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December 2017 Issue number 08

www.railprofessional.com

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR RAIL

Air and rail cooperation We talk to the organisation dedicated to helping airports and railways around the world achieve harmonious connections

CONSULTING Why organisational culture matters

ROLLING STOCK Moving Malaysia – the role of rail in economic growth

SECURITY AND SAFETY COTS safety technology and the digital railway


COMMITTED TO THE HEALTH OF ONE WWW.FORBO-FLOORING.COM/CHO


WELCOME |

3

December 2017 Issue number 08

www.railprofessional.com

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR RAIL

Air and rail cooperation We talk to the organisation dedicated to helping airports and railways around the world achieve harmonious connections

CONSULTING Why organisational culture matters

ROLLING STOCK Moving Malaysia – the role of rail in economic growth

editor’s note

SECURITY AND SAFETY COTS safety technology and the digital railway

publisher RAIL PROFESSIONAL LIMITED Hallmark House, Downham Road, Ramsden Heath, Essex CM11 1PU Tel: +44 (0)1268 711811 EditorIAL EDITOR SAM SHERWOOD-HALE editor@railprofessional.com ADVERTISING christian wiles chris@railpro.co.uk BEN WARING ben@railpro.co.uk HANNAH CARRATT hannah@railpro.co.uk ADMINISTRATION cherie nugent info@railpro.co.uk LISA ETHERINGTON admin@railpro.co.uk GILLIAN DUNN office@railpro.co.uk DESIGN & PRODUCTION MILES JOHNSTONE production@railpro.co.uk

Rail Professional welcomes contributions in the form of articles, photographs or letters, preferably by email. Original photographs may be submitted, but, while every care will be exercised, neither the editor nor the publisher take responsibility for loss of, or damage to, material sent. Submission of material to Rail Professional will be taken as permission for it to be published in the magazine. ISSN 2397-8287 © All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the copyright owners. The views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher, nor does it accept liability for any printing errors or otherwise which may occur.

C

ooperation and collaboration is the focus of the rail industry in Asia Pacific right now, with Hong Kong and China coming together to operate the new high-speed rail terminus that links Guangzhou with the autonomous territory. After signing a legally binding agreement last year, Singapore and Kuala Lumpur have continued to be model partners as they close out 2017 by calling for tenders to appoint a consultant to assess the social impact of the Kuala Lumpur-Singapore high-speed rail project. Continental Southeast Asia is also starting to capitalise on ASEAN’s economic growth with Thailand finally approving a $5.5 billion budget for a railway that will eventually cross its northeast border into Laos. Another cross-border railway linking Cambodia with Thailand has also taken steps forward as both parties confirm their desire to work together. Added to that China and Japan are stepping up their interest in investing in Indonesia as both countries jostle for position. As Rail Professional Asia Pacific rounds off its second year of publication we continue to see huge investment and new railway networks being imagined every day. Our final issue of 2017 covers consulting, rolling stock and safety and security. Our interview with Andrew Sharp from the International Air Rail Organisation touches on how the two industries can complement each other as well how they can directly cooperate. Thilina Weerasinghe from BMT Asia Pacific tells us why organisational culture matters and the different mechanisms companies can employ to ensure they have a strong organisational culture themselves. Ahmad Marzuki Ariffin of Bombardier explains how economic growth and a wellmaintained transportation network are interlinked. Most Southeast Asian cities are clogged with traffic, with Kuala Lumpur and Singapore notable exceptions. Malaysia’s heavy investment in rail has developed the country’s urban transit network and boosted rural connections, Ahmad argues that doing this has reduced its population’s dependence on the car and helped to grow the economy. Jean-Francois Beaudoin, senior vice president of Alstom, Asia Pacific, fills us in on all the new driverless trains in operation across the region and what companies are doing to reassure those with doubts about passenger safety. Sedat Sezgün, head of rail at HIMA, introduces the ‘Rail 4.0’ era and compares commercial off-the-shelf controllers and proprietary safety technology. Rowe Hankins has been selected to appear in the 2017 edition of the UK’s government Parliamentary Review and explains why here. Forbo Flooring has a case study on its work with the Virgin Trains East Coast franchise in the UK and Ludovic Lang from Thales tells us about big data and the commuter experience.

Sam Sherwood-Hale

editor@railprofessional.com

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issue 08 • DECEMBER 2017

News

07

Singapore SMRT brings in new talent in engineering and safety, Northrail project out: Philippines National Railways North 2 in, Indonesia courts Japan and China as railway investment increases, JR Central launches app for overseas passengers to book Japanese bullet trains

Map

09

A map of the future of Southeast Asia’s railways by James Clark of Nomadic Notes

Rail Professional interview

11

Andrew Sharp spent 14 years as director-general of the International Air Rail Organisation (IARO), a worldwide group of organisations across the air and rail industry. We talk to Andrew about how airports and railways can complement each other to offer travellers a fuller experience

Consulting

15

Why organisational culture matters by Dr Thilina Weerasinghe, senior consultant at BMT

Rolling Stock

19

The role of rail in Malaysia’s economic growth by Ahmad Marzuki Ariffin of Bombardier

Safety and Security

22

Jean-Francois Beaudoin, senior vice president of Alstom, Asia Pacific on the safety concerns and opportunities of driverless trains

Safety and Security

24

Commercial off-the-shelf controllers and the digital railway by Sedat Sezgün, head of rail at HIMA

Education

26

Anna Fraszczyk uses her regular column to tell us about how digital learning can help students looking at a career in rail

Business Profile

29

Rail safety systems manufacturer Rowe Hankins has been selected to appear in the 2017 edition of the government publication that flagships the very best practice in British businesses

Business Profile

31

Forbo Flooring has a case study on its work with the Virgin Trains East Coast franchise in the UK

Business Profile

33

Ludovic Lang from Thales tells us about big data and the commuter experience

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7 Time to upgrade your wipers? NEWS |

More news at www.railprofessional.com/news

Singapore SMRT brings in new ...News introducing PSV’s new replacement system in brief... China and Vietnam release statement on trade cooperation Hanoi, Vietnam – The governments of China and Vietnam have released a statement detailing strengthening cooperation on trade and maritime issues. Of interest to the rail industry would be Hanoi and Beijing’s joint decision to complete the Hanoi LRT project earlier than scheduled. The other railway concerning the two countries is a standard-gauge railway linking the port city of Hai Phong and the capital Hanoi with Lao Cai on the Chinese border. That railway is currently at the design stage and is also expected to be expedited.

talent in engineering and safety

Singapore – SMRT, Singapore’s multimodal transport operator, has announced it has brought in engineers who specialise in subjects such as technology, building infrastructure and operations and support (O&S) for up to six months to help ongoing efforts to High-speed railway linking Xi’an and review and improve Chengdu to open before end of 2017 train maintenance. Chengdu, China – The Xi’an to Chengdu highThe O&S engineers speed railway is currently in the inspection phase will help SMRT Trains before its start operations at the end of 2017. better manage the The railway, which will shorten the journey life cycle of complex between the two cities from 16 hours down to engineering systems. For SMRT Trains, such expertise will reinforce continuing efforts to just three hours, will have a designed speed of update its maintenance regime for equipment, some of which dates back 30 years. the railway is 250 kph. A team of five engineers from the Defence Science and Technology Agency (DSTA) will be It will be the first high-speed railway to pass attached to SMRT system Trains starting from December this year. ... introducing PSV’s new replacement through the Qinling mountains. Testing began Seah Moon Ming, chairman of SMRT said: ‘We must gather the best engineering talents back in July with further testing in September at and all necessary resources in Singapore to support SMRT in its drive towards rail operations Foping Station. and maintenance excellence. SMRT needs to critically review its O&S and maintenance policies, manuals and procedures, and update these to world-best standards in railway management.’ Thailand to build four new light rail lines in The DSTA team will review and recommend improvements to SMRT’s O&S capability, smaller cities covering organisation and policies, processes and procedures, and competency and training. Bangkok, Thailand – Thailand is planning to At the same time, Taipei Rapid Transit will be sending a team to work with SMRT Trains to build light rail networks in four cities across the conduct a thorough and comprehensive review to examine the way it operates and maintains country. the MRT network. The seaside city of Phuket, the northern tourist SMRT announced back in September that it had set up a joint task force for safety and hot spot of Chiang Mai, the northeastern security with the National Transport Workers Union (NTWU) of Singapore. The main focus of industrial city of Khon Khaen and the central city the task force was to establish a Track Access Management system for better access control for of Nakhon Ratchasima are all scheduled to start personnel needing to work on the tracks and the use of geo-fencing to demarcate parts of the construction of light rail lines next year. track that people must not enter. The projects will be built under public-private • Arms Other changes to strengthen workplace health and safety include changing work tools from partnership (PPP) programmes at a total cost of • Wiper blades metal to a composite material to reduce the risk of electrocution. $4.9 billion. • Motors (24v and 110v) At that time SMRT appointed a Safety Review Committee (SRC) comprising local and Each project is at a different stage. The • Linkage systems international industry experts to advise on safety aspects of SMRT’s network and workplace. Phuket lines have already passed a feasibility The panel’s recommendations centred on improvements to work instructions, operating • Control switches study whereas Chiang Mai is currently split procedures and workforce discipline. • Components & spares between two potential routes and Khon Whether your trains operate in the heavy of on improving We safety offerand robustly forontrain Thissnow recent focus operationalengineered standards comessolutions after an incident Khaen is conducting an environmental impact October 7 when flood water inundated tunnels one stretch of the MRT and fire was theassessment. mountains, the heat of the desert, or the harsh builders, andonsystem upgrades fora small operators spotted in another tunnel elsewhere on the network on the same day. The disruption caused by salty environment of the coast... you need wiper (especially those experiencing a high LCC on the floodawaters lasted for almost an entire day. The breakdown was one oforiginal the worst inequipment). SMRT’s history and questions were asked in system you can rely on. Looking to lower your Life Cycle Costs? PSVparliament can help. Singapore’s about the operator’s worsening reliability record.

