland (806) 893-3982 (806) 543-8579 129


Scott Jeffreys LSG Show Pigs Lubbock (806) 548-1490 Coby Johnson Slaton (806) 353-5206 Matthew Kirkland K&K Farms Hale Center (806) 292-8620 (806) 879-2126 Tadd & Scotta Knight Knight Show Pigs Shallowater (806) 873-3535 (806) 832-1896 Josh Krohn DL Show Pigs Lamesa (806) 759-7735 Randy Lambert Lambert Farms Memphis (806) 204-0185 (806) 259-3881 Shalin Lawson Plainview (806) 292-9760 (806) 889-3607 Heath Link Link Showpigs New Home (806) 241-4749 (806) 241-4750 Lee Lisemby Lisemby Show Pigs Wilson (806) 777-9400 Lowery, Cooley, Spargo Top of Texas Show Pigs Idalou (806) 544-6199 Milton Marrow Marrow Farms Levelland (806) 791-1591 (806) 894-6614 (806) 891-6205 Sean Mason Mason Brothers Show Stock Muleshoe (806) 965-2199 (806) 946-9707 130

Rick McKay McKay Show Pigs Plainview (806) 518-0282 (806) 889-3555

Robbie & Sissy Phillips Phillips Show Pigs Levelland (806) 790-4345 (806) 297-3238

Timothy Meador Meador Showpigs Aspermont (940) 200-0655 (940) 200-1401

Curtis Preston Preston Show Pigs Muleshoe (806) 946-7467 (806) 272-4583

Kevin Methvin Methvin Hog Farm Levelland (806) 638-5140 (806) 894-8068

Danny Preston Preston Show Barrows Tahoka (806) 759-1090 (806) 561-5365

Junebug Miller S.S.T. Swine Hale Center (806) 292-2002

Mario Quintanilla Levelland (806) 781-9056

Tripp Cutter Moore Brownfield (432) 250-5774

Oliver Rusher Sweet Tooth Farms Plainview (806) 685-1941

Colby Newbrough Newbrough Farms Memphis (806) 983-0017

Kamberlyn Faith Salazar Turkey (806) 269-7603 (806) 423-1161

Gary & Robin Nixon Nixon Family Farms Floydada (806) 632-2241 (806) 983-5483

Shane & Brooke Shobert Red Raider Genetics Spur (806) 269-1313 (806) 269-9998 (806) 271-4238

Chad Orum Orum Show Pigs Seminole (806) 535-9144 Delton Osbourn 3rd Day Genetics Justiceburg (806) 559-8787 (806) 629-4088

Emily Shultz Lubbock (806) 789-1469 Bryan Thomas Circle T Show Pigs Spur (806) 470-1170

Bill Owens Owens Show Pigs Lubbock (806) 863-2544

Kenneth Thomason KT Show Pigs Spur (806) 269-4200 (806) 294-5057

Alan Parker Big Country Show Pigs Rotan (806) 662-7485

Sawyer Thompson Triangle T Farms Paducah (806) 269-4343 (806) 492-2360

Steve Paz Steve Paz Show Pigs Lubbock (806) 319-2421

Rusty Trull Rusty Trull Farms Morton (806) 893-5987

Dustin Urbantke Muleshoe (806) 638-0099 Robert Van Meter Flatlander Show Pigs McAdoo (806) 675-6004 (806) 697-2685 Mitch Whitefield Roby (325) 776-2194 (325) 735-3031 (325) 201-3627 Jay Winter Wintex Farms Lubbock (806) 438-2986 (806) 892-3089 Stanley M. Young Belew & Young Lubbock (806) 777-9098 (806) 745-2645

NORTH TEXAS Debbie & Nathan Acuff D & N Show Pigs Farmersville (214) 725-2116 Ronnie Allen & Stacy Henry BRS Hog Farm Crowell (940) 655-8081 Shannon Barbee Hamlin (325) 370-4503 Brian Bennett Bennett Showpigs & Edwards Family Genetics Stephenville (254) 396-4400 (254) 223-2479 Elmer Beshear Beshear Showpigs Royse City (972) 977-1375 Glen Blount Blount Farms Denison (903) 814-4900 (903) 465-9687


Dane Bonfy Bonfy & Klein Vernon (940) 357-1592 (940) 553-2755 David W. Bragg BRAGG Farms Stephenville (254) 977-4141 (254) 965-4141 Bill Burkard Burkard Family Farm Bonham (214) 475-4931 Katelynn Butler K1O Stephenville (254) 592-2588 (254) 965-4561 Terry Calhoun Calhoun Show Pigs Sherman (903) 819-2287 (903) 532-6628 Mark Castleberry Castle Rock Nutrition LLC. Stephenville (806) 252-8283 David Chumbley Chumbley Farms Plano (903) 814-4282 (972) 576-8808 Cody Conner Conner & Sons Show Pigs Vernon (940) 839-5110 (940) 887-3333 Jaycee Cowley Nevada (214) 769-6135

Mike Fischer Fischer Show Pigs Iowa Park (940) 642-5653 J.R. Fortner Fortner Showpigs Anna (214) 878-2714 Greg Gibson Dublin (254) 784-5045 (254) 445-4678 Julie Godfrey Tarleton State University Stephenville (254) 968-9215 (254) 968-9203 Randy & Megan Gross Gross Livestock Grandview (817) 269-2304 (817) 866-4230

Carl Kent Carl Kent & Sons Pottsboro (903) 271-5128 (903) 786-9423 Braylee Kirkpatrick Diamond S Showpigs Tolar (817) 559-7683 Jason Lackey Lackey Livestock Haskell (806) 787-3606 Ronnie Lambert Knox City (940) 203-2500 (940) 657-3654 Dustin Lambert Lambert Genetics Sherman (903) 744-2437

Wesley McMillian Dublin (254) 764-4275 Ray Michou Michou Chester Whites Weatherford (817) 304-2335 Tanna Moeller BLT Swine Haskell (940) 863-0069 (940) 203-0387 Coleman Morrison Tolar (817) 578-1719 (254) 835-4458 Phillip Newton The Herd Haskell (940) 256-0410 Jacob Norwood Valley View (940) 736-3021

Willard Hill Hill Show Pigs Nevada (214) 808-7695

Larry D. Larrison Larrison Creek Livestock Cleburne (817) 946-7672 (817) 641-0277

Ginger Hilton Hilton Farms, Inc. Olney (940) 564-3990 (940) 782-7107

Skylin Ledesma Sky’s the Limit Show Pigs Knox City (940) 256-0058 (940) 657-5532

Jacob Holland PH Genetics Blue Ridge (214) 491-0335 (972) 740-2048

Amber Lockhart Flying J Show Pigs Olney (940) 564-3042 (940) 250-9805

Mike Parsons EZ Farms & IBEX Genetics Albany (325) 762-4018 (325) 762-2547

Chip & Shyann Holley Shy’s Durocs Wylie (214) 562-7774

Brad Massey Blazin 7’s Farms Mineral Wells (940) 682-6355 (940) 325-3371

Brady Pierce Iowa Park (940) 923-3365 (940) 636-2490

Curt Crago Graham (817) 991-9293

Barry Hudgens H&C Showpigs Mabank (903) 386-9271

Clayton Cumby CIC Farms Haskell (325) 439-8027

Cynthia Jenkins Lone Horse Ranch Hawley (325) 280-9932

Zachary Curry Curry Livestock Dublin (254) 434-1365 (254) 592-1395

Ky Kennedy Kennedy Livestock Breckenridge (806) 470-1699

Cody McCleery McCleery Family Durocs Poolville (817) 613-6666 Dee McLaughlin RAMAC Show Pigs Vernon (940) 839-6499 (940) 552-5035 Kraig McMillan Pavement Ends Enterprise Elbert (940) 862-5660

Jarred Oliver Commerce (903) 456-5080 Landry Packard Rockin’ P Genetics Nevada (972) 800-3567

Matthew Peterson Powerline Swine Krum (817) 891-3071 Mark Pugh Pugh Show Pigs Breckenridge (254) 559-4899 Dan & Ragen Reed Reed Livestock Krum (817) 706-7259 131


Chynee Roberson Roberson Showpigs Knox City (940) 207-7874 Bob Schnitker Schnitker Family Farm Howe (903) 813-6229 (903) 476-5831 Maci Spivey Breckenridge (325) 330-2907

Kelton Ward Farmersville (972) 658-5198 Wayne Ward Fargo Unlimited Show Pigs Vernon (940) 886-8436 KD Weaver Weaver Showpigs Gainesville (940) 390-6816

Paul Starr Paul Starr Showpigs Iowa Park (940) 631-7086

Spike Williams Spike Williams Show Pigs Glen Rose (254) 897-2079 (254) 897-9117

Dub Stepp Twister Show Pigs Cleburne (817) 517-4302 (817) 373-2687

Pat Williams Williams Showpigs Nocona (940) 736-5720

Roy Stull Stull Show Pigs Graham (940) 521-2094 (940) 549-6339 Hannah Sullivan 5S Showpigs Pilot Point (214) 616-1704 Kevin Thomas Thomas Showpigs Jacksboro (940) 507-0772 (940) 567-5433 Bryce & Kristi Thompson BTZ Showpigs Farmersville (214) 842-0714 Jodi Toler 4T Farms Forestburg (817) 271-1021 Terry Utley Utley Farms Knox City (940) 657-4330 (940) 256-3288 Josh Vincent Vincent Farms Howe (903) 821-8638 132

Sallie Williams W-W Hog Farm Graham (940) 452-6624 (940) 362-4421 Mike Woodruff Weatherford (817) 597-8247 (817) 594-8951 Dan Young Young Livestock Burkburnett (940) 631-8339 (940) 569-0119

EAST TEXAS Jeff Eichman Eichman Family Farms Apple Springs (936) 577-0086 (936) 831-2039 (936) 435-8226 Travis, Phillip, and Payton Evans Carthage (903) 692-3293 Blayne Hodges Hodges Show Pigs Sumner (903) 517-4666

Delaney Taylor Pork & Ponytails Show Team Bullard (903) 312-1483

SOUTH EAST TEXAS

Dwayne Adams Base Genetics Highlands (281) 691-2626 David & Lisa Berckenhoff Berckenhoff Showpigs Hallettsville (361) 772-4392 (979) 561-6281 (979) 743-5905 James Cook Gulf Coast Genetics Pasedena (832) 341-0498

Walt Fehrle KMW Swine-Show Pigs Burton (281) 682-6868

Charles Hodde Hodde Farms Burton (979) 251-4718 (979) 289-3020 (979) 289-3115

Ed & Brenda May Splendora (832) 671-5010 (281) 689-3649 Chad McCawley McCawley Livestock Baytown (936) 346-2045 Robert Nagel Nagelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fine Swine Cuero (361) 648-3226 (361) 277-6032

Terry Pool Pool Show Pigs Splendora (936) 828-0553

Daniel & Lance Engeling Engeling Show Pigs Brenham (979) 203-8279 (979) 836-2684

Jimmy Hayes HF Genetics Port Lavaca (361) 920-0964 (361) 552-4819

Chris & Cortney Jones Jones & Bennett Berks Conroe (936) 446-0725

Robby Perkins Perkins Family Genetics Houston (713) 542-0804 (713) 542-6934

Todd Dooley Oak Valley Farm Round Top (979) 421-3572 (832) 260-2742

Mike Harmel Burton (979) 277-5522 (979) 289-4674

Jimbo Holland Holland Showpigs Cuero (361) 652-9183

Billy & Jane Rash Rash Livestock Willis (936) 856-9730 Darryl, Teri, & Derek Ressmann Refugio (361) 526-9159 Gary Williams GW Genetics Huffman (281) 889-0816

The Texas Pork Producers Association is not split into regions. The map provided was created for convenience and ease of finding breeders near you!


SOUTH TEXAS Scott Heffernan Poteet (830) 742-7540 (830) 570-7540 Drew Hubert Drew Hubert Show Pigs Hebbronville (361) 296-4530 Gary Kelley Kelley Showpigs Sinton (361) 364-1569 (361) 222-0284 Richard & Ryan Lewis Rocking L Ranches Hondo (210) 365-7716 Troy Patton Y4G Showpigs Taft (361) 633-9725 Mike Peek Peek Performance Sabinal (830) 988-2345 (830) 486-6324

Timbo Tatsch Tatsch Show Pigs Yancey (832) 385-6071 (830) 426-7660 Morgan Wagner Wagner Family Genetics Poteet (830) 480-8028 (830) 480-4114

HEART OF TEXAS Will & Bailey Adair Gatesville (254) 223-5477 (254) 223-0449 Doug Alderson Alderson Farms Marion (210) 296-4479 Doug Aldrich River Ridge Show Pigs Killeen (254) 289-5909 Jackson Allen Cedar Park (512) 207-0038

Josh Powell Powell Livestock Pleasanton (210) 336-4091 (830) 214-4138

Lance Allerkamp L&J Stock Farms Comfort (830) 739-5631 (830) 995-2930

Jason Roane Jason Roane Show Pigs Campbelton (210) 508-5960 (830) 256-4716

Greg Baethge Harper (830) 889-0625 (830) 669-2792 (830) 739-0625

Johnny R. Sanchez Double S Farms Poteet (210) 414-2830

Ty Baird San Antonio (210) 416-4027

Scot Sullivan S&W Swine Productions Robstown (361) 960-6725 (361) 387-9686

Robert (Bobby) Balser RB2 Showpigs Kerrville (830) 739-6593 (830) 896-2100 Cliff Berger Berger Farms Giddings (979) 540-7004

Bob Bishop Bishop Show Pigs Pflugerville (512) 751-8654 Haiden Boyd Boyd Farms Boerne (830) 822-9588 John Brown Brown’s Durocs Bartlett (254) 541-9558 (254) 527-3844 Bobby Carroll Carroll Farms Lampasas (254) 220-2517 (512) 525-1540 Alvin Carter Carter Farms La Feria (956) 245-0309 (956) 797-1501 Ty Clark Lazy Oaks Genetics Kyle (512) 634-7106 Kelly Cody Boerne (830) 446-6574 Robert Coldwell Center Point (830) 739-9177 (830) 634-7179 Tracey Cortez Lanier FFA Austin (512) 923-2633 Katherine & Clyde Culver Culver Show Pigs Boerne (210) 827-2258 (830) 336-3046 Douglas David David Show Pigs Bartlett (512) 922-5888 (254) 527-3222 (512) 971-5990 Reggie Davis Washboard Farms Fairfield (903) 388-1942 (903)389-6206

Brian & Jan Davis 3D Show Pigs Hico (254) 485-3427 (254) 796-4184 John L. Dechert J&L Hog Farm Blanco (830) 833-4865 Tim Doege Doege Show Pigs St. Hedwig (210) 667-9627 Michael & Mason DuBois 4M Show Pigs Troy (936) 402-6915 Rory Duelm Duelm’s Prevailing Genetics New Braunfels (830) 608-5058 Diane Elrod Elrod’s Show Pigs Iredell (210) 601-6164 Charles Ely & Chris Hohmann C-C Show Pigs Sisterdale (210) 887-5708 David Esser Esser Show Pigs Kendalia (830) 446-9163 (830) 336-2437 Zachary Felux 3 Oaks Show Hogs Floresville (830) 583-5602 Kenneth Fey Fey Show Pigs Stockdale (830) 481-3162 Lesleigh Flora-Bagley FDF Genetics College Station (936) 391-5045 (979) 583-8282 Kellen Floyd Floyd Family Hog Farms Bertram (830) 613-1334 133


