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A few words from the Board...

Texas producers of er mb nu ge lar a u, yo print and reaches ite unique By the time this goes to 2015 livestock show season. Our state is qu se taking with five of the will  be in the midst of the tewide livestock shows, uary and March. I’m not sta jor ma six ve ha y ntl , Febr – we  curre und ten weeks in January place during a span of aro or a curse! sure if this is a blessing unique with y in Texas is also quite dle region str du In n tio uc od Pr rk The structure of the Po mber of farms located in the upper Panhan is quite an extremely small nu large percentage of the pigs. Their mission table, and to do so in large producing an extremelyuct that is safe, desirable to the consumer, profipercentage of the producers simple – produce a prodfolks, which by the way is an extremely large uded mission and one that numbers. The rest of us small percentage of the pigs, have a pretty clo producing an extremelyproducer. varies from producer to mbers as swine used by 4-H and FFA me to the next. To be to s pig e uc od pr us m one farm ucers, most of Outside of the larger prodat local and state shows. The mission varies fros for their children, or youth projects to be exhibited a hobby. Often it is parents that are raising pig lex equation is competition. exists in this comp some, it is business; others it. The one constant that ustry in Texas, it is extremely important to not hib ex to s pig g sin rai rs ll ind exhibito of our youth exhibitors wi tive nature of the show pig In regard to the competi rtant fact. While we recognize that a large number e the animal project should lose sight of a very impork production past the show ring, we must realiz ulture, to develop a sense of never be involved in po ide an opportunity to experience production agricthis when winning becomes serve as a vehicle to provong work ethic and pride. We often lose sight of placed on the back burner. I responsibility, build a strr mission and ethics and a sense of fair play are ld always be encouraged to the primary focus of ou examine your mission. Our young people shouof the color of the ribbon, or challenge each of you tod be proud of their accomplishments, regardlessthat hug or pat on the back as hold their heads high an Never let a chance pass to give our youngsters the absence of a ribbon. way to the truck. they leave the ring on the ucers. We, as the number of youth prodrk production in n tio na the in t 1s ks ran the area of po sense; Texas We are unique in another rtunity to reach and teach more young people in xas, the TPPA Staff, Board Te po producers, have the op derstanding the nature of pork production in youth of our state, as Corby than any other state. Un hip have displayed a genuine belief that the with at night,” are the future ers of Directors and members tuck in bed and say prayare in their life, so it is extremely we es on he “t , ue iss t Barrett stated in the las Our children tend to model the adults that rents, teachers, dership as breeders, pa lea r Ou s. ple of agriculture in our state. am ex ive ide them posit important that we prov integral to ensure their success. is agents and volunteers ating in by attending and particip le. The is rs ito hib ex uth yo ote lt Show and Sa One such way to prom ow’s CTBR Texas Stars Gi Sh ding ck sto ve Li lo ge An n the Sa own some of the top breeg the to y nit rtu po op the u yo sale will not only give s breeders, but will go a long way in securin be females offered by Texauth exhibitors. The CTBR Foundation Gilt will n future success of our yo special sale. The CTBR Scholarship/Productio t offered as Lot #3 in the funds for deserving 4-H and FFA members tha’s Grant Program providesed Pigs during their show ring career. This year d have exhibited Texas BrWalser Farms/Hot Rod Genetics of Canadian an es. gilt is being offered by Thanks to Weldon and Rodney and their famili should be a great one! donors; we have been truly blessed. Many thanks to our past g health, safety, and a stron th wi u yo of ch ea ss ble God in all your endeavors. sense of accomplishment Voice for the Te Representing a Unified P.O. Box 10168

Austin, TX 78766

xas Pork Industry Since

512.453.0615

1889

512.451.5536 Fax


February / March 2015

UPCOMING EVENTS FEBRUARY

Good Luck at the upcoming shows!

4th - 6th ~ Fort Worth Barrow Show 6th - 8th ~ Team Purebred Southwest Regional , Chickasha, OK 11th ~ San Antonio Swine Skillathon Contest 11th - 14th ~ San Antonio Junior & Open Breeding Gilt Shows 14th - 15th ~ San Angelo Breeding Gilt & CTBR Texas Stars Gilt Show

TPPA Mission Statement “The mission of the Texas Pork Producers Association is to help our members produce and market pork for a profit.”

17th ~ CTBR Texas Stars Select Gilt Sale, San Angelo 17th - 19th ~ San Angelo Barrow Show

Producer Connection is the official publication of the Texas Pork Producers Association and is published by the Texas Pork Producers Association. All inquiries should be directed to the TPPA office.

21st - 26th ~ San Antonio Barrow Show 21st - 23rd - Team Purebred Mid-South Regional, Greenwood, MS

Advertising Information To place an ad or for advertising rates and guidelines, please contact Texas Pork Producers Association at (512) 453-0615 or communications@texaspork.org

25th - 28th ~ NSR Southwest Type Conference, Belton, TX

MARCH 5th - 8th ~ NJSA Western Regional, Turlock, CA

Texas Pork Producers Association P.O. Box 10168 Austin, Texas 78766 512-453-0615 - Local Phone 512-451-5536 - Fax tppa@texaspork.org www.texaspork.org Texas Pork Producers Association 8500 Shoal Creek Blvd. Bldg. 4, Suite 120 Austin, Texas 78757

6th - 7th~ Houston Breeding Gilt Show 14th - 19th ~ Houston Barrow Show 20th - 22nd ~ Star of Texas Barrow Show, Austin, TX

Follow TPPA: facebook & twitter

Programs are made available to pork producers without regard to race, color, sex, religion or national origin. TPPA is an equal opportunity employer.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

BOARD OF DIRECTORS STAFF

President - Kyle Stephens, Amarillo

Lorenzo Devora, Pipe Creek Rory Duelm, New Braunfels Mike Gruber, Dalhart Kurt Kelso, Seguin David Kempen, San Angelo Melton Harms, Springtown Barret Klein, Boerne Cody McCleery, Weatherford Robert Peffley, Miami Chuck Real, Marion Ewrin Schwartz, Jr., San Angelo

President Elect - Jimmy Hayes, Port Lavaca Vice President - Corby Barrett, Perryton Immediate Past President - Kenneth Kensing, Fredericksburg Executive Member - Stanley Young, Lubbock Executive Member - Denny Belew, Tahoka Executive Member - Jay Winter, Lubbock

Executive Vice President Brandon R. Gunn bgunn@texaspork.org Director of Communications Cassidy Smith csmith@texaspork.org


President

President Elect

Vice President

Kyle Stephens

Jimmy Hayes

Corby Barrett

Term Expires 2016

Term Expires 2017

Term Expires 2015

Meet Your

Executive Vice President

Amarillo

Immediate Past President

Port Lavaca

Perryton

2015 TPPA Officer Team Brandon Gunn

Term Expires 2017

Elections took place during the Board of Directors meeting on December 2nd. It was voted on and passed, the following as the new officers and Executive Committee members of the Texas Pork Producers Association.

Executive Comm. Member

Executive Comm. Member

Executive Comm. Member

Stanley Young

Jay Winter

Denny Belew

Term Expires 2016

Term Expires 2016

Term Expires 2017

Kenneth Kensing Fredericksburg

Lubbock

Lubbock

Austin

Tahoka


Market News Wiechman Pig Company

January 14, 2015 (Daily Buying Station) Top Butchers (200-300 lbs.) - $47.09/cwt. Sows (< 450 lbs.) - $0.34/lb. Sows (450 - 500 lbs.) - $0.35/lb. Sows (500 - 550 lbs.) - $0.37/lb. Sows (550 - 600 lbs.) - $0.38/lb. Sows (600+ lbs.) - $0.39/lb. Big Boars - 13.00 /cwt.

Gainesville Livestock Auction January 20, 2015

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#1 Butchers (230-270 lbs.) - $0.50 - $0.60/lb. #2 Butchers (220-280 lbs.) - $0.40 - $0.50/lb. Sows (<400 lbs.) - $0.20 - $0.45/lb. Sows (400-500 lbs.) - $0.35 - $0.40/lb. Sows (500-700 lbs.) - $0.35 - $0.40/lb. Feeder Pigs (25-90 lbs.) - $0.50 - $0.85/lb. Feeder Pigs (100-175 lbs.) - $0.50 - $0.85/lb. Boars (<200 lbs.) - $0.35 - $0.50/lb. Boars (200-300 lbs.) - $0.25 - $0.35/lb. Boars (300+ lbs.) - $0.15 - $0.23/lb.

Brenham Livestock Auction January 16, 2015

Butchers 1-2 Grade (230-260 lbs.) - $0.70 - $0.80/lb. Butchers 2-3 Grade (225-275 lbs.) - $0.65 - $0.70/lb. Butchers 3-4 Grade (225-275 lbs.) - $0.60 - $0.65/lb. Packer Sows 1-2 Grade (550-700 lbs.) - $0.38 - $0.42/lb. Packer Sows 2-3 Grade (350-500 lbs.) - $0.35 - $0.38/lb. Packer Sows 3-4 Grade (250-500 lbs.) - $0.32 - $0.35/lb. Lightweight Boars - $0.30 - $0.40/lb. Feeder Pigs 1-2 Grade (40-80 lbs.) - $1.10 - $1.20/lb. Feeder Pigs 2-3 Grade (40-80 lbs.) - $0.90 - $1.10/lb.

Seguin Cattle Company January 13, 2015

#1 Butchers - $0.65 - $0.70/lb. #2 Butchers - $0.55 - $0.60/lb. Sows - $0.45 - $0.60/lb. Feeder Pigs - $1.20 - $1.50/lb. Feeder Shoats - $0.70 - $1.05/lb.

Muleshoe Livestock Auction January 17, 2015

Top Butchers (230-290 lbs.) - $0.55 - $0.62/lb. Feeder Shoats (100-160 lbs.) - $0.65 - $0.75/lb. Sows - $0.30 - $0.35/lb.

CHECK YOUR E-MAIL FOR WEEKLY MARKET REPORTS


Year End Review of 2014 Hog Prices from Around the State Other livestock auctions marketing swine: Muleshoe, Karnes City, Kirbyville.

Join TPPA to receive weekly Market Report Updates


2015: Lower Costs, Robust Demand Point to Profits of $30/Head By Steve Meyer

A

fter all is said and done, economic analysis boils down to supply and demand. The dance is complex, but the concepts are pretty simple. For pork producers, 2015 is looking to be among the most profitable years ever. After the “complications” witnessed in 2014, pork producers are contemplating what’s ahead for 2015. Several key issues, including lower production costs and robust demand, will impact hog and pork markets.

Pre-ethanol Corn Prices?

Record-large corn crops in 2013 and in 2014 have pushed corn prices to their lowest level since 2010 and could drop them all the way to pre-ethanol levels. A soybean crop of nearly 4 billion bushels has pushed soy prices to much more reasonable levels. The combination has projected 2015 break-even production costs as of early November down 10 percent from 2014 and 23 percent from 2013. Perhaps more important: Costs could stay at this level or lower for the foreseeable future since world corn production has now caught up with higher demand created by biofuels subsidies and mandates.

Robust Demand Continues

Real per capita expenditures for pork have been on a roll the past two years. This measure of consumer demand exceeded year-earlier levels every month in 2013, closing the year up 5.5 percent from 2012. Through September this year, real per capita expenditures for pork were higher than a year earlier in every month except January. In January, severe winter storms impacted consumer behavior in much of the country and especially on the East Coast. Real per capita expenditures for pork were up 7.1 percent from a year ago through September. Two of the best months ever were May and September, up 12.5 percent and 11.4 percent, respectively. As shown in the chart above, September’s real per capita pork expenditures of $12.56 (year-2000

Real Per Capita Expenditures for Pork $/month, 2000$ 15.00 14.00 13.00 12.00 11.00 10.00 9.00 8.00 ‘90

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dollars) were the highest for September since 2003. Just an average Septemberto-November increase this year will put November at $13.20, the highest monthly level since 1991. Strong consumer demand has translated to strong hog demand in spite of higher margins at both retail and packer levels this year. The adage of “a rising tide lifts all boats” applies to markets as well as oceans.

What about PEDV?

Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus (PEDV) definitely was a factor in reducing hog supplies in 2014, but it remains to be seen how big of a role it will play in 2015. Producers and packers made up for much of the shortfall in pig numbers this year by harvesting pigs at heavier weights. Weights are not expected to be quite as high if PEDV losses wane and finishing buildings are again more fully utilized. However, weights likely will remain historically high. USDA’s Quarterly Hogs and Pigs Report, released Sept. 26, suggested ongoing expansion of the sow herd and more litters farrowed in the Sept.-Nov. and Dec.-Feb. quarters. If PEDV losses decline substantially, litter size could rebound nicely from last year’s levels, expanding slaughter totals by 4.0 to 4.4 percent from the second quarter of 2015 and on. Analysts expect first-quarter hog supplies to be close to year-earlier levels, but

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recent data indicate that PEDV breaks in sow herds have been substantially lower than last year since May. This suggests that pre-weaning death losses have been reduced over that period and that supplies in December and the first quarter may be larger than initially expected.

Bumper Crops Fuel Sow-Herd Expansion Active expansion in the U.S. sow herd likely will pick up steam with this fall’s bumper crop. A sow herd growth of 3 to 4 percent would not be surprising if producers do not have to battle PEDV to the same degree as in the past year. Expansion and PEDV relates to the adage of draining the swamp in the presence of alligators. However, the question is: How many PEDV alligators will there be this year?

Profits of $30 to $40/Head

Amid talk of expansion, don’t forget that 2015 hog prices still will be very good, with attractive returns. As of Nov. 12, futures markets for corn, soybean meal and hogs offered profits of over $30 per head for 2015 in my model based on Iowa State University’s historical costs and returns series. That would put 2015 in the top five years ever, with the best operations netting $40 or more per head. All in all, not a bad dance in store for producers in 2015.

* Article Reprinted from the Winter 2014 Issue of Pork Checkoff Report Magazine


Informs and educates legislators Amplifies the producer voice with lawmakers

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Enhances domestic and global demand

Counters misinformation and activists

Develops and defends export markets

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As the global voice of the U.S. pork industry, NPPC identifies and addresses critical issues.


News from the

National Pork Board NATIONAL PORK BOARD NAMES CHRIS HODGES AS CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Chris Hodges, a pork industry leader with substantial senior management experience in agriculture, will join the National Pork Board as its new chief executive officer on Feb. 16. Currently based in Kansas City, Hodges is senior vice president - business development of Smithfield Farmland. “When I first joined what was then Farmland Industries as a grain division manager, I joined a farmer cooperative,” said Hodges. “Over the years, I have grown to understand the needs and challenges facing pork producers. From product marketing to disease management to sustainability, I look forward to working with the National Pork Board staff and Board to develop the tangible tools and grassroots programs on behalf of America’s pig farmers.” Hodges brings to the Pork Checkoff decades of in-depth knowledge and innovation in marketing pork to key U.S. food retailers and into international markets. Much of his fresh pork marketing experience includes direct producer outreach and involvement related to adopting on-farm practices specifically designed to improve overall meat quality. His last day with Smithfield will be Feb. 13, upon which he will move to Des Moines to lead the Pork Checkoff.

INDICATORS POINT TO FALLING DEMAND

Autumn hog slaughter typically fell well short of year-ago levels, averaging 5 to 6 percent under year-ago rates in late September, then narrowing the annual difference to about 2.5 percent in mid-tolate December. Those reductions largely matched USDA pig supply estimates in the quarterly September report. Big weight increases reduced the cuts in pork production, but the latter totals still remained below year-prior levels through fall. In the light of reduced supplies and the huge price increases experienced last spring and summer, the fact that the CME lean hog index fell below comparable year-ago levels in late 2014 is rather stunning. That is, the index bottomed at 79.23 cents/pound in late

2013, but slipped below that figure just after Christmas 2014. It continued sliding, reaching 77.72 cents on January 6. It does seem set to turn upward. Still, these developments suggest underlying pork demand has fallen well below year-ago levels. It certainly seems drastically reduced from spring and summer levels. Ultimately, soaring mid2014 prices rather clearly depressed consumer interest in early winter, which seemingly bodes ill for the shortterm outlook, particularly if the USDA is correct in anticipating a 3 percent increase in hog supplies by early-to-midFebruary. Nevertheless, we think the situation is setting the stage for resurgent hog and pork demand by the time spring grilling season rolls around, especially if cattle and beef supplies remain extremely tight. Consumers seem likely to buy much cheaper pork quite actively, thereby potentially exaggerating the usual spring rally. We don’t expect hog and pork prices to challenge the stunning highs reached last year, but we wouldn’t be at all surprised to see the CME index push back above $1.00/pound by late spring.

THIRD PEDV STRAIN IDENTIFIED

There’s now a new strain of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus (PEDv) on the loose, recently confirmed by the University of Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Association of Swine Veterinarians (AASV) announced the confirmation in December. “Three naturally occurring U.S. PEDV strains have been identified: the original PEDV, the PEDV with changes in the spike gene (INDEL), and the PEDV strain (S2aadel),” the AASV reported. “The role of genetic changes in the US PEDV strains to clinical disease has yet to be reported. The clinical presentation of diarrhea in this case was reported as equally or more severe than such presentation in cases caused by the prototype PEDV Colorado/2013.” The CDC adds that though the North American PEDv variant-INDEL strain was only recently identified, it was first detected in June 2013 and reported in February 2014 by the Ohio Department of Agriculture. This suggests the

original PEDv strain mutated or two different PEDv strains were introduced concurrently in the United States. More information about the third PEDv strain can be found from the CDC. Since it was first identified in U.S. hog herds in April 2013, PEDv had killed an estimated 8 million pigs. It is a fastspreading disease that thrives in cold weather, and it doesn’t take much of infected feces to spread the infection. One gram of feces diluted in 24,000 gallons of water is still enough to infect pigs. In June, USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack announced the department would pump $26 million into fighting the disease, including $11.1 million to support strengthened bio-security practices at farms. Vilsack also announced mandatory PEDv reporting.

EXPORT STATISTICS

Data released for the first eleven months of the year showed US pork export volumes down for November, but on pace to beat a record in value for the year. For the year, exports are up 2% in value ($6.133 billion) and down 11% in volume (4.398 billion pounds), from 2013. November exports were down 13% in volume and 6% in value. Exports to Mexico slowed for the first time in 2014 and the EU gained market share in key US markets. The average value per head due to exports for the year is $63.21. Top volume markets are: Mexico, Japan, Hong Kong/China, Canada, South Korea, Central/South America, ASEAN and Oceania. Top value markets were: Japan, Mexico, Canada, Hong Kong/China, South Korea, Central/ South America, Oceania and ASEAN.