Time • Armsto upgrade your wipers? • Wiper blades • Motors (24v and 110v) • Linkage systems • Control switches • Components & spares

Looking to lower your Life Cycle Costs? PSV can help.

Time to upgrade your wipers?

We offer robustly engineered solutions for train At PSV, we’ve been developing and manufacturing Our manufacturing facility in Worcester also has a builders, and system upgrades for operators ... introducing PSV’s new replacement system quality wiper systems for over 35(especially yearsthose (with 20 a high LCC onhighly experienced team of in-house designers experiencing years experience working withinoriginal theequipment). rail industry). and engineers who will work alongside you At PSV, we’ve been developing and manufacturing Our manufacturing facility in Worcester also has a to meet your individual needs. quality wiper systems for over 35 years (with 20 highly experienced team of in-house designers Weexperience are a proud supplier to international OEM years working within the rail industry). and engineers who will work alongside you to meet your individual needs. train builders, fleet operators and fleet support If you’re looking to replace or upgrade your wiper We are a proud supplier to international OEM train builders, fleet operators and fleet support If you’re looking to replace or upgrade your wiper distributors. systems, we’re just a phone call away. distributors. systems, we’re just asystem phone call away. Introducing PSV’s new replacement Whether your trains operate in the heavy snow of the mountains, the heat of the desert, or the harsh salty environment of the coast... you need a wiper system you can rely on.

Time to upgrade your wipers? Why not discover the benefits of a PSV wiper system? Call us today and ask for our Rail Specialist, Paul Curry.

• Arms • Wiper blades • Motors (24v and 110v) • Linkage systems • Control switches • Components & spares

Why not discover the benefits of a PSV wiper system? Call us today and ask for our Rail Specialist, Paul Curry.

PSV Wipers Ltd., Navigation Road, Diglis, Worcester WR5 3DE Tel. +44 (0)1905 350 500 • sales@psvwipers.com PSV Wipers Ltd, Navigation Road, Diglis, Worcester WR5 3DE, United Kingdom www.psvwipers.com Tel. +44 (0)1905 350 500 sales@psvwipers.com www.psvwipers.com Photo reproduced under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license. Credit: eisenbahnfans.ch

Looking to lower your Life Cycle Costs? PSV can help.


8

Time to upgrade y

| NEWS

News in brief... Huge interest from construction companies in Malaysia’s East Coast Rail Link Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia – Over one thousand engineering and construction companies in Malaysia have shown interest in the civil works contract for the East Coast Rail Link (ECRL) project. Construction began back in August on the peninsula spanning railway. China’s state-owned China Communications Construction Company (CCCC) has been appointed to build the railway. The total cost of the railway is $13 billion with China providing 85 per cent of that in the form of a loan from China Exim Bank. Darwis Abdul Razak, chief executive officer of the rail project owner Malaysia Rail Link (MRL), said in a statement that CCCC will shortlist the qualified subcontractors for tendering the infrastructure work packages in the ECRL project. ‘The enthusiasm shown by Malaysian contractors during the recent roadshow is a further endorsement to the project. We are optimistic that their firm support would facilitate the effective implementation of civil works for the rail alignment that stretches from Kota Bharu to Port Klang’ Darwis said. Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak highlighted the ECRL project in a budget announcement in October where he proposed a $61.5 billion budget for 2018. ‘The government is committed to implement fiscal consolidation measures and to ensure that the government’s financial position continues to be resilient, and debt level remains low in the medium and long-terms’ he said. Various work packages such as earthworks, formation works, drainage works, foundation works, building works and tunnelling are being subcontracted by CCCC to Malaysian contractors in line with the federal government’s commitment to support the involvement of local companies in the ECRL project. The strategic location of the two end points of the railway should secure a larger slice of regional trade as Kota Bharu is near the coast that borders the South China Sea and Port Klang looks out on the Malacca Strait, both of which are busy shipping lanes.

More at www.railprofessional.com

More news at www.railprofessional.com/news

Northrail project out: Philippines ... introducing PSV’s new National Railways North 2 in

rep

Manila, the Philippines – After years of arbitration, the Northrail project has come to a conclusion and will be rebranded as the Philippine National Railways (PNR) North 2. The Philippine government and China National Machinery Industry (Sinomach) were involved in a legal dispute after Sinomach sued the government for cancelling a contract. Sinomach had been contracted to build a railway that would connect Tutuban in Manila to Malolos, Bulacan, then on to Clark in Pampanga. ‘There is no more Northrail project. There will be [a new] rail project from Tutuban (Divisoria in Manila), the City of Malolos (Bulacan) and Clark (Pampanga)’ transportation secretary Arthur Tugade told inquirer.net. Northrail, a state owned agency that had made the original agreement with Sinomach, had spent almost $3 million on legal costs but avoided the $100 million penalty that Sinomach had originially been seeking. The agreement draws a line in the sand over the issues and frees up the government to pursue the new PNR North 2. ‘The PNR Manila to Clark railway project is expected to serve as a catalyst to decongesting Metro Manila, and at the same time bring growth to the regions north of the capital, particularly Central Luzon’ the Department of Transport said in a statement. Chinese companies are still involved in rail projects in the Philippines however, with China Railway Design (CRDC) designing the PNR South Long Haul, also known as Bicol Express. The Bicol Express is a 581 kilometre long railway which will terminate at the Port of Manila. Along with the CRDC doing the design work, the project is also being funded by a loan from China. ... introducing PSV’s new replacement system Japan is also involved in railway projects in the Philippines. It is funding a $7 billion subway in Manila and will be providing loans for the North-South Commuter Railway which is composed of the 38-kilometre long Tutuban to Malolos line also known as PNR North 1, the 69-kilometre Malolos to Clark New City or PNR North 2, and the 72-kilometre Tutuban to Los Banos, Laguna also known as PNR South Commuter.

Time • Armsto upgrade your wipers?

• Wiper blades • Motors (24v and 110v) • Linkage systems • Control switches • Components & spares Indonesia courts Japan and China as railway investment increases

Jakarta, Indonesia – Indonesia’s government is considering expanding the Jakarta LRT and offering China a role in an extended airport link as Japanese officials discuss their own railway projects. • Arms The government is currently working to a planned 42 kilometres of LRT lines connecting Jakarta with its satelliteblades cities. The route runs for 18.5 kilometres from east Jakarta to a town • Wiper called East Bekasi, the extension being discussed could see the line double in length to reach the • Motors (24v and 110v) town of Meikarta which issystems a further 20 kilometres east. • Linkage ‘We will soon conductswitches an integrated study with our deputy of infrastructure next week. • Control Then, we will discuss with the residents and landowners in the area [Bekasi regency], hopefully, • Components & spares Whether your trainssaid operate in maritime the heavy next month we are able to make a decision’ coordinating affairssnow ministerof Luhut Pandjaitan onthe the sidelines of an event in Meikarta in October. mountains, the heat of the desert, or the harsh Meanwhile president Joko Widodo met with former Japanese prime minister Yasuo Fukuda salty ofAssociation the coast... you need a wiper who is now chairman environment of the Japan Indonesia for Economy Cooperation. The Japanese system government is involved in two rail projects, the Jakarta-Surabaya medium-speed you can rely on. railway and the second phase the Jakarta MRT. Life Cycle Costs? PSV can help. Looking tooflower your

Time to upgrade your wipers? ... introducing PSV’s new replacement system

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We offer robustly engineered solutions for train At PSV, we’ve been developing and manufacturing Our m builders, and system upgrades for operators quality wiper systems for over 35(especially yearsthose (with 20 a high LCC onhighly experiencing original equipment). years experience working within the rail industry). and en At PSV, we’ve been developing and manufacturing Our manufacturing facility in Worcester also has a to me Looking to lower Life Cycle PSV can help. quality wiper systems for over 35your years (with 20 highlyCosts? experienced team of in-house designers Weexperience are a proud supplier to international OEM years working within the rail industry). and engineers who will work alongside you Whether your trains operate in the heavy snow of the mountains, the your heat of the desert, or the harsh salty to meet individual needs. train builders, fleet operators and fleet support If you’ We are a proud to international OEM you can environment of thesupplier coast, you need a wiper system rely on. builders, fleet operators and fleet support quality wiper If you’re looking to replace upgrade your wiper At train PSV, we’ve been developing and manufacturing systems for over 35 yearsor(with 20 years distributors. distributors. systems, we’re just aOEM phone callbuilders, away. fleet system experience working in the rail industry). We are a proud supplier to international train Whether your trains operate in the heavy snow of the mountains, the heat of the desert, or the harsh salty environment of the coast... you need a wiper system you can rely on.

operators and fleet support distributors. • Arms • Wiper blades • Motors (24v and 110v) • Linkage systems • Control switches • Components & spares

Why not discover the benefits of a PSV wiper system? Call us today and ask for our Rail Specialist, Paul Curry.

Why not discover the benefits of Call us today and ask for our Rail

PSV Wipers Ltd., Navigation Road, Diglis, Worcester WR5 3DE Tel. +44 350 500 • United sales@psvwipers.com PSV Wipers Ltd, Navigation Road, Diglis,(0)1905 Worcester WR5 3DE, Kingdom www.psvwipers.com Tel. +44 (0)1905 350 500 sales@psvwipers.com www.psvwipers.com Photo reproduced under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license. Credit: eisenbahnfans.ch


9 Time to upgrade your wipers? NEWS |

More news at www.railprofessional.com/news

JR Central launches app for overseas passengers to book Japanese bullet trains

... introducing PSV’s new replacement system Transportation minister Budi Karya Sumadi said the Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA) will make its final recommendations for the JakartaSurabaya railway project in November. On the same day it was announced that Indonesia may offer a project to construct an extended railway connecting Jakarta and West Java to PT Kereta Cepat Indonesia China (KCIC), a joint venture between an Indonesian company and a Chinese company. Budi Karya Sumadi said the extension will cover more than 63 kilometres and that the government is looking for new investors in the $6 billion project. The extended railway will link up with the 142 kilometre track from East Jakarta’s Halim Perdanakusuma Airport and connect to the new international airport being built in West Java, Kertajati International Airport.

Time to upgrade your wipers?

Tokyo, Japan – Japan has launched a new app that will allow passengers to book tickets and reserve seats for the Tokaido Sanyo Shinkansen. The app is in English and is available for download in the USA, Hong Kong, Singapore and Australia. Customers can use credit cards from one of those four countries or inside Japan to quickly and easily book seats and purchase Shinkansen tickets one month prior to departure. The booking system closes only four minutes prior to departure. The Tokaido Sanyo line runs from Tokyo to Hakata, stopping off at Fuji, Kyoto and Hiroshima along the way as well as 12 other stations.

... introducing PSV’s new replacement system

• Arms • Wiper blades • Arms • Motors (24v and 110v) • Wiper blades • Linkage systems • Motors (24v and 110v) • Linkage systems • Control switches • Control switches • Components & spares

Last December we reproduced a map of every proposed and operational railway in Southeast Asia by James Clark, editor of Nomadic Notes. James is back this year with an updated map that shows the ambitious rail growth the ASEAN countries are envisioning in the coming years.

• Components & spares

Looking loweryour your Life Life Cycle PSV cancan help. Looking to to lower CycleCosts? Costs? PSV help. Whether your trains operate in the heavy snow of

Whether your trains operate in the heavy snow of the mountains, the heat of the desert, or the harsh the mountains, the heat desert, or the harsh salty environment of of thethe coast... you need a wiper salty environment ofrely theon. coast... you need a wiper system you can system you can rely on.

At PSV, we’ve been developing and manufacturing for overand 35 years (with 20 At PSV,quality we’vewiper beensystems developing manufacturing years experience working within the rail industry).

quality wiper systems for over 35 years (with 20 years experience working within the rail industry). We are a proud supplier to international OEM

We offer robustly engineered solutions for train We offer robustly engineered solutions for train builders, and system upgrades for operators builders,those and experiencing system upgrades (especially a high for LCC operators on (especially those experiencing a high LCC on original equipment).

original equipment).

Our manufacturing facility in Worcester also has a Time to upgrade your wipers? highly experienced team of in-house designers Our manufacturing facility in Worcester also has a and engineers who will work you ... introducing PSV’salongside new replacement system highly experienced team of in-house designers to meet your individual needs.

and engineers who will work alongside you

We offer robustly solutions for train builders, andsupport system upgrades forIfoperators (especially those experiencing a train engineered builders, fleet operators and fleet you’re looking replace orneeds. upgrade your wiper to meet your to individual high LLCare ondistributors. original equipment). We a proud supplier to international OEM systems, we’re just a phone call away. Our manufacturing facility in Worcester also has a highly designers and engineers who will train builders, fleet operators and fleetexperienced support team of in-house If you’re looking to replace work alongside you to meet your individual needs.

or upgrade your wiper systems, we’re just a phone call away.

distributors.

If you’re looking to replace or upgrade your wiper systems, we’re just a phone call away.

Why not discover the benefits of a PSV wiper system? • Arms • Wiper blades Call us today and ask for our Rail Specialist, Paul • Motors (24v and 110v) Curry.

Why not discover the benefits of athePSV system? Why not discover benefitswiper of a PSV wiper system? Call us today and ask for our Rail Specialist, Paul Curry. PSV Wipers Ltd, Navigation Road, Diglis, WR5our 3DE, Rail UnitedSpecialist, Kingdom Call us today andWorcester ask for Paul Curry. • Linkage systems • Control switches • Components & spares

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INTERVIEW |

11

Air and rail cooperation Andrew Sharp spent 14 years as director-general of the International Air Rail Organisation (IARO), a world-wide group of organisations across the air and rail industry

T

he IARO has a specific interest in rail links to airports. Andrew retired in 2012 and is now the organisation’s policy adviser.

What do you do in your role at the International Air Rail Organisation? I produce our weekly newsletter, IARO Express, which contains five stories about the airport rail industry world-wide. It is published every Thursday. I try to write up one item from the UK, one from the rest of Europe, one from North America and two from elsewhere in the world, although it isn’t always possible. I also keep our database of rail links to airports up to date. 245 airports have one or more types of rail link, and more are opening! My list of actual and planned links exceeds 1,100. How did you first get involved in the industry? I have always worked in the rail industry. Privatisation of British Rail ended my job with them: I was working with Heathrow Airport

on the Heathrow Express at the time and the first managing director of Heathrow Express suggested I form an organisation to bring together people worldwide interested in rail links to airports. I ran the organisation for nearly 20 years as director general, stepping down to become Policy Adviser in 2012. What do you define as successful air-rail cooperation? Where the railway meets the needs of the airport (in terms of service to passengers and employees), and where both work together to mutual benefit. Which areas of Asia Pacific are of greatest interest to the IARO? At the moment, China, Malaysia and Indonesia. I was very impressed by the new link to Medan airport in northern Sumatra and look forward to seeing it again when the route upgrade is completed. What do you think about projects like the


12

| INTERVIEW

Kuala Lumpur – Singapore high-speed train and the impact it will have on air travel in Malaysia and Singapore? I regret that it will not serve KLIA, although I understand the reasons. I think it will considerably reduce air traffic on the route, to the benefit of the environment and passengers. Developing countries like Cambodia and Myanmar are rehabilitating their rail networks, at what stage do you think these countries need to consider a dual strategy for air and rail? Air and rail should each do what they do best – air covering long distances, crossing bodies of water or mountains, and rail carrying people and goods over distances of 600 – 1,000 kilometres. This economic imperative should be considered when upgrading transport links, in the interests of efficiency. On a 600-kilometre flight, half of the fuel loaded is used for takeoff and landing: this is not efficient. The Hong Kong Airport Express is one of the most popular air-rail links in the world in terms of passengers carried, what makes it so successful?

MTR does everything well and the Airport Express is no different. From the design of the airport interface (no changes of level for arriving or departing passengers) to the downtown check-in service at Central and Kowloon, it’s all done well. And the Octopus Card is just the icing on the cake. It has carried 200 million passengers since it started in 1998: its nearest competitors are Heathrow Express and Airport Express Oslo, which have both carried 100 million. Does Hong Kong do things differently to Heathrow? The airport express at Heathrow is owned by the airport: this has advantages in terms of cooperation. The one in Hong Kong is owned by the transit authority, which has other advantages in terms of cooperation!

Which other cities in Asia Pacific do you think are capable of achieving similar success? Any city with a reasonable volume of air traffic and an airport 20-60 kilometres from the city it serves – as long as there is the will and the imagination to make it work. Asia has a few records in different areas, the Shanghai Pudong airport express is the fastest in the world at 225 kph and the Narita Express is the longest in the world at 66 kilometres. The Bangkok Airport Link which connects Bangkok’s largest airport with the city’s MRT and Skytrain lines is the cheapest in the world at just $0.08 per kilometre. With high-speed rail dominating the agenda for railways in the coming decades, what strategies can airlines and air-rail networks adopt? It’s interesting to see the growth in high-speed rail stations at airports, especially in China. In a few places, this has led to successful airrail code-shares – to mutual advantage. The ‘trunk haul’ – for example, New York to Paris – is done by air: the short connecting journey (Paris to Lille) is done by high-speed train. This benefits the environment as long haul flights have lower emissions: it also frees up slots at congested airports and improves airlines’ bottom-lines as the profit margin from long haul flights is larger. This has also resulted in low-cost carriers flying further instead of only trying to compete with the new high-speed rail networks that will attract passengers making short and medium length journeys. What are the benefits of joining the IARO? Membership is open to companies, organisations and academic institutions with an interest in air-rail activities from all over the world. It gives access to a unique network with information and ideas about what works – and, just as important, what doesn’t!

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CONSULTING |

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Why organisational culture matters Recent major rail incidents have caused considerable harm to people, property and reputations

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hen the derailment of 32 train cars of a freight train took place in Belford county, USA in August this year, preliminary investigations indicated that crew members mistakenly operated the train with the air brakes applied to several cars. Last month, the Singapore metro system faced more than 20 hours of service delays. Initial investigations found that service disruption was caused by malfunctioning water pumps which led to flooding in a tunnel. On the surface, it would seem that these incidents were caused predominantly by human error. Delving deeper, would evidence support these initial findings? Holding it all together Oftentimes slips, mistakes, lapses and violations are attributed solely to human error, but this is rarely a complete picture of the facts. There are latent causes: complexity of tasks, external distractions, poor procedures, poor training, poor capabilities and other complex organisational factors that lie beneath the surface. A reoccurring reason for incidents is weak integration of the very things that smooth operations rely on: the human element, systems and procedures. These three factors need to come together, using organisational culture as the ‘bonding’

agent. Good organisational cultures enable seamless interaction, poor cultures create barriers. After the incident: avoiding pitfalls A typical reactive response to incidents is to identify and penalize the people involved. This is a flawed approach as it inadvertently creates a culture of blame and triggers undesirable events. Employees will be tempted to cover up minor mistakes to avoid punishment. This in turn will create a poor safety culture, making the organisation vulnerable to larger and more dangerous safety incidents. When things do not go according to plan, it is far more valuable for any organisation to review its organisational culture to understand underlying issues, rather than penalizing individuals. Another typical action after incidents is the launch of investigations and audits to identify the weaknesses in procedures or systems. These often recommend process and system revamps, adding more checklists and steps to an already complex situation. Facing a procedural quagmire, employees respond by using short cuts to achieve their tasks. There is no argument that it is beneficial to identify the weaknesses in procedures and system, but it is equally important to identify aspects of organisational culture that are preventing employees from following existing

A reoccurring reason for incidents is weak integration of the very things that smooth operations rely on: the human element, systems and procedures. These three factors need to come together, using organisational culture as the ‘bonding’ agent. Good organisational cultures enable seamless interaction, poor cultures create barriers

procedures and systems effectively and efficiently. The constructs of organisational culture The collective values, procedures, norms, traditions, beliefs and perceptions within an organisation are all latent factors that make up the organisational culture. To create a productive, effective culture, it is necessary for any organisation to assess its current situation, and uncover and understand why things are done in the way they are done. Without any mechanism to monitor organisational culture, problems will only become visible when something goes wrong. Another key factor affecting organisational culture is the country in which the organisation is established, causing an additional layer of complexity Rail Professional


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| CONSULTING

What we learned: • Human error is only the tip of the organisational iceberg • Latent, or hidden, factors are the patchwork of work culture. Culture is the glue that holds together the systems, processes and people that make up an organisation. • Organisations need better responses to incidents to avoid further fuelling a poor safety culture, which could involve blaming, taking short cuts and eventually lead to larger and most harmful incidents • Organisational Culture Assessment brings latent issues to surface, showing the strong and weak cultural elements • A robust approach to culture assessment and management brings widespread benefits, impacting profit, cost savings, employee engagement and organisational reputation

• developing a diagnosing method • identifying improvement actions • implementing those identified actions. This cycle will repeat at a frequency defined by the organisation to assess the organisational culture and keep track of the effectiveness of the improvement efforts. What good organisational culture looks like The most immediate benefit of an organisational culture assessment is that it provides a snapshot of the organisational culture, showing strong and weak cultural elements. With this snapshot, the organisation is able to focus its efforts to improve weaker

safety in all levels of organisation. These discussions set effective strategic and tactical improvement objectives in terms of risk management, safety and operations. Positive organisational culture motivates employees to carry out their work with higher level of risk awareness, putting a stop to risky working methods and cornercutting, ultimately reducing the lost time to injuries and absenteeism. It also promotes increased employee acceptance of new or changed procedures, greater ownership of decisions, and improved retention rates. Reputation It is widely known that a robust approach to assessing and maintaining an open, safetyfirst organisational culture will result in decreased incident rates. The digital era has transformed smartphones into megaphones, adding decibels upon decibels to one voice. Any small incident will be posted to multiple social media platforms in a matter of seconds, damaging the hard-earned image of an organisation. Having fewer incidents and ensuring reliable operations will help organisations to meet customer expectations and gain higher level of recognition from the general public.

to global businesses. The renowned social psychologist Professor Geert Hofstede introduced several indices such as Uncertainty Avoidance (UAI), Power Distance (PDI) and Masculinity (MAS) to describe the culture of a country. Individuals in countries with low UAI, such as Singapore (8) and Hong Kong (29), would often take risky/ challenging decisions compared to the individuals from countries with high UAI such as Japan (92) and France (86). Organisations in high PDI countries would exhibit stronger hierarchy compared to the organisations in low PDI countries. Stronger hierarchy would suppress open discussions which could hinder safety communication in an organisation. However, if the organisational culture is carefully tailored, it can create a sub culture which could overcome these effects or the culture of a country.

Positive organisational culture motivates employees to carry out their work with higher level of risk awareness, putting a stop to risky working methods and cornercutting, ultimately reducing the lost time to injuries and absenteeism. It also promotes increased employee acceptance of new or changed procedures, greater ownership of decisions, and improved retention rates

Assessment and management Having a mechanism to assess its organisational culture allows an organisation to effectively focus its improvement efforts on the elements yielding the greatest improvements to the organisational culture. As any other periodical assessment method, organisational culture is cyclical. The frequency of assessment will depend on the magnitude of the issues related to organisational culture and the safety and risk commitment of the organisation itself. The assessment cycle includes: • setting up a health check and decisionmaking system

elements and promote a proactive approach to safety and risk management. With time and persistence, safety and high-performance operations become everyone’s responsibility.

Savings and profits Good organisational cultures can produce financial gains by decreasing the costs of incidents, compensations, service delays and lost working days.

An engaged workforce Collaboration among staff across seniorities and effective and efficient communication has become the essence for safe and reliable operation in a highly automated working environment such as modern railway systems. A good organisational culture stimulates open communication about risk and

Dr Thilina Weerasinghe, senior consultant at BMT, is a Human Factors expert with experience in Safety Climate assessment related activities for the rail, product design and power sectors. His areas of expertise include Human Factors & Ergonomics, Human Centred Design, Design Thinking, Product Design and Human Factors training to clients of different technical backgrounds.

Rail Professional


First Class 385 trains, with interiors designed by DCA, completed at Newton Aycliffe factory


ROLLING STOCK |

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Moving Malaysia – the role of rail in economic growth The development of a well-maintained transportation network is becoming synonymous with a country’s economic growth and competitiveness

T growth.

his article looks at aspects of Malaysia’s investment in rail transportation from a supplier perspective as an important factor in achieving economic

Shift in modal connectivity Private cars are a convenient, popular mode of transportation in Southeast Asia but create increased road congestion and pollution which is worsened by rapid urbanisation. Faced with these issues, trends in public policy have been shifting towards more sustainable forms of public transport to improve mobility and services, also supporting growth and competitiveness. Malaysia is one country at the forefront of developing its integrated public transportation network to provide a peoplecentric, reliable and sustainable system, including through a high level of investment in rail. Malaysia’s transformation programme The government of Malaysia has foreseen that developing urban mobility will support its ambition to transform the country into a high-income economy by 2020. Its Government and Economic Transformation Programmes, announced in 2010, include plans to develop the country’s urban transit network and boost rural connections. This has been driven since then by the Land Public Transport Commission (known as SPAD) with one part of its longterm vision to increase public transport modal share in urban areas to 40 per cent by 2030. In addition, major investment is underway to improve public transportation infrastructure across the densely-populated and growing Greater Kuala Lumpur (GKL)/ Klang Valley area including through rail projects such as the new Klang Valley Mass Rapid Transit (KVMRT) and expansion of existing monorail and light rail transit lines. Fast forward to today and this investment in rail is starting to have an impact. The capacity and reach of the KL’s LRT has been increased through new extensions and investment in the vehicle fleets and in 2017, full operation started on Line 1 of the new KVMRT. And Bombardier

Transportation, with its well-established presence in Malaysia and range of global solutions, is playing a significant part to boost this connectivity. Partnership for sustainable transportation Bombardier’s role in Malaysia began in 1992 as lead supplier for the 27-kilometre Kuala Lumpur Sri Petaling and Ampang Lines, formerly known as Sistem Transit Aliran Ringan (STAR) and now operated by RapidKL, which started revenue service in 1996. In addition, the BOMBARDIER INNOVIA APM 100 transit system has run at Kuala Lumpur International Airport since 1998 and, in 2004, Bombardier delivered 20 Blue Tiger Locomotives, for freight and express trains, to the Malaysian National Railways KTMB. During the 1990s, the 29-kilometre Kelana Jaya LRT, Malaysia’s first fullyautomated, driverless metro entered service in time for the 1998 Commonwealth Games, linking the western and eastern suburbs with Kuala Lumpur’s downtown core. A Bombardier Consortium supplied an INNOVIA ART 200 advanced rapid transit system for the line which included all of

the electrical and mechanical equipment, vehicles and services. According to Prasarana Malaysia Berhad, responsible for upgrading Malaysia’s public transport services, the line had become the busiest line on the KL network by January 2017, moving up to 254,854 passengers daily, with passenger demand expected to surge further. As a result, enhancements are being implemented to the line which have included an LRT extension programme to connect the Kelana Jaya and Ampang Lines as well as upgrades to the fleet. Rail Professional


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| ROLLING STOCK

Bombardier continues to support Prasarana, delivering 14 additional vehicles to the Kelana Jaya Line since 2009 and a latest order for 27 INNOVIA Metro 300 trains to be delivered by 2022. Operating with the new trains, the line can carry up to 30,000 passengers per-hour, per-direction, and ridership has increased by 26 per cent since early 2017, after the first new vehicle started operation. Whilst the INNOVIA Metro 300 trains are designed and largely constructed in Kingston, Canada, interior fit-out and final completion is carried out in Malaysia, at the Westport facility of the Bombardier Hartasuma Consortium. Further to support the rising ridership due to extension of the line, Bombardier is also adding value to the life cycle of the train fleets by refurbishing the original trains. The Bombardier Hartasuma consortium is converting the original two-car trains to a four-car configuration with inter-car walkthrough which will increase passenger capacity and comfort, to be completed by 2020. Spanning the value chain Kuala Lumpur is not stopping at upgrading existing lines and the new Klang Valley MRT is one of the largest transport infrastructure construction projects in Malaysia, adding three new lines to KL’s network to connect new areas of the city. Bombardier, working with local partner Global Rail, is equipping the first two new lines of the system with its fully-automated, driverless CITYFLO 650 communicationsbased train control (CBTC) technology. The 51-kilometre Sungai Buloh-Kajang (SBK) Line 1 began full operation in July 2017 serving a corridor of an estimated 1.2 million residents. The system features a centralised control centre system and advanced radio-based communications. Driverless trains operate with a peak-time frequency of less than three and a halfminute intervals and at speeds of just under 100 kph and passengers can cross the capital in under 90 minutes. With a final targeted ridership of 400,000 passengers, the new line has the potential to remove 160,000 vehicles from the road. Since 2016, Bombardier and Global Rail are also equipping the 52.2-kilometre Sungai Buloh-Serdang-Putrajaya (SSP) Line 2 with the solution. Reflecting its range of rail systems in 2012, Bombardier provided its onboard signalling technology for KL’s existing ‘KTM Komuter’ cross-city routes which initially started service in 1995. The BOMBARDIER EBI Cab 2000 solution was installed on 52 new six-car EMU trains, which are being gradually rolled out to upgrade services on the two commuter lines that connect major residential and shopping areas across the metropolitan area. Of course, Bombardier’s product range extends further with its solutions ranging across monorail, heavy metro, automated Rail Professional

people mover, light rail and advanced rapid transit vehicles and systems, as well as commuter, regional, intercity and highspeed trains and locomotives. All of which can integrate seamlessly into a multi-mode transport infrastructure, ready to address continuing demands for efficient and ecofriendly transport. Focus on infrastructure management In addition, as operators become more forward-looking, there is an increasing demand to use digitalisation to boost performance of existing and aging rail infrastructures, as many networks are being stretched to the limit. This is an area where suppliers will continue to add benefit, as seen by Bombardier’s growing portfolio of technologies designed to provide new tools to increase overall infrastructure management and efficiency. With the latest BOMBARDIER OPTIFLO rail control services solution, Bombardier can capture real time information and big data from railway signalling systems for analysis. The EBI Tool Maintenance Diagnostic Centre is designed to allow real time prediction of failures among rail

assets and helps identify improvement opportunities in system performance. With the ORBITA Fleet Monitor, data can be collected and evaluated on the use of individual vehicle components, thus significantly improving life cycle costs. All these tools offer customers various modules to maintain their entire infrastructure across the entire value chain. Building the future together With the ever growing demand to deliver integrated and reliable mobility solutions to better connect people, public rail transportation has a vital role to play. In addition, the value of a long-term and well established partnership between rail system operators and system suppliers can be seen. Malaysia has the vision to see the benefit of an integrated rail network to support economic development and Bombardier Transportation can contribute along the value chain to ensure truly integrated mobility, helping Malaysia to meet its plan to ensure enjoy a seamless journey by 2030. Article by Ahmad Marzuki Ariffin of Bombardier Transportation.


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Photo reproduced under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license. Credit: eisenbahnfans.ch


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| SAFETY & SECURITY

The future is driverless Today, driverless trains are speeding more passengers to their destinations in major metro systems throughout the world

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ith 55 fully automated metro lines in 37 cities around the world, there has been increase in track length of better than 14 per cent over the 2014 figures, and the forecast is that by 2025 there will be over 2,300 kilometres of automated metro lines in operation. True driverless metro operations are defined as being GoA4 (Grade of Automation four) systems, in which trains are able to operate fully automatically at all times, including door closing, detecting obstacles and responding correctly to emergencies.   There tends to be a public belief that driverless trains are a very recent development, but they were actually introduced in the 1980s. The Port Island Line in Kobe, Japan, started operations in 1981, followed in 1983 by the Lille Metro in northern France. This was Europe’s first ever driverless metro, and today it runs over a 45 kilometre long route, with 60 stations. Since then, there is increasing public awareness of autonomous train operations, as a growing number of city networks in Asia embrace true driverless systems, with trains that run automatically with no need for any onboard staff. The newly opened Hong Kong South Island Line, the Singapore Circle Line and the Shanghai Line 10 are all managed from a control centre by remote technologies, from CCTV cameras and onboard sensor technology.  

