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Fall ‘16 Issue 05

FAll ‘16 Issue 05 Ryerson Arts & Design Magazine //FASHION //PHOTOGRAPHY //DESIGN


Specializing in prepress and commercial printing t: 416-663-6703 • www.colourinnovations.com • sales@colourinnovations.com


EDiTor’s issue 05 note A leap of faith was taken by all last year when I was approached with an opportunity to be a part of the new and exciting team, student group, magazine, company, and family, known as RADmag. We were a dedicated group with enormous determination and passion that benefited greatly from a diverse spectrum of past experience. With this shift in management, an evolution in RADmag’s brand, structure, and magazine was inevitable. Change is good – it invigorates, it excites and it helps move us forward. Change requires passion and creativity, along with a heavy dose of openness and courage. This year at RADmag our motto was “CHANGE”; from the website and magazine design to the structure of the team, our goal was to maintain the RADmag legacy established by past editors and team members, while increasing the awareness and impact of RADmag as a public portal to the tremendous talent that exists in our faculty. This evolution of RADmag was bred out of the passion and desire to showcase the amazing work done by students within the Faculty of Communication and Design. The past year has resulted in a multitude of awards and recognitions within Ryerson, as well as extending more broadly throughout the greater Toronto area via our increased presence and involvement within the public community. I have been honoured to work alongside the amazing individuals of the RADmag team as well as people from Faculty of Communications & Design. My time with RADmag over the last year is something that I will never forget. I am certain that with the caliber of people and their work fostered and produced within the walls of Ryerson, RADmag will continue to succeed and surpass all expectations, inspiring all for years and years to come. Sincerely, Imogen Wallis-Mayer


ROSTER EDITORIAL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF IMOGEN WALLIS-MAYER MANAGING EDITOR GRAEME MONTGOMERY PHOTO EDITOR CONNOR REMUS INTERIOR DESIGN EDITOR ARTEMIS HAN INTERIOR DESIGN EDITOR SIDNEY TSAO

ADMIN

VIDEOGRAPHER EMMA ROBINSON

PUBLISHER ANUM SYED

WEB EDITOR DYLAN FREEMAN-GRIST

ADVERTISING & DISTRIBUTION MANAGER DARCI JONES

CONTENT CREATOR SASHA DOWNIE-ROSS CONTENT CREATOR STEPHANIE PEREIRA CONTENT CREATOR SEBASTIAN BACK

MARKETING LEAD KIRA ANDERSON ASSISTANT MARKETING LEAD DESIREE AMANI MARKETING WILL FRASER

COPY EDITOR EMMA ZERNASK

MARKETING LIANA MALLIA

COPY EDITOR MEGAN KWAN

PRODUCTION ART DIRECTOR KELLY ANN NGUYEN PRESS EDITION MANAGER ALYSSA KAYE ANDINO PRESS EDITION ASSISTANT JODY MITCHELL GRAPHIC DESIGNER SARAH MAN GRAPHIC DESIGNER JEREMY PAGÉ GRAPHIC DESIGNER PAOLO SULAY

radmag.ca editor@radmag.ca /radmagazine @rad_magazine rad-mag.tumblr.com @rad_magazine

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contents issue 05 68 8

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AU NATURAL JUSTINE LATOUR BARE CHRISTY STOPFEL SPORTRAITS KHRISTEL STECHER THESIS COLLECTION BONNIE YANG ALLUVION: LODGING FOR 2100 MELISSA POON PRODUCT JULIANNA DAMER CMYK RADMAG ERSTELLEN EPIPHANY KAROPOULOS UNTITLED JORDAN BROWNE PETRICHOR CLEMENT CHAN CUBE NORAIN CHANG DIANA JASON PERREAULT ALEC HILDEBRAND ALEC HILDEBRAND


STOCKISTS

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A. RYERSON ART SPACE 1214 Queen St. West Toronto, ON M6J 1J6 ryersonartspace.com B. SWIPE DESIGN 401 Richmond St. West Toronto, ON M5V 3A8 C. SOOP SOOP 1315 Dundas St. West Toronto, ON M6J1X8 soopsoop.ca D. TYPE BOOK 883 Queen St. West Toronto, ON M6J 1G5 typebook.ca

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E. QUANTUM COFFEE 406 King St. West Toronto, ON M5V 1L7 quantumcoffee.io F. LIKELY GENERAL 389 Roncesvalles Avenue Toronto, ON M6R 2N1

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justine latour au natural Justine Latour is a Toronto-based multidisciplinary artist, and recent graduate from the Fashion Design program at Ryerson University. Central to her work is a drive to make statements, push boundaries, and provoke reactions regarding fe m i n i st i s s ue s , s p e c i f i ca lly concerning the human figure. The conceptual basis of her work is explored through a combination of collage, craftsmanship and digital design techniques. She’s a millennial artiste with 21st century sensibilities, tools and training that empower her to pursue all manners of projects.