MORE PORK ON THE WAY

Pork producers are gearing up to provide their customers with what they want and that is “More Pork” and “More Bacon.” The nation’s hog producers have expanded the breeding herd by four percent and have already farrowed three percent more sows this past fall. The larger number of young pigs will begin to move pork production above yearprevious levels in early 2015 and could reach seven percent higher by the end of 2015. Annual production may average five percent higher. This major increase


comes after a series of years of smaller pork supplies dating back to 2007 when feed prices began to escalate and most recently due to large baby pig death losses in 2014 due to PED. The breeding herd has grown over the past year by 212,000 animals, mostly in the center of the country. The Western Corn Belt breeding herd increased by 105,000 head, with numbers increasing by 55,000 in Missouri, 40,000 in Iowa, and 10,000 in Minnesota. The second largest growth region was the Southern Plains as that region recovers from the long-term drought. Both Texas and Oklahoma added 20,000 animals to the breeding herd. The third region of concentrated growth was the Central Plains, with Nebraska adding 15,000 animals and Kansas adding 10,000. PED appears to be continuing to cause death losses for the industry and remains one of the on-going uncertainties for baby pig survival this winter. Clearly, PED can still have impacts on final 2015 pork supplies. To estimate PED death losses, the estimated number of pigs per litter from USDA is compared to the “expected” number of pigs per litter based on recent five year trends. That analysis suggests that baby pig death losses were greatest last January to March when losses were about eight percent more than trend. During the warm weather months of July, August, and September those losses dropped to about two percent. The most recent information for October and November suggest the death losses are increasing again to three to four percent. If so, these are similar to the rates of loss in late 2013. Looking forward, even though PED continues to impact baby pig survival, the number of pigs per litter is expected to be higher by two to three percent during the first-half of 2015. Pork production is expected to be up one percent in the first quarter of 2015, but five percent higher in the second quarter. That second quarter increase will come from the four percent larger pig crop last fall and one percent higher marketing weights. Pork production in the last-half of 2015 is expected to be five to seven percent higher, driven by three to four percent larger farrowings this winter and spring, by higher weaning rates, and by small increases in market weights. For the year, these factors will provide about five percent more pork. Pork consumers had to bear much of the costs of the PED virus which came at a time when pork supplies were already low due to an earlier period of extremely high feed prices. Retail pork prices reached a peak of $4.22 per pound in

September 2014, according to USDA, and have been dropping since. The general trend toward more affordable pork should continue throughout 2015. While pork producers suffered through PED death losses in 2014, they were rewarded with record high hog prices and record profitability partially as a result of PED. Hog prices averaged near $76 per live hundredweight, with estimated profit above all costs of $53 per head. The theme for pork producers in 2015 will be to strive to gain control over PED death losses and to continue to expand the breeding herd. It is likely the breeding herd will continue to expand another two to four percent over the course of 2015.

TO BE AN EFFECTIVE ADVOCATE, BUILD TRUST AND RELATIONSHIPS

Advocacy: It’s an active process for a cause or proposal, and that’s why we’re all here. Everyone recognizes the need for advocacy. That’s why we are Farm Bureau members; that’s why we are here participating in our policy process, identifying issues, setting our priorities for advocacy for the next year. Farm Bureau is an advocacy organization. Our goal is to “promote conditions which will make it possible for farmers to earn a fair return in a manner which will preserve freedom and opportunity.” That’s straight out of our policy book. Advocacy comes in many forms. My role as chairman of the board of the California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom allows me to interact with board members and supporters from throughout the state who are committed to educating California students about agriculture. The Ag in the Classroom staff works tirelessly, creating curriculum that teachers and volunteers use in the classroom. The advocacy tool that’s worked well for me in order to establish relations, earn credibility and help urbanites understand agriculture is getting them in my truck for a couple of hours— showing them what we do in our operations, in the packing sheds, in our communities, the whys and hows and the new technology. Explaining how past and proposed legislation will affect you, while standing in your field, has impact we can’t make over the phone or in a Capitol office.

We cannot let others define our industry or what we do. We have to make the relationships, and tell our story. It’s uncomfortable for all of us, but education is the key for agriculture to survive. In the past, we’ve had many issues that stand out as lightning rods. Today, water makes our past issues look minor. We need to push for solutions that preserve our freedom and opportunities. For example, we don’t have a groundwater problem; we have a surface water problem. What we need to do is capture and distribute surface water to the people who need it. In the past, when we’ve needed water, we developed solutions: dams, canals, technology. I know in my area, some of those projects are more than 100 years old. We need to motivate decisionmakers to find solutions. Look back in history and find those stories of solution. Look to the future for opportunities to solve our water needs, and advocate for those solutions. When we were short on gasoline in the 1970s, we refined more. When we were short on electricity, we created more distribution and generation. We never told a business they couldn’t operate in California, or put limits on our population. When the schools were full, we didn’t pick which kids could go and which couldn’t. Why do they want to do this with water? We need to educate, by telling those stories of success. The National Pork Board has responsibility for Checkoff-funded research, promotion and consumer information projects and for communicating with pork producers and the public. Through the Pork Checkoff, U.S. pork producers and importers pay $0.40 per $100 of value when pigs are sold and when pigs or pork products are brought into the United States. The Pork Checkoff funds national and state programs in advertising, consumer information, retail and food service marketing, production improvement, technology, swine health, pork safety and environmental management. For more information on Checkoff-funded programs, pork producers can call the Pork Checkoff Services at (800) 456-7675 or check the website at www.pork.org.


News from the

National Pork Producers Council WEST COAST PORT CONGESTION CONTINUES AT ALARMING RATE

NPPC this week signed onto a letter to Robert McEllrath, president of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU), and James McKenna, chairman and CEO of the Pacific Maritime Association (PMA), urging the two to find a resolution to a contract dispute between dock workers and the ports and shipping companies that has caused massive WeSst Coast port congestion and even forced port shutdowns. The Obama administration recently agreed to send a mediator to assist in the contract negotiations. The ILWU contract with the PMA expired July 1, 2014. Both parties agreed to continue port operations until an agreement was reached, but in November the ILWU withdrew that commitment and has since been refusing to send qualified workers to the ports, causing alarming port congestion and high levels of uncertainty for importers and exporters alike. The slowdown has cost businesses tens of millions of dollars in lost sales and unanticipated port charges, and the congestion at the ports of Seattle and Tacoma, Wash., and at the California ports of Los Angeles, Long Beach and Oakland now has reached a breaking point. There is no space to store pork, beef, and poultry that was destined for export markets. If the situation at the Port of Oakland were resolved tomorrow, for example, it would take 30-45 days to clear the backlog of containers. And if the dispute isn’t resolved soon, meat companies may be forced to shut or slow processing lines, which could have catastrophic consequences for livestock producers, with animals ready for market taking space on farms. In addition, global customers are upset by the failure of U.S. companies to satisfy orders. More than 16,000 metric tons of U.S. pork and 10,000 metric tons of U.S. beef get exported to Asia each month. Some U.S. meat companies report they have containers of meat sitting at West Coast ports that were sent before Christmas. The short shelf life of meat and poultry make

timely delivery critical. Last year, more than $6 billion worth of U.S. pork was exported, with about half of that going to markets in the Pacific Rim, making the West Coast port system a crucial part of the supply chain.

U.S., EU, JAPAN WIN WTO CASE AGAINST ARGENTINA

The United States, the European Union and Japan this week won a World Trade Organization (WTO) case against Argentina, with a WTO Appellate Body finding that Argentina’s import controls are not WTO-compliant and result in “managed trade.” Currently, fresh and frozen pork from the United States are ineligible to be shipped to Argentina. There is no reason – scientific or legal – that Argentina’s pork market should be closed to U.S. pork. The U.S. Department of Agriculture is in the process of negotiating an export certificate with Argentina that would result in the opening of the market, but progress has been limited. While NPPC has pushed for an export certificate the past couple of years, the general trade climate between the United States and Argentina has deteriorated significantly. In general, Argentina’s trade relationship with most of its trading partners has worsened because of a spate of protectionist measures installed by the administration of Argentine President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner. This week’s WTO ruling is a positive step in holding Argentina accountable for its international trade commitments. NPPC will continue to push for unfettered access in the South American country.

DOT TO IMPLEMENT NAFTA TRUCKING PROVISION

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) last Friday announced it will permanently open the U.S. border to Mexican long-haul motor carriers, allowing trucking companies to operate beyond the commercial zones on the U.S.-Mexico border and ending a 20-year trade dispute between the two countries. The trucking provision in the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which took effect in 1994, was

supposed to allow Mexican trucking companies to operate in the United States, with a phase-in period starting in 1995. But implementation of the NAFTA provision was thwarted several times, making the U.S. vulnerable to NAFTA-authorized retaliatory tariffs. After Congress failed in 2009 to renew a 2-year-old pilot program that allowed a limited number of Mexican trucks into the United States, Mexico imposed tariffs on $2.4 billion of U.S. products, including in August 2010, pork. The trade retaliation ended when another pilot program was put in place in 2011. For the year tariffs were placed on pork, U.S. exports to Mexico fell by 17 percent over the same period a year earlier, while Canadian pork exports grew significantly. NPPC has long urged the U.S. government to live up to the NAFTA trucking provision and is optimistic that DOT’s recent announcement will bring the dispute to an end. Mexico is the second largest value market and the largest volume market for U.S. pork exports. In 2014, the United States exported about 670,000 metric tons of pork and pork products, valued at more than $1.5 billion, to its southern neighbor. Under the new trucking policy, Mexican carriers must undergo a thorough application process, including a safety audit, before being approved by DOT.

TPP NEGOTIATIONS

The latest round of negotiations for the TPP were held early December in DC. NPPC’s Nick Giordano, met with representatives from key TPP countries to discuss mutual areas of interest and avenues to a positive outcome for US pork in each market. The lynchpin issue in the TPP negotiations remains market access in Japan. Japan’s current TPP market access proposal exempts pork, rice, wheat, beef and dairy products from tariff elimination. If Japan is allowed an unprecedented amount of exemptions from tariff elimination, other TPP countries likely


will pull back on both market access and rules, which would significantly diminish the benefits of the entire agreement and set a precedent for future trade negotiations. However, the recent general election in Japan was viewed as a referendum on President Abe’s economic policies, known as “Abenomics,” which have included a large fiscal stimulus and massive monetary easing. Abe is expected to continue his Abenomics campaign by implementing structural reforms, and agriculture is one of the top candidates for improvement. Japan’s agriculture industry is highly subsidized and protected but the government overhaul may include reducing import barriers.

NPPC SUBMITS COMMENTS ON 2015 DIETARY GUIDELINES

NPPC again submitted comments related to the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, voicing great concern with the direction taken by the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC), which makes recommendations for the guidelines to the secretaries of Agriculture and Health and Human Services. In its final meeting, the DGAC removed lean meat from the healthy diet profile. A DGAC subcommittee tasked with reviewing the importance of meat in the diet initially included it in recommendations for a healthful diet. The move by the DGAC to exclude meat confirms a suspicion NPPC has long had: that the advisory committee is biased against consumption of animal protein and is ignoring the many health benefits lean meat provides. NPPC also raised concerns that the DGAC may have excluded from its evidence library science that supports the health benefits associated with meat consumption. The DGAC is expected to issue by the end of the month a final report with its dietary guidelines recommendations. At that time there will be a period for stakeholders to comment on the report.

AMBASSADOR FROMAN TO PERU, DEPUTY USTR TO JAPAN FOR TPP TALKS

The United States this week participated in another round of negotiations on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a regional trade deal that includes the United States,

Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam, which account for nearly 40 percent of global GDP. The U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Michael Froman was in Peru for the latest round of negotiations, while Deputy USTR Wendy Cutler traveled to Tokyo for talks with Japanese chief TPP negotiator Hiroshi Oe. NPPC applauded U.S. trade officials for their continued commitment to negotiating a “goldstandard” deal for U.S. pork producers.

PEDV SHOWING UP IN FINISHING HOGS

The National Pork Producers Council President Howard Hill recently shared both good news and bad news for the pork industry. The good news is that Epidemic Diarrhea virus is mild compared to last year, thanks to the increased efforts of producers to keep the disease at bay. The bad news is that still more needs to be done, especially for those with finishing pigs. “The prevalence has been relatively low this winter,” Hill told WNAX News Radio. “Compared to last year, I would classify it as minimal.” Hill believes a lot of the credit for this improvement goes to producers, who have taken steps to secure their sow herds by increasing biosecurity measures both on the farm and off. However, the news from Hill wasn’t all positive. He provided an update that PEDv has also been found in finisher pigs. He says, “We are getting some reports of finishers that are breaking post-first or -second cut, and we think that may be due to contamination back from the dock of the packing plant or wherever the first point of concentration is that the pigs are going to.” Hill is encouraging producers with finishing loads to be diligent in washing, disinfecting and drying transport vehicles.

114TH CONGRESS CONVENES, LEGISLATIVE ACTIONS PENDING

Members of the 114th Congress were sworn in to start the new year, with most action being ceremonial. Legislative action in the coming weeks is expected on the Keystone XL pipeline, which would bring oil sands from Canada to refineries in the United States. President Obama Tuesday made

clear he would veto a bill authorizing construction of the pipeline. The Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee worked on the issue this week but postponed a scheduled hearing on legislation to approve the project. Meanwhile, the new chairman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, Jim Inhofe, R-Okla., promised to conduct a thorough review of regulations proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, including one to define “Waters of the United States” (WOTUS), a rule NPPC vigorously opposes. Congressional action also is expected soon on a fiscal 2015 homeland security appropriations bill that includes a provision to stymie the president’s immigration executive order. In December, Congress agreed to fund the Department of Homeland Security only until Feb. 27, 2015.

MEAT SAFETY LABELS DELAYED TO 2018

Special safety labels won’t be required for mechanically tenderized meat until at least 2018 after the Obama administration failed to finalize the regulation in time for it to take effect earlier. The labeling rule, which will require packages to provide cooking instructions for the meat, had to be finalized by Dec. 31 in order for it to take effect before 2018 under separate requirements of the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service. The National Pork Producers Council conducts public-policy outreach on behalf of its 43 affiliated state associations, enhancing opportunities for the success of U.S. pork producers and other industry stakeholders by establishing the U.S. pork industry as a consistent and responsible supplier of high-quality pork to the domestic and world markets. The Strategic Investment Program, is the primary source of funds for the National Pork Producers Council. By enrolling in SIP, you are assured a seat at the table when decisions are made regarding the future of the U.S. pork industry. For more information or to join NPPC, visit WWW.NPPC.ORG


Pork Producers Supporting a Great Cause Twenty-one pork producers from Texas, Illinois, Iowa and Georgia served hundreds of military families by distributing pork meals on Dec. 13 during the 2014 Snowball Express, a charity for the children of America’s fallen military heroes. More than 2,700 meals were served to the children and military family members, traveling from across the country to Texas for Snowball Express, which was held in the Dallas-Ft. Worth area. Snowball Express connects military families to one another and creates opportunities for friendship and communal healing during the holidays. Since 2006, the mission of Snowball Express has been a simple, yet profoundly important one: Provide hope and new happy memories to the children of fallen military heroes who have died while on active duty since 9/11. “This was my second Snowball Express and it left me even more humble and grateful than the first one.” Said Robert Peffely, Operation Manager of Smithfield Premium Genetics and TPPA Board of Director, “I feel proud and honored that we as pork producers can come together to volunteer for an event like this. To see bus after bus come rolling in with all of these families and knowing we are going to make an impact on their lives was uplifting. I enjoy seeing the smile that we are able to put on a child and/or their guardians face from a simple gesture of serving them or giving them a stuffed pig.”

emotion of joy almost overwhelms as a person witnesses the smiles of the families when they say ‘Thank you for remembering us’ to the volunteers,” said Corby Barrett, Texas Pork Producers Association Board Member.

Following a parade in downtown Ft. Worth, the pork producers were on hand to greet and serve families and volunteers at a nearby ranch. In a little over an hour, producers served more than 1,000 hot dogs, 1,000 brat burgers and 750 boneless loin chops to those in attendance. Johnsonville Foods provided the brat burgers while TPPA donated the chops that were served to the families.

Pork producers also distributed Pork Checkoff stuffed toy pigs, coloring books and pig erasers to the children. The opportunity reflects the pork industry’s We Care® initiative, which demonstrates pork producers’ commitment to established ethical principles that promote “I was honored and humbled to have the opportunity a better quality of life in local communities. to serve the families of our fallen soldiers for my second “We should continue to support this charity, these time at Snowball Express. Though the emotional swing families have paid the ultimate sacrifice with a loved goes from very happy to moments of very sad; the primary one’s life for our freedom.” Peffley said.


These families have paid the ultimate sacrifice with loved one’s life for our freedom.

- Robert Peffley, Operations Manager Smithfield Premium Genetics-Texas and TPPA Board Member


What We Do...

Membership Driven!

At TPPA we strive to: Provide a structure for cooperation of pork producers in Texas Encourage efficient production and marketing methods Promote the consumption of quality pork products Provide educational and networking opportunities Represent producers in legislative and regulatory matters

Participate in Texas Pork Industry Conference and other TPPA sponsored events Networking opportunities to learn the most efficient practices and new concepts Our goal is to improve & increase the quality & production of the Texas swine industry.

Est. 1889

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Scholarship opportunities Develop & enhance leadership skills through activities: ◆Texas Pork Leadership Camp ◆TPPA Internships ◆Texas Pork Youth Symposium Connect with influential industry leaders

Stay current by receiving timely updates on: ◆Stock Shows ◆Important Issues ◆Market Reports ◆Activities & Events ◆Certified Texas Bred Registry Information Subscription to Producer Connection Receive Spring Buyers Guide and Fall Sales Trail

Representing the Voice of Texas Swine Breeders & Agriculturalists Join Texas Pork Producers Association TODAY Annual Membership Sept. 1st - Aug. 31st

Name: Name of Business: Address: Phone: Youth $10

On

Email: Producer $35

Professional $35

TPPA Office ◆ P.O. Box 10168 Austin, TX 78766 ◆ 512-453-0615 ◆ www.texaspork.org

Associate $125


Your CONTRIBUTION can keep our LEGACY ALIVE! Honoring Our History

The Texas pork industry has a rich history filled with hardworking, passionate individuals whose dedication, to the swine industry is still present today. For 27 years, these individuals commiment to the Texas swine industry has been recognized in the Texas Pork Hall of Honor, located in the Kleberg Animal Science building at Texas A&M University, in College Station. Within recent years, Texas A&M University dedicated the atrium of the Animal Science building to Dr. Hesby, for his dedication to the thousands of students he instructed, in his lifetime. Hanging in the most visible part of the atrium, there are currently 26 inductees, in the Hall of Honor, all of which have helped guide and improve the Texas pork industry. Additionally the atrium has been remodled, providing relaxing study areas for students. All areas of the atrium have been remodled, except the Hall of Honor. Over the years, several plaques have fallen apart and become damanged. To continue this time honored tradition of showing appreciation to our associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past and present leaders, the Texas Pork Hall of Honor needs your assistance to maintain its location and prominance. TPPA needs your help to raise the necessary funds in order to restore this prestigous part of our history. Your contribuation will be greatly appreciated and recognized on a plaque, at the location of the Texas Pork Hall of Honor, as well as multiple TPPA media outlets. Use the form below, or go to the TPPA website, at texaspork.org and join me in the effort to save a great part of our history.

We have already raised $3,500! Let's keep it going!

Hall of Honor Plaque Restoration Donation Form Name: Company: Address: City: Bronze $100+

Zip:

State: Silver $250+

Gold $500+

Platinum $750+


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Texas Pork Producers Association

Certified Texas Bred Registry

The Certified Texas Bred Registry program was established to promote Texas bred and raised pigs and support both the breeders and the 4-H / FFA youth of Texas who raise & show Certified Texas Bred pigs.

How does participation benefit you? ✓ Additional Premiums

• $100 premium is awarded to individuals exhibiting a CTBR Class Champion in each class of the barrow shows at the State Fair of Texas, Fort Worth Stock Show, San Antonio Livestock Exposition, Star of Texas and the Houston Livestock Show. • Premium money is distributed to all placing barrows at the San Angelo Stock Show in addition to buckles and trophies awarded to exhibitors of Champion and Reserve Champion breeds. • $46,000+ was awarded during the 2013-2014 show season to Texas 4-H and FFA students.

✓ Scholarship Opportunities

• $27,500 has been awarded to Texas students since 2011 through the CTBR program. • In 2014, three scholarships were awarded at $2,500 each.

✓ Production Grant Program

• Provide financial assistance to deserving 4-H and FFA students at a minimum amount of $2,500 who are continuing their involvement in swine production through establishing their own breeding program.

✓ Participate in the San Angelo Stock Show

• The CTBR Texas Stars Gilt Show & Select Sale and the San Angelo Barrow Show is only open to youth exhibiting pigs registered in the Certified Texas Bred Registry program. • Gilts selected for the sale brought an average of $2,275 back to each exhibitor in 2014.

How to participate?

✓ Buy your showpigs from a CTBR breeder! ✓ Exhibit your CTBR pig at a Texas Major Show or the State Fair of Texas! ✓ Become a TPPA member for additional benefits!

Visit texaspork.org to view our Breeder Directory & the Texas Sales Trail, a comprehensive list of Fall showpig sales. P.O. Box 10168

*

Austin, TX 78766

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512.453.0615

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512.451.5536 Fax


! u o Y k n a h T

On behalf of the Texas Pork Producers Association membership and Texas 4-H and FFA exhibitors, we want to say THANK YOU to our Certified Texas Bred Registry Sponsors for the 2015 show year. This group of dedicated individuals, businesses and organizations make it possible for us to continue recognizing the achievements that Texas swine breeders and exhibitors earn in the show ring. Without our sponsors, the Certified Texas Bred Registry program would not be possible. We greatly appreciate your constant commitment to this association and our youth, and good luck this show season!

2015 Certified Texas Bred Registry Sponsors

Linder Feed, Overall Title Sponsor

Team Lindner prides itself on helping exhibitors and their families achieve success and have an exceptional record doing so over the past decade. Lindner Feed & Milling is a fourth-generation family owned feed mill founded in 1938 by the Lindner Family. Over the last ten years, Lindner Feed & Milling has become a leader in the show feed arena in the Southwest, as proven by the number of banners collected at the major shows; and through several partnerships and cooperative efforts, now has feed available in more than 20 states across the United States.

National Pork Board, Breeder Cap Sponsor The National Pork Board, headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa, is one of our association’s most valuable partners. TPPA is an affiliation of the National Pork Board, providing us with a strong backing, as both organizations work to protect and promote the swine industry. The National Pork Board strives to elevate U.S. pork as the global protein of choice by continuously and collaboratively working to do what’s right for people, pigs and the planet. The National Pork Board and Pork Checkoff are the links that unite America’s pork producers with key stakeholders focused on building a bright future for the pork industry through research, promotion and education.


Texas Star Gilt Show DL Show Pigs, Lamesa,

DL Show Pigs takes pride in providing today’s youth with quality and winning show pigs and looks forward to helping existing and new customers with their future show ring successes. Josh, Bridgette and their daughter Kenley raise competitive Hampshire, Yorkshire, Duroc and Crossbred show hogs. In 2014 alone, the Krohn Family produced gilts and barrows that took home top honors at various county, Texas majors and national shows. A sponsor of two awards, we greatly appreciate DL Show Pigs for sponsoring both the Supreme Champion Gilt trophy and the Champion Yorkshire Barrow buckle.

Harman Farms, Perryton

Customer success and satisfaction, that is the foundation that Harman Farms has built their operation on. They focus on raising highly competitive show pigs and breeding stock that continue to win in the show ring year after year. In addition to raising show pigs, Harman farms operates a small boar stud, featuring proven boars that are utilized in their own genetic program, as well as other successful breeding programs, across the nation. When you purchase an animal from Wayne and Leslie, you are not only buying the animal, but you also gain access to their training, feeding, fitting, and showmanship resources. We thank them for sponsoring the Reserve Supreme Champion Gilt trophy.

Duelm’s Prevailing Genetics, New Braunfels,

For over 35 years Duelm’s Prevailing Genetics has been a leading source for consistent, predictable genetics that yield champion results through out the United States; producing 30 grand or reserve grand champion barrows at Texas majors. Duelm’s Prevailing Genetics have pigs available all year round for most county shows, and majors in the country, so existing and potential customers are welcome to come to the farm, visit with Rory and pick out their next champion at anytime. As a sponsor of two awards, TPPA greatly appreciates Duelm’s Prevailing Genetics for sponsoring both the Champion Crossbred Barrow and Gilt buckles.

Real Hog Farm, Marion

Making champion kids through champion hogs is what Real Hog Farms is all about. For 50 years, The Real Family has made the purebred hog business their full-time passion, and have established a strong and successful reputation in the process. Real Hog Farms farrow approximately 110 sows year round, offering quality Duroc, Yorkshire, Berkshire, Hampshire and Crossbred seedstock and show pigs to their customers. Chuck and Debbie deeply appreciate their customers and the hog industry, and love watching its young people grow and develop in such a positive environment. TPPA is very grateful for Real Hog Farms sponsorship the Champion Purebred Gilt buckle.


McCleery Family Durocs, Poolville

The McCleery Family have a passion for the Duroc breed and that passion is visible by the number and quality of Duroc show pigs they produce, which is seen on all levels. In addition to serving on the TPPA Board of Directors, Cody is on the National Swine Registry Executive committee and the Duroc Board of Directors. Although Durocs are the family’s specialty, they also offer a few crossbred litters as well as offering semen on their select set of boars. We thank the McCleery Family for sponsoring the Reserve Champion Crossbred Gilt buckle.

Peugh’s Show Pigs, Stanton

Peugh Show Pigs has worked hard to combine a strong sow herd with the top boar genetics available to produce nothing but STINKIN’ GOOD PIGS! Cody, Shanna and their three girls farrow Yorkshire, Hampshire, Duroc and Crossbred sows, raising quality show projects for their exhibitors. Always in the barns, you can always count on Cody to lend a helping hand and offer support throughout the year. TPPA greatly appreciates Peugh Show Pigs and their sponsorship of the Reserve Champion Purebred Gilt buckle.

San Angelo Barrow Show

ADM Moorman’s ShowTec, Quimcy, IL TPPA is very appreciative for ADM MoorMan’s ShowTec sponsoring the Grand Champion Barrow trophy. ADM MoorMan’s ShowTec- Winning performance is a priority and a tradition for ADM Alliance Nutrition®. That’s why exhibitors and breeders choose MoorMan’s® ShowTec® show feed products. Proven performance from Innovative Nutrition® is evident in the many local and national Grand and Reserve Grand Champions animals that were fed MoorMan’s ShowTec products. ADM Alliance Nutrition is a market leader in producing quality show products, which can help your show animals reach their maximum genetic potential.

Mund Livestock, Wall

Making quality count is the motto for this family business. Mund Livestock focuses on producing high quality pigs that are raised to be competitive at the major stock shows across the nation. Brad, Casey and Brice take pride in the genetics that they have gathered to help their litters have the ability to hang banners. Mund Livestock is a family ran operation that enjoys helping other families and kids accomplish their show ring goals. Mund Livestock’s sponsorship of the Reserve Grand Champion Barrow trophy is greatly appreciated.


Belew & Young, Tahoka & Lubbock

Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no denying the amount of effort and time spent working with youth that Denny Belew and Stanley Young have devoted over the years. With their portfolios including extensive work in extension, agriculture education, TPPA Board of Directors, volunteering and breeders in a swine partnership that formed before the CTBR program even started, Belew & Young are committed to the pork industry and its youth, both serving on numerous statewide committees and contributing extensively with the Texas Pork Leadership Camp. We are very thankful for Belew & Young, and their sponsorship of the Champion Hampshire buckle.

West Texas Genetics, San Angelo

Where functional genetics receive honest results! West Texas Genetics is a show pig operation composed of 50 Chester, Duroc, Spot, belted, blue and white Crossbred sows. The primary focus is on seedstock and show pig production, in conjunction with supplying top quality semen from their show pig sires. Clint and Julie Halfmann started West Texas Genetics in 2010. In this short time, their passion for show pigs has proved prosperous, having won top honors at shows across Texas and national type conferences. TPPA is grateful for West Texas Genetics sponsoring the Champion White OPB Barrow buckle.

Schwartz Livestock, Wall

Schwartz Livestock is appreciated for their sponsorship of the Champion Dark OPB buckle. Schwartz Livestock was founded on the values of family and agriculture. Erwin Sr. started the operation with hard work and now keeps everyone in line. Erwin Jr., known as Frankie, along with Dale and Randall operate the farm, which now runs around 100 sows and farms a tremendous amount of land. The Schwartz Family are leaders of the Wall community and lead the swine committee at the San Angelo Stock Show.

W. Rode & Sons, Fredericksburg W. Rode & Sons have been raising show pigs, in the Hill Country, since 1970. The operation continuously raises high quality show pigs, and are especially recognized for their Duroc herd. The family are longtime supporters and friends of the TPPA, serving on several committees and are a staple at numerous TPPA and livestock functions. We are thankful that W. Rode & Sons is sponsoring the Champion Duroc buckle.


Creative Awards & Trophies, Fredericksburg Owned by the Rode Family, Creative Awards & Trophies is no stranger to the junior livestock program. Since taking over the company in 1992, the Rode family has grown Creative Awards & Trophies into a nationally renowned business whose clientele includes every Texas major, the San Antonio Spurs, World Pork Expo and numerous other events. TPPA is appreciative of Creative Awards & Trophies sponsoring the Reserve Champion Duroc Barrow buckle.

K&C Farms, Fredericksburg

Kenneth and Caroline have spent many years dedicated to youth and the junior livestock program in Texas. An agriculture teacher for 31 years, Kenneth went up and down the road all over the state hauling students and pigs, among other livestock. Now retired, Kenneth and Caroline continue their involvement through their work on the TPPA Board as well as the countless hours volunteering on several San Antonio Stock Show committees. Kenneth has raised hogs from the time he was a youngster, and with Caroline, these two don’t seem to be slowing down. Our association is very thankful for K&C Farms sponsoring the Reserve Champion Hampshire buckle.

Wall Swine Breeders, San Angelo

Graciously serving as a sponsor since the inception of the CTBR shows at San Angelo, the Wall Swine Breeders is a group composed of show pig producers in the Wall and San Angelo area. What started out as a few breeders getting together to put on a pig sale, has developed into a structured local association that also supports the youth participating in junior swine programs. We thank Wall Swine Breeders for sponsoring the Reserve Champion Yorkshire Barrow buckle.

SAMM’s Hog Farm, Loraine

Stan and Mary McMullen, long-time CTBR award sponsors, are always a familiar face at the San Angelo Stock Show. You can find Stan welcoming exhibitors and serving on the swine committees and Mary encouraging the youth. The McMullen’s are originally from Louisiana, where Stan ran a commercial hog farm. Since transitioning to Texas, the McMullen’s have been dedicated supporters of the Texas youth livestock programs. TPPA thanks SAMM’s Hog Farm for sponsoring the Reserve Champion Dark OPB buckle.


Dale Wilde, Wall Dale Wilde is greatly valued for his sponsorship of the Reserve Champion White OPB buckle. Dale and his family have been a fixture in the Wall agriculture community for years where they have farmed and raised high quality show hogs. Dale has been heavily involved in the Texas show pig industry for years. He is a previous Director of TPPA, and currently serves as the Superintendent for the Junior Gilt Show for the San Angelo Stock Show.

Knight Show Pigs, Shallowater

Knight Show Pigs is a fourth generation family operation that focuses on the production of champion show pigs and high quality breeding stock. Their herd consists of a limited number of high quality and powerful females. While maintaining about 30 sows, Tadd and Scotta have managed to be recognized as a Top 10 Breeder in the Certified Texas Bred Program for seven years! Their show winning experience and track record over the years translates into show ring consistency that is second to none for their customers. We are thankful for Knight Show Pigs sponsorship of the Reserve Champion Crossbred Barrow buckle.

Foundation Gilt

Walser Farms/Hot Rod Genetics, Canadian For over 50 years, the Walser Family has made show pig production and youth development their passion. Raising Duroc, Hampshire, Yorkshire and Crossbred show pigs, this operation has plenty of experience in the industry. Highly successful, the number of banners continues to increase for this family. Since their establishment, Weldon, Rodney and their families have been constant supporters of TPPA; most recently being presented TPPA’s Heritage award. We greatly appreciate Walser Farms/Hot Rod Genetics for donating the 2015 TPPA Foundation Gilt.

Much Appreciation!


Breeder Spotlight

Walser Farms & Hot Rod Genetics The Rodney Walser Family

Located south of Canadian, Texas is a show pig operation that is backed with five generations of pork producers. Rodney Walser was born into the swine industry and for many years has made it his livelihood. Rodney, along with his wife Tamara and their daughters Kayln, Kilie and Adison currently run a 125 head sow herd, consisting of mostly Duroc females, but also have Hampshire, Yorkshire and Crossbred females. Walser Farms/Hot Rod Genetics have two farrowing seasons, the first lasting from January until early April, and the second spanning from late August through October, providing quality show pigs for their daughters, as well as numerous other exhibitors. In conjunction with their sows, the Walser Family has a boar stud consisting of approximately 10 Hampshire, Duroc, Yorkshire and Crossbred boars. Rodney’s passion for show hogs was ignited at an early age. Rodney showed his first hog when he was four years old, and continued to show hogs competitively through high school. Rodney’s father, Weldon, began raising Durocs in 1969 and enlisted the help of his children in deciding complimentary genetic matches and farrowing out their sows. With the guidance of his father, Rodney started his own sow herd at the young age of 10. The foundation of Rodney’s sow herd included around 10 Hampshire and Crossbred females. Rodney fondly remembers the start of his independent show pig operation. “My dad helped me get started by picking me up a Hamp gilt raised by the Lancaster family,” Rodney said. “My dad and older brother Mike have influenced me the most.” Walser went on to attend Clarendon College, where he was a member of the livestock judging team. Following college Rodney realized that it was his true desire to return to the family farm and continue raising show pigs. The Walser Family has experienced show ring success since the early years of their establishment and take great pride in the fact that they only show livestock born and raised on their farm. What quickly comes to mind when asked is exhibiting the Champion Duroc Barrow at the 1989 Houston Livestock Show and selling what was a record selling pig at the 1995 Pampa Pig Sale, which sold for $7,000.

The many achievements have carried over for Rodney and Tamara’s daughters, who have been competitive at all the major stock shows in Texas. In 2011, when Kilie was just nine years old she exhibited the Champion Duroc Barrow at Fort Worth. Their oldest daughter, Kayln, showed a blue belted barrow that won Grand Champion honors at the State Fair of Texas in 2009. Rodney said that one of his proudest moments came this past year when Kayln drove Champion Hampshire at the 2014 Houston Barrow Show. It was such a special moment for the family, because it was her last show before graduating high school and going on to play volleyball this year in college. The lasting success of Walser Farms/Hot Rod Genetics is a direct result of them building their operation on a few strong principles. Besides hard work and dedication, when talking about the actually traits of hogs, Rodney says that structure and balance are very important for them in their breeding program. “It’s hard to single trait hogs and continue to raise consistent, good ones,” said Rodney. “You might get beat by an extreme one, but you will be in the hunt and be able to sell show pigs if you stay true to it.” Anyone can look back through the history of the show pig industry and see that extreme trends have been in abundance. As various trends run their course, Rodney stands by


one constant philosophy. “Start with good females,” explained Rodney. “We don’t sell many gilts, because we always keep the best gilts out of every farrowing to ensure that we continue to raise show pigs that can compete.” Rodney notes that the show pig industry is continuously in transition, and credits the drive that keeps the industry progressing to this constant change. He says that trying to guess the direction and staying genetically a step ahead of the competition is what separates the good breeders from everyone else. Rodney also admits to being very critical when evaluating livestock, saying there is always something that needs to be changed in an animal. “A good hog today won’t be as good five years from now,” explained Rodney. The Walser Family has been in the show pig business for decades, and they have no plans of slowing down. Their second daughter Kilie is in the eighth grade and Adison will begin showing barrows in the 2016 show season, making it Rodney’s goal to keep pumping out good pigs for many years to come. “As long as I continue to raise pigs, I would like to stay at the top of my game,” said Rodney. “It’s hard to do. It seems like everyone rides the roller coaster of ups and downs, in this very competitive industry.” Rodney’s dedication to raising show hogs is a testament to his passion for agriculture and the people who make up this community. He says that it’s

the exceptional character of the youth who are raised in agriculture that motivate him to continue to raise hogs. “I’m a firm believer that the life skills and experiences that kids learn from showing livestock are unmatched by any other program.” Walser recognizes that starting a show pig operation requires a great deal of work, but that kids just need to start with the best hog they can and build on that. Show pigs are just one of this family’s passions. Rodney and his brother, Mike, are also competitive desert racers. They race a Trophy Truck in the Best in the Desert Racing Association. Within this organization, they travel to Nevada, Arizona and California to compete in six off-road races. The family also races in the Baja 1000 in Mexico. Their racing successes include winning the point championship in their open wheel unlimited car. Rodney is very thankful for the help of his family and employees, allowing him to have time to race, hunt, fish and ski. Walser Farms/Hot Rod Genetics are longtime members and supporters of the Texas Pork Producers Association. In 2014, the TPPA Board of Directors honored the operation for its 50 plus year commitment to the swine industry, by presenting the family with the prestigious Heritage award. The Walser’s continue to show their support by donating the Foundation Gilt, to be presented at the 2015 Texas Stars Gilt Show in San Angelo.


Donald B. Lawhorn Endowed Faculty Fellowship in Swine Medicine By contributing to the Donald B. Lawhorn Endowed Faculty Fellowship in Swine Medicine at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM), you can make a difference in the education of tomorrow’s veterinarians in the area of treating and managing pigs and feral hogs.

endowment was initiated to insure that faculty continued to expose veterinary students to swine medicine. Doctor of veterinary medicine (DVM) graduates from the CVM proceed to careers in mixed and companion animal practices, industry, research, and regulatory medicine, all of which benefit from a working knowledge of swine medicine.

Our Objective

The Initiative There are approximately 48,000 show pigs raised in Texas every year. Several commercial operations have farms in the state that contribute to the industry. The USDA reports that there are over 500,000 market hogs in the state. Innumerable pet miniature pigs are kept and millions of feral swine roam the countryside.