The aspirations of commuters, too, are evolving. They want their metro to provide increased reliability and frequency, with a more comfortable and efficient ride and greatly improved provision of information

Rail Professional

Factors leading towards driverless metro systems Urban transport has always faced a unique set of challenges. Asia’s growing population and increasing need for mobility have created an urgent need for efficient, reliable and sustainable public transport systems that will not contribute to pollution and climate change. The solution to the challenge of moving huge and increasing numbers of people around major cities has been the mass transit rail network – known variously as

the metro, tube, subway or MRT. Mass transit authorities are increasingly viewing the driverless metro as a relevant solution to these challenges, as an intelligent, sustainable and greener transportation system. The aspirations of commuters, too, are evolving. They want their metro to provide increased reliability and frequency, with a more comfortable and efficient ride and greatly improved provision of information. Operators, in turn, want to satisfy their customers at the best possible price. They


SAFETY & SECURITY |

With contracts in such cities as Singapore, Riyadh, Shanghai, and Dubai, as well as in France, we aim to play an active role in this important new transportation technology – especially as we see a pickup in the implementation of metro systems across Southeast Asia think in terms of total cost of ownership, and they must also address one new challenge. Cybersecurity The benefits of a driverless system are endless. Most important is its ability to provide increased line capacity. Driverless systems optimise the running time of trains and increase the average speed of the system, allowing trains to run more frequently. For example, the Moscow Metro operates at a frequency of 90 seconds, with up to nine million passengers using the train on a daily basis. In Asia, the potential for such capabilities is tremendous. At the same time, reduced operation costs by controlled energy consumption allows operators to optimise deployment of their resources. As no driver is required, these experienced resources can be trained

as service employees on platforms, providing extra security and general passenger assistance. Understandably, one key barrier to public acceptance is the perception that a train without a human driver is less safe. Isolated cases have occurred in various places where the intervention of a human driver has prevented an accident, but on metro networks that have been specifically designed to host driverless trains, the evidence suggests that safety records are excellent. Using a driverless radio Communication-Based Train Control (CBTC) system as well a secure communication network for security and other subsystems including public address and passenger information equipment, fulfils the highest security and safety standards. The technology also offers an advantage during emergencies, since train service can

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be resumed via a reset of the train from the operations control centre. With none of the fanfare surrounding the rather patchy introduction of autonomous cars, driverless mass transit systems are being increasingly adopted around the world. Examples include the automated systems in operation in Barcelona, Budapest, Paris, Singapore and Shanghai. Alstom recently supplied the Hong Kong MTR South Island Line (SIL) with the signalling system, track works, overhead line electrification and traction and Train Control Management System. The SIL is Hong Kong’s first driverless subway train, a high level of reliability and greater train frequency, which is essential for big-city metros like Hong Kong. Hong Kong’s MTR is just one of the world’s driverless mass transit systems that is utilising Alstom’s technology and solutions. With contracts in such cities as Singapore, Riyadh, Shanghai, and Dubai, as well as in France, we aim to play an active role in this important new transportation technology – especially as we see a pick-up in the implementation of metro systems across Southeast Asia. Jean-Francois Beaudoin is senior vice president of Alstom, Asia Pacific

DB Engineering & Consulting

Photo:Rejeesh Bhaskar / Tom Job

Railways for the world of tomorrow.

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DB Engineering & Consulting offers technically sophisticated and customized infrastructure, mobility and transport solutions. By offering sustainable solutions, we help to ensure the future success of business centers and make an important contribution to environmental protection, thereby shaping the world of tomorrow. www.db-engineering-consulting.com

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COTS safety technology and the digital railway The international rail market has great potential with above average growth rates predicted for the next three decades with an inclinination towards digital technology

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ithin this context, the industry is in the midst of a change from costly proprietary safety technology to open source, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) controllers that provide flexibility and cost saving for digital rail transport. More and more vital control processes are being implemented as cloud- or internetbased solutions. In the digital age, safety controllers form the basis for critical applications such as level crossings, rolling stock and interlocking. In addition, the interplay of safety and security is becoming increasingly important, and in the ‘Rail 4.0’ era, COTS controllers can be more flexible and more economical than proprietary safety technology. The question of which is preferable – proprietary safety technologies or standardized, COTS solutions – is currently a hot topic. COTS designates series production controllers, which are sold in large numbers and deployed in a variety of industry sectors. Thanks to the use of standard components, they are significantly less costly than proprietary systems, while at the same time fulfilling all important safety standards of the railway industry. The global market share of COTS controllers in safetyrelated electronic systems is expected to be about 25 per cent by 2020. COTS vs proprietary systems Historically, the railway industry was slow to change. It does not help that over recent decades, technological advancement has been relatively sluggish in the rail industry. Now, with the advent of digital technology resulting in lower costs for COTS, more stringent compliance requirements and the need for flexibility and scalability, there is a clearly visible trend toward COTS components as the new standard. Proprietary safety systems are developed and produced in small quantities. That makes them more expensive than COTS systems and it limits their application flexibility. After original equipment installation, users are ‘forced’ to procure follow-on systems from the same Rail Professional

manufacturer, which is often the control system supplier. By contrast, COTS systems are standardized, produced in large numbers and have a prior track record in numerous applications outside the railway industry. Using standard components gives railway operators flexibility in their choice of suppliers and allows them to select the best solution for each application, including safety technology. A decisive prerequisite for the digital railway era is the networking of a wide variety of systems for data exchange. Here as well, COTS safety controllers have an advantage over proprietary solutions because the interfaces of conventional systems are not standardized. That can make it difficult to integrate those solutions into existing heterogeneous automation architectures. Due to proprietary programming, in many cases only the controller manufacturer is able to carry out upgrades, updates and maintenance. By contrast, COTS controllers have operating systems that are based on globally available standard programming languages compliant with IEC 61131. They also support interfaces for all major communication protocols, including Ethernet, TCP/UDP, RS485, RS422, RS232 and CAN. Standard industrial protocols are used for communication.

Standardisation Many people come into contact with a safety controller during its long lifetime. They include hardware and software developers, operators and users – train drivers, maintenance staff, assessors, inspectors from approval agencies and commissioning technicians. Consequently, the system should be


SAFETY & SECURITY

With their modular structures, standard communication interfaces, and stringent safety compliance, COTS systems are easy to adapt to changing needs arising many years later as simple and intuitive as possible. The objective is to make it as easy as possible for all people who deal with vital matters every day to operate safely and reliably, and manage very complex machines such as railway vehicles. Reducing the complexity of safety systems also reduces the cost of training service employees. Presently many railway applications are an eclectic collection of proprietary technology, often consisting of several generations of equipment. This lack of

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standardization and modularity makes maintenance and system extensions both complicated and costly. Standardization and the widespread use of industry-standard programming languages compliant with IEC 61131 make COTS controllers easier to use and maintain, making operating and life cycle costs significantly lower in comparison to proprietary technology with the same level of safety. Due to the required long-term availability of safety controllers in rail transport, in part made necessary by the long useful life of rolling stock, future viability is an important evaluation criterion. The acceleration of adopting digital technology and ever-shorter innovation cycles increase the significance of this aspect. With proprietary technology, the cost of keeping the solutions constantly up to date is relatively high due to the small production volume. For users there is also a risk that the product may no longer be available for the next application. The standardization and widespread use of COTS systems will give users more planning security. That also applies to the availability of spare parts and software updates. Moreover, COTS controllers comply with the strict SIL 4 standard in accordance with CENELEC, the European Committee for Electro-technical

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Standardisation. With their modular structures, standard communication interfaces, and stringent safety compliance, COTS systems are easy to adapt to changing needs arising many years later. Indonesia joins the future Independent provider of smart safety solutions, HIMA, recently signed a strategically significant contract with Indonesian rail supplier PT Len Industri (Persero). The Indonesian company is state-owned and produces railway systems, including railway signal systems for the local rail industry. Under the contract HIMA is to upgrade the safety technology at 25 railway stations in Indonesia. A major factor in awarding the $2.1 million project to HIMA was that HIMA equipment uses open source communication architecture, making its controllers simple to integrate with other equipment and to configure. The open architecture allows PT Len Industri to seamlessly integrate HIMA’s technology with its own legacy systems and with technology from other vendors. Sedat Sezgün is head of rail at HIMA

Email: s.sezguen@hima.com Visit: www.hima.com

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Rail Professional


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Let’s talk about digital learning in rail Apple, Samsung, Huawei, Oppo and so many other companies sell their smart mobile devices and services to people in the Asia Pacific region

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he market is large and still growing. These devices are often used to facilitate learning, even if this is only a Google search type of self-learning. But could they also be used for a more formal learning about railways? The answer is obviously yes but the real question is why isn’t this already happening? Barriers One of the problems is that education system in general is still very rooted in a paper based learning. Kids at school might get an hour or two a week on an iPad (my daughter certainly does!) but most of the learning involves a book supported by a duo of pencil and paper. There is some progress visible as more ‘edu apps’ and games appear to support maths or language skills. At a university level however, there are very few courses that offer digital or at least a blended (digital and analogue mix) form of rail education or training.

The University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign provides an online MS degree in civil engineering with a specialisation in railway transportation. WebRail in Australia offers rail industry training. UIC has been working on an online offer, too Rail Professional

What are the barriers to digital learning in rail? Is the technology mature enough? Or maybe it is a human factor that delays the education system from fully embracing the digital world? Free short courses Most likely the answer is more complex as digital learning requires relevant content presented in a userfriendly way. It would not be a problem to put a bunch of slides online and let students read them. It is a challenge to put a good quality complex course together, though. There are platforms that support such initiatives e.g. Coursera (www.coursera.org) or Future Learn (www.futurelearn.com) or EdX (www.edx.org). They offer online courses in English open to all individuals where a course provider (often a university) is presented with a set of tools and templates to start with. Whilst this forms the basis of a great idea, completion is still a long way off. Currently, EdX offers a course in railways (‘Railway Engineering: An Integral Approach’ by TUDelft) while the others have a few transport-related courses on offer only. Other models Here is where we realize that it is not just a lecturer, but a good media team that is needed to build and deliver such an online product with a variety of interactive tools, such as videos, audios, tests, slides, etc. This obviously costs time, money and effort. Luckily, the benefits of such courses are slowly being recognised as something worth investing in. An online education system called ‘High Speed Rail Learning System’ is being developed in the US as a prototype to encourage online railway education. The University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign provides an online MS degree in civil engineering with a specialisation in railway transportation. WebRail in Australia offers rail industry training. UIC has been

working on an online offer, too. More universities and training providers have also started developing online content for their prospective learners. Actions We should be demanding and expecting more online education in rail, and soon! If we are to educate the next generation of railway professionals, we should be using their language and their tools to facilitate their learning process. An online path of education looks unavoidable, so let’s start talking about digital education in rail. First, we start talking, next we start acting. Dr Anna Fraszczyk is a Visiting Professor at Mahidol University, UIC Railway Talents Ambassador and RailUniNet secretary

Email: anna.fra@mahidol.ac.th Visit: www.railtalent.org www.railtalent.org/what-it


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BUSINESS PROFILE |

29

Selection for Parliamentary Review Rail safety systems manufacturer Rowe Hankins has been selected to appear in the 2017 edition of the government publication that flagships the very best practice in British businesses

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he manufacturer, based in Greater Manchester, features alongside British prime minister Theresa May and a small number of outstanding organisations in the Parliamentary Review. Intended to celebrate excellence and to raise standards, it is sent to over half a million leading policymakers and businesses throughout the UK. The Review’s release is now a key fixture in the political calendar and the articles act as both a blueprint for success and a template for reform.

train and tram disasters in the future. Globally, Rowe Hankins exports its rail safety systems to 15 countries, including Intelligent Wheel Flange Lubrication (iWFL), an innovative system which increases safety and reduces the number of train and tram derailments caused by heavily worn track. The onboard dispensing system applies precise amounts of biodegradable lubricant and is engineered for both national rail networks and urban tram services. The iWFL system uses geographical location-based dispensing of flange lubrication. Its intelligent design senses the location and intensity of track curves using a combination of GPS signals, speed and distance sensors. The unit processes the data and, only where required, applies lubricant precisely at each location. When used with the company’s Intelligent Top of the Rail Friction Modifier (iTORFM) it improves safety by reducing friction and rail wear.

In an article spread over three pages, Mike Hankins, managing director of Rowe Hankins, talks about the company’s commitment to the advancement of the rail industry. ‘It fills me with immense pride to be chosen to contribute to such an important document. Contributing to the Review has given me an opportunity to promote the vital importance of investing in innovative technology that improves safety and increases utilisation in rail operations. ‘Britain was once a world leader in the rail industry but is now falling behind the rest of the world as it continues to operate on outdated and less efficient technology. ‘The UK’s railway needs a champion at government level, who can support us to push through change. It should not need nationalisation of the railways for Britain to be working to the same standards as our European and international counterparts’ he said.

Return on investment The eco-friendly and cost-effective iWFL system is already in use on rail networks across Europe, and train operators are already seeing the financial benefits. It is Rowe Hankins’ strategic aim for iWFL to be standard amongst British rail operators. The company believes that British investment in iWFL will see a full return on capital expenditure in under 12 months, a significant saving, in the order of 10 to 15 per cent of total fuel cost alone. The onboard system lasts for the average life of a train, approximately 30 years. The benefits include a significantly reduced wheel noise screech levels and rail wear, and an extension to wheel life by up to 50 per cent, when compared with a non-lubricated network. It also improves service and maintenance intervals, reduces down-time and costs, and most important, boosts fuel efficiency and safety.

Commitment to advancement Metal fatigue continues to be one of the main culprits in train and tram derailments. However, research shows that the use of intelligent wheel flange lubrication can increase safety and help to prevent further

Entering the Asia Pacific region In recent years, the global rail supply industry has enjoyed robust growth due to urbanisation and the shift in focus on sustainable transportation networks.

The Asia Pacific market has seen consistent growth and is a target area for the British company, which believes that the rise in the number of railway projects in the business region will increase the long-term demand for rail technologies that improve safety and increases utilisation in rail operations. A copy of the Parliamentary Review, which was officially launched in September, can be viewed by visiting www.theparliamentaryreview.co.uk/ editions/manufacturing-services/specialist Tel: +44 (0)161 7653005 Email: Deborah.Wilkinson@rowehankins.com Visit: www.rowehankins.com Rail Professional


BUSINESS PROFILE |

31

A fresh look for Virgin Trains East Coast When Virgin Trains East Coast took over the east coast franchise in 2015 it made the decision to refurbish and rebrand its fleet of trains

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ne of the particular challenges facing Virgin Trains East Coast was to select a flooring that was aesthetically appealing, compliant with all fire and safety standards, whilst being hardwearing and easy to clean. Forbo Flooring has the widest portfolio of flooring products for rail therefore could easily tick all of the boxes required. With an innovative approach, the project was completed within 18 months from initial design conception to installation. On this design-led project Virgin Trains East Coast used the skills of Charles Greenway, Atlantic Design director, and Graham Love from Atlantic Design who approached Forbo Flooring in 2015. Decision time Charles Greenway, Atlantic Design director, explained why the company chose Forbo Flooring over other options in the market: ‘Atlantic Design has worked with Forbo Flooring for many years, their willingness to listen and respond to our requirements has resulted in some excellent solutions for our clients.’

A total of 412 coaches, comprising of 30 nine-car MKIV Electric sets and 15 nine-car HST Diesel trains plus a number of spares vehicles underwent refurbished. The majority of the work on the electric fleet was undertaken and Bounds Green depot with the Diesel sets and some electric sets being done at Craigentinny depot

The project’s timescale spanned from June 2015 to January 2017 and the refurbishment took place at two depots – Edinburgh Craigentinny and London Bounds Green. Two fleets of long haul intercity vehicles comprised the project; Yellow Rail took care of floor installation for the work at London Bounds Green and TXM projects did the same at Craigentinny. A total of 412 coaches, comprising of 30 nine-car MKIV Electric sets and 15 nine-car HST Diesel trains plus a number of spares vehicles underwent refurbishment. The majority of the work on the electric fleet was undertaken and Bounds Green depot with the Diesel sets and some electric sets being done at Craigentinny depot. For any rail interiors project, compliance with stringent safety standards and easy cleaning characteristics are mandatory. However, design also remains a crucial element if passenger satisfaction is to be achieved. This is why Virgin Trains East Coast chose floor coverings that would ensure visual appeal, yet also satisfy passengers’ comfort levels which is paramount on longer haul journeys. Bryan Winslow, fleet materials and Rail Professional


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procurement manager at Virgin Trains East Coast commented: ‘We used Forbo Flooring as their floor coverings had been used in other Stage Coach Group projects, for example East Midlands Trains and we had heard good feedback. They could match our desired style and brand preferences.’ Product choices Tessera Alignment FR is a tufted multiheight loop pile carpet manufactured from 100 per cent solution dyed nylon 6.6 yarns. It was chosen because its composition means that the carpet is a cost effective and convenient alternative to wool-based flooring traditionally used in saloon carriage interiors.

Charles Greenway continued: ‘From a design and maintenance perspective the Tessera FR product is unique. When reviewing floor covering products for the Virgin Trains East Coast refurbishment, we took our client along to review the Tessera FR we had specified on the East Midland HST fleet six years earlier. It became clear that performance was exceptional, the original design being still vibrant and in excellent condition. ‘We required something new for Virgin Trains East Coast and the design and production team at Forbo worked patiently with us to develop the custom ‘velocity’ pattern with increased density along the aisle to hide wear. It was not a difficult decision to select Coral Duo FR for the entrance areas due to its unique highperformance and attractive appearance.’ Flooring technology With Coral Duo FR, passengers entering the train vestibule are met underfoot by a moisture-removing surface that helps to reduce wet and dry soiling from the soles of shoes and suitcases. It also helps to prevent premature wear and tear to interior floor coverings, which in turn minimises cleaning and maintenance costs. The way it is engineered also protects passengers by reducing slip hazards,

Times House, Bravingtons Walk, Regent Quarter London N1 9AW. Tel: +44 (0) 7042 9961 david.hiscock@rmf.co.uk www.rmf.co.uk

Rail Professional

especially important with the rail industry’s concerns to comply with DDA requirements. Forbo Flooring’s products are tested to withstand high volumes of traffic which is especially reassuring considering the dramatic increase in rail passenger numbers over recent years. With ridership predicted to continue to rise, flooring was chosen by Virgin Trains East Coast with longevity in mind. Bryan Winslow concluded: ‘We have no negative feedback and are extremely satisfied with the result. We are particularly pleased with the way in which Forbo dealt with any initial issues and the performance of the floor coverings has proven to be a success.’ Tel: +44 (0)1773 744121 Email: transport@forbo.com Visit: www.forbo-flooring.com/transport


BUSINESS PROFILE |

33

Big data and the commuter experience Digitalisation has demonstrated rich value in industries such as finance and real estate, but it has yet to make a significant impact in the ground transportation industry

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ig data analytics is the future of operational efficiency targeting improved passenger experience. Exponential growth and availability of data along with the latest digital technologies – big data and big analytics, machine learning, etc – open new ways towards more efficient operations, structured interactions between the various services, and addresses passenger expectations for more personalised services. Public transport’s challenges With the growth in urban population, there is an exponentially increasing demand for public transportation. Trains, buses, and other forms of transport are now experiencing bigger crowds of people and forcing mass transit system operators to deal with the consequences of it. A bigger mass of people often means altered efficiency. Large floods of people accompanied with rush hour overcrowding, delays, human error, and malfunctioning machines creates a plethora of unhappy customers having to choose between waiting in long lines and finding an alternate mode of transportation. Along with ridership growth, passenger expectations are increasing. Passengers now expect a more personalized experience with maximum comfort and ease. While operators are faced with all of these issues, they are also bounded by the constraints of existing aging assets and increasing operating costs. Operators’ current efforts in understanding their passengers involve manually counting passengers at a few particular stations only a fraction of the time on particular days. This method is costly, inaccurate and only provides a very limited understanding of the passenger journey patterns. It misses the variability between days or stations and the different perturbations that can occur in the network.

data analytics allow them to learn about passengers and their everyday patterns. By creating algorithms that analyse multiple data points like ticketing data, GSM, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and social media posts, they can better understand the everyday flow. More importantly, they can study the data to be more efficient and provide a better service. Unlike traditional surveys, with big data analytics, all real trips made by commuters are taken into account to ensure completeness and fact-based outputs. Armed with its digital services, Thales is shaping up to become a pioneer in the new digital era of the transport industry. As an example, Thales delivers the most up-to-date and accurate digital solution to one of the busiest urban rail networks in the world. Thales’ product Naia is delivered as a service for the Train Occupancy and Platform Analytics for MTR Network project in Hong Kong. With eleven railway lines and 93 stations, Hong Kong’s Mass Transit Railway (MTR) accommodates over five million passengers resulting in more than nine million data inputs each day.

Simplifying the complex The big data analytics platform Naia assesses the performance of the urban rail network by processing the data from the network delivering on a fifteen-minute interval the number of passengers per train, per platform and per station. It provides key performance indicators such as train occupancy, platform crowding, and waiting time or missed trains, enabling operators to study, plan and adapt the capacity of the lines and train services, ultimately giving riders a better commuting experience. The data is securely gathered and collected in what is called a data lake before being processed. With an accuracy level of 95 per cent, the journey of each single passenger is reconstructed anonymously to enable the computation of the key performance indicators. Not only can the transit operators use the data to better plan and operate its services, the data can also be used as a policy tool to create winwin situations for both themselves and the commuters, as well as a tool for marketing campaigns. Stephen Lau, manager for market

Big data analytics Transit operators are generating huge amounts of data and the latest digital solutions can make the data talk and create value for them. For instance, big Rail Professional


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analysis and planning at MTR, said: ‘Train occupancy and platform crowding analytics for MTR brings us a lot of useful train service information, which supports us in performance monitoring and service planning for our expanding network.’ Also, moving towards near realtime data analytics for prediction and passenger sentiments analytics, rail operators and passengers are ensured of a consistent, safe, and efficient experience every day. This advanced technology enables rail operators to maximize efficiency and safety by anticipating what the crowd would be and, hence, mitigating risk and inefficiency of human error, delays, and rush hour over-capacity. Direct benefits Better understanding the journey patterns allow any public transport agency to adapt its timetable, fare table, discount policy and transport resources. For instance, it can be materialized through a marketing campaign along the most crowded routes. Operators can also decide to better dispatch their staff where the crowd is and may need assistance. Routes and connection can be redefined. Passengers can also benefit from realtime accurate information on waiting times at the platform, or through their personal connected devices. Thanks to the direct communication channel between the operation and passenger information systems, any delay or change is communicated immediately, without any

operator intervention. In a nutshell, serving the passengers better is a direct causation of an increase in ridership and, therefore, the generation of additional revenue by capturing more customers. Digital services Technical solutions are not sufficient. Data science as well as new development techniques – design thinking, lean usability, fast prototyping through the concept of minimal viable product – demonstrate the importance of joint efforts between an industrial player such as Thales and the public transport operators. Iterative processes are what make big data analytics really meaningful to the users. Not only does Thales provide a solution at the beginning of a customer’s journey – it aims to be dedicated by being with the customer every step of the way. The flow of passengers, the way the passengers travel may be different, because there will be an event, there will be an opening of a new line, unforeseen circumstances. The solution has to be adaptive and customized through time. Instead of delivering the full functionality at the

beginning, the minimal scope covering user appeal, usability, reliability and functionalities is designed and developed in a short time, the prototype is presented to the users, their feedback is collected, fine-tuning applied to the prototype before expanding the scope of each component to deliver the desired solution. About Thales Thales is a global technology leader for the aerospace, transport, defence and security markets. With 64,000 employees in 56 countries, Thales reported sales of $17.6 billion in 2016. With over 25,000 engineers and researchers, Thales has a unique capability to design and deploy equipment, systems and services to meet the most complex security requirements. Its exceptional international footprint allows it to work closely with its customers all over the world. Technology driven by nature, Thales is inspired to meet its goals in four core digital technologies: connectivity, data analytics (including real time), artificial intelligence, and cyber security. Over the past two to three years, Thales has invested $1.2 billion to reinforce the group in these four core technologies. Recently, Thales launched a fully-fledged digital platform for industry-focused services called Digital Factory to cater to customers’ digital transformation in key markets. To further enhance its capabilities and establish its position in the world of big data, Thales also made a strategic move in the acquisition of the Silicon Valley big data analytics giant Guavus, with extensive experience in the telecommunications industry in the US. With a proven track record spanning more than 40 years in the rail industry, a detailed understanding of its customers’ activities and a broad portfolio of solutions and credentials, Thales has the expertise to meet the concerns of city authorities, with a particular focus on mobility. Tel: +852 39 16 87 87 Email: ludovic.lang@thalesgroup.com Visit: www.thalesgroup.com

Rail Professional


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RAIL PROFESSIONAL ASIA PACIFIC DECEMBER 2017  

RAIL PROFESSIONAL ASIA PACIFIC DECEMBER 2017

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