Vince Franckowiak Franckowiak Show Pigs St. Hedwig (210) 336-9428 (210) 667-1522 (210) 667-1346

Robert & Faye Huebner R&F Hog Farms Kingsbury (830) 660-7101 (830) 639-4788

Thomas Lambert, Jr. TGH Show Pigs Kerrville (830) 459-3407 (830) 257-2391

Emily Garcia Lometa (512) 734-2178

James Jackson Jackson Family Showpigs Granite Shoals (512) 755-5794

Hermilo Garcia, Jr. P&G Showpigs Bartlett (512) 422-1937

J.P. Jansen Jansen Show Pigs Kyle (512) 787-2021 (512) 216-3596

Larry J. Langbein Sister Creek Farm Boerne (830) 285-1949 (830) 324-6742

Wyatt & Faith Geistweidt WF Genetics Fredericksburg (830) 998-5233 Mike Hail Lamapasas (512) 734-0180 Chad Hajda Hajda Showpigs Granger (512) 423-2434 (512) 423-2101 Roger Herridge Llano (512) 809-1297 Mason & Holly Hines Lometa (512) 556-2999 (512) 734-5126 (512) 556-2777 Alan Holt Johnson City (512) 468-6557 James A. Holt, Jr. Holt Farms Kyle (512) 217-6543 (512) 398-5948 Chad Hopson Hopson Show Pigs Lampasas (512) 734-2122 Joshua Horton Midnight Acres Showpigs Jonesboro (254) 216-2413 Curtis W. Houy Fredericksburg (830) 889-8457 (830) 997-8457 134

Glenn Kaiser BK Genetics Center Point (830) 634-2100 (830) 739-3338 Kurt Kelso Rodney Kelso & Sons Seguin (210) 240-6710 Kenneth & Caroline Kensing K&C Farms Fredericksburg (830) 928-4845 (830) 997-3637 Barrett Klein Bonfy & Klein Boerne (940) 838-8300 (830) 537-4200 (830) 249-8063 Kerby Knaupp Knaupp Showpigs, Inc. Fredericksburg (830) 459-4826 (830) 685-3355 Russell Kneese Kneese Show Pigs Fredericksburg (830) 456-3298 Ryan Koltermann Koltermann Showpigs La Vernia (210) 844-7484 Caleb & Gideon Kruse Fredericksburg (830) 990-1431

Luke Lindner Comfort (830) 377-0969 (830) 431-1183 Joe Long Long Ranch Llano (512) 755-5952 Robert Loyd Loyd Show Pigs Troy (254) 493-1839 Otto Luensmann Seguin (210) 315-8999 (830) 914-2507 Edward E. Luna Full Circle Swine Troy (254) 760-1938 Dustin Marsh Marsh Show Pigs Adkins (210) 649-1236 (210) 649-2139

Edmund Meier, Jr. Grand Slam Swine Genetics Helotes (210) 355-3216 (210) 681-1391 Kally Meyer Meyer Swine Farm Lott (254) 654-7123 Grant Meyer Meyer Showpigs Harper (830) 459-8645 (830) 864-5064 Mike Mikeska Mikeska Showpigs Rogers (254) 624-2283 Hailey & Kaila Morgan Morgan Girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Showpigs Medina (830) 796-0151 (830) 589-7796 Richard Neill Stockdale (830) 534-2440 Michael Nellis TAMU-Swine Center College Station (512) 623-9156 Corden Nichols Corden Nichols Show Pigs Burnet (512) 663-2856

Kylie McIntosh Vogts 3C Show Pigs Boerne (210) 878-7644 (830) 537-4470

Bill Owen Salado Creek Farm Salado (254) 760-7918 (254) 947-5243

Keith McWilliams JKL Showpigs Hearne (979) 279-6828

Bart Parker Parker Showstock Harper (830) 998-7777 (830) 669-2487

Jason Medlin Medlin Farms Salado (512) 818-3745 (254) 947-0716 (254) 718-6133

Chad Phillips Boerne (830) 237-9830 Chuck Real Real Hog Farm Marion (210) 827-7351 (830) 914-2833


Warren Reeh Comfort (830) 995-4161 (830) 739-1977

Chase Sligh Red Barn Genetics Moody (254) 717-1967

Rick & Niki Whitman RW Genetics Anderson (512) 540-1119

Cole Reeves Reeves Livestock Hico (254) 624-3080

Dennis Snow Snow’s Show Pigs La Vernia (830) 779-2254 (210) 219-3984

Kenneth & Kyle Wildman Sure Success Show Pigs San Antonio (210) 863-2950

Wayne Rode W. Rode & Sons Fredericksburg (830) 990-8206 (830) 997-2540 Ben & Tricia Rush Mart (254) 652-2974 (254) 875-2387 Clarence Schmidt Center Point (830) 285-4600 (830) 634-2117 Sharla Schmidt Ede Stonewall (830) 456-4161 Michael Schneider Bohemian Farms Burlington (254) 721-4162 (254) 985-2249 T.K. & Mike Schneider S&S Swine San Marcos (830) 708-7447 (512) 754-6806 Ricky Schroeder Schroeder Genetics Anderson (936) 825-1390 (936) 873-2542 Alan Shipp Two Ton Showpigs Bertram (512) 557-9531 (512) 355-2908 Jeff Shows Shows’ Genetics Dime Box (979) 884-0335 (979) 224-5483 Dustin Shuffler Shufflet Show Pigs Kempner (254) 394-4475

Patrick Spinn Spinn Farms Holland (254) 913-6284 (254) 657-2472 Dan Steele Steele Hog Farm Temple (254) 984-2479 (254) 624-9708 Gus Stehling Whiskey Creek Show Pigs Sisterdale (830) 537-5372 (210) 445-3131 Samual Taggart Taggart Farms Temple (254) 598-0357 (254) 760-4900 Bailey Tankersley C.B.C. Showpigs Granite Shoals (830) 265-8543 Darrell Trojacek Trojacek Ranch Franklin (979) 777-2268 (254) 746-7930 Jarrod & Carole Usener Fredericksburg (325) 347-4278 Holt & Hal Vestal Fredericksburg (830) 997-4543 Will & Peggy Wallace U4 Farm Blanco (830) 833-5335 Harold (Choppy) White Lone Star Super Hogs Bryan (979) 777-4180 (979) 774-2288

Jack Winterrowd Five Gables Farm Georgetown (512) 203-3694 Shannon & Cheyenne Zaiontz Zaiontz Farm San Antonio (210) 213-1687

WEST TEXAS Matt & Curry Allen Allen Farms Ovalo (325) 370-6924 Brianna Andrews Charlotte’s Web Showpigs Blanket (325) 998-2694 (325) 998-2739 Richard Batla Batla 7B Livestock Garden City (432) 354-2654 (432) 213-2488 Blake & Shannon Berry B/S Showpigs Abilene (325) 721-4359 (325) 721-3103 Craig & Lisa Bessent Bessent Farms Abilene (325) 665-7375 (325) 692-5937 (325) 692-7375 Bobby Brazelton Brazelton Livestock Trent (325) 338-2484 (325) 846-3156

Rodney Buxkemper Buxkemper Showpigs Ballinger (325) 786-2241 (325) 365-1017 Bo Caraway Caraway Farm Eastland (254) 639-2545 Jim & Beverly Cogburn C-4 Show Pigs Colorado City (325) 242-5503 (325) 728-2355 Jessica Colvin Western Texas College Snyder (806) 777-2269 (325) 574-7920 Bobby & Kelly Corder Bobby Corder Showpigs Coleman (325) 636-7420 Ben Cozart Cozart Family Genetics Zephyr (254) 433-1961 Charles Crawford, Jr. De Leon (254) 893-2679 Derek Creed Creed Showpigs Sweetwater (325) 864-0274 Robert & Tammra Cunningham Cunningham Ranch Cisco (325) 665-9150 Carlos Cura Rankin (432) 693-2271 (432) 693-7003 Ronnie Daniel Daniel Farm Santa Anna (325) 348-7058 Victoria Davis Blackwell (325) 282-4022 April Davis Santa Anna (817) 219-4803 135


Landrie Day Triple L Farms Comanche (254) 842-4132 (254) 879-2557

Clint Halfmann West Texas Genetics San Angelo (402) 429-4946

Kaitlyn Lawson Rankin (432) 693-6611 (432) 693-2652

Cody Peterson Peterson Showpigs Ballinger (325) 718-8422

Wesley Dockery Lazy D Show Pigs Rockwood (325) 214-2151

Myron Halford Halford Show Pigs Ballinger (325) 365-5822 (325) 365-6371

Tim Levrets M.T. Levrets Farm Abilene (325) 695-1250 (325) 280-5614

Cody Peugh Peugh Showpigs Stanton (432) 459-2288 (432) 517-0196

Averin Donough Cardonya Farm Comanche (325) 356-1596 (325) 330-1798

Richard Hardin Baker Hardin Show Pigs Stanton (432) 230-6894

Lyndsei McBryde McBryde Farms Midland (432) 770-0669

Lynn Hays Underdog Genetics Merkel (325) 260-5968

Kelby McCorkle Silver Valley Show Pigs Coleman (325) 214-4130 (325) 625-2830

Matthew & Andy Polnack Polnack Showpigs Sweetwater (325) 338-3223 (325) 235-4642

Tooter Draper DCB Showpigs Ranger (254) 433-2677 Billy Dunn Sugar Creek Ranch Show Pigs Big Lake (325) 450-9343 Gary Dutton Double D Durocs Gorman (254) 893-5038 Bronc Fleming Fleming Livestock San Angelo (325) 895-5096 Leon Freeman Freeman Showpigs Lohn (325) 344-5749 (325) 344-5514 LeAnna Garza PLP Genetics Merkel (325) 733-6315 (325) 733-6909 Marcus Gerngross Gerngross Livestock San Angelo (325) 656-8391 (325) 651-9726 Rodney Glass Snyder (325) 575-5566 (325) 573-7156 Scott Halfmann Garden City (432) 397-2757 (432) 268-3947 136

Melanie Hutchinson Buffalo Gap (325) 267-5068 Frankie W. Hyles Rafter 9 H Showpigs Cross Plains (325) 669-9348 (254) 725-7285 Kenley Ivy Midland (432) 349-5546

James McDougal Abbey & McDougal Show Pigs Gustine (254) 842-4262 (325) 667-7090 Callaway McMorries Diamond M Showpigs Tarzan (432) 459-2774

Peyton Johnson Johnson Show Pigs Early (325) 203-0151

Ted Merryman Merryman Show Pigs Clyde (325) 669-7597 (325) 893-1562

Kyler Keith Merkel (817) 307-8870

Judy Moore J & J Show Pigs Tuscola (325) 669-0964

David & Pam Kempen San Angelo (210) 260-3233 (325) 651-2912 Tara Kinslow Clyde (325) 893-4054 (325) 733-8002 Mark Kirby Kirb Your Genetics Mason (325) 347-7639 (325) 347-7637 John & Amy Lange Lange Livestock Miles (325) 895-0961 (325) 468-2233

Brad Mund Mund Livestock Wall (325) 277-7228 J.T. & Kelli Naron Merkel (325) 660-2183 (325) 928-5425 Matt & Kaleb Nowlin Gorman (254) 485-1452 Dale Partin 4P Show Pigs Priddy (325) 451-0370 (325) 966-3783

Michael Porter Raising Kayne Genetics Snyder (325) 207-3397 Wyatt Porter Priddy (325) 451-4723 (325) 996-3002 Mike Pruitt Midland (432) 296-1819 (432) 570-1120 Carl & Raye Pyron Pyron Farms Tuscola (325) 370-2845 Terry Queen Bronte (325) 763-9953 Cory Rains Rains Livestock Roscoe (325) 236-0593 Bobby Rich Rich Show Pigs Gorman (254) 433-0273 (254) 734-6532 Allen & Aiden Richburg Richburg Show Pigs Roscoe (325) 236-5666 Burke, Cami, & Kaitlyn Robinson R4 Genetics Putnam (325) 669-6636


Stevi Rumfield Pappys Pigs Early (325) 998-1810

Zachary Squyres Wild Card Show Pigs Early (325) 642-6585

Douglas Schaefer Schaefer Livestock Garden City (432) 517-0352 (432) 354-2564

Greg Stansell Stansell Showpigs Fluvanna (432) 528-7684 (432) 573-4157

Doyle Schaefer Garden City (432) 354-2619 (432) 268-3177

Jimmy Strube Garden City (432) 270-0381 (432) 397-2381

Clarence Schaefer, Jr. Schaefer’s Pigs Rowena (325) 718-8949 (325) 442-2401

Tony Thompson 4T Swine Genetics Rising Star (325) 647-8822

Erwin Schwartz, Jr, Schwartz Livestock San Angelo (325) 234-5206 (325) 651-5206 Harvey Schwertner Schwertner-Byrd-Helms Miles (325) 895-1909 (325) 468-5501

Max Tongate Top Notch Show Pigs Bangs (325) 647-5200 (325) 752-1199 Doug Tounget Tounget Farms Bronte (325) 473-5044 (325) 656-9874

Bryan Senkirik SCS Genetics Early (325) 203-6133

Stan Tyson Tyson Farms Early (325) 217-2989 (325) 217-4025

Kerry Shain Outlaw Genetics Sonora (325) 206-3615

Frank Valdez Brownwood (325) 647-0026 (325) 643-2032

Waymond Sheppard Sheppard Farms Bangs (325) 642-5152 (325) 998-1295

Fred Van Cleave Van Cleave Showpigs Tuscola (325) 721-1673 (325) 554-9226

Ethen Smith Merkel (325) 201-4766

Keith Walker Sweetwater (325) 721-1434 (325) 721-2382

Sam Sparger De Leon (254) 842-4008 (254) 893-2137 Reggy Spencer S3 Genetics & Spencer Show Pigs Colorado City (325) 370-8990

Alexis Washington A&J Washington Santa Anna (325) 829-8602 (325) 348-9351

FAR WEST TEXAS

Jacob, Marty, & Zachary Weishuhn Weishuhn Brothers San Angelo (325) 651-7885

Bob Dillard Dillard & Sons Fort Davis (432) 556-2219 (432) 426-3077

Criswell Whisenhunt, Jr. Whisenhunt Hog Farms Merkel (325) 665-9316 (325) 665-9313

Genai Lopez Fort Stockton (432) 923-3737

Kastin Wilde Garden City (432) 940-6265 (432) 397-2287 Dale E. Wilde Wall (325) 450-3401 (325) 651-9453 (915) 651-7050 Malcham Williams Williams Brothers Show Pigs Monahans (432) 208-4095 Natalie Wright Comanche (254) 396-5958

Gary Mills Mills Family Showpigs (432) 923-3082 (432) 336-8350 Brandy Owen Owen Show Pigs Clint (915) 204-8713 Janay Pasqua Triple J Show & Breeding Pigs Fort Davis (432) 249-1713 Eric Vasquez V5 Show Pigs Fort Stockton (432) 940-7361

Major Show CTBR Certificates Now Available to purchase!! Online at www.texaspork.org

Rode Walters Early (325) 643-3313 Jennie Wann W-2 Showpigs Roscoe (325) 829-8528 (325) 766-3807

You Don’t have to be a breeder to participate in TPPA. Join today!! 137


Drive to the Backdrop K&C FARMS

CONSIGNING TO: * Private Treaty Starting around September 1st * Power of the South Sometime in September * Gillespie Co. Swine Breeders October 17th

20 + Litters Farrowed Mid-July - September

Kenneth & Caroline Kensing Fredericksburg, TX 830.997.3637 830.928.4845

Curtis Houy Hog Farm We will be offering Duroc, Hamp, Berk, Poland, Spot & Cross born in July, August & September 64 Litters

Boars used from Shipley Swine Genetics Duroc Boars  Crown Royal x Royal Crown Spot Boar  Son of “Off the Chart” Duroc Females out of  Red Angus  Red Bull  MoJo 138

The BEST pigs and the BEST year we’ve ever had! What are you waiting for, your time is running out! Don’t forget us at: Gillespie County Swine Breeders Sale October 17th ON- FARM Private Treaty Starting September 1ST

Curtis Houy 643 Houy Rd • Fredericksburg, TX 78624 • 830-997-8457 Home • 830-889-8457 Cell


Neill Farms Where Success is RED HOT! 15 Duroc Litters 3 Cross Litters July & Aug. pigs will be sold on a 1st come 1st serve basis.

Rickey Neill 830-534-2440 Susan Neill 830-534-9226 rneill_2000@yahoo.com

Sept. p i Farm gs will be s Sale N o ov. 3rd ld at Also se . 12 pm lling a t Succe ss & in Ring of Dunca n!

302 CR 425 Stockdale, TX 78160

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A WINNING TRADITION

Year after Year

HIGH PLACING DUROC BARROW

CHAMPION BOPB BARROW

CLASS CHAMPION CROSS BARROW

CLASS CHAMPION SPOT GILT

CLASS CHAMPION CROSS BARROW

CLASS CHAMPION DUROC BARROW

Denver :: Congratulations Flaharity Family

Houston :: Congratulations Olfers Family

Austin :: Congratulations Rasco Family

San Angelo :: Congratulations Perez Family

State Fair of TX :: Congratulations Bevins Family

San Angelo :: Congratulations Reed Family

Fall Sale Schedule SEPTEMBER 12 Farm Opens for Private Treaty Sales of July Barrows & Gilts SEPTEMBER 22 Elite Gilt Online Sale at Showpig.com SEPTEMBER 29 Cream of the Crop Online Sale at Showpig.com OCTOBER 11 On the Farm Sale #1 - 10:30 AM at the farm OCTOBER 20 Elite Gilt Online Sale at Showpig.com OCTOBER 31 On the Farm Sale #2 - 12:00 noon at the farm NOVEMBER 10 Cream of the Crop Online Sale at Showpig.com

plus

SELECT SALES - For more info follow us on Facebook & our new website

GILTS for sale by private treaty everyday off the farm

WWW.HARMAN-FARMS.COM

S

MAN FARM R A H

HF Focused on Success

Wayne and Leslie Harman 12498 Co Rd 16

Perryton, TX 79070

Wayne 806-202-2175

Leslie 806-202-2176 141


r e c u Prod ght i Spotl

On the

Fast Track 142


You reap what you sow.

We have all heard this saying throughout our lives. It implies that what you put into something determines what will happen or how you will be rewarded. Since the establishment of Rival Genetics, in 2011, Shane and Tatum Swenhaugen have been sowing time, dedication and passion into their show pig operation, and in return are reaping the benefits of making a name for themselves in the show pig industry. After getting married in 2011, Shane and Tatum moved Rival Genetics to Canadian, Texas. From that point on, the Swenhaugens’ have quickly built their sow herd to approximately 60 sows. The primary focus is to produce Crossbred pigs, but they also farrow litters of Chester, Berkshire, Spot, Yorkshire and Hampshire hogs. Currently the majority of litters are targeted for the spring majors, but around 10 to 15 litters are farrowed for fall shows, and in the near future, Shane and Tatum want to farrow year round. Their families have long been involved in the hog industry, instilling a love for livestock and a drive to succeed in both Shane and Tatum at an early age. From 1976 until 1985, Tatum’s grandparents raised commercial hogs in Silverton, Texas and then added show pigs to the mix in 1989. Similarly, Shane’s parents started raising show hogs when Shane was about five years old. As Shane grew up working in the show pig industry, he quickly realized that he wanted to own his own farm one day. To turn this dream into reality, during Shane’s senior year of high school he partnered on some sows with his uncle, Kevin Van Hoesen, laying the foundation for what was to become Rival Genetics. Like the start of any business, building Rival Genetics has required the support of many. Playing a leading role in this operation has been Tatum’s parents, Keith Ellison and Jeannita Ellison; along with Shane’s Uncle Kevin, who still lends a helping hand whenever it is needed. Keith and Jeannita were key in in transitioning the operation from Perryton to Canadian, allowing Shane and Tatum to keep all their sows and build facilities on Jeannita’s land and supporting them in all their endeavors. There are several others that have provided advice and insight over the past few years. Shane credits Mike Clay as a big player in the very beginning of Shane’s show pig operation.

“Alot of our older sows that I bought when I first started, which go back to Space Monkey, came from Mike and we have tried to build our herd around them. Still today those females continue to produce some our best show pigs.” Dan and Rachel Schley have influenced the Swenhaugens’ as well. Shane and Tatum have bought sows and gilts that have been integral in the progression of Rival Genetics and Dan is Shane’s first call when he is in need of advice or an answer to a question. Another veteran to the show pig world, JoBonney LeCompte, is a close friend and mentor to the owners of Rival Genetics. During Shane’s showing days, JoBonney was his Ag teacher and is still a good friend today. “The list could go on and on,” stated Shane. “But Josh and Carrie Brockman, Colby Christie and Kelton Mason have been a huge help to our success as well. There are many others that we could certainly include.” In the short four years that Rival Genetics has been in business Shane and Tatum have steadily increased the size and scope of their operation. Even as they have grown one piece of advice that is always at the forefront of their minds is: never overload the boat. “Rory Duelm once told me that and it is the best advice I have ever been given,” said Shane. “It reminds me that when you have more than you can take care of on your own, animals don’t get tended to like they should and that leads to other problems.” All of this guidance and assistance has no doubt influenced the makeup of Rival Genetics. We at Texas Pork Producers wanted an insight to the workings at Rival Genetics and the Swenhaugens’ were excited to indulge us. “ S h o w pigs in general, and specifically raising them, is a passion that we both share,” explained Tatum. “But to be more specific, we try to build competitive barrows and gilts that can compete and be successful at every level.” Shane is dedicated to building hogs from the ground up. “I stay true and like hogs that are built correct, heavy structured and good designed,” said Shane. “Whether it be a boar, female or show pig, they all have to be sound and functional on their feet and legs. Structure and balance are very important when it comes to choosing females for our breeding program.”


When it comes time to A.I. sows, this duo focuses on maintaining a balance between using proven boars, along with new “up and comer’s.” “We try to focus on proven boars and genetics,” explained Shane. “When there is a new “hot” boar each year that we like, that doesn’t mean we won’t try him on some, because to progress that is a must. However, we always try to keep the mindset to stick with what we can trust, what is proven and has a strong genetic family behind them. That philosophy has worked for us when making boar selections, and determining what females to retain.” Like every operation, Shane and Tatum deal with their own set of obstacles on a daily basis. Along with every show pig operation and commercial hog farm, biosecurity is a major issue that has to be constantly monitored. Mother nature is another challenge that this Texas Panhandle based operation faces. Experiencing everything from extreme summer heat to bitter winters, the welfare and daily care requirements of their hogs alter every day.

Best hog you’ve ever seen? Shane: There are many that come to mind, but one of the best I’ve ever seen would have to be the Grand Champion Barrow at the 2012 HLSR that Brady Leach showed and Kip Smith raised.

Outside work from the farm? Shane: Apache Oil and Gas Corporation Tatum: Dental Clinic in Canadian and Wheeler

Hobbies? Shane: We both like spending time with our families and going to the lake. Tatum: I like helping my grandparents with their garden in the summer.

Favorite quote? Tatum: Go Big or Go Home - Colby Christie

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“In the spring time, one day we might be making sure the sows are cool enough, and then the next day we could be putting hay out to make sure the sows are warm enough,” explained Shane. Additionally, staying on top of your game provides a certain set of challenges. Anyone in the show pig industry can attest to the fact that the image of the “ideal” show hog has changed over the years. You can flip through any livestock magazine and see different trends that have come and gone, and know that the same type of show pigs who are taking home banners today, might not turn heads in a few years. Many would say that this constant evolvement is what keep things interesting, but also presents challenges. “You’re going to have good years and bad years but during the bad years you can’t give up,” said Tatum. “You have to reevaluate what you have and figure out what needs to be fixed. One must stay open minded, but at the same time, don’t get caught up in chasing the trend and then always stay grounded to what you believe in.”


Then...

“A real champion isn’t made in the ring. They’re made in the barn by a clever showman, who had the vision to create it and worked hard to condition it.”

...and Now

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While it is true that breeders of livestock will endure good years along with some rough ones, it is safe to say that the 2014-2015 stock show season was one for the books. In addition to numerous county and major class winners, Rival Genetics raised the Reserve Grand Champion Barrow at the State Fair of Texas, the Grand Champion Barrow at the San Angelo Stock Show and the Reserve Breed Champion Yorkshire at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. Those wins alone are enough to put a smile on any producers face, but the proudest moment for Rival Genetics thus far would have to be raising the Reserve Grand Champion Barrow at Houston, their favorite show. Other wins that are close to Shane and Tatum’s hearts date back to their own showing days when Shane drove the Reserve Grand Champion Barrow in 2003 at both the San Antonio Livestock Exposition and State Fair of Texas. What is just as much fun as banners and backdrop photos for Shane and Tatum, is encouraging and teaching the next generation of agriculturalists, just like their mentors taught them. “Kids involved in agriculture and showing livestock are taught responsibility, good morals and have a strong work ethic,” said Tatum. “The livestock industry teaches kids that you have to work hard each and every day to get a banner or a trophy at the end of the season, as well as all the life lessons learned along the way.” Tatum is such a believer in the youth livestock program that she happily accepted the offer to be the area 4-H Swine Project Leader for the upcoming stock show season. “I’m very excited about this opportunity and I hope to get more kids from our community involved in showing hogs.” To get where they are today, Shane and Tatum were given sound advice; now they are taking the opportunity to pay it forward. Their first piece of advice to young people is: “be sure you are fully committed to raising show pigs and that you are financially able to do it. Next, find someone you trust and who has been in the industry to help you along the way. Last but certainly not least, is to not get more than you can handle and realize the hard work and dedication it takes day in and day out to be successful in this industry.”

“The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.”

- Vince Lombardi

146


Shane and Tatum know first hand the dedication and sacrifice it takes to have a successful operation. Two summers ago Rival Genetics doubled their numbers when they purchased bred sows from Josh Vincent. With the increase in numbers the Swenhaugens were faced with the decision to either hire additional help to farrow the sows or for Tatum to quit her full-time job that she was very passionate about. Since farrowing sows and taking care of the babies in the crate are Tatumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite farm duties, it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take her long to decide that she would be the one hanging out in the farrowing house all summer long keeping an eye on everything. With a past as bright as theirs there is no doubt that Rival Genetics will continue to shine in future. On the To-Do list for this aspiring team includes hopefully partnering on a boar stud, allowing Rival Genetics to sell more breeding stock. They also want to continue to strive and help their feeders reach the goal of taking home Grand Champion banners from the prestigious San Antonio and Houston barrow shows. Eventually, Shane and Tatum want to increase the size of their household and watch their children grow up in the livestock industry, just as they did. There is no questioning whether or not these goals can be accomplished and we look forward to watching the long, lustrous career that awaits Rival Genetics.

Canadian, Texas | rivalgenetics.com Shane: 806.202.4789 Tatum: 806.217.1093

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PRODUCER CONNECTION

THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE TEXAS PORK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION

Advertising Rate & Specifications

The Producer Connection is a bi-monthly publication sent to active members of the Texas Pork Producers Association. This publication includes information on current pork related events and youth programs and news & updates on issues in our industry, not only in Texas but nationwide. Scheduled publication months include February, April, June, August, October and December.

Advertisement Rates All ads will be in full color. Prices are for completed Camera Ready advertisements; layout and designing of ads is available at an additional cost. Premium pages available as First Come, First Serve, please call for availability and pricing.

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FULL PAGE Bleed Size: 8.75”w x 11.25”h Trim Size: 8.5”w x 11”h

BACK PAGE/ 2/3 PAGE HALF-PAGE HORIZONTAL THIRD-PAGE VERTICAL FOURTH-PAGE VERTICAL Bleed Size: 8.75”w x 7”h Bleed Size: 8.75”w x 5.5”h Trim Size: 2.75”w x 11”h Trim Size: 3.75”w x 5”h Trim Size: 8.5”w x 7”h Trim Size: 8.5”w x 5.5”h Changes in Certified Texas Bred Registry For 2013 Shows

Changes in Certified Texas Bred Registry For 2013 Shows

Changes in Certified Texas Bred Registry For 2013 Shows

The TPPA Board of Directors have adopted rule changes submitted by the Committee that oversees the Certified Texas Bred Registry. These new rules will impact producers participating in the CTBR program shows next year, including Fort Worth, San Angelo Barrow Show, Stars of Texas Gilt Show & Sale in San Angelo, San Antonio, Houston and the 2013 State Fair.

The TPPA Board of Directors have adopted rule changes submitted by the Committee that oversees the Certified Texas Bred Registry. These new rules will impact producers participating in the CTBR program shows next year, including Fort Worth, San Angelo Barrow Show, Stars of Texas Gilt Show & Sale in San Angelo, San Antonio, Houston and the 2013 State Fair.

The TPPA Board of Directors have adopted rule changes submitted by the Committee that oversees the Certified Texas Bred Registry. These new rules will impact producers participating in the CTBR program shows next year, including Fort Worth, San Angelo Barrow Show, Stars of Texas Gilt Show & Sale in San Angelo, San Antonio, Houston and the 2013 State Fair.

During the Texas Pork Industry Conference in San Angelo, CTBR Committee Chairman, David Kempen, explained the rule changes and the purpose for the changes. Kempen said that over the years, the CTBR program has provided thousands of 4-H & FFA students with additional premium money, prizes, awards and scholarships, provided by the hundreds of Texas breeders participating in CTBR. He said that these Texas breeders have been rewarded with significant recognition and increased market demand for their pigs. Kempen explained that all of this has been accomplished based on the last statement in the CTBR rules: “The validity of the Certified Texas Bred Registry is wholly dependent on the honesty and integrity of the breeders participating in the Registry and the reliability of pig registration.”

During the Texas Pork Industry Conference in San Angelo, CTBR Committee Chairman, David Kempen, explained the rule changes and the purpose for the changes. Kempen said that over the years, the CTBR program has provided thousands of 4-H & FFA students with additional premium money, prizes, awards and scholarships, provided by the hundreds of Texas breeders participating in CTBR. He said that these Texas breeders have been rewarded with significant recognition and increased market demand for their pigs. Kempen explained that all of this has been accomplished based on the last statement in the CTBR rules: “The validity of the Certified Texas Bred Registry is wholly dependent on the honesty and integrity of the breeders participating in the Registry and the reliability of pig registration.” Kempen said that the integrity and honesty of a small number of breeders have come into question by the CTBR Committee and that they felt it important to provide some increased requirements for the CTBR program. They proposed the new rule changes that were adopted by the Board members on July 6, 2012. The most significant rule change is that producers will now have to provide TPPA with the number of litters farrowed at their farm and the ear notching system that they use for identifying their litters. (See CTBR rules in this issue and on the texaspork.org web site.) Prior to October 1, 2012, producers that will want to purchase CTBR certificates for pigs showing in 2013 must

During the Texas Pork Industry Conference in San Angelo, CTBR Committee Chairman, David Kempen, explained the rule changes and the purpose for the changes. Kempen said that over the years, the CTBR program has provided thousands of 4-H & FFA students with additional premium money, prizes, awards and scholarships, provided by the hundreds of Texas breeders participating in CTBR. He said that these Texas breeders have been rewarded with significant recognition and increased market demand for their pigs. Kempen explained that all of this has been accomplished based on the last statement in the CTBR rules: “The validity of the Certified Texas Bred Registry is wholly dependent on the honesty and integrity of the breeders participating in the Registry and the reliability of pig registration.” Kempen said that the integrity and honesty of a small number of breeders have come into question by the CTBR Committee and that they felt it important to provide some increased requirements for the CTBR program. They proposed the new rule changes that were adopted by the Board members on July 6, 2012. The most significant rule change is that producers will now have to provide TPPA with the number of litters farrowed at their farm and the ear notching system that they use for identifying their litters. (See CTBR rules in this issue and on the texaspork.org web site.) Prior to October 1, 2012, producers that will want to purchase CTBR certificates for pigs showing in 2013 must have submitted to TPPA a “CTB Litter Record”. A CTB Litter Record will be an official document to tell TPPA how many litters are farrowed at the farm and litter ear notches assigned to those litters. This will include an explanation of the litter notching system used by the producer. TPPA will strongly encourage breeders to notch litters in sequence starting with the litter “1” notch. However, if producers use a different sequence and numbering system they must provide an explanation of that system. Kempen explained that most producers will be able to comply with this new requirement easily because they identify their litters in sequence each year starting with the litter “1” notch. He said that when looking through all of the CTBR pig registrations at the shows most producer’s litters can be followed with little effort. However, Kempen said that the Committee becomes very concerned when you know that a farm only farrowed 25 litters and most of their pigs have litter notches of 1 through 25, then a few have litter notches with 50’s or 80’s. He said that seems difficult to understand and puts into question the integrity of that breeders pig registrations. He and the CTBR Committee believe that the new “CTB Litter Record” will give them a better understanding of a breeders notching system and allow them to ef-

BUSINESS CARD Trim Size: 3.5”w x 2”h

Changes in Certified Texas Bred Registry For 2013 Shows

Changes in Certified Texas Bred Registry For 2013 Shows

The TPPA Board of Directors have adopted rule changes submitted by the Committee that oversees the Certified Texas Bred Registry. These new rules will impact producers participating in the CTBR program shows next year, including Fort Worth, San Angelo Barrow Show, Stars of Texas Gilt Show & Sale in San Angelo, San Antonio, Houston and the 2013 State Fair.

The TPPA Board of Directors have adopted rule changes submitted by the Committee that oversees the Certified Texas Bred Registry. These new rules will impact producers participating in the CTBR program shows next year, including Fort Worth, San Angelo Barrow Show, Stars of Texas Gilt Show & Sale in San Angelo, San Antonio, Houston and the 2013 State Fair.

During the Texas Pork Industry Conference in San Angelo, CTBR Committee Chairman, David Kempen, explained the rule changes and the purpose for the changes. Kempen said that over the years, the CTBR program has provided thousands of 4-H & FFA students with additional premium money, prizes, awards and scholarships, provided by the hundreds of Texas breeders participating in CTBR. He said that these Texas breeders have been rewarded with significant recognition and increased market demand for their pigs. Kempen explained that all of this has been accomplished based on the last statement in the CTBR rules: “The validity of the Certified Texas Bred Registry is wholly dependent on the honesty and integrity of the breeders participating in the Registry and the reliability of pig registration.”

During the Texas Pork Industry Conference in San Angelo, CTBR Committee Chairman, David Kempen, explained the rule changes and the purpose for the changes. Kempen said that over the years, the CTBR program has provided thousands of 4-H & FFA students with additional premium money, prizes, awards and scholarships, provided by the hundreds of Texas breeders participating in CTBR. He said that these Texas breeders have been rewarded with significant recognition and increased market demand for their pigs. Kempen explained that all of this has been accomplished based on the last statement in the CTBR rules: “The validity of the Certified Texas Bred Registry is wholly dependent on the honesty and integrity of the breeders participating in the Registry and the reliability of pig registration.”

Kempen said that the integrity and honesty of a small number of breeders have come into question by the CTBR Committee and that they felt it important to provide some increased requirements for the CTBR program. They proposed the new rule changes that were adopted by the Board members on July 6, 2012. The most significant rule change is that producers will now have to provide TPPA with the number of litters farrowed at their farm and the ear notching system that they use for identifying their litters. (See CTBR rules in this issue and on the texaspork.org web site.)

Kempen said that the integrity and honesty of a small number of breeders have come into question by the CTBR Committee and that they felt it important to provide some increased requirements for the CTBR program. They proposed the new rule changes that were adopted by the Board members on July 6, 2012. The most significant rule change is that producers will now have to provide TPPA with the number of litters farrowed at their farm and the ear notching system that they use for identifying their litters. (See CTBR rules in this issue and on the texaspork.org web site.)

Prior to October 1, 2012, producers that will want to purchase CTBR certificates for pigs showing in 2013 must have submitted to TPPA a “CTB Litter Record”. A CTB Litter Record will be an official document to tell TPPA how many litters are farrowed at the farm and litter ear notches assigned to those litters. This will include an explanation of the litter notching system used by the producer. TPPA will strongly encourage breeders to notch litters in sequence starting with the litter “1” notch. However, if producers use a different sequence and numbering system they must provide an explanation of that system.

Prior to October 1, 2012, producers that will want to purchase CTBR certificates for pigs showing in 2013 must have submitted to TPPA a “CTB Litter Record”. A CTB Litter Record will be an official document to tell TPPA how many litters are farrowed at the farm and litter ear notches assigned to those litters. This will include an explanation of the litter notching system used by the producer. TPPA will strongly encourage breeders to notch litters in sequence starting with the litter “1” notch. However, if producers use a different sequence and numbering system they must provide an explanation of that system.

Kempen explained that most producers will be able to comply with this new requirement easily because they identify their litters in sequence each year starting with the litter “1” notch. He said that when looking through all of the CTBR pig registrations at the shows most producer’s litters can be followed with little effort. However, Kempen said that the Committee becomes very concerned when you know that a farm only farrowed 25 litters and most of their pigs have litter notches of 1 through 25, then a few have litter notches with 50’s or 80’s. He said that seems difficult to understand and puts into question the integrity of that breeders pig registrations. He and the CTBR Committee believe that the new “CTB Litter Record” will give them a better understanding of a breeders notching system and allow them to effectively visit with breeders about their pig registrations when necessary.

Kempen explained that most producers will be able to comply with this new requirement easily because they identify their litters in sequence each year starting with the litter “1” notch. He said that when looking through all of the CTBR pig registrations at the shows most producer’s litters can be followed with little effort. However, Kempen said that the Committee becomes very concerned when you know that a farm only farrowed 25 litters and most of their pigs have litter notches of 1 through 25, then a few have litter notches with 50’s or 80’s. He said that seems difficult to understand and puts into question the integrity of that breeders pig registrations. He and the CTBR Committee believe that the new “CTB Litter Record” will give them a better understanding of a breeders notching system and allow them to effectively visit with breeders about their pig registrations when necessary. The CTBR Committee wants breeders to know that this year the October 1, 2012 deadline for submitting a CTB Litter Record in order to be allowed to purchased CTBR certificates is very firm with one small exception: if a breeder does not meet the deadline this first year of the new rule, they can still submit the CTB Litter Record but they will be charged a monetary fee to be eligible to participate in the CTBR program. (See CTBR Rules in this magazine and on the texaspork.org web site.)

Promote your farm or sale instantly with an E-Blast! E-blast sent to all TPPA members & County Agents We can schedule to e-mail any day, any time. Only $50 per E-blast!

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Publishing Schedule / Ad Deadlines February / March

Stock Show In Full Swing Advertising Due: January 15, 2016 Mail Date: February 1, 2016

April / May

Spring Buyers Guide & Stock Show Results Advertising Due: March 25, 2016 Mail Date: April 10, 2016

Distribution: TPPA Members, All Texas Major Stock Shows, and various events throughout Texas.

Distribution: TPPA Members, Texas Ag Teacher, County Extension Agents, and various events throughout Texas.

June / July

August / September

Conference Information

Show Pig Sales & TPPA Event Wrap-ups

Advertising Due: May 15, 2016 Mail Date: June 1, 2016

Advertising Due: July 25, 2015 Mail Date: August 10, 2015

Distribution: TPPA Members, Texas Pork Industry Conference, summer shows, clinics, and various events throughout Texas.

Distribution: TPPA Members, Texas Ag Teachers, County Extension Agents, some pig sales and various events throughout Texas.

October / November

December / January

National Pork Month

Advertising Due: September 15, 2015 Mail Date: October 1, 2015

Distribution: TPPA Members, State Fair of Texas Livestock Show, some pig sales and various events throughout Texas.

Holiday Season

Advertising Due: November 15, 2015 Mail Date: December 1, 2015

Distribution: TPPA Members, some jackpot shows, clinics, and various events throughout Texas.

Layout and Design Charges If a camera-ready ad is not provided, advertiser will be responsible for layout fees. The ad design rate is determined by the size and scope of the advertisement. Please call for pricing on ad design rates.

Want more information or book your advertisement? Cassidy Smith â&#x20AC;˘ 512-453-0615 â&#x20AC;˘ csmith@texaspork.org.

Texas Pork Producers Association P.O. Box 10168 Austin, Texas 78766 512-453-0615 www.texaspork.org

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Producer Connection

Advertisers Index 4P Show Pigs....................................................... 83 Koltermann Show Pigs......................................... 32 Ag Workers Insurance.......................................... 97 L&J Stock Farms.................................................. 26 Alderson Farms.................................................... 63 Link Show Pigs................................................... 101 Allen Farms........................................................ 140 McKamie Livestock................................................ 9 Allied American Crop Insurance............................ 43 Meyer Show Pigs............................................... 114 Backdrop Babies ................................................. 34 Miles FFA Show Pig Sale.................................... 100 Belew Farms...................................................... 122 Moorman’s ShowTec.....................................IFC, 78 Beyers Farms & Biggs Livestock......................... 152 Mote Farms.......................................................... 63 Blount Farms...................................................... 139 Neill Farms......................................................... 139 Bohemian Farms.................................................. 62 Priddy FFA Pig Sale.............................................. 83 BRS Farms........................................................... 82 Rafter H Showpigs............................................... 63 Central Texas Jackpot Series................................ 35 Rains Livestock.................................................... 77 Cornerstone Ventures......................................... 148 Ranch House Designs............................................ 3 Coyote Creek Genetics....................................... 122 Real Hog Farm..................................................... 92 Curry Livestock..................................................... 35 River Ridge Show Pigs....................................... 115 Curtis Houy Hog Farm........................................ 138 Rounsavall Show Pigs.......................................... 33 DL Showpigs...................................................... 153 RW Genetics...................................................... 117 Doege Show Pigs............................................... 123 S&W Swine........................................................ 114 Duelm’s Prevailing Genetics................................ IBC Sanchez Show Pigs.............................................. 63 Exiss Trailers......................................................... 79 Schaefer Livestock............................................. 116 Five Gables Farm.................................................... 8

Schwertner, Helms, Bryd Showpigs...................... 24

Flying J Show Pigs............................................... 63 Shannon Barbee Show Pigs................................. 90 Franckowiak Show Pigs....................................... 32 Show Pig Alley.................................................... 112 Freeman Showpigs................................................. 8

Shuffler Show Pigs.......................................... 1,115

Gillespie County Swine Breeders........................ 124 Spinn Farm & Steele Show Hogs........................ 104 GO Genetics......................................................... 91 Spinn Farms......................................................... 24 Harman Farms.................................................... 141 Stand Alone Feed................................................. 81 Heart of the Hills Breeders Assoc....................... 125 Steele Show Hogs................................................ 49 HF Genetics....................................................... 156 Taggart Farms...................................................... 62 Holland Farms...................................................... 34 Texas Farm............................................................. 6 Kevin Howell Hogs............................................... 25 Twister Show Pigs................................................ 34 K&C Farms......................................................... 138 Underdog Genetics............................................ 105 Kelso Genetiks..................................................... 27 Utley Farms.......................................................... 93 Kerby Knaupp Show Pigs................................... 115 West Texas Genetics........................................... BC Kneese Show Pigs............................................... 76 Wintex Farms..................................................... 155 154


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Texas Pork Producers Association P.O. Box 10168 Austin, Texas 78766

West Texas Genetics.com TO THE MAX 10-9 Littermate to Reserve Ch. Chester. Dallas ‘13. Due 7-20, bred to Si.

Big Lebowski 24-4

Century 29-9 Littermate to class winning & high selling york gilt CTBR show ‘15. Due 7-28, bred to Sonnyboy.

WWII 9-5 Mother of Appleseed. Due 8-17, bred to Sugar Daddy.

Dakota Red 31-13 Due 7-30, bred to Loaded.

Hillbilly Cadillac 11-7 Mother to Grand at Eastland Co., Ch. Hamp Burnet Co., CTBR sale gilt, & Reserve overall both days San Angelo Fall Spectacular. Due 7-23, bred to Sugar Daddy.

Maternal sib to class winner & high selling spot gilt CTBR show ‘15. Champion & Reserve barrows, Angelo ‘14. Due 7-30, bred to Crossfire.

* 60 litters available July, August, & September. * Bred gilts available private treaty. * Barn opens in September.

Clint: 402-429-4946 Julie: 325-340-0232

cmhalf@yahoo.com San Angelo, Texas

Sale Dates: Miles - Sept 27 Wall Swine Breeders - Oct. 11 Seminole - TBA * Check the website for updated sale dates and online sales.

Producers connection august september  
Producers connection august september