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ASSOCIATE AIA, AIAS

RAFAEL ANTONIO ARMENDARZ

UNDERGRADUATE ARCH.PORTFOLIO


RAFAEL ANTONIO ARMENDARZ, ASSOC AIA, AIAS

ACADEMIC WORK

SWENSON 51 Designing for the Entrepreneurial Journey from Start-up to Success................................................. ORIGEN MUSEUM RE-IMAGINED Exhibit Expansion....................................................................................... FRAME of MIND Material Investigation using Sampo-Gumi-Shikuchi .................................................................. SPATIAL SYSTEMS Exploration of 2D Patterns and 3D Space............................................................................. NARA COMMUNITY CAMPUS New Heart of a Rural Las Vegas Community.................................................... THE CITY STADIA The Next Generation of Stadium Design.................................................................................

PROFESSIONAL WORK

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DOWNTOWN NORTH LAS VEGAS LIBRARY Adaptive Re-Use.......................................................................... 55


ACADEMIC WORK

University of Nevada, Las Vegas School of Architecture 2014-2019


SWENSON 51 Designing for the Entrepreneurial Journey from Start-up to Success COURSE ::

AAE 380 Architectural Design I, Fall 2016 - Prof. David Baird

RECOGNITION :: 2017 AIAS National Design Excellence Award Featured in Vertex: a Compendium of Research and Design, a compilation of student work at the UNLV School of Architecture

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The ethnographic research has a huge impact on the final product... Exterior renderings are wonderful, can give a vibrant picture of how the building relates to the context... As far as design and graphics- they were communicated very clearly! ... b ​ ench​becomes a w ​ all​, becomes the ceiling! Very ​​ well executed... - AIAS 2017 Honor Awards Jury


“Swenson 51” is a business incubator that focuses on empowering entrepreneurs through building their professional network. While incubators usually focus on setting up infrastructure, the most successful are those that emphasize institutionalized networking. This model was selected to capitalize on the positive business environment created in Las Vegas through favorable tax incentives as well as the site’s proximity to three of the city’s major economic influences: McCarran Airport, the Strip, and UNLV.

this, the building is bifurcated into two zones. The entrepreneurial journey starts in the subterranean incubator, the primary work space, which is designed to facilitate collaboration internally among the entrepreneurs. As the entrepreneur journeys to the surface, they find themselves in the most prominent physical feature, the “Networking Chamber.” This event space serves the business’ primary function, to grow the user’s professional network. This creates a processional form that reflects the entrepreneur’s own journey from start-up to success, celebrating the Swenson 51’s design was derived to encourage points many interactions and connections made along the of interaction between the users. To accomplish way.

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Final Form 07


Bifurcation

Addition

Subtraction

Collision

Movement

Push+Pull

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Basement Plan (Incubator) 0

20’

60’

Level 1 Plan (Lobby)

Level 2 Plan (Networking Chamber)

Level 3 Plan (Networking Chamber) 09


Networking Chamber Typical Section Perspectives 10


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Atrium Section

(by Rafael Armendariz)

ORIGEN MUSEUM RE-IMAGINED Exhibit Expansion COURSES :: PARTNER ::

AAE 382 Architectural Design II, Spring 2017 - Prof. David Baird; Prof. Steven Clarke ABS 322 Construction Technology II, Spring 2017 - Prof. Eric Weber Nick Goodman

RECOGNITION :: Featured in Vertex: A Compendium of Research and Design, a compilation of student work at the UNLV School of Architecture

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The OriGen Museum – an existing museum located within the Las Vegas Springs Preserve – suffers from insufficient space and a constricting layout that makes for an arduous exhibit turnover process. Due to site constrictions, expansion beyond the existing footprint would be difficult; however, the ceilings are 30-35 feet high, allowing for expansion to be vertical through a “cat-walk-like” second level deck. The new second level would house the museum’s permanent exhibits, including fossils and artifacts, allowing the entire first floor to be opened up as flexible exhibit space.

glulam beams with plate steel reinforcement allow the existing cast-in-place walls to supply most of the support while steel cables tie into the ceiling structure above that was already designed to support hanging exhibits.

After working collaboratively to design and layout the expansion, Rafael served as the primary 3D modeler, handling most of the axonometric graphics and perspective renderings. Both partners’ prior experience in fabrication allowed them to co-produce the mockup. Rafael’s experience in the wood shop allowed him Materials were chosen to complement a palate to be the primary fabricator of the glulam beams and consisting primarily of natural finishes utilized by deck while working with Nick Goodman on the steel the OriGen and the Springs Preserve. Heavy timber fabrication.

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0

20’

60’

Proposed 2nd Level Expansion 15

(by Nick Goodman and Rafael Armendariz)


Deck Expansion Exploded Axon

(by Rafael Armendariz)

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Construction Mock-Up Detail 17

(by Rafael Armendariz)


Fabrication Photos 18


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Completed Mock-Up

(photographs by Nicholas Goodman)

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FRAME of MIND Material Investigation using Sampo-Gumi-Shikuchi COURSE :: PARTNER ::

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ABS 321 Construction Technology I, Fall 2016 - Prof. Eric Weber Nguyen Pham


(photographs by Nguyen Pham)

“Frame of Mind” explores the material qualities of wood through a composition of linear and planer elements confined to a 16x16x16 volume. The ancient Japanese “Sampo-gumi-shikuchi” joint was used to construct a frame that would suspend interconnected wood boards, varying in size, to frame different views from all six sides. The joint was selected because its complexity contrasts it’s modest and unassuming appearance. The joint hides the intersection between the three linear elements allowing the focus of attention to be the view that is framed. The boards are configured in two separate masses that are cantilevered from opposite corners of the frame. The

two masses converge on the center, suspended just beyond the other’s reach, creating the illusion that the entire configuration is interconnected. The result is a sculptural piece that provides the viewer a different experience from all sides of the cube. After collaboratively designed the concept, Rafael took the responsibility of developing the final composition through 3D modeling software to test its viability and laying out the pieces in the order by which they are assembled. Once this process was complete, the Rafael and Nguyen produced multiple iterations of the project until the complex joint had been perfected.

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SPATIAL SYSTEMS Exploration of 2D Patterns and 3D Space COURSE ::

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AAE 280 Design Fundamentals II, Fall 2015 - Prof. Shai Yeshayahu


“Spatial systems” was developed through the application of a unique order of parameters to two-dimensional grids that would produce threedimensional spaces. These parameters and the corresponding grids became the only constraint to the design process as it was through the composition of both that the space received its shape and structure. This forced the designer to think with both creative and mathematical precision to investigate how the space would play with light, shade, and shadow.

progression where a grid was developed through different card-stock study models that were then tested with various systems of folding to produce a desired volumetric. The final design was based on an abstracted version of the traditional origami reversefold method. Through cutting, folding, manipulating, and reattaching elements along the “zig-zag” grid an undulating form was created that varied in scale, moving from a large, open volume to a smaller, more intimate space

This process lent itself to an intensely investigative

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Original Grid & Final Form 25


Select Study Models

Final Iteration

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North Elevation and Plan 27


Section A-A

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NARA COMMUNITY CAMPUS New Heart of a Rural Las Vegas Community COURSE :: PARTNER ::

LAND 480X Option Studio, Spring 2018 - Prof. Steven Clarke Destanee Cook

RECOGNITIONS :: 2018 AIA Nevada Design Honor Award - Academic Category 2018 AIAS National Design Excellence Award Published in the City of Las Vegas NARA Rural Neighborhood Plan report

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The project is beautifully scaled and full of good intentions. It offers a different type of place within a rural landscape with it’s modest, compounded, simple forms. The package itself is clear, well executed and compelling. More than recognizing that it could be built, we note that we would like to see it built. - AIA Nevada 2018 Design Awards Jury


NARA Corner

The Northwest Area Residents Association (NARA) is a proud community that embraces its rural roots and character. For decades, much of real estate along the northern stretch of the Tonopah Highway has been defined by large, open land and horse property. Despite its recent designation as rural preservation land, NARA has faced encroachment from developers who see the opportunity for strip malls, business parks, and tract housing. How do we the protect Las Vegas communities, rich in culture and rural character, from urban sprawl and subdivision development? This challenge was the driving force behind the design of the “NARA Community Campus,” a concept that embraces the

(by Rafael Armendariz)

open space that makes rural communities like NARA unique from urban and suburban neighborhoods. Drawing inspiration from a three-day community design charrette, the campus emerges as a physical representation of the community, thus solidifying NARA’s place in the fabric of Las Vegas culture and becoming a beacon for attracting new families to ensure its survival for generations to come. After developing the master plan and design language collaboratively, Rafael’s primary role in this project was to design “NARA Corner” – the library, café, meeting space, and plaza at the corner of the Alexander Ln. and Tuffer Rd – as well as the community’s recreational center.

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Community Design Charette 31

(photographs by Kiresten Clarke)


Programming and Site Analysis

(by Rafael Armendariz)

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LEARNING SPACE+ AMPHITHEATER RECREATION CENTER

CAFE

NARA PLAZA

Progamming Diagram 33

(by Rafael Armendariz)


LIBRARY MAKERSPACE

NARA MEETING + ADMINISTRATIVE SPACE

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Makerspace 35

(by Destanee Cook)


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Recreation Center 37

(by Rafael Armendariz)


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THE CITY STADIA The Next Generation of Stadium Design COURSES :: HON 499 Honors Thesis, Fall 2018 - Prof. Glenn Nowak, Prof. Steven Clarke, Dr. Lisa Menegatos HON 498 Honors Thesis, Spring 2018 - Prof. Glenn Nowak, Prof. Steven Clarke, Dr. Lisa Menegatos RECOGNITION :: Received an “A” grade which translates into a distinction of “Summa Cum Laude” at graduation provided GPA remains a 3.7 or above.

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The stadium is one of the premier archetypes of entertainment and leisure that the built environment has to offer; however, the current model can be financially straining on the communities it becomes a part of, with limited usability and return on investment. The “City Stadia” was developed through an extensive examination and research into the archetype through the lens of stadium-urbanism. With Las Vegas, NV as the prototype city, the project utilizes the growing trend of public viewing to design a new generation of stadia that weaves cityscape and sportscape together. The stadium become is a multi-use complex in the

heart of Downtown Las Vegas, made up of towers that incorporate “city programming” – such as higher education and housing – while “stadium programming” is pushed into the city through the implementation of temporary public viewing stations in public parks and open space. This allows the stadium to expand and contract in response to public demand while the game itself exists at the epicenter where the lines between the city and the stadium are blurred. With this model, stadia cease to be massive, monofunctional objects within the city and become an active and productive components of the urban fabric.

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The CITY and the STADIUM (Current Archetype)

Break Apart the STADIUM

Push the STADIUM into the CITY

The CITY STADIUM (Next Generation)

City Stadia Concept Diagram 41

Pull the CITY into the STADIUM


PUBLIC VIEWING NORTH LAS VEGAS

CENTRAL STADIUM PUBLIC VIEWING SUMMERLIN

DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS

PUBLIC VIEWING LAS VEGAS STRIP

PUBLIC VIEWING UNLV

PUBLIC VIEWING HENDERSON

City Stadium Prototype - Las Vegas 42


LEARN TOWER

THE PAVILIONS AT WORLD MARKET

0

100’

East-West Section 43

300’


LIVE TOWER

PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE ACROSS UNION PACIFIC RR

BASEBALL DIAMOND

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Learn Tower (UNLV College of Fine Art) 45

0

25’

50’


Live Tower (Loft Apartments) 46


CULTURE TOWER

THE SMITH CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

0

100’

North-South Section 47

300’

SYMPHONY PARK

BAS


SEBALL DIAMOND

SPORT TOWER

WORK TOWER

FOOTBALL FIELD/SOCCER PITCH

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Culture Tower (Art Museum) 49

0

25’

50’


Sport Tower (Team Offices) 50


Work Tower (Office Space) 51

0

25’

50’


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PROFESSIONAL WORK

SH Architecture 2016-present


(base render by third party, edited by Rafael Armendariz)

DOWNTOWN NORTH LAS VEGAS LIBRARY Adaptive Re-Use CLIENT :: COMPLETION :: PROJECT TEAM ::

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City of North Las Vegas 2020 (Projected) Eric Roberts, AIA - Principle in Charge Danny McGinnis, Assoc. AIA - Project Manager, Designer Rafael Armendariz, Assoc. AIA, AIAS - Designer


Having long sat unnoticed in the shadow of the Strip and Downtown Las Vegas, the City of North Las Vegas’ blighted downtown core has become a neglected haven for crime, particularly along Lake Mead Blvd corridor. Seeing the need for redevelopment, the city developed a progressive master plan, dubbed the “Lake Mead Village West District,” to create a gateway into the downtown. The first project in this plan is the Downtown North Las Vegas Library, an adaptive reuse of an abandoned industrial building. The dilapidated property is to be transformed into a community hub that transcends traditional library programing to include a makerspace and career center. The adjacent

lot is to be developed as an urban park to complete what is to act as the catalyst of the entire master plan. Rafael’s role in the project carried on from initial schematics through final construction documentation. He worked with Danny McGinnis to layout the spaces before taking the responsibility of producing multiple design iterations using the layout and massing the two had created. The final concept featured an industrial palette of weathered and blackened steel, sealed concrete, natural wood, and exposed structure that would celebrate adaptive re-use in a city that is far too apt to demolish and start from scratch.

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Form Finding

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(by Rafael Armendariz)

Existing Building 57

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(photographed by John Ritz, edited by Rafael Armendariz)

R OO R IND TDOO U

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Programmatic Exploded Axon

(by Rafael Armendariz)

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View from Lake Mead Blvd. 59

(base render by third party, edited by Rafael Armendariz)


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Profile for Rafael Antonio Armendariz

Undergraduate Architecture Portfolio  

Selected works from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas B.S. Architecture Program (2014-2019) and professional work as a member of SH Archit...

Undergraduate Architecture Portfolio  

Selected works from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas B.S. Architecture Program (2014-2019) and professional work as a member of SH Archit...

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