Currently, veterinary medical students participate in lectures, laboratories, and extracurricular activities regarding pigs. The goal of this endowment is to support swine medicine educational opportunities for veterinary medical students. Student learning will be enhanced by endowment supported underwriting of swine industry speakers in lectures and meetings, travel to focused learning opportunities, and participation in scholastic activities that will benefit the swine industry.

Pork is the number one animal protein consumed in the world, providing a good balance of vitamins and nutrients. Feral swine contribute to income for sport ranches, damages to farms and pasture lands, and as potential reservoirs for diseases. Swine have become important models for research to improve human medicine. Dr. Donald “Bruce” Lawhorn spent his career training veterinarians, veterinary students, and pig owners in swine medicine. After his retirement, this O.J. “Bubba” Woytek, DVM ‘65, Assistant Vice President of Development Chastity Carrigan, Senior Director of Development Guy A. Sheppard, DVM ‘78, Director of Development Development Office • Office of the Dean College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences Texas A&M University • 4461 TAMU • College Station, TX 77843-4461 Tel. 979.845.9043 • Fax 979.862.3104 • vetmed.tamu.edu/giving/

Your Support Bringing swine specific experiences to students is increasingly difficult. The cost of providing and maintaining live animals for laboratory experiences is ever-increasing, yet the experience that students receive from hands-on interaction is irreplaceable. Maintaining the current program is essential. And, expanding opportunities for students with a real interest in swine medicine is a necessary part of educating future veterinarians with the skills to help a diverse and ever-changing industry and world.

Making a Difference in Veterinary Medicine 26

9/14


Mark Francis Fellows Private contributions provide the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences with the financial help required to maintain its vitality and to strengthen its national influence.

Giving

Being a Mark Francis Fellow

Although Texas A&M University is a state-assisted institution, it must rely on private contributions and support to maintain its excellence. When you have made one or more contributions totalling $1,000 to any of the development initiatives at the college, you become a Mark Francis Fellow. Fellows help meet needs in several fundamental areas including student scholarships and financial aid, equipment, public outreach, academic programs, research, and animal treatment.

Fellows comprise a select group of College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences advocates who find satisfaction in close involvement with a college whose achievements are immediate, tangible, and significant.

Major Areas of Support

Fellows are the leaders for voluntary giving and set the pace for other donors to the college.

• Enroll the most talented students, regardless of their financial status • Recruit and retain the very best scholars and teachers • Provide environmental and technological resources conducive to learning and research • Provide assistance to clients who may not otherwise be able to afford life-saving medical treatment for their pets • Enhance innovative programs, such as practitioner involvement in clinical research, education, technology, basic research, new initiatives in patient care, and new thrusts in continuing education

Membership Levels As Fellows continue to give to the college, they are recognized at the following levels: Basic ..................................................$1,000–$2,499 Maroon Level I .................................$2,500–$4,999 Maroon Level II ...............................$5,000–$9,999 Maroon Level III ..............................$10,000–$24,999 Diamond Level I ..............................$25,000–$49,999 Diamond Level II .............................$50,000–$99,999 Diamond Level III ............................$100,000 and over

Fellows are people who are concerned about Texas veterinary medicine—people who recognize that the college is in a unique position to make important advancements for animals and human beings through education, research, and service.

As a Mark Francis Fellow, your gifts will enable Texas A&M University to continue its long-standing tradition of making a difference in veterinary medicine.

About Dr. Mark Francis Dr. Mark Francis became the first professor of veterinary science at Texas A&M and was largely responsible for the establishment of the College of Veterinary Medicine in 1916. He served as the college’s first dean until his death in 1936. Francis is fondly remembered for his pioneering efforts in the fight against the devastating Texas Tick Fever. He helped organize the Texas veterinary profession in 1903 and became the first president of the newly formed state organization, which later became the Texas Veterinary Medical Association (TVMA).

O.J. “Bubba” Woytek, DVM ‘65, Assistant Vice President of Development Chastity Carrigan, Senior Director of Development Guy A. Sheppard, DVM ‘78, Director of Development Development Office • Office of the Dean College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences Texas A&M University • 4461 TAMU • College Station, TX 77843-4461 Tel. 979.845.9043 • Fax 979.862.3104 • vetmed.tamu.edu/giving/

Making a Difference in Veterinary Medicine 27


Texas A&M introduces Master of Agriculture with an emphasis in the meat industry

Students seeking a Master of Agriculture in Animal Science at Texas A&M University now have the ability to choose to follow a curriculum specifically designed to emphasize the meat industry. The new emphasis for the degree plan provides students with a bachelor’s degree supplemental coursework in addition to practical experience gained through internships to prepare them for a variety of careers in, and for future leadership of, the U.S. meat industry. “The meat science program at Texas A&M is one of the leading programs of its kind in the nation. As such, we have a proven record of success focusing on the preparation of young scientists to conduct research, perform food quality/safety functions and initiate product development efforts,” said Dr. Russell Cross, head of animal science. “By expanding the existing Master of Agriculture in Animal Science to include an emphasis in the meat industry, the meat science program is broadening and enhancing the knowledge of young people who wish to enter the professional workforce of the U.S. meat production, processing and sales industry as supervisory or middle-management personnel,” Cross said. The Master of Agriculture with an emphasis in the meat industry program will focus on the process of accelerating the climb up the corporate management ladder by exposing students to the tutelage of veteran industry experts with records of previous industry success, said Dr. Gary Smith, visiting professor and chair of the Master of Agriculture with an emphasis in the Meat Industry executive committee. Students will be required to complete 36 hours of coursework in meat science, management, marketing, communication and leadership, and two short-term professional internships within the meat industry that are customized to meet each student’s specific career interests. Students can complete a graduate certificate in Meat Science as a component of this degree plan. “Through collaboration with our colleagues in the Departments of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Leadership, Management, Marketing and Poultry Science, students will be fundamentally exposed to interpersonal communication and employee management skills development, thereby enhancing their ability to relate to and supervise employees under their direction upon achieving full-time employment.” In addition to being a continuation of a bachelor’s degree education emphasizing meat, animal or food science, the Master of Agriculture with an emphasis in the meat industry could be used as a refresher or retooling option for individuals who have industry experience wanting to advance their careers in the meat industry, Smith said. For additional information regarding the Master of Agriculture in Animal Science with an emphasis in the meat industry, contact Dr. David Forrest d-forrest@tamu.edu or Dr. Gary Smith gary.smith@ag.tamu.edu at (979) 845-1541. The degree plan may be viewed at http://animalscience.tamu.edu.

Our Responsibility. Our Promise. Get Certified. A voluntary, industry-driven program, PQA Plus® combines food safety and animal well-being principles into a widely-respected and used certification program. By becoming PQA Plus certified, pork producers demonstrate commitment to provide high quality, responsibly produced products. The program includes: • Individual certification through producer education • Site status through an on-farm site assessment • Opportunity for third-party verification to give the system credibility

Learn more about PQA Plus by visiting www.pork.org/certification or by calling the Pork Service Center at 800-456-7675.

©2013 National Pork Board. Des Moines, IA  USA. This message funded by America’s Pork Producers and the Pork Checkoff.


National Swine Reproduction Guide a troubleshooting and management guide

The National Swine Reproduction Guide is a web-based troubleshooting guide on swine reproduction problems. This National Swine Reproduction Guide is available as a web application and easily accessed through personal computer, smart phones and tablets. Its portability makes the guide readily available and convenient for use anywhere. The troubleshooting and management guide is built in a user-friendly and intuitive format. The reproductive guide contains an incredible amount of information and support for pork producers, including more than 1,000 fact sheets and references.

The decision tree begins with three categories and a search feature:

Problems with Replacement Gilts

Problems with Sows

Problems with Semen Quality

The reproductive decision tree is designed with an easy-to-use format and navigation. 3 Categories Decision Tree

Answer/Factsheet

Price: â&#x20AC;˘ $75 annually U.S. and Canada, $500 annually for foreign licenses via USPorkCenter.org/store â&#x20AC;˘ Free for professors for classroom use

1-WEEK TRIAL

USPorkCen ter.org/Free Trial

FREE!

USPorkcenter.org For more information contact Chelsey Branderhorst at (800) 456-7675 or CBranderhorst@USPorkCenter.org


MISSION STATEMENT The mission of the U.S. Pork Center of Excellence is to add value to the pork industry by facilitating research and learning for U.S. pork producers through national collaboration.

PROGRAM BENEFITS • A more efficient and cost effective collaborative process of problem-solving through focused research project management resulting in less duplication and more planned replication. • Undergraduate and graduate students interested in swine production are given access to the most knowledgeable swine educators and industry experts in the United States. • Opportunities for private entities, not-for-profit organizations, universities, and government agencies to be involved collaboratively with improving the swine industry for national benefit. • Increased and immediate access to science-based information for educated decision-making. • The output of more academically trained individuals, access to greater expertise and information, and improved tools for third parties assisting pork producers.

TEACHING CENTER OF EXCELLENCE Providing intensive swine production education • Members from universities, allied industries, government agencies, and not-for-profit organizations form teaching advisory committees. • Regional swine schools are established and managed as accredited classes in various disciplines of swine and pork. • Targeted students are those interested in swine production from across the nation, thereby keeping the pipeline of talent and expertise flowing into the future. • The regional swine schools provide students access to the most knowledgeable swine educators and industry experts in the United States. • The regional swine schools provide opportunities for universities to offer swine programming for pork producer clientele which may have been lacking in certain disciplines or overall. • Graduates supply a more globally competitive pork industry with a stronger base of knowledge in swine and pork.

EXTENSION CENTER OF EXCELLENCE

RESEARCH CENTER OF EXCELLENCE Coordination of collaborative research on focused issues

Pork Information Gateway (PIG)

• Members from universities, allied industries, government agencies, and not-for-profit organizations form research advisory committees.

• Members from universities, allied industries, government agencies, and not-for-profit organizations form extension advisory committees.

• Issues or problem areas within the swine industry are identified and goals are set accordingly.

• PIG encompasses a virtual center of information development, warehousing, and delivery involving a nationwide pork extension network.

• Decisions are made regarding what is currently known within each problem area and what needs more attention. • With competitiveness in mind, optimum facilities and researchers for conducting specified research within problem areas are located and approached. • Assistance with the sources and allocation of funds for specified research is accomplished. • Communication is directed between research projects within problem areas for progress monitoring, information updates, and cooperative support. • Research findings within each problem area are compiled and distributed. Information distribution is facilitated through an annual research conference, regional swine schools, and the Pork Information Gateway.

©2006 National Pork Board Des Moines, IA USA

• Online access to an extensive virtual library of science-based information. • An answer center for the science-based answers to any question a producer might have in his or her pork operation. • Easier access to training on all areas of pork production. • Better tools for third parties assisting pork producers such as extension specialists, veterinarians, consultants, and knowledge transfer specialists. • Access to expertise and information nationally. • Access to research results within each problem area of the collaborative research on focused issues.

This new organization is initially supported by grants from the USDA, the National Pork Board, and the National Pork Producers Council, and through financial support from several land-grant universities.


How do I enroll in a course?

To enroll in a specific course, contact any of the following: Iowa State University: Lori Youngberg – lyoun@iastate.edu North Carolina State University: Julie Holder – julie_holder@ncsu.edu South Dakota State University: Katie Grayson – gpidea@sdstate.edu University of Missouri: Nita Smarr – smarrj@missouri.edu Kansas State University: Amanda Gnadt – gpideacc@ksu.edu

Upcoming Course Schedule: Spring 2015

(courses worth 1 credit unless otherwise specified)

What is Swine Science Online?

Swine Science Online is an online program comprised of 19 University-level courses, taught by swine specialists from leading universities with swine science programs. Because each swine science class is taught online, the student can participate in the course at their convenience.

Course

Instructor

Basic Swine Science (2 credits)

Dr. Tom Baas

Advanced Swine Science (2 credits)

Dr. Robert Goodband

Swine Health & Biosecurity

Dr. Locke Karriker

Marketing & Risk Management

Dr. Kelly Zering

Pork Product & Quality Safety

Dr. Dana Hanson

Swine Science Online is available to anyone interested in pursuing further education in swine science and management. Students can take a course at any time, depending on the semester it is offered. If the student completes 12 credit hours they will become eligible for the Swine Science Online certificate.

Swine Breeding & Gestation Management

Dr. Billy Flowers

Swine Manure & Nutrient Management

Dr. Dan Andersen

Contemporary Issues in the Swine Industry

Dr. Jodi Sterle

Swine Nursery & Finishing Management

Dr. Ken Kephart

What is the cost?

Farrowing Management

Dr. Tim Safranski

Who can take Swine Science Online courses?

Common Rate Tuition: Approximately $370/credit hour with no additional fees or textbook requirements.

What courses are required to attain the Swine Science Online certificate? USPCE Swine Science Online Certificate Requirements Required Courses:

(7 Credits)

Basic Swine Science Basic Swine Science Lab Swine Health & Biosecurity Employee Management for the Swine Industry Internship in the Swine Industry

One course in production management from the following:

Elective Courses: (Choose 5 Credits)

Contemporary Issues in the Swine Industry

Swine Nursery & Finishing Management

Course

Instructor

Internship in the Swine Industry

Dr. Cynthia Wood

Pork Export Markets

Dr. Sang Oh

Farrowing Management

Dr. Kara Stewart

Swine Nursery & Finishing Management

Dr. Ken Kephart

Fall 2015 (courses worth 1 credit unless otherwise specified) Course

Instructor

Swine Business & Records Analysis

Basic Swine Science (2 credits)

Dr. Tom Baas

Pork Export Markets

Employee Management

Dr. Cynthia Wood

Swine Feed Mill Management

Dr. Charles Stark

Swine Environment Management

Swine Environment Management

Dr. Jay Harmon

Swine Manure & Nutrient Management

Swine Nutrition

Dr. Bob Thaler

Marketing & Risk Management in the Swine Industry

Pork Product & Quality Safety Swine Feed Mill Management

Swine Nutrition Swine Breeding & Gestation Advanced Swine Science Management Farrowing Management

Summer 2015

(courses worth 1 credit unless otherwise specified)

Swine Breeding & Gestation Management Farrowing Management Swine Nursery & Finishing Management

*For course descriptions, please visit swinescienceonline.org

For more information, please contact: Chelsey Branderhorst US Pork Center of Excellence – Program Manager (800) 456-7675 cbranderhorst@usporkcenter.org Or go to: SwineScienceOnline.org


Launch of the new texaspork.org is coming soon! We are in the final design phase of constructing a new and improved website to better assist our members and consumers. Planned to launch this spring, it includes a NEW ADVERTISEMENT OPPORTUNITY to showcase your farm, along with many other new features!

Attentio n!! Ne Adver tisw Oppor tuement nity


2014 Wine and Swine Wine & Swine is an annual event hosted by the Austin Food & Wine Alliance where Central Texas’ top chefs go head to head in a pig roast competition. The competition is a fundraiser for the Austin Food & Wine Alliance’s Grant Program that has given $75,000 in grants since 2012. This year’s event was held outdoors at the historical 1800’s setting of Star Hill Ranch, which was accompanied with live music by the Marshall Ford Swing Band. The day was filled with great weather, 645 of attendees, the superb scent of roasted pig, laughter, fine wine, and, of course, great food. The centerpieces of the show are always the chefs and this year there was a star-studded line up from all over the state. All of this was made possible by the generosity of the Texas Pork Producers with their donations of locally raised Duroc pork, from Cody McCleery, McCleery Family Durocs, to participating chefs. John Bates of Noble Sandwich Co. took home the top prize of $1,000 cash and a trophy, with his smoked pork taco with lard tortilla and fermented jalapeño salsa. Silver Oak won the top Wine with Swine award.


Apricot-Dijon Pork Salad Ingredients:

1 whole pork tenderloin, about 1 pound 1 cup apricot preserves 1/4 cup white wine vinegar 2 tablespoons Dijon-style mustard 1 teaspoon ground ginger 1 10-oz package mixed salad greens 1 15-oz can apricot halves, drained, sliced 1/2 cup dried tart cherries 4 - 5 ounces provolone cheese, cut into 1/2-inch cubes 8 green onions, sliced 1/4 cup pecan pieces, toasted

Directions: In small bowl stir together preserves, vinegar, mustard and ginger. Reserve 3/4 cup for salad dressing. Butterfly pork tenderloin (cut almost in half, but not quite through, horizontally; open and lay flat. Prepare medium-hot fire in kettle-style grill. Grill tenderloin over heat 5-6 minutes per side; brushing with remaining apricot mixture during last 2 minutes on each side until internal temperature on a thermometer reads 145 degrees F. Remove tenderloin to cutting board and let rest for 3 minutes. Meanwhile in large bowl toss together greens, apricots, cherries, cheese, pecans and onions. Divide mixture evenly among 4 plates. Slice pork into 1/2-inch pieces. Arrange portions of pork on top of greens on each plate; drizzle with reserved apricot mixture.

Cuban Pork Adobo Chops

SERVES 6

6 New York (top loin boneless) pork chops, 3/4 in. thick 1 c. lime juice* 4 cloves garlic, minced 11/2 tsp. ground cumin 3 /4 to 1 tsp. salt 1 /4 tsp. ground black pepper Olive oil for grill grate In a small bowl, whisk lime juice, garlic, cumin, salt and pepper; transfer mixture to self-sealing plastic bag. Add chops; seal bag and refrigerate 2-4 hours. Prepare medium-hot fire with charcoal or preheat gas grill to medium high. Lightly oil grill grate. Remove chops from marinade; do not pat dry. Discard remaining marinade. Grill chops over direct heat, turning once, until internal temperature of pork on a meat thermometer reads between 145°F (medium rare) and 160°F (medium) – about 8-11 minutes. Remove and let rest 3 minutes. *Traditional Cuban cooking uses sour orange juice, which is less sweet and more acidic than common orange juice. If sour oranges like Seville or Bergamont are available, use instead of lime juice. You can also use 1/2 c. lime juice and 1/2 c. orange juice.

PorkBeInspired.com

©2015 National Pork Board, Des Moines, IA USA. This message funded by America’s Pork Producers and the Pork Checkoff.


If You’re in the Area.... Gourdough’s Donuts

Showcasing the best pork around!

Hula Hut

Austin

Huisache Grill New Braunfels

Austin

* Flying Pig - Bacon w/ Maple Syrup Icing (pictured)

* Slow-Roasted Pork Tacos

* Fat Elvis - Grilled Bananas & Bacon With Peanut Butter Icing & Honey

* Pecan Dusted Pork Tenderloin Medallions (pictured)

* Pork Burrito

* Black Forest Ham & Smoky Gouda Sandwich

* Porkey’s - Canadian Bacon, Cream Cheese & Jalapeno Jelly Submitted by: Dawn Hunt

(pictured)

* Texas Nachos w/ Pulled Pork Submitted by: Austin English

* Grilled Pork Tenderloin Sandwich Submitted by: Matt Anguiano

SHARE WITH US on Facebook and Twitter!!! Send us your favorite yummy pork dishes and restaurants so we can publish it here!!!

To order a shirt please contact TPPA Office at 512.453.0615.


National National Pork Pork Board Board || 800-456-7675 800-456-7675 || pork.org pork.org

Swine Health Guide

Swine Health Recommendations:

Exhibitors of All Pigs Going to Exhibits or Sales With With the the animals animals being being commingled commingled at at an an exhibition, exhibition, show show or or sale, sale, spreading spreading disease disease is is aa risk. risk. The The recommendations recommendations listed listed apply apply to to all all swine swine at at an an exhibit exhibit or or sale sale that that are are physically physically on on the the premise. premise. Having Having aa plan plan in in place place to to identify identify and and handle handle sick sick animals animals properly properly will will help help reduce reduce the the chance chance of of disease disease spread. spread.

In preparation for the exhibit or sale:

How do I take my pig’s temperature?

Consult Consult aa veterinarian veterinarian to to understand understand and and implement implement applicable biosecurity and swine health applicable biosecurity and swine health practices; practices; keep keep the the veterinarian’s veterinarian’s phone phone number number in in your your barn barn with with your your pig’s pig’s papers papers and and ifif possible, possible, in in your your cell cell phone. phone.

1. 1. Restrain Restrain your your pig pig to to avoid avoid injury injury to to you you or or the the pig pig 2. Use a thermometer to measure temperature: 2. Use a thermometer to measure temperature: a. a. Digital Digital –– insert insert into into the the rectum; rectum; push push the the button button and and wait wait for for the the beep; beep; read read temperature temperature b. b. Mercury Mercury –– shake shake down down the the thermometer thermometer so so the the red red line line is is not not showing; showing; insert insert into into the the rectum rectum of of the the pig pig and and wait wait 30 30 seconds seconds before before reading reading the the temperature temperature c. c. Laser: Laser: point point the the laser laser at at the the space space on on the the skin skin behind behind the ear and read temperature the ear and read temperature

Have Have aa premises premises identification identification number number for for your your farm farm or or where where the the pig(s) pig(s) are are housed housed (required (required for for PQA PQA Plus® Plus® certification or state equivalent) certification or state equivalent) Utilize Utilize an an individual, individual, readable readable identification identification method method for for each each pig: pig: •• Individual Individual identification identification helps helps accurately accurately and and quickly quickly identify identify aa pig pig in in the the event event of of aa health health issue, issue, validation validation of of ownership ownership or or for for other other exhibit exhibit needs; needs; papers papers can can get get lost lost or or misplaced, misplaced, but but individual individual identification identification will will remain remain with the pig with the pig •• Refer Refer to to the the exhibit exhibit organizers organizers and and the the State State Veterinarian Veterinarian for specific requirements for individual for specific requirements for individual animal animal identification identification

NOTE: NOTE: Laser Laser thermometer thermometer may may not not be be as as accurate accurate as as rectal rectal thermometer thermometer

Digital Digital Thermometer Thermometer

Become Become familiar familiar with with the the clinical clinical signs signs of of aa sick sick pig pig (such (such as as fever, fever, off-feed, off-feed, lethargy, lethargy, nasal nasal discharge, discharge, cough, cough, “thumping” “thumping” or or hard hard time time breathing, breathing, and and diarrhea). diarrhea). •• Normal Normal rectal rectal temperature temperature of of aa pig pig == 101.5° 101.5° -- 102.5° 102.5° FF •• Pigs can’t sweat, they need help staying cool on Pigs can’t sweat, they need help staying cool on hot hot days. days. ›› During hot weather a pig’s temperature may During hot weather a pig’s temperature may be be elevated. elevated. ›› If If its its temperature temperature is is raised, raised, allow allow the the pig pig to to cool cool off off and and re-take re-take the the temperature temperature in in 15 15 minutes. minutes. •• Work Work with with your your veterinarian veterinarian ifif your your pig pig becomes becomes sick. sick.

Some Some diseases diseases can can transmit transmit from from humans humans to to pigs pigs and and from from pigs pigs to to humans, humans, so so itit is is important important to to not not go go to to the the exhibition exhibition or or show show ifif you you or or your your pig pig is is sick. sick. Make Make sure sure that that you you have have all all of of your your equipment, equipment, including including your your show show box box and and its its contents, contents, clean, clean, disinfected disinfected and and ready ready to go prior to the exhibition. Do not share any equipment to go prior to the exhibition. Do not share any equipment with with other other exhibitors exhibitors once once at at the the exhibit. exhibit. Fill Fill out out the the appropriate appropriate paperwork paperwork for for the the exhibition exhibition including including health health certificates certificates

©2013 ©2013 National National Pork Pork Board, Board, Des Des Moines, Moines, IA IA USA. USA. Th Thisis message message funded funded by by America’s America’s Pork Pork Producers Producers and and the the Pork Pork Checkoff Checkoff..

11

#04108-9/13 #04108-9/13


At the exhibition or sale:

For your pig’s health certificate, you will need to provide the following information: • Your name, contact information and farm address • Individual pig identification and physical description for each animal going to the exhibit or sale • If exhibiting in a state other than where you live, have your veterinarian check with the state you are exhibiting in for specific requirements • Include information for exhibit-specific requirements • If requested, list any current vaccines the pig has received (i.e. influenza or PRRS) and current disease testing (i.e. PRRS; PRV)

• Assess your pigs’ health on a daily basis • Report any swine health issues to the exhibit organizer (i.e. swine superintendent) or show veterinarian so they can assess the pig in question • Ask the exhibition organizer about any specific actions that may be required if a pig becomes sick at the show. • Keep your area clean and free of manure contamination • Do not share equipment with other exhibitors • Do not bring your pets (cats or dogs) at the exhibit

Once you get home: When pigs from different farms are brought to an exhibit or sale and commingled with other pigs of a different health status, the risk of catching a disease can be high. Just like people can spread illness to each other when gathered in a group, pigs from many locations in an exhibit can also spread illness to each other. Therefore, when you bring your pig back home from an exhibit or sale, it is best to place them in isolation. Isolate returning pigs from the other pigs at your farm. • Work with your veterinarian for an isolation plan. The isolation/observation period before returning to contact with other pigs should be no fewer than 7-30 days in order to detect an illness. • Consult a veterinarian if your pig becomes ill. • Clean and disinfect equipment, clothing, shoes, show box and contents, and vehicles/trailers that were used at the exhibition.

Animals like cats and dogs can carry pathogens that can make pigs sick. It is important to prevent the spread of pathogens to your pigs or to others. Keep pets at home, do not let them be in contact with your pigs and do not bring them to the exhibit.

Clean-up can be as simple as washing, disinfecting and allowing your equipment to dry out in the sun Clean and dry equipment will help to prevent the spread of pathogens

Recommendations for isolation: (if you have other pigs at your farm) • Isolation will allow for time for pigs to be observed for disease after they return from an exhibition or sale. When pigs are in isolation, additional testing can be complete to check for diseases before pigs are added back to the rest of the farm (e.g. PRRS). Check with your veterinarian for testing recommendations. • Have a designated area away from other pigs that have not been to a show. • Do chores for the pigs in the isolation area as the last task of the day after you have already worked with your other pigs. • Have dedicated boots and coveralls for isolation only. Another option is to use disposable coveralls and plastic boots for use in isolation and then thrown away when done in isolation. • Have a separate trash can for use in isolation only. • Supplies such as buckets and feed pans should not be shared between pigs in isolation and other animals. • All equipment should be thoroughly cleaned, disinfected and allowed to dry after use in the isolation area.

2


Wanna hit your target audience? Advertise with TPPA!

April/May Issue distributed to Texas Extension Offices, FFA Chapters and TPPA members.

AD RATES Back Cover/ Full Page Two-Thirds Page Half Page Third Page Fourth Page Business Card

Contact Cassidy Smith to reserve your ad space now! www.texaspork.org 512.453.0615

PEDV Brings Its WORST. Pork Checkoff Brings Its BEST. PEDV RESOURCES

PEDV Brings Its Worst. Pork Checkoff Brings Its Best.

Fast Action Within a month after Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus was first identified in the United States in 2013, the National Pork Board began funding scientific research about how to stop this costly disease. Major Funding By mid-2014, the Pork Checkoff had funded nearly $3 million in PEDV and related research for more than 35 separate projects.

For the latest Checkoff-funded PEDV information and resources, go to:

pork.org/pedv

©2014 National Pork Board. Des Moines, IA USA This message funded by America’s Pork Producers and the Pork Checkoff.

$400 $325 $275 $200 $150 $75

Resources Delivered Thanks to Checkoff-funded research already conducted, some practical on-farm solutions to PEDV have been delivered to U.S. pork producers.

For the latest Checkoff-funded PEDV information and resources, go to pork.org/pedv. ©2015 National Pork Board. Des Moines, IA USA This message funded by America’s Pork Producers and the Pork Checkoff.


8 Reasons Why Ag Careers are Needed More Than Ever While agriculture is a multi-billion dollar industry that directly affects everyone in the world each day, employers still struggle to find qualified candidates that are enthusiastic about the industry and need. According to the USDA, “between 2010 and 2015 there will be more jobs available in ag and food systems, renewable energy, and the environment than qualified graduates to fill them.” With the industry booming but college students being left uninformed about the importance of agricultural careers, the numbers need to increase. Here are 8 reasons that agriculture is needed now more than ever and to choose an agricultural career: 1. Population is Increasing. By 2050 the world’s population is projected to hit 9 billion people. To be able to feed and clothe the world, the population is going to rely heavily on agriculture. With that comes the need for new technology, hard workers, creative minds, and college graduates that are ready to get into the workforce and support this ever-changing industry. 2. New” Generation of Agriculture. Baby boomers are in the primary agricultural leadership roles, but they are retiring at vast rates, leaving many positions un-filled. Employers are having difficulties finding the right talent to put into these positions and 60% of them are shifting their focus to recruiting college graduates. 3. Job Diversity. Within the last 20 years, agriculture has expanded and become so diverse, giving job seekers a wide variety of careers to choose from. There are significant jobs in production, economics, marketing, agribusiness, technology, sales, finance, microbiology, communications, and much more. In 2013, there were 52,862 jobs posted on AgCareers.com containing differentiated career opportunities in every aspect of the agricultural industry! 4. Shortage of College Graduates in Agriculture. The truth of the matter is, there just are not enough people going into an agricultural related program of study causing a shortage of qualified job seekers. According to the AgCareers.com Enrollment and Employment Outlook Survey, less than 1% of college students are in an agricultural major. In 2013 there were 56,000+ career opportunities in the industry but only 29,000 graduates were trained to fill them. 5. Industry Growth. Since the industry is growing at such a fast pace, there is high demand for qualified job seekers in every aspect of agriculture. The U.S. Department of Labor projects significant growth in selected food, renewable energy, and environmental jobs from now and throughout 2018. Even more, the Agribusiness HR Review shows that 60% of employers are planning to do more college recruiting within the next 1-5 years. 6. Technology Advancements. Agricultural technologies are constantly evolving to help improve productivity. With the new technology, comes a need for job seekers with the right education to be able to work with and develop the technology that will continue to shape the industry. 7. Increased Salary. To remain competitive and to secure the best talent in the industry, employers have been consistently increasing salaries. They have also offered better benefit packages to retain employees. Furthermore, qualified talent is being promoted now faster than any other generation has before. 8. Rewarding. Working in an agricultural related field is rewarding. You get the peace of mind knowing that you are making a positive impact on those around you. People that have careers in agriculture are passionate about what they do and want to see the industry be successful and prosperous. It’s rewarding to know that by working in an ag-related career, you are making a difference. Plus, the industry is an easy sector to network and make lasting connections with others in your field. It is undeniable that the agriculture industry is one of the smartest career paths to take. Whether you are looking for a company that you fit in with, a competitive salary, or you want to make a difference, the agricultural sector has such a wide variety of jobs to choose from that it is easy to find what suits you best. It’s a growing field that needs new and talented employees to be ready to fill positions and be the next generation of agriculture. By AgCareers.com


CAPITOL REPORT

Texas News

The 84th Texas Legislature is off and running! TPPA will have a few “Capitol Days” where organized visits with your legislators and their staff will take place. Proposed dates are being set for the beginning and end of March, with a day later in the Session to take place also. Stay tuned for final announcements to be posted on the website and by email. If you are interested in participating, please contact the office for more details. With the major stock shows in full swing, it can be tough to balance everything, so assisting TPPA during the Session will be legislative consultants Bob Turner and Joe Morris. The Texas Pork Producers Association is also a member of the Texas Agriculture Council, which is an excellent resource with other state ag groups working together to monitor bills and provide guidance to each other.

New Ag Commissioner

Sid Miller today took the oath of office as Texas’ 12th Commissioner of Agriculture before hundreds of his fellow Texans at the State Capitol in Austin on January 7. Governor Rick Perry, who held the top job at the Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA) from 1991 until 1999, administered the oath during a formal ceremony. Commissioner Miller addressed his family, friends, supporters and colleagues, including Lt. Governor David Dewhurst, Lt. Governorelect Dan Patrick, three former Texas Agriculture Commissioners, several legislators and officeholders from across the state.

The Texas Agriculture Council (TAC) serves as a forum of organizations whose members depend upon agriculture for their livelihood. TAC’s purpose is to promote discussion of political, legislative and regulatory issues of importance to the future of Texas agriculture. While the Council does not take positions on legislative or political issues, its member organizations are actively involved in the resolution of these issues for the betterment of Texas agriculture.

“Agriculture touches the lives of every man, woman and child in Texas more times a day than any other industry,” Commissioner Miller said. “It doesn’t matter whether you live on a farm in Hockley County or in the suburbs of Houston. Life doesn’t work without agriculture. It matters to every parent who wants to ensure their children have access to the best quality and safest food available. Agriculture matters to the one in seven Texans who work in an agriculture-related job. Texas has always been at the forefront of producing the food and fiber that sustains our nation and the world. Let’s face it: Agriculture is the driving force that makes our lives worth living.”


D.C. News

The following week, in his first official act as Commissioner of Agriculture for the State of Texas, Commissioner Sid Miller announced amnesty for cupcakes during a press conference in Austin. The event was part of an effort to spread the word to all Texans that the Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA) does not prevent parents from bringing cupcakes to their children’s school. “We want families, teachers and schools in Texas to know the Texas Department of Agriculture has abolished all rules and guidelines that would stop a parent from bringing cupcakes, cookies or snacks to school,” said Commissioner Miller. “This act is about providing local control to our communities. I am evaluating agency policies and procedures to ensure we are in touch with Texas consumers, while also decreasing state regulation and expanding local control.”

“I am humbled and honored to be selected as the 50th chairman of the storied House Committee on Agriculture. The work that farmers and ranchers do is part of our country’s foundation. They feed, fuel, and clothe our nation.” Conaway

The first week of January, the 114th Congress was sworn in on Capitol Hill, beginning the new session where both the House and Senate Agriculture Committees see new leadership. Rep. Mike Conaway (R-Midland) was sworn in as Chairman of the House Committee on Agriculture. Conaway represents Texas’ 11th Congressional District and has been a member of the Agriculture Committee since beginning his service in Congress in 2005. Most recently, Conaway served as Chair of the General Commodities Subcommittee working on two Farm Bills. “I am humbled and honored to be selected as the 50th chairman of the storied House Committee on Agriculture. The work that farmers and ranchers do is part of our country’s foundation. They feed, fuel, and clothe our nation. I look forward to building on the bipartisan work of the chairmen who have led this committee for the past two centuries. “I represent, and love, rural America. It’s the backbone of our country. The values and concepts that make America great are stored in rural America, and I want to protect that. There are fewer and fewer voices representing rural America, and I am honored to be one of those voices. That is my overarching drive as the Committee moves forward.” Rep. Randy Neugebauer (R-Lubbock) will serve as Vice Chair of the committee. He represents Texas’ 19th Congressional District and, like Conaway, has served on the Agriculture Committee since his election to Congress in 2003 and chaired several subcommittees. Rep. Frank Lucas (R-Cheyenne, OK), the previous Chairman, will remain on the committee. Rep. Filemon Vela (D-Brownsville) and Rep. Michelle LujanGrisham (D-Albuquerque) are also expected to remain on the committee but have yet to be announced by the Committee’s Ranking Member, Rep. Colin Peterson (D-Minn.). Senator Pat Robert has been selected to serve as the Chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee for the 114th Congress. During his time in the House of Representatives, Roberts served as the Chairman of the House Agriculture Committee. Senator Roberts is the only Member of Congress to serve as Chairman of both committees. The Senate passed organizing resolutions this week establishing the committee membership and leadership for the 114th Congress.


Where are they now... As the 84th Texas Legislature is in now in session, it’s only fitting to recognize Representative Trent Ashby. The citizens he represents, and many across the state can testify to his exceptional leadership and dedication. Texas agriculturalists have a great deal of respect for Ashby because he works continuously and diligently to stand up and protect what is important and right for the Texas agriculture industry and the people it encompasses. What many people don’t know is that Ashby was member of the inaugural group of campers who were the first to attend the Texas Pork Leadership Camp. Since that experience, Ashby has been a dedicated supporter and friend to the Texas Pork Producers and the Texas agriculture community. We were privileged to sit down with Ashby to discuss and understand the past that has shaped and continues to shape this young political figure.

E

ach of us walks down our life’s path, sometimes unaware of where it will take us. Eventually we find ourselves in a position, or place, in life and realize that each step along the way shaped us and led us to that specific moment. This statement rings true for Texas State Representative Trent Ashby, whose path to political success was marked by numerous accomplishments and unique perspectives. Ashby started his life immersed in the agriculture industry of Rusk County; now he is a strong voice in the Texas House of Representatives, where he works hard to represent the best interests for not only of the citizens of District 57, but rural Texas as a whole. Growing up on a diversified livestock operation in Rusk County, he and his family ran a dairy farm and small sow herd. Trent spent the days of his childhood working on the family farm and was a very active member of his local 4-H and FFA chapters. As a 4-H and FFA member, Ashby exhibited livestock for approximately 10 years, helped host chapter competitions, and participated in method demonstrations and FFA record book keeping. Trent recalls some of his most favorite 4-H and FFA memories being the days he spent at various summer camps, 4-H Roundup and Congress. It was during these years that Ashby attended the very first annual Texas Pork Leadership Camp. As his involvement in 4-H and FFA progressed, Ashby got his first taste of politics, running for and being elected Texas State 4-H President for the 1990-1991 term, and Texas State FFA Vice President the following year. As Ashby transitioned from high school to college, he didn’t waste anytime becoming involved. During his time at Texas A&M University, this dedicated Aggie was elected to the Student Senate, Class Treasurer and Yell Leader. In 1996, Ashby completed his time at Texas A&M by earning a Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics. Although his fondest A&M memory was proposing to his wife, Nickie, under the Century Tree, another great honor

of Ashby’s includes being elected by his fellow Aggies, to be one of three Class Agents, a position he kept until 2005. Following graduation, Ashby advanced from school politics to government politics, working in Washington as a Congressional aide. In 2003, Ashby went back to work in the rural sector, taking a position as the Executive Director of the Texas Forest Country Partnership, a nonprofit organization focused on promoting economic development activities in East Texas. Ashby was the first person to ever fill this position that consisted of representing 13 counties in the East Texas region. Ashby continues his career as a businessman along with his political obligations; Ashby is the Angelina County Chairman for Citizens National Bank. 2012 marked the beginning Ashby’s political path being elected to represent District 57 in the Texas House of Representatives. Ashby started his political career on a high note. During his first legislative session in 2013, Ashby had six bills signed into law and was named Outstanding Republican Freshman of the Year by the GOP Caucus. During the 83rd Session, Ashby served on the Appropriations and Natural Resource Committees, and was asked to serve on the Select Committee on Economic Development Incentives during the interim. Ashby started his sophomore term in the Texas House of Representatives on January 13, 2015. Even with Ashby’s numerous personal and career accomplishments, Trent considers his family his greatest triumph. “I’ve reached a point in my life where my proudest moments usually involve the achievements of my two boys,” said Ashby. Trent and his wife Nickie reside in Lufkin with their two sons — Garin and Grant, where they are very active in their son’s schools and their church, Harmony Hill Baptist Church. Although Trent is very busy, he and his family like to spend their free time at the Ashby’s family farm, enjoying the outdoors and doing everyday farm work.


Why do you think young people should be involved in organizations such as 4-H and FFA? In my opinion, both of these youth organizations are outstanding and offer so much. For many young people, they offer opportunities to hone skills and learn life lessons that will be with them forever. Competing in different events often leads to trips to other cities, regions of the state, and sometimes other states; that opens the door to a world outside their local community, as well as exposes them to a vast network of individuals, many whom often become good friends. Lastly, I like the fact that both the 4-H and FFA organizations stress personal responsibility and citizenship. You attended the first ever Texas Pork Leadership Camp, can you briefly describe your experience? I’ve always had a fascination with the pork industry since my dad bought a farrowing house and some crates when I was young. When the opportunity presented itself to attend I jumped at the chance. We met in Austin then traveled down to see a number of swine operations in the New Braunfels area. I also vividly remember a tour we received of a meat processing facility. Coming from a farm where we might have had 10-12 sows, to see firsthand these rather large, first-class, state of the art breeding programs was quite an eye opening experience. Ken Horton spearheaded that first trip for the Texas Pork Producers Association, and I’m pleased to still call him a friend today. Who inspired your involvement in politics? My mother always inspired me to seek out opportunities to help others, and public service provides an opportunity for me to do just that.

What are some goals or issues that you wish to conquer while serving your time in the Texas House of Representatives? My primary goals revolve around taking care of the major concerns and issues that affect not only the six counties I represent in East Texas, but rural Texas at large. With the population shift to urban/suburban areas of the state, we’ve seen a decline in the number of rural representatives serving in the Texas Legislature. I work very hard with my colleagues from other parts of Texas to make sure we’re protecting those issues we hold near and dear as rural Texans. Issues such as water, public education, private property rights, maintaining farmto-market roads and state highways, and protecting our farming and ranching heritage are very important to me. What do you feel is the biggest obstacle for the Texas agriculture industry? I’m deeply concerned about the declining number of family farms and the lethargic numbers of young people interested in pursuing a career in production agriculture. Additionally, I wonder what more can be done to ensure the overwhelming majority of Texans who live in the metropolitan areas of the state understand that their food and fiber doesn’t come from a retail store. What are some of the personal goals you have set for yourself? I recognize that time is fleeting, and I constantly strive to balance my paying job as a banker, with being an engaged and responsive public official, all the while, being a full-time father and husband. Striking a balance between these three time commitments is by far my biggest challenge and goal I’ve set for myself.

We want to Thank Representative Trent Ashby for his continued support and wish him the best in this Legislative Session.


G N I L CAL E N I W S L L S A T S A I S U H T N E

Texas Pork June 21 - 26, 2015 Leadership Camp

Texas Pork Leadership Camp is an intense, progressive and thought provoking week, full of activities, tours and presentations featuring all aspects of the pork production industry from Farm to Fork! Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have the opportunity to visit with world leading commercial hog operations, top Universities & industry professionals and tour large scale harvesting and pork processing plants.

Who can attend?

- Ages 16-18, not in college yet - Have an interest in the swine industry - Willing to learn, grow and be an advocate for the swine industry

Topics Covered:

- Key Industry Issues - Live Animal Evaluation - Taste & Sensory Panels - Promotion & Media - Leadership & Team Building - College Prep, Careers & Internships - Harvesting & Processing - Breeding, Reproduction & Genetics on a Commercial Level - Retail Marketing

Application Deadline: April 1st

Application available at www.texaspork.org


SEE W HAT P AST PARTI CIPAN TS HAVE T O SA Y... “It was a very well organized camp that showed every aspect of the industry. It was amazing to see and experience every step from breeding the animal to receiving on your plate. I met a lot of great people that loved the industry just as much as I do and grew tremendously as an individual and an exhibitor.” Regean Langmier, ‘14 Student Marion High School “Looking back when I went through the camp years ago and now having been a host for it, I know that it is a phenomenal experience and opportunity for our youth. Especially now when the focus of many is in the show ring, this camp provides so much value and education on the realization of pork production and the food industry.” Daryl Real, ‘94 Livestock Director, State Fair of Texas “You get a realization of the real world as opposed to the small surface you receive from the show ring. You will make friends and contacts from similar backgrounds which remain much longer than the week you spend on the tour. Part of my everyday keep/cull selection specifically leaving the farrowing house is based off of knowledge gathered from the managers of the large operations throughout this tour.” Clint Halfmann, ‘03 West Texas Genetics “TPPA Camp was definitely an educational highlight for me. It exposed me to the huge scale of the pork industry as well as the connection between show pig and market hog production. This is a great opportunity, it’s lots of fun, and I’d recommend it to any young person pursuing a career in production agriculture” Kevin Mock, ‘01 ShowRite Feeds National Accounts Manager and Mock Livestock “The comradely and interaction with fellow campers was one of the greatest attributes of the pork tour in my opinion. When you’re a passionate hog kid and you love and breathe it, getting to spend a week with others your age that share that same fire is an incredible opportunity. Looking back, I know that experience was a huge reason I wanted to stay closely connected with the swine industry.” Cassidy Hayes, ‘05 HF Genetics “I was lucky enough to attend camp twice, first as a camper and then a leader with my TPPA internship. TPLC was the most eye-opening, challenging, and entertaining camp I ever attended... all at the same time! My favorite part was learning how to inform the public about hog farming practices.” Ian Schaefer, ‘11 Student Texas Tech University “I really enjoyed my time at camp. Coming from a show pig background I had no idea what the “real world” swine industry was all about. I was able to learn from industry leaders as well as visit some of the top universities in Texas. The camp helped set my future as it had a major role in helping me pick where I went to college and more specifically select a major. The camp definitely helped lay the foundation I needed to succeed not only while at college but also now into my professional career.“ Josh Powell, ‘00 Wiley Lease Co. Operations Manager and Powell Livestock


Scholarship and Grant Opportunity CTBR Foundation Gilt Scholarship and Production Grant now available online at www.texaspork.org

Scholarship: - $20,000 has been awarded in scholarships since 2011 - In 2014, three scholarships were awarded at $2,500 each

Production Grant: - Provide financial assistance to deserving 4-H and FFA students who are continuing their involment in swine production through establishing their own breeding program. - Minimum amount of $2,500.

APPLICATION DEADLINE APRIL 15TH www.texaspork.org

Summer Internship - Become active in TPPAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s daily functions - Help plan and facilitate Texas Pork Leadership Camp and Texas Pork Industry Conference - Assist with production of Producer Connection - Promotional events & social media campaigns - Working with producers and youth throughout the state

Applications Available Online www.texaspork.org

Applications due April 1st


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The Judge’s Corner Travis Platt

2015 Houston Barrow Show Travis Platt spends his days in Roanoke, Ind., where he and his wife of five years, Adrienne, raise their nine-month old son, Brantley. From breeding, raising, selling and promoting, this 31-year-old livestock enthusiast is involved in all aspects of the show pig world. Platt stays very busy tending to their 40 sows, raising competitive Crossbred, Yorkshire, Landrace, Berkshire and Duroc show pigs that are shown across the country. In addition to owning Platt Show Pigs, Travis and his family own and operate the tremendously popular Pig Planet, and co-own Upperhand Genetics. Aside from his successful businesses, Travis dedicates a great deal of time traveling the country, judging hog shows, of all sizes, and working with youth. The Houston barrow show, won’t be Travis’s first time sorting hogs in Texas, aside from numerous jackpots, he judged the San Angelo Barrow Show in 2012. Travis’s many accomplishments and immense involvement within the swine industry are a testament to the passion he has for it, especially the show pig world. Platt got his start in the show pig industry by joining 4-H and the National Junior Swine Association (NJSA), where he traveled the country, exhibiting hogs at county, state and national shows. Travis then went on to attend Purdue University where he graduated, in 2006, with a bachelor’s degree in Ag business and a minor in Ag econ. Platt credits his start and success within the hog industry to several key people. His first show hogs came from his current inlaws, the Malcolm Family. This family took Travis to hog shows and NJSA events; he also promoted the Malcolm’s hog operation by selling many show pigs. As his knowledge and interest for show pigs grew, Platt said John Graber gave him a great set of hogs to show and also worked with him on selling some more show pigs. Travis said that Jim and Steve Rodibaugh are great breeders that he looks up to, and he appreciates the advice, breeding stock and opportunities the family has given him. Also, the Cobb Family had a great part in shaping Travis as a show pig breeder, and he really respects what they have done for the industry. Steve and Aaron Cobb have partnered with Platt on some females, as well as worked with him on boars. During Platt’s college years, he worked for Daniel Hendrickson, becoming even more knowledgeable about the hog industry, and building strong industry relationships. Who do you enjoy to watch and listen to sort hog shows? There are many fellow breeders and livestock judges that I look up to and love to hear on the mic. To narrow it down, I think that last years San Antonio and Houston judges and the 2015 San Antonio barrow show judges are six of the best in the business, and all friends of mine. Those people are Willie Kirkpatrick, Ryan Sites, Ben Bobell, Mark Hoge, Andy Rash and Brandon Ogle. There are many other names that also rise to the top of my list, and I have a great deal of respect for and love listening to each of them, in and outside of the show ring. What is your philosophy on raising hogs and how would you label your “kind” of hogs? We love to win as much as anyone, but we strive to match up boars to gilts with different traits, in order to make each generation better. My initial sift revolves around levelness, squareness and freshness. For me, hogs have to be fresh and have a good look from the side with enough power and bone. When I get on top of them they need to have some spread and shape, with enough center body and cover. I like hogs that are wide, yet square and flexible on the move. I always say, “have enough of everything and not too much of anything.” “I want my family and our businesses to grow and evolve in this industry,”

What is your showmanship style preference? Do you have any pet peeves, in the ring? I like hogs that hit the ring with a natural, yet heads up look and that aren’t over shown. I have been known to be a fairly quick judge, so its important for hogs and their showman to find the pace and keep moving, I don’t like it when a hog stops in the ring. What challenges do you see facing the show pig industry? Within the hog industry, disease has been an issue for the past 10 years. Some years have been worse than others, but last years PEDv issue was a reality check for many breeders. To maintain and improve herd health, being aware and having a close relationship with a vet is key. You run the very popular Pig Planet. Could you talk about its services and how it has managed to become so successful? Adrienne and I work closely with Novel Designs, with the goal being to make this website the best that we feel it can be. We also work with Willoughby Sales to run the Online Sales division. This part of the website has grown and host some of the best breeder’s pig sales. Our Breeder’s Directory is a great asset for producers. Anyone who visits Pig Planet can look up breeders and check out their websites. Breeders can tell us when they are going to make updates to their websites and we will post a tagline stating that there is an update. A very popular part of Pig Planet is our Show and Sale Results section. We list all showman and breeders that are linked with our Breeder’s Directory, sires of winning hogs for the majority of national shows, majors and state fairs. We also post the results from our sales. By working with Novel Designs and Willoughby Sales, Pig Plant has become extremely effective and popular in the four years that it has been up and running. Why do you think young people should get involved with showing projects; what are the biggest benefits that you see? Ag programs for youth are a great way to make each generation of our young people better. By being involved, kids learn communication and money management skills, build friendships, have a sense of responsibility for caring for their livestock and fellow competitors, and learn how to be graceful winners and losers. What is the most impressive hog you have ever seen? I have two hogs that are close in my mind, and both were shown in 2013. The first was a Duroc barrow, which was shown by Cole Wilcox. The barrow was bred by Brandon Ogle and placed by our family. He had a great summer, winning many shows and ended his career by winning the Indiana State Fair. Willie Kirkpatrick judged Indy that year and that barrow, to this day, is one of his favorites. In 2013, I was the sift judge for Ben Bobell at OYE. This blue barrow, raised by Ryan Sites, hit the ring and I knew it was on because the grand and reserve barrows ended up being in that same class. When I met Bobell to sort through the dead sea, I told him he has a black one coming early and a blue one coming late. That barrow was very good. Although Travis and his family have experienced a great deal of success, earning a respectful reputation along the way, Platt still has a list of goals he wants to accomplish. Travis’s plan is to continue expanding Upperhand Genetics and building his sow herd, increasing their number of champion titles in conjunction. He also strives to maintain and grow the popularity and effectiveness that thepigplanet.com has had on the swine industry. Travis is looking to add new breeders to the already impressive breeders directory, and further promote and feature hog sales and show results. Travis’s number one goal is to keep his family in the show pig industry, for as long as possible.


MAJOR SHOW WEIGHT BREAKS

Fort Worth Barrow Show 2012 2014 2013

Black 230-250 OPB 251-267 268-270 Duroc 230-256 258-269 270 x2

230-249 250-269 270 230-255 256-269 270 x2

Hamp 230-237 238-254 255-264 265-269 270 W. OPB 230-251 252-269 270 York 230-257 259-269 270 Cross 230-234 235-245 246-254 255-260 261-264 265-269 270 x2

230-235 236-248 249-258 259-268 269-270 230-253 254-267 268-269 230-254 255-269 270 230-231 232-245 246-256 257-259 260-265 266-269 270 x2

230-247 248-267 270 230-254 255-267 268-270 270 230-236 237-250 251-259 260-269 270 230-252 253-269 270 230-250 251-269 270 230 231-243 244-251 252-257 258-264 265-269 270 x2

Jr. Texas Stars Gilt Show Non-Pedigreed Only

Class 1 Class 2 Class 3 Class 4 Class 5 Class 6 Class 7 Class 8 Class 9 Class 10 Class 11 Class 12

2014

230 231-242 243-252 253-259 260-266 267-274 275-282 283-291 292-298 299-315 316-330 331-391

2013

230-233 230-233 230-233 234-242 243-249 250-255 256-265 266-270 273-283 285-294 295-305 306-373

240 241-254 255-265 266-279 280

Duroc

240-257 240-251 258-271 252-265 272-280 x2 266-279 280 240-250 240-252 251-277 253-268 280 269-280 240-253 240-248 255-275 249-267 276-280 268-280 240-249 240-244 250-261 245-260 262-278 261-271 280 272-280 240 240-243 x2 240-242 244-252 243-251 253-265 252-258 266-275 259-263 276-280 264-268

York W. OPB B. OPB

Cross

240-244 240-244 245-256 257-269 270-280

Berk Spot

Hamp

Duroc

Poland D. Cross

2012

230 230 230 231-239 240-245 246-253 254-259 260-267 268-274 275-280 281-303 304-380

San Angelo Barrow Show 2012 2013 2014

Hamp

San Antonio Barrow Show 2013 2012 2014

230 231-246 247-254 255-266 267-270 230-242 243-259 260-270 x2 230-244 245-264 265-270 230-244 245-269 270 230-236 237-250 251-266 267-270 230-237 x2 238-247 248-257 258-269 270

Chester

Landrace York

Other Cross

240-254 255-269 273-280 240 241-254 255-269 270-280

240-256 257-272 273-280 240-245 246-257 258-272 273-280

240-252 253-265 267-277 278-280

240 x3 241-247 248-253 254-257 258-262 263-265 266-271 272-276 277-280 x2 240 241-253 254-258 259-264 265-268 269-273 274-278 279-280 x2 240-257 240-261 258-280 262-280 240-242 x2 240 243-250 240-244 251-255 245-252 256-263 253-258 264-269 259-267 270-279 268-275 280 276-280 x2 240-255 240-250 256-271 251-263 272-280 264-274 275-280

240 x3 21-247 246-250 251-255 256-260 261-265 266-270 271-277 278-280 x2 240-242 243-250 251-258 259-265 266-269 270-274 275-279 280 x2 240-262 263-280

240-263 264-280

240-263 264-280

240-265 267-280

240-245 246-257 258-266 267-275 276-280 x2 240-243 x3 244-247 248-251 252-256 257-259 260-263 264-266 267-271 272-274 275-277 278-280 x3

240-247 248-258 259-266 267-274 275-280 x2 240 x3 241-246 247-250 251-255 256-259 260-263 264-266 267-269 270-273 274-276 277-280 x3

240-249 250-260 261-268 269-276 277-280 x2 240 x3 241-247 248-251 252-254 255-258 259-262 263-265 266-268 269-272 273-275 276-279 280 x2

240 x3 241-246 247-253 254-257 258-262 263-268 269-274 275-279 280 240 240-241 245-253 254-262 263-268 269-276 277-280 x2

2014

Duroc 240-243 244-258 259-275 276-280 D. OPB 240-249 250-274 275-280 W.OPB 240-252 256-280 York 240-249 250-267 268-280

2013

240-247 248-264 265-279 280 240-249 250-260 261-280 240-259 260-280 240-259 260-271 272-280

240-252 253-265 267-277 278-280

2012

240-253 254-266 267-279 280 240-263 264-280 240-256 257-280 240-251 252-269 272-280

Houston Barrow Show 2013 2012 2014

Berk 240-249 250-271 272-280

Chester 240-257 258-277 278-280 x2 Duroc 240 241-257 258-264 265-272 273-278 279-280 Hamp 240-243 x4 244-248 249-254 255-259 260-263 264-266 267-270 271-277 278-280 x2 Spot 240 241-256 257-272 273-280 L. Cross 240-243 x3 244-247 248-252 253-256 257-258 259-261 262-265 x2 266-269 270-273 274-277 278-280 x3 Poland 240-260 261-280 D. Cross 240 x2 241-251 252-258 259-265 266-271 272-279 280 York 240-244 245-255 256-263 264-270 271-279 280

240-264 265-280

240-252 253-274 275-280

240-252 253-264 265-273 274-280 240 241-254 255-261 262-268 269-276 277-280 x2 240 x4 241-245 246-249 250-254 255-257 258-260 262-265 266-271 272-279 280 240-245 x2 240 246-262 241-255 263-280 256-272 273-280 240-242 x5 240 x4 241-246 243-247 247-251 248-250 252-255 251-253 256-258 254-255 259-261 256-259 262-264 260-262 265-266 263-265 267-268 266-268 269-271 269-272 272-275 273-275 276-279 276-279 280 x3 280 x2 240-264 240-259 265-280 260-280 240-243 x3 240 x2 244-251 241-247 252-258 248-253 259-266 254-261 267-277 262-268 278-280 269-276 277-280 240 240-246 241-253 247-253 254-262 254-261 263-268 262-272 269-279 274-279 280 280 240-249 250-262 263-273 275-280 240 242-253 254-260 261-267 268-276 277-280 x2 240-243 x5 244-248 249-253 254-257 258-262 263-267 268-271 272-279 280

Star of Texas Barrow Show 2014 2013 2012

Hamp 240 x2 241-245 246-250 251-258 260-267 268-276 277-280 Cross 240-244 x3 245-249 250-256 257-259 260-264 265-270 271-276 277-280 x2

240 x2 240-243 244-255 256-262 263-272 273-279 280 240-243 x3 244-251 252-255 256-262 263-268 269-274 275-279 280

240 x2 242-251 252-260 262-268 269-275 278-280 x2 240-243 x3 244-256 257-263 264-271 272-276 277-280 x2


Focused on YOUR SUCCESS in the Ring and the Farrowing Barn

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Thank You!

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ts o h S p a d n Sn u ro a from State the


Banner Worthy Fashion Dress to Impress

The ever fashionable Rachael Zoe once said, “Style is a way to say who you are, without having to speak.” So don’t you want to ensure that what you are saying, or wearing, is worth hearing and looking at? Follow these few simple fashion guidelines and your show pig won’t be the only thing that is worthy of a banner and a backdrop photo.

Fashion for the Girls

I will be the first to admit that I love stylish outfits and good accessories, but ladies, lets keep in mind that we are showing livestock and not walking down a runway. Your show ring attire should always be classy and trendy, yet very functional. Once the highly anticipated show day comes around, between feeding, washing and showing your hogs, you have a lot on your plate! On hectic days I always stick with a no fuss style, because what is the fun of your shirt being incredibly cute, if it requires you to keep adjusting it all day long? Let’s get started! My number one tip is that you explore your existing wardrobe, because chances are, the clothes that what you wear to school or out with your friends can easily transition into the show ring. Step one: choosing your blouse. A few styles that are timeless and very show ring chic are button down shirts, sweaters, and flowy blouses. A good button down, collared shirt is always a professional, reliable and stylish go-to. You can play with your look by pairing your button downs with bright colored sweaters or a vest, if it’s a chilly show day. You can also mix and match colors and play up a solid colored shirt with a patterned sweater. You can also get a button down shirt with ruffles to add some flare to your look. Another fashionable staple is flowy shirts. This style enables female exhibitors to wear tops of different textures like lace, sheer and fringe, as well as trendy patterns such as chevron, stripes and paisley. When you are strutting your stuff in the ring, you need to express your individuality and own sense of style, but remember you don’t need to take away attention from your show pig. Try to steer clear of bright neon colors, ill-fitting clothes and low-cut shirts. Also, you might want to wear a tank top under your blouse so you will be comfortable when you are driving your barrow or gilt. Step two: finding the right pair of jeans. In my opinion, dark washed jeans are the way to go. They will give you a clean-cut, professional look and won’t show dirt as easily. There are countless styles, cuts and brands for consumers to pick and choose the perfect pair of jeans; just make sure that you are comfortable with the fit and style of the pants. I know a pet peeve of mine is when my jeans don’t fit over my boots just perfect, therefore I tend to buy more wide legged jeans styles.

Accessories

I’m a firm believer that the perfect piece of jewelry can take a good outfit, and make it a great outfit. When it comes to selecting the finishing touches of your ensemble, enlist the help of the queen of class, Coco Chanel. One of her fashion rules is, “Before you leave the house, look in the mirror and remove one accessory.” I always do this when I’m getting ready in the morning, because it is very easy to put on earrings, a necklace and an arm full of bracelets, even though you don’t need all that bling. I have made a rule for myself to implement in the jewelry selecting process. If I want to wear a bigger, chunkier necklace, then I will pair it with small earrings such as studs and I will not wear bracelets. If I’m planning on wearing bigger, statement earrings, than I will only add a few delicate bracelets and won’t wear a necklace.


Fixing Your Hairdo

There are a few perfect hairstyles that give you a polished look and keep your locks out of the way. Some of my favorite hairstyles include: a half-up half-down style, bangs clipped back, or a slightly teased low ponytail. If you are looking to add variety to your hairstyles, Pinterest always has countless hair tutorials, helping you look your best. A hair accessory that has recently made its way into the show ring is the headband. These hair accessories are great for keeping hair out of your face, but that is the only thing they should be used for. I know that the across-the-forehead headband look is very popular, and honestly I like the look myself, but just not for show day. There is a time and place for everything, and this trend is a little too laid back and distracting for the show ring. If you are a headband kind of girl, feel free to wear them around the barns, but go for a more sophisticated look once it’s your turn to enter the ring.

These Boots Aren’t Made for Walking

That’s because they are made for showing! Good, clean and comfortable boots are worth every penny. They will take your look to the next level, and if you take care of them, can last for years. In the past, many people believed that boots were the only shoes appropriate for the show ring. In recent years, the junior livestock industry has taken a more relaxed perspective regarding exhibitors’ footwear, now deeming it acceptable to wear Sperry’s and Twisted X shoes in the show ring. When it comes to fashionable and functional footwear, my motto is to make sure they are clean and presentable. Additionally, it is very important to NOT tuck your jeans in your boots. I understand that you might not want the bottom of your jeans getting muddy, but I promise you there won’t be mud in the show ring; so take the jeans out of your boots and look professional.

Looks for the Boys

Growing up as the only girl in my family and being a part of two predominately male livestock judging teams, I have come to realize that guys have it very easy when it comes to fashion. Fellas, a starched button down and pair of jeans is a look that comes second to none. This men’s style combines professionalism with comfort and always looks great for any occasion. If show day is colder than ideal, a great addition is a quarter zip pullover. Like the ladies, pick a jeans style that is appropriate for your body type, but still go with a dark wash to limit stain visibility. Also, make sure you have a fresh haircut and are clean-shaven for your backdrop moments! This kid is no where near show ring ready. He needs to take lessons from this cat.

Working Your Style

You have worked for months feeding, walking and working with your show projects to ensure that they look the part for the ring. On show day, it is time for you and your hog to shine, and with these few fashion rules, you will be turning heads in the show barn and hitting the shavings with style. My final words of wisdom are definitely my best piece of advice,

“Self confidence is the best outfit, rock it and own it.”

So go to your closet, assemble your banner worthy look and rock the show ring! Written by: Cassie Godwin


FAQs regarding the 2015 Official PIN Tag Requirement What is the packer requirement? The majority of packers and processors that harvest breeding stock are requiring official premises identification tags (official PIN tag) by Jan. 1, 2015, as a condition of sale.

Why is Jan. 1, 2015, significant? January 1 is the date that the pork industry requested that packers harvesting breeding stock require official PIN tags as a condition of sale.

The requirement DOES NOT apply to feeder pigs, market hogs or show pigs being sold as market hogs.

To ensure “full value” for breeding stock, starting Jan. 1, 2015, all breeding stock should be identified with an official PIN tag BEFORE moving into harvest channels.

What is the history of this requirement? Where did it come from? The Swine ID program standards stipulate that breeding swine entering harvest channels must have an official ear tag bearing the PIN of the breeding farm. In 2008, USDA worked with the Swine ID Implementation Task Force to develop the official premises identification number tag (PIN tag). The swine health committees and boards of directors of the National Pork Board and the National Pork Producers Council, along with the board of directors of the American Association of Swine Veterinarians have supported producer adoption of the official premises ID number tags for use in breeding swine entering harvest channels. In 2013, the National Pork Board’s Pork Act delegates unanimously passed an advisement asking packers to require the official PIN tags as a condition of sale by Jan. 1, 2015. A similar resolution was passed by the National Pork Producers Council delegate body.

Why is it important to the swine industry and producers? Using official PIN tags greatly improves the speed and accuracy of traceback for diseases and to protect producers against being wrongly identified as delivering animals to market with a violative animal health product residue. The tags also: • Reduce business disruption during a disease or residue traceback by providing for accurate identification of sows and boars in commingled market channels. • Provide a mechanism to associate breeding stock to movement, health, and treatment records for PQA Plus®. • Improve national swine disease surveillance programs by the use of standardized animal identification which can ensure early disease detection and demonstrate freedom from swine diseases that limit commerce and trade. • Support U.S. producers’ competitiveness in international markets by demonstrating a valid preharvest traceability system to trading partners. In 2014, export markets provided $69 per head additional value to pork producers.

What does PIN stand for? Premises identification number. The PIN is a unique 7-character, alpha-numeric national site identifier that is required to order official PIN tags. Producers can register their site(s) free of charge with their state animal health official to get a PIN. For more information call (800) 456-7675 or go to pork.org/PIN. Which packers and processors are requiring USDA official PIN tags as a condition of sale? Johnsonville, Hillshire Brands, Calihan Pork Processors, Bob Evans Farms, Wampler’s Farm Sausage, Pine Ridge Farms, Pioneer Packing Co., Pork King Packing and Abbyland Pork Pack. Who manufactures approved official PIN tags? To find an approved manufacturer go to pork.org/PINtag and follow the link. When contacting manufacturers, make sure to ask about a distributor near you. What information is required to order official PIN tags? You will need a valid premises identification number (PIN). If you don’t have a PIN, call (800) 456-7675 or go to pork.org/PINtag. What is the cost of official PIN tags? Costs vary. To find an approved manufacturer go to pork.org/PINtag and follow the link. When contacting manufacturers make sure to ask about a distributor near you. When do breeding stock have to be identified with the USDA official PIN tag? Breeding stock must be identified with the official PIN tag BEFORE moving into harvest channels. In some cases, the official PIN tag acts as a production or management tag and is applied when the gilt or boar is selected for breeding. In other cases, the official PIN tag is applied right before the breeding gilt, sow or boar is shipped into harvest channels.


Can official PIN tags be used as a production or management tag? Yes. The official PIN tag can be customized with a production number. Can I get official PIN tags that are blank (no management number)? Yes. Go to pork.org/PINtag to locate an approved manufacturer.

Do I have to use official PIN tags for identifying feeder pigs/weaner pigs for movement and/or show pigs? No, they are intended to be used in breeding stock entering harvest channels. Approved form of identification for feeder/weaner pigs can be found in code of federal regulations at 9 CFR 71.19. Work with your veterinarian to make sure you comply with the federal requirements.

Do I need more than one official PIN tag when I market my sows or boars? Only one official premises ID number tag is required to meet the requirement for the identification of breeding stock in harvest channels.

When are producers applying official PIN tags? In some cases, the official PIN tag acts as a production or management tag and is applied when the gilt or boar is selected for breeding. In other cases, the official PIN tag is applied right before the breeding gilt, sow or boar is shipped into harvest channels.

What records do I need to keep? According to the Swine ID program standards, regardless of the destination of any movement of breeding stock, producers need to record the following information and hold it for three years: • Date the gilt, sow or boar was tagged • Number of the PIN tag applied (both PIN and management number if present) • Number of any other identification present on the gilt, sow or boar when entering the premises • Date the animal moved onto the premises and premises identification number (PIN) of the source location • Date the animal moved off of the premises and premises identification number (PIN) of the destination • If replacing a lost official PIN tag, the number of the new official PIN tag and the one lost (if known)

If a gilt, sow or boar has an official PIN tag and it is moved to another production site in the production system does it have to be retagged with another official PIN tag? No, as long as the following is recorded and held for three years: • Date the gilt, sow or boar was tagged • Number of the PIN tag applied (both PIN and management number if present) • Number of any other identification present on the gilt, sow or boar when entering the premises • Date the animal moved onto the premises and the premises identification number (PIN) of the source location • Date the animal moved off of the premises and the premises identification number (PIN) of the destination • If replacing a lost official PIN tag, the number of the new official PIN tag and the one lost (if known)

Do I need to tag breeding stock in both ears? No. Only one official premises ID number tag is required to meet the requirement for the identification of breeding stock in harvest channels. However, duplicate tags with the same PIN can be applied to both ears if you choose to do so. What happens when an official PIN tag is lost? A new official premises ID number tag bearing the PIN of the breeding farm can be applied and recorded in the production record. Can I remove official PIN tags? Producers are prohibited from removing official PIN tags without authorization by the state, federal or tribal animal health authority.

What happens to sows and boars that are not identified with official PIN tags when marketed? Talk to your market on specifics. Sows and boars without an official PIN tag can still be identified with a USDA official backtag at markets. However, this could affect the value of the sow or boar. What about gilts and young boars that are not selected for breeding? Talk to your buyer on how they handle heavy gilts or young boars not selected for breeding. In general, if the gilt or young boar has the potential to be sold to one of the packers requiring official PIN tags as a condition of sale, identifying them with an official PIN tag will help ensure full value when sold.

Are boars also required to have official PIN tags? Yes, all breeding swine entering harvest channels should have an official PIN tag to ensure full value.

©2014 National Pork Board, Des Moines, IA USA. This message funded by America’s Pork Producers and the Pork Checkoff.


PRODUCER CONNECTION

THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE TEXAS PORK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION

2015 Advertising Rate & Specifications

The Producer Connection is a bi-monthly publication sent to active members of the Texas Pork Producers Association. This publication includes information on current pork related events and youth programs and news & updates on issues in our industry, not only in Texas but nationwide. Scheduled publication months include February, April, June, August, October and December. * Special issues may be published in addition to these scheduled newsletters as necessary.

Advertisement Rates All ads will be in full color. Prices are for completed Camera Ready advertisements, layout and designing of ads is available. Limited space is available for advertisements and are First Come, First Serve.

Back Cover/ Full Page Two-Thirds Page Half Page Third Page Fourth Page Business Card

$400 $325 $275 $200 $150 $75

Next Issue Publi shed: April 2015

* 10% discount on 4 or more continuous issues

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Take the worry out of advertisement design; we can design your ads for you.

BACK PAGE/ 2/3 PAGE HALF-PAGE HORIZONTAL THIRD-PAGE VERTICAL FOURTH-PAGE VERTICAL Bleed Size: 8.75”w x 7”h Bleed Size: 8.75”w x 5.5”h Trim Size: 2.75”w x 11”h Trim Size: 4.2”w x 5.4”h Trim Size: 8.5”w x 7”h Trim Size: 8.5”w x 5.5”h Changes in Certified Texas Bred Registry For 2013 Shows

Changes in Certified Texas Bred Registry For 2013 Shows

Changes in Certified Texas Bred Registry For 2013 Shows

The TPPA Board of Directors have adopted rule changes submitted by the Committee that oversees the Certified Texas Bred Registry. These new rules will impact producers participating in the CTBR program shows next year, including Fort Worth, San Angelo Barrow Show, Stars of Texas Gilt Show & Sale in San Angelo, San Antonio, Houston and the 2013 State Fair.

The TPPA Board of Directors have adopted rule changes submitted by the Committee that oversees the Certified Texas Bred Registry. These new rules will impact producers participating in the CTBR program shows next year, including Fort Worth, San Angelo Barrow Show, Stars of Texas Gilt Show & Sale in San Angelo, San Antonio, Houston and the 2013 State Fair.

The TPPA Board of Directors have adopted rule changes submitted by the Committee that oversees the Certified Texas Bred Registry. These new rules will impact producers participating in the CTBR program shows next year, including Fort Worth, San Angelo Barrow Show, Stars of Texas Gilt Show & Sale in San Angelo, San Antonio, Houston and the 2013 State Fair.

During the Texas Pork Industry Conference in San Angelo, CTBR Committee Chairman, David Kempen, explained the rule changes and the purpose for the changes. Kempen said that over the years, the CTBR program has provided thousands of 4-H & FFA students with additional premium money, prizes, awards and scholarships, provided by the hundreds of Texas breeders participating in CTBR. He said that these Texas breeders have been rewarded with significant recognition and increased market demand for their pigs. Kempen explained that all of this has been accomplished based on the last statement in the CTBR rules: “The validity of the Certified Texas Bred Registry is wholly dependent on the honesty and integrity of the breeders participating in the Registry and the reliability of pig registration.”

During the Texas Pork Industry Conference in San Angelo, CTBR Committee Chairman, David Kempen, explained the rule changes and the purpose for the changes. Kempen said that over the years, the CTBR program has provided thousands of 4-H & FFA students with additional premium money, prizes, awards and scholarships, provided by the hundreds of Texas breeders participating in CTBR. He said that these Texas breeders have been rewarded with significant recognition and increased market demand for their pigs. Kempen explained that all of this has been accomplished based on the last statement in the CTBR rules: “The validity of the Certified Texas Bred Registry is wholly dependent on the honesty and integrity of the breeders participating in the Registry and the reliability of pig registration.” Kempen said that the integrity and honesty of a small number of breeders have come into question by the CTBR Committee and that they felt it important to provide some increased requirements for the CTBR program. They proposed the new rule changes that were adopted by the Board members on July 6, 2012. The most significant rule change is that producers will now have to provide TPPA with the number of litters farrowed at their farm and the ear notching system that they use for identifying their litters. (See CTBR rules in this issue and on the texaspork.org web site.) Prior to October 1, 2012, producers that will want to purchase CTBR certificates for pigs showing in 2013 must

During the Texas Pork Industry Conference in San Angelo, CTBR Committee Chairman, David Kempen, explained the rule changes and the purpose for the changes. Kempen said that over the years, the CTBR program has provided thousands of 4-H & FFA students with additional premium money, prizes, awards and scholarships, provided by the hundreds of Texas breeders participating in CTBR. He said that these Texas breeders have been rewarded with significant recognition and increased market demand for their pigs. Kempen explained that all of this has been accomplished based on the last statement in the CTBR rules: “The validity of the Certified Texas Bred Registry is wholly dependent on the honesty and integrity of the breeders participating in the Registry and the reliability of pig registration.” Kempen said that the integrity and honesty of a small number of breeders have come into question by the CTBR Committee and that they felt it important to provide some increased requirements for the CTBR program. They proposed the new rule changes that were adopted by the Board members on July 6, 2012. The most significant rule change is that producers will now have to provide TPPA with the number of litters farrowed at their farm and the ear notching system that they use for identifying their litters. (See CTBR rules in this issue and on the texaspork.org web site.) Prior to October 1, 2012, producers that will want to purchase CTBR certificates for pigs showing in 2013 must have submitted to TPPA a “CTB Litter Record”. A CTB Litter Record will be an official document to tell TPPA how many litters are farrowed at the farm and litter ear notches assigned to those litters. This will include an explanation of the litter notching system used by the producer. TPPA will strongly encourage breeders to notch litters in sequence starting with the litter “1” notch. However, if producers use a different sequence and numbering system they must provide an explanation of that system. Kempen explained that most producers will be able to comply with this new requirement easily because they identify their litters in sequence each year starting with the litter “1” notch. He said that when looking through all of the CTBR pig registrations at the shows most producer’s litters can be followed with little effort. However, Kempen said that the Committee becomes very concerned when you know that a farm only farrowed 25 litters and most of their pigs have litter notches of 1 through 25, then a few have litter notches with 50’s or 80’s. He said that seems difficult to understand and puts into question the integrity of that breeders pig registrations. He and the CTBR Committee believe that the new “CTB Litter Record” will give them a better understanding of a breeders notching system and allow them to ef-

BUSINESS CARD Trim Size: 3.5”w x 2”h

Changes in Certified Texas Bred Registry For 2013 Shows

Changes in Certified Texas Bred Registry For 2013 Shows

The TPPA Board of Directors have adopted rule changes submitted by the Committee that oversees the Certified Texas Bred Registry. These new rules will impact producers participating in the CTBR program shows next year, including Fort Worth, San Angelo Barrow Show, Stars of Texas Gilt Show & Sale in San Angelo, San Antonio, Houston and the 2013 State Fair.

The TPPA Board of Directors have adopted rule changes submitted by the Committee that oversees the Certified Texas Bred Registry. These new rules will impact producers participating in the CTBR program shows next year, including Fort Worth, San Angelo Barrow Show, Stars of Texas Gilt Show & Sale in San Angelo, San Antonio, Houston and the 2013 State Fair.

During the Texas Pork Industry Conference in San Angelo, CTBR Committee Chairman, David Kempen, explained the rule changes and the purpose for the changes. Kempen said that over the years, the CTBR program has provided thousands of 4-H & FFA students with additional premium money, prizes, awards and scholarships, provided by the hundreds of Texas breeders participating in CTBR. He said that these Texas breeders have been rewarded with significant recognition and increased market demand for their pigs. Kempen explained that all of this has been accomplished based on the last statement in the CTBR rules: “The validity of the Certified Texas Bred Registry is wholly dependent on the honesty and integrity of the breeders participating in the Registry and the reliability of pig registration.”

During the Texas Pork Industry Conference in San Angelo, CTBR Committee Chairman, David Kempen, explained the rule changes and the purpose for the changes. Kempen said that over the years, the CTBR program has provided thousands of 4-H & FFA students with additional premium money, prizes, awards and scholarships, provided by the hundreds of Texas breeders participating in CTBR. He said that these Texas breeders have been rewarded with significant recognition and increased market demand for their pigs. Kempen explained that all of this has been accomplished based on the last statement in the CTBR rules: “The validity of the Certified Texas Bred Registry is wholly dependent on the honesty and integrity of the breeders participating in the Registry and the reliability of pig registration.”

Kempen said that the integrity and honesty of a small number of breeders have come into question by the CTBR Committee and that they felt it important to provide some increased requirements for the CTBR program. They proposed the new rule changes that were adopted by the Board members on July 6, 2012. The most significant rule change is that producers will now have to provide TPPA with the number of litters farrowed at their farm and the ear notching system that they use for identifying their litters. (See CTBR rules in this issue and on the texaspork.org web site.)

Kempen said that the integrity and honesty of a small number of breeders have come into question by the CTBR Committee and that they felt it important to provide some increased requirements for the CTBR program. They proposed the new rule changes that were adopted by the Board members on July 6, 2012. The most significant rule change is that producers will now have to provide TPPA with the number of litters farrowed at their farm and the ear notching system that they use for identifying their litters. (See CTBR rules in this issue and on the texaspork.org web site.)

Prior to October 1, 2012, producers that will want to purchase CTBR certificates for pigs showing in 2013 must have submitted to TPPA a “CTB Litter Record”. A CTB Litter Record will be an official document to tell TPPA how many litters are farrowed at the farm and litter ear notches assigned to those litters. This will include an explanation of the litter notching system used by the producer. TPPA will strongly encourage breeders to notch litters in sequence starting with the litter “1” notch. However, if producers use a different sequence and numbering system they must provide an explanation of that system.

Prior to October 1, 2012, producers that will want to purchase CTBR certificates for pigs showing in 2013 must have submitted to TPPA a “CTB Litter Record”. A CTB Litter Record will be an official document to tell TPPA how many litters are farrowed at the farm and litter ear notches assigned to those litters. This will include an explanation of the litter notching system used by the producer. TPPA will strongly encourage breeders to notch litters in sequence starting with the litter “1” notch. However, if producers use a different sequence and numbering system they must provide an explanation of that system.

Kempen explained that most producers will be able to comply with this new requirement easily because they identify their litters in sequence each year starting with the litter “1” notch. He said that when looking through all of the CTBR pig registrations at the shows most producer’s litters can be followed with little effort. However, Kempen said that the Committee becomes very concerned when you know that a farm only farrowed 25 litters and most of their pigs have litter notches of 1 through 25, then a few have litter notches with 50’s or 80’s. He said that seems difficult to understand and puts into question the integrity of that breeders pig registrations. He and the CTBR Committee believe that the new “CTB Litter Record” will give them a better understanding of a breeders notching system and allow them to effectively visit with breeders about their pig registrations when necessary.

We can also do E-BLAST’s for you.

Kempen explained that most producers will be able to comply with this new requirement easily because they identify their litters in sequence each year starting with the litter “1” notch. He said that when looking through all of the CTBR pig registrations at the shows most producer’s litters can be followed with little effort. However, Kempen said that the Committee becomes very concerned when you know that a farm only farrowed 25 litters and most of their pigs have litter notches of 1 through 25, then a few have litter notches with 50’s or 80’s. He said that seems difficult to understand and puts into question the integrity of that breeders pig registrations. He and the CTBR Committee believe that the new “CTB Litter Record” will give them a better understanding of a breeders notching system and allow them to effectively visit with breeders about their pig registrations when necessary. The CTBR Committee wants breeders to know that this year the October 1, 2012 deadline for submitting a CTB Litter Record in order to be allowed to purchased CTBR certificates is very firm with one small exception: if a breeder does not meet the deadline this first year of the new rule, they can still submit the CTB Litter Record but they will be charged a monetary fee to be eligible to participate in the CTBR program. (See CTBR Rules in this magazine and on the texaspork.org web site.)

E-blast sent to all TPPA members & County Agents We can schedule to e-mail any day, any time. Only $50 per E-blast!


Publishing Schedule / Ad Deadlines February / March 2015 Stock Show In Full Swing

Advertising Due: January 15, 2015 Mail Date: February 1, 2015

April / May 2015

Spring Buyers Guide & Stock Show Results Advertising Due: March 15, 2015 Mail Date: April 10, 2015

Distribution: TPPA Members, All Texas Major Stock Shows, and various events throughout Texas.

Distribution: TPPA Members, Texas Ag Teacher, County Extension Agents, and various events throughout Texas.

June / July 2015

August / September 2015

Conference Information

Show Pig Sales & TPPA Event Wrap-ups

Advertising Due: May 15, 2015 Mail Date: June 1, 2015

Advertising Due: July 15, 2015 Mail Date: August 10, 2015

Distribution: TPPA Members, Texas Pork Industry Conference, summer shows, clinics, and various events throughout Texas.

Distribution: TPPA Members, Texas Ag Teachers, County Extension Agents, some pig sales and various events throughout Texas.

October / November 2015

December / January 2016

National Pork Month

Advertising Due: September 15, 2015 Mail Date: October 1, 2015

Distribution: TPPA Members, State Fair of Texas Livestock Show, some pig sales and various events throughout Texas.

Holiday Season

Advertising Due: November 15, 2015 Mail Date: December 1, 2015

Distribution: TPPA Members, some jackpot shows, clinics, and various events throughout Texas.

Layout and Design Charges If a camera-ready ad is not provided, advertiser will be responsible for layout fees. The ad design rate is determined by the size and scope of the advertisement. Please call for pricing on ad design rates.

Want more information or book your advertisement? Cassidy Smith â&#x20AC;˘ 512-453-0615 â&#x20AC;˘ csmith@texaspork.org.

Texas Pork Producers Association P.O. Box 10168 Austin, Texas 78766 512-453-0615 www.texaspork.org

TEXAS PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION


2015 Spring Buyers Guide to be Featured in the April/May Producer Connection

New Changes

The 2015 Spring Buyers Guide will be included within the April/ May issue of the Producer Connection, much like the Fall Sales Trail. Advertise your pigs for the late summer and early fall shows. We will not include any pigs available after July 31, 2015. 30

Amarillo

26 6

If you want to be listed on the map & in the featured sales listing...

192 4

Lubbock

4 10

5 Midland

Fort Worth

2

9

Dallas

15

29 21

12

17 14

Option 1 Place an advertisement in the April/ May issue Fourth Page or larger and be listed for FREE.

1 13 1 1

18 27 7

Waco

23 Austin

8

28 22

20

Houston

2014 Spring Buyers Guide of Texas Show

(Must still complete the form below)

1

Option 2 Complete & submit the form below and submit $50 to TPPA by March 15th.

San Antonio

Kerby Knaupp Knaupp Showpigs, Inc.

Date Available: As Ready (March & April Litters) Location: 767 Knaupp Mohr Road Fredericksburg, TX 78624 Offering: 30 Litters Chester, Cross, Duroc, Hamp, Spot Contact #: (830) 685-3355 Home (830) 459-4826 Cell Web Address: www.facebook.com/pages/ kerby-knaupp-show-pigs

6

16

Corpus Christi

25

3

James & Glen Bloun Blount Farms

Date Available: May 10 and after Location: 3044 Desvoignes Roa Denison, TX 75021 Offering: 10 Litters ~ Cross, Dur Contact #: (903) 465-9687 Farm (903) 814-4900 Glen E-Mail: glen.blount@bellsisd Web Address: blountfarms.com

Shannon R. Essary 7 2 SRE Family Farm Bo Caraway Please make checks payable to TPPA. Date Available: May 15 Caraway Spots, Polands, Berks, & Crosses Location: 1123 CR 664 th May not - Call be for Info If payment is not received by MarchDate 15Available: you will included in this publication. Devine, TX 78016 Location: 2918 Highway 2563

I would like to purchase: (circle one) Name: Farm Name: Address: Address Listing: (circle one) Phone #: E-mail Address: Offering: (circle all that apply) Berk Date Pigs are available: Web Address:

Offering: Eastland, TX 76448 Contact #: Offering: 35 Litters ~ Berk, Cross, Poland, Spot Option 1(254) 639-2545 Option 2 ~ $50 E-Mail: Contact #: (214) 674-5700 E-Mail: pcaraway@cctc.net 8 Web Address: www.carawayshowpigs.com Date Available: Location: 3 Jimmy & Cassidy Hayes

HF Genetics

Date Available: May - June Location: Port Lavaca, TX Offering: 150 Head ~ Cross, Hamp, York Contact #: (361) 920-0964 Jimmy and Cell State Full Address or List City (361) 920-1015 Cassidy Cell E-Mail: hayesfarms@gmail.com Web Address: www.hfgenetics.com

4

Josh Krohn DL Showpigs

Date Available: May 1 2101 CRHamp 24 Duroc Landrace Lamesa, TX 79331 Offering: 60 (March & April) Litters Chester, Cross, Hamp, York Number of Duroc, Head/Litters: Contact #: (806) 759-7735 E-Mail: bridgette.krohn@gmail.com Web Address: www.dlshowpigs.com

Chester Location: Cross

5 Allen & Aiden Richburg Send form and payment to Texas Pork Producers Association * P.O. Box 10168 Richburg Show Pigs Date Available: May 1 Location: 15417 South Interstate 20 Roscoe, TX 79545

Offering: Contact #: E-Mail:

Only

9

50-75 Head ~ Berk, C (830) 665-3761 srefamilyfarm@yahoo

Kenneth Fey Fey Show Pigs

May 15 (March & Apr 2681 CR 420 Stockdale, TX 78160 25-30 Head ~ Cross, H (830) 481-3162 kennethfey@gmail.co

Clint Halfmann West Texas Genetic

Date Available: May 15 Location: San Angelo, TX Offering: 100 Head ~ Chester, C Hamp, Sp Contact #: (402) 429-4946 Clint (325) 340-0232 Julie Poland York E-Mail:Spot cmhalf@yahoo.com Web Address: westtexasgenetics.co

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Craig & Lisa Bessen Bessent Farms

Date Available: May 17 Location: 1735 Iberis Road Abilene, TX 79606 Offering: 150 Head ~ Cross, Ha * Austin, TX 78766 Contact #: (325) 665-7375 E-Mail: cbessent@wylie.esc1 Web Address: www.allenbessentfar


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Rising

Stars

It’s a Family Affair: The Kelso Krew Kolton, Karson, Kross and Kase

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aising hogs is in the DNA of the four Kelso grandsons. Dating back to 1941 with grandma Sylvia’s family, this group is firmly rooted in the swine industry. When Sylvia married Rodney the boy’s grandparents really made their mark on the show pig industry, taking home champion banners every decade dating back all the way to 1950. Fast-forward to the present, and Kelso & Sons Show Pigs is far from slowing down, because the youngest generation of Kelso’s are following in their family’s footsteps, leading them straight to the show ring. The four Kelso boys, Kolton, Karson, Kross and Kase, all live and work on the family farm located in Seguin. The operation has changed over the years where it now consists of 85 sows and 10 boars, with breeds including York, Duroc, Hampshire and Crossbred seedstock and show pigs. Raising and showing hogs is truly a family production for the Kelso bunch. The grandparents, parents and children all enjoy spending time in the barn, farrowing sows, feeding hogs, and working with their projects. The boys are proud to say that the majority of their show hogs are “homegrown,” raising, training and showing the majority of their own livestock. Kolton, Karson, Kross and Kase are all in agreement when it comes to their favorite part of raising hogs. “Being successful in the ring with hogs we raised is our favorite part,” said Karson, the 13-year-old son of Kurt and Stepheny. “It’s also satisfying to see how proud our parents and grandparents are when we are showing, whether we win or lose!” replied Kross.

Kolton Kelso

Age: 16 years old School: Junior, Marion High School. 4-H/FFA chapter: Marion FFA and New Berlin 4-H Club Accomplishment: Grand Champion Barrow at the Guadalupe County Show, SALE Open Gilt Show Champion Hampshire, 2010 Star of Texas Champion Duroc Favorite hog: Miss Poly Future goals: Place at every Texas major Likes: Hunting, cross-country and shooting sports events. Future plans: Texas A&M, wildlife management


Karson Kelso

Age: 13 years old School: 7th grade, Marion Middle School. 4-H/FFA chapter: Marion FFA and New Berlin 4-H Club Accomplishments: Placing at every major show at least once, 10th place AllAround division NJSA, 2014 SALE placing 2nd in swine skill-a-thon and 4th in beef skill-a-thon Favorite hog: Batman Future goals: Win Houston and SALE Likes: Football and baseball Future plans: Texas A&M and raise hogs. In fact, the four Kelso boys credit much of their success to their grandparents and parents. All four of them say that their dad’s and grandfather, Opa, have helped them the most in all of their endeavors. The oldest of the Kelso grandchildren, Konni, is now a college graduate and employee of Cargill Pork would help the two oldest Kelso boys, Kolton and Karson, before she went to college. Looking back they say they greatly appreciate all of Konni’s help, but admit to having to remind Opa and their dad’s that they aren’t Konni and do some things differently. Like so many livestock exhibitors, the boys

Champion Pedigree Rodney Sylvia

Stepheny Kurt Kyle Shell

Konni Karson Kase Kolton Kross Kodi

have had to learn how to balance school and sports with their responsibilities on the farm. Aside from showing advice, the older generations of Kelso’s have passed on words of wisdom to their youngsters. When asked, each boy gave a different response as to what they have learned from the family—Kase: “never give up,” Kross: “always do your best,” Karson: “being a success doesn’t always mean you will win,” and Kolton: “if you work hard in the beginning it will pay off in the end.” It’s these words that they too are passing on to the youngest grandkid Kodi, the first grader anxiously awaiting her chance to join 4-H. Tradition runs deep in this close-knit family. All four of them began showing when they were three years old, getting their start in the open gilt show at the San Antonio Livestock Exposition (SALE), noting that this is the entire family’s favorite show, considering it their “hometown” show. “We all love San Antonio,” said Kolton, the oldest of the Kelso boys. “We have a lot of friends that show there and it’s where we started.”


Additionally, they showed at various jackpot shows across Texas. When each of the boy’s became eligible to enter all of the shows, the family kicked it into high gear. The boys show year round, attending all Texas majors, Guadalupe County Youth Show, State Fair of Texas, Fall Classic, Belt Buckle Bonanza and numerous jackpot and prospect shows. The Kelso Krew are longtime members and supporters of the National Junior Swine Association (NJSA), giving them the opportunity to also travel across the country, competing at the NJSA Southwest Regional and the National Junior Swine Spectacular. In 2014, Kolton and Karson showed at the World Pork Expo for the first time, and are very excited to add that trip to the show roster. The National Junior Summer Spectacular, held in Louisville, Ky., ranks second on the Kelso kids list of favorite shows. Running the hog operation, along with their cattle, doesn’t leave much time for vacations, so the Kelso’s make the Summer Spectacular their annual family

Kross Kelso

retreat. At the show the kids compete in showmanship, the barrow and gilt show, as well as educational contests such as livestock judging, photography and the swine skill-a-thon. This show gives the kids a chance to spend time with their friends from other parts of the country, and the family gets to enjoy some time away from the show ring, visiting local tourist attractions like Churchill Downs, Six Flags Kentucky Kingdom, the Louisville Zoo and Slugger Museum. The Kelso Family have made show pigs their history and they are making it their future; a future that is looking very bright with the hard work and leadership of these passionate and capable new-comers. With the constant support and guidance of their seasoned grandparents and parents, Kolton, Karson, Kross and Kase are all forging their individual paths of success in the show ring, and we look forward to seeing where it takes them. Some would say it’s a kalling; with them it can be kompetitive; it’s sometimes krazy and komical; there’s no komparison; they are the Kelso Krew.

Age: 10 years old School: 4th grade student at Marion Elementary 4-H/FFA chapter: Marion FFA and New Berlin 4-H Club Accomplishment: First belt buckle in 2013 at the Seguin Swine Breeders Prospect Show, 2-time showmanship winner State Fair of Texas, 2014 GCYS Champion Duroc Favorite hog: Champion Future goals: Win Houston Likes: Baseball and football Future plans: Be a NFL player


Kase Kelso

Age: 9 years old School: 3rd grader at Marion Elementary 4-H/FFA chapter: Marion FFA and New Berlin 4-H Club Accomplishment: Rookie of the Year 2015 GCYS, first buckle 2014 Seguin Swine Breeders Prospect Show, 2014 State Fair of Texas 1st swine skill-a-thon Favorite hog: Kevin Future goals: Win more buckles than my sister, Konni Likes: Football and baseball. Future plans: Be a NFL player, Monster Truck Driver and a hog farmer


Prevailing Genetics

Online sale info coming soon!

* Early December pigs available at the farm starting early February * January and February pigs available at the farm starting early March * MOST PIGS FOR SALE AT THE FARM * Delivery available to California, Colorado, Minnesota, and the Mid-West

Go to the website for more info:

showpig.com

WWW.DUELMSPREVAILINGGENETICS.COM RORY DUELM 830.608.5058 * MATT LEE 830.708.4274


Texas Pork Producers Association P.O. Box 10168 Austin, Texas 78766

West Texas Genetics “Where functional genetics receive honest results” APPLESEED

MY TIME (BIG TIME 81-11 x SUPER 8) x "APPLE " (WWII x BORN READY) 40 Litters available December thru April cmhalf@yahoo.com westtexasgenetics.com San Angelo, TX Clint Halfmann - 402.429.4946 Julie Halfmann - 325.340.0232

February Producers Connection  

Texas Pork Producers Association

February Producers Connection  

Texas Pork Producers Association