Before Christianity put down its roots through Europe, there was such a thing as an unadorned, unadulterated female nude. Indeed during the time of Ancient Greece, women’s bodies were not a thing of shame or disgust, but rather something that was celebrated in all of its glory. However, Christian beliefs dating back to the Old Testament have had a profound impact on the way that we think of ourselves, and our bodies. In today’s society, laws concerning decency and obscenity

have made us to believe that female nakedness is sinful, ugly and evil. Au Natural, a five look art-to-wear collection, hopes to dispute these common views concerning nudity, and also highlight issues of gender inequality in current censorship laws and policies. Consisting of three dimensional construction, print and transparency, Au Natural looks to exhibit the natural body in a celebratory and beautiful way, and inspire positive outlooks and opinions surrounding the female nudde.

ART DIRECTOR/STYLIST MICHAEL NYARKOH PHOTOGRAPHER DAVID TRAN HAIR AND MUA AMANDA BLAIR ROBERSON MODEL TEESHA ROUSE MODEL FISAYO OLOWOLAFE @ justine.latour

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christy stopfel bare Christy Stopfel is currently pursuing an education in Interior Design at Ryerson University. Throughout her education, she has developed a passion for design that is based on intelligent, well-informed solutions to difficult problems. Her aim is to eventually participate in design that promotes the successful integration of form and function through thoughtful consideration of the human experience within a space. In addition to this, Christy hopes to gain experience that will allow her to focus on projects that promote social sustainability within existing communities both locally and globally. This focus also extends to projects that make significant strides in environmental sustainability.

Bare is a mixed-use centre that acts as a metaphor for how social media affects us in our everyday lives. Social media is about the feed, a concept that is based on a linear, grid-like progression. The idea of the feed is metaphysical in the same way our connection to clothing and comfort is metaphysical. The relationship represented in this building is the dichotomy represented by our actual lives and our curated lives presented to the public through social media. Bare allows visitors to truly gain confidence through their clothing, and to make the connections that ultimately result from it.

christystopfel.com christystopfel@gmail.com @echristystopfel

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Khristel Stecher Sportraits Khristel Stecher was born in San Jose, Costa Rica in 1990. She works predominantly in the medium of photography, focusing her commercial practice in portraiture, editorial, and product photography. She will be completing her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Photography at Ryerson University in 2016. She has had group exhibitions in Toronto at the Elgin and Winter Gardens Theater, Maximum E xposure , Ryerson Artspace and London, England at The Blacksmith and Toffee Maker. In 2014, she received the SF Award in Photography for the current 3rd-year photography student through Ryerson University. Khristel Stecher is currently living and working in Toronto, Canada, and occasionally takes sporadic trips to San Jose, Costa Rica to do documentary work.

www.khristelphotography.ca khristelphotography@gmail.com Khristel Photography @khristelphoto

Sportraits is a series of environmental p o r t r a i t s e x a m i n i n g R ye r s o n University’s athletes in their athletic arena. The environments include fields, open spaces, gymnasiums, ice rinks, and swimming pools. Khristel photographed the athletes in action, directing them from behind the camera. It was important to capture both the athlete and the sport. In some photographs, motion is the key component. In others, it is the interaction between subject and photographer. This is because eye contact, to a photographer, is vital in understanding the character and personality of a person. This also highlights the active nature of athletes in their domain. This particular selection of highlights two swimmers, Danica Vidotto and Yavor Milanov. Both of these athletes have competed regionally in the Masters Swim Competition in 2016, and hope to swim in various other competitions during the summer.

The technical aspects of the project are also significant. The portraits are lit in such a way that they can exist as commercial and fine art portraits. As commercial por trait s, Khristel envisions the images existing in a magazine editorial that tells a story about athletes in the Ryerson community. As fine art portraits, the work exists as a representation of young athletes and how they are presented to the public. The images address the athletic body and form, but also demonstrate athletes as individuals with personalities that show through their athletic excellence. Stecher’s approach to presentation speaks to her primary influence for this project, Annie Leibovitz. Leibovitz’s lighting techniques were highly influential, and her work also straddled the line between commercial and fine art.

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bonnIE yang thesis collection Bonnie Yang is a fashion and costume designer with a passion in artistic creation and a skill set that combines creativity and technical ability. She never stops learning and questioning how design can help improve daily life and uses this mindset in every garment she creates. Yang is a strong believer in the experimental process and that hard work leads to desired results.

(BEIGE SHOOT) PHOTOGRAPHER NELSON HUANG

The inspiration for Yang’s thesis collection is taken from Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye in Paris, France, a pinnacle piece of architectural history for international modernism. The structures of the building and layered effect of Villa Savoye shape the organic volumes of the garments in this collection. The collection uses the colour pallet of flat whites of the buildings with its natural surroundings of open sky and soft sunlight to create a calm and peaceful wearer experience.

PHOTOGRAPHER ASSISTANT NICOLE KWON HAIR AND MUA FEI FEI WANG + SHAN HWANG MODEL ARABELLE GREGOIRE STYLIST PAOLO SULAY ART DIRECTOR KELLY ANN NGUYEN (LIGHT SHOOT) PHOTOGRAPHER ANNABELLE LOI HAIR AND MUA NICOLE WEITZEL MODEL KATIE CRESPI bonnieyangstudio.com yang.bonn@gmail.com facebook.com/yang.bonn @bonnivyre

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Melissa Poon Alluvion: Lodging for 2100 Melissa Poon is a recent graduate from the Ryerson School of Interior Design. She became interested in becoming an architect at the age of ten, pursuing her passion for the visual arts. Following this ‘creative’ incentive, she became an art major throughout high school, and soon became captivated by the diverse creativity and technicality of the interior design industry. In recent years, Melissa’s design approach has taken on a bold, simple, and sophisticated quality. She is constantly inspired by architectural legends such as Kengo Kuma, Tadao Ando, and Santiago Calatrava. As she works to perfect her design process and implementation, she finds herself continually striving to establish a unique design identity. She aspires to use her background in interior design to pursue the field of architecture at the University of Toronto, and to one day join MASS Design Group to construct housing and amenities for developing countries.

By 2100, scientists have predicted that Bangkok will be completely submerged and inhabitable. Alluvion serves as a model to allow tourists of the new century to experience the submerged artifacts of Bangkok in 2100. With Alluvion, century-old artifacts and architecture will be able to withstand the flooding of Bangkok, and the opportunity to see and experience these cultural monuments will not be washed away. Embracing the inevitable and intense nature of water, Alluvion offers an exhilarating experience within an underwater vessel designed for a fluid landscape. The destination serves as a reminder of the Bangkok culture, the negligence of the state, the implications of changing climate conditions, and the

almighty waters that have sculpted the city’s state. It shows what was once lost, yet offers an opportunity to regain these moments through an enclosed experience in Bangkok’s waters. T h e i m p l i c at i o ns of d we l l i n g underwater brings into question if this unnatural landscape is simply a condition to be accepted, or if it symbolizes the need for awareness. Tourists will be witness to the negligence of the sunken city and symbolic culture that will be buried forever. Alluvion is a space that houses intrigue, euphoria, and contemplation; it is a sensorium that channels the immersive experience of the mysterious underwater landscape.

mkpoon.10@gmail.com

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julianna Damer Product Julianna Damer is a FrenchCanadian image-maker and visual explorer dividing her time between Edmonton and Toronto, where she is currently pursuing a BFA in Photography Studies at Ryerson University. In 2013, she completed a BSc in Human Ecology at the University of Alberta with a major in Textiles & Clothing. Julianna’s b a c kg ro u n d i n tex ti le s a n d material culture has influenced her photographic and artistic practices, leading her to explore the significance and use of materials, objects, and technology in everyday life. Photography, film, 3D printing, and installation art practices have allowed her to explore these issues and represent them visually. With such a wide landscape of visual media in the twenty-first century, Julianna is continuously excited by the field’s rich potential for visual exploration.

This proje ct pl ays with the photographic print medium and the idea of representation. Julianna specifically chose objects that contained or produced something. This ranged from egg yolks inside eggshells, to light emanating from a lamp. After choosing the objects, she photographed them in the studio and printed them. Each print was then re-photographed with its product or content. The print and the objects interact with each other in a way that is playful and creates a trompe-l’oeil effect.

juliannadamer.com julianna@damer.ca @jdeebo

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radmag cmyk Entitled “CMYK,” the specific colours optimized for print and the inspiration for our logo (past and present), this editorial is not about one specific aspect of creativity or method (Fashion, Photography, or Interior Design), but the integration of all three. When looking at the images, we hope to establish an understanding of the team that created the end result— from production to styling, makeup, to post production editing. RADmag is made up of creative individuals who dedicate their time to developing and showcasing Ryerson talent. However, while we love to give our talented peers the attention they deserve, we too enjoy collaborating and creating our own art. Thus,

this semester, our team decided to produce its first in-house editorial. This marks a shift in the function of the magazine, to focus on collaboration and production across the creative programs of FCAD. Collaborating across our three genres, our editors came together to personify the RADmag brand within an editorial. By playing with colour, line, and shape we developed a custom set, curated looks from Ryerson Fashion student’s collections, and emulated our minimalist, colour blocked look onto our models.

PRODUCER GRAEME MONTGOMERY ART DIRECTOR/STYLIST KELLY ANN NGUYEN PHOTOGRAPHER CONNOR REMUS PHOTOGRAPHER ASSISTANT IMOGEN WALLIS-MAYER SET DESIGN ARTEMIS HAN, SIDNEY TSAO MUA NICOLE WIETZEL, STEPHANIE PEREIRA MODELS MATEA, LINDSAY, AND MITCHELL (SPOT 6) BTS EMMA ROBINSON

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Epiphany Karopoulos Erstellen Epiphany Karopoulos is currently in her second year at Ryerson University’s School of Interior Design. She is a designer who is inspired by abstract, architectural movements that challenge the norm. Through her projects, she experiments with fluidity, emotions, and light to create her own innovative and unique design language.

Erstellen is a boutique that challenges the typical clothing store. The boutique keeps the creative process open to every client and allows for a translucency to the designer’s work. Located in Kitchener’s downtown core, it ties into the larger vision for the city’s future. By injecting arts and creativity, Erstellen enriches the cultural and physical surroundings.

The movement of fabric directly epiphany.karopoulos@gmail.com inspires the spatial experience of the boutique. Two large abstract forms occupy the space. These forms act as a guide for the environment. The journey begins at the entrance through the user’s physical interaction, followed by moving through the forms across the main floor, and finally by moving along them upward through the play of light. These abstract forms show the creative process of creating

a garment. It is initially experienced on the atelier floor, through design iterations, alterations, and fabric sourcing. The garment concludes in a final display, and retail on the main floor. The various levels also make for an interesting experience, created by trimming the front length of the atelier floor, allowing the designers to look upon the retail floor through the aluminum profiles. This creates a constant relationship between the two floors. The space continues to be inspired by the clothing with the choice of materials. Subdued, neutral, and transparent materials such as white marble, white aluminum, and glass allow for the clothes to be constantly experienced.

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Melissa Poon Alluvion: Lodging for 2100 Melissa Poon is a recent graduate from the Ryerson School of Interior Design. She became interested in becoming an architect at the age of ten, pursuing her passion for the visual arts. Following this ‘creative’ incentive, she became an art major throughout high school, and soon became captivated by the diverse creativity and technicality of the interior design industry. In recent years, Melissa’s design approach has taken on a bold, simple, and sophisticated quality. She is constantly inspired by architectural legends such as Kengo Kuma, Tadao Ando, and Santiago Calatrava. As she works to perfect her design process and implementation, she finds herself continually striving to establish a unique design identity. She aspires to use her background in interior design to pursue the field of architecture at the University of Toronto, and to one day join MASS Design Group to construct housing and amenities for developing countries.

By 2100, scientists have predicted that Bangkok will be completely submerged and inhabitable. Alluvion serves as a model to allow tourists of the new century to experience the submerged artifacts of Bangkok in 2100. With Alluvion, century-old artifacts and architecture will be able to withstand the flooding of Bangkok, and the opportunity to see and experience these cultural monuments will not be washed away. Embracing the inevitable and intense nature of water, Alluvion offers an exhilarating experience within an underwater vessel designed for a fluid landscape. The destination serves as a reminder of the Bangkok culture, the negligence of the state, the implications of changing climate conditions, and the

almighty waters that have sculpted the city’s state. It shows what was once lost, yet offers an opportunity to regain these moments through an enclosed experience in Bangkok’s waters. T h e i m p l i c at i o ns of d we l l i n g underwater brings into question if this unnatural landscape is simply a condition to be accepted, or if it symbolizes the need for awareness. Tourists will be witness to the negligence of the sunken city and symbolic culture that will be buried forever. Alluvion is a space that houses intrigue, euphoria, and contemplation; it is a sensorium that channels the immersive experience of the mysterious underwater landscape.

mkpoon.10@gmail.com

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julianna Damer Product Julianna Damer is a FrenchCanadian image-maker and visual explorer dividing her time between Edmonton and Toronto, where she is currently pursuing a BFA in Photography Studies at Ryerson University. In 2013, she completed a BSc in Human Ecology at the University of Alberta with a major in Textiles & Clothing. Julianna’s b a c kg ro u n d i n tex ti le s a n d material culture has influenced her photographic and artistic practices, leading her to explore the significance and use of materials, objects, and technology in everyday life. Photography, film, 3D printing, and installation art practices have allowed her to explore these issues and represent them visually. With such a wide landscape of visual media in the twenty-first century, Julianna is continuously excited by the field’s rich potential for visual exploration.

This proje ct pl ays with the photographic print medium and the idea of representation. Julianna specifically chose objects that contained or produced something. This ranged from egg yolks inside eggshells, to light emanating from a lamp. After choosing the objects, she photographed them in the studio and printed them. Each print was then re-photographed with its product or content. The print and the objects interact with each other in a way that is playful and creates a trompe-l’oeil effect.

juliannadamer.com julianna@damer.ca @jdeebo

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radmag cmyk Entitled “CMYK,” the specific colours optimized for print and the inspiration for our logo (past and present), this editorial is not about one specific aspect of creativity or method (Fashion, Photography, or Interior Design), but the integration of all three. When looking at the images, we hope to establish an understanding of the team that created the end result— from production to styling, makeup, to post production editing. RADmag is made up of creative individuals who dedicate their time to developing and showcasing Ryerson talent. However, while we love to give our talented peers the attention they deserve, we too enjoy collaborating and creating our own art. Thus,

this semester, our team decided to produce its first in-house editorial. This marks a shift in the function of the magazine, to focus on collaboration and production across the creative programs of FCAD. Collaborating across our three genres, our editors came together to personify the RADmag brand within an editorial. By playing with colour, line, and shape we developed a custom set, curated looks from Ryerson Fashion student’s collections, and emulated our minimalist, colour blocked look onto our models.

PRODUCER GRAEME MONTGOMERY ART DIRECTOR/STYLIST KELLY ANN NGUYEN PHOTOGRAPHER CONNOR REMUS PHOTOGRAPHER ASSISTANT IMOGEN WALLIS-MAYER SET DESIGN ARTEMIS HAN, SIDNEY TSAO MUA NICOLE WIETZEL, STEPHANIE PEREIRA MODELS MATEA, LINDSAY, AND MITCHELL (SPOT 6) BTS EMMA ROBINSON

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Epiphany Karopoulos Erstellen Epiphany Karopoulos is currently in her second year at Ryerson University’s School of Interior Design. She is a designer who is inspired by abstract, architectural movements that challenge the norm. Through her projects, she experiments with fluidity, emotions, and light to create her own innovative and unique design language.

Erstellen is a boutique that challenges the typical clothing store. The boutique keeps the creative process open to every client and allows for a translucency to the designer’s work. Located in Kitchener’s downtown core, it ties into the larger vision for the city’s future. By injecting arts and creativity, Erstellen enriches the cultural and physical surroundings.

The movement of fabric directly epiphany.karopoulos@gmail.com inspires the spatial experience of the boutique. Two large abstract forms occupy the space. These forms act as a guide for the environment. The journey begins at the entrance through the user’s physical interaction, followed by moving through the forms across the main floor, and finally by moving along them upward through the play of light. These abstract forms show the creative process of creating

a garment. It is initially experienced on the atelier floor, through design iterations, alterations, and fabric sourcing. The garment concludes in a final display, and retail on the main floor. The various levels also make for an interesting experience, created by trimming the front length of the atelier floor, allowing the designers to look upon the retail floor through the aluminum profiles. This creates a constant relationship between the two floors. The space continues to be inspired by the clothing with the choice of materials. Subdued, neutral, and transparent materials such as white marble, white aluminum, and glass allow for the clothes to be constantly experienced.

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jordan browne untitled Jordan Browne is a photo-based artist located in Toronto whose work focuses on the nude body and the ways in which body language and gesture can communicate unseen emotion to audiences. Jordan is currently attending Ryerson University for photography with plans to graduate in 2016.

jordan-browne.com jordanmbrowne@gmailcom @jordan_browne

This series explores themes of masculinity in relation to the body and its portrayal in the male nude. While not explicitly a critique, I photograph various gay and queer men in ways that evoke a sense of calm and quiet – a proposition that contrasts with depictions of male bodies in photography throughout much of its history. By photographing individuals who do not subscribe to heteronormative values, I encourage viewers to reflect on commonly held definitions of masculinity and its relevance in present-day society.

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clement chan petrichor Clement Chan is a Toronto-based fashion designer. Having grown up in both Hong Kong and Toronto, Clement approaches design with an East meets West philosophy. The dynamic between such opposing forces—one of contrasts and juxtapositions—serves as the basis for Clement’s work aesthetic. With a penchant for experimentation, he introduces a unique perspective to the fashion ideal.

Petrichor is a contemporary womenswear collection that explores the concept of creating a sensory connection between clothing and consumer. Taking inspiration from the smell and moment after it rains, Petrichor aims to translate an experience through visual, tactile, and olfactory tangibility.

STYLIST LIN CANO PHOTOGRAPHER LAWRENCE CORTEZ HAIR AND MUA ANDREA CANO MODEL CRYSTAL TANG (ELITE)

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NORAIN CHANG cube Norain Chang is a graduating 4th year from Ryerson’s School of Interior Design (RSID) pursuing her Masters of Architecture at the University of British Columbia. The feeling of built spaces has interested her from a young age. However, it was not until she arrived at RSID that she was able to articulate these haptic observations into concrete thought constructions. As an interior designer, Norain tries to curate an experience that transports the occupants to an alternate world separate from the outside. She examines the relationship between the users and the atmospheric elements of the space in a micro perspective. Through architecture, this notion can be extrapolated to show how a structure informs the users in a macro perspective. Norain’s thesis is a direct exploration of this concept, and how a psychological ideal to which urban dwellers have been subjected can be addressed by the exterior of the structure, and articulated within the interior of the space.

norainchang.com chang.norain@gmail.com

Often the term ‘sacred space’ is tied to the religious definition, and connected with spiritual sacred spaces such as cathedrals, synagogues, and more. CUBE aims to redefine the idea of the sacred space. That is, not to replace the term, but to provide a more contextually relevant definition to the current day urban dwellers.

within each site. CUBE Toronto is a space with no agenda in the midst of the busy financial district. Located next to the TD Pavilion, an existing void, CUBE Toronto regulates the rhythm and pace of its users through circulation. The aim is to slow one’s pace down to a complete stop as users reach the lower level.

The idea of a void as a sacred space and its ability to transcend sanctity is tested through CUBE. CUBE aims to address the urban illness that exists within the urban fabric, a by-product of built spaces such as infrastructure, architecture, and urban planning. It further questions how creating void spaces in cities can cure the urban illness.

While the network of overpasses in Hong Kong increases efficiency in travel, it in turn, creates a disconnection between life on the street level and one on the elevated walkways. By injecting itself in an existing overpass overlooking the entire network, Cube Hong Kong seeks to form an internal world where the two elevations are re-connected and the displacement is blurred.

The base geometry of the cube was chosen for its orthogonal qualities, allowing it to disappear into the backdrop of the urban fabric. The cube’s enclosure also serves as the simplest form of shelter. By honing in on the respective illnesses that are prominent within the three chosen cities (Toronto, Hong Kong, and Chicago), elements within the cube transform and seek to address and solve the specific illness

Sound pollution in Chicago caused by the elevated L Train track causes a disruption in the internal rhythm of surrounding users. CUBE Chicago aims not to contain the noise from trains, but to be a sound void that addresses the noise by providing a shelter where sound disruption is acknowledged as opposed to experienced.

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Jason Perreault Diana Jason Perreault is a FrenchCanadian photography student at Ryerson University with a primary focus on portraiture. His work questions issues of gender and sexuality in hopes of blurring the solid lines of gender norms and expectations. It is also important that the photographs he creates are very inclusive and accessible to his viewers. One of the ways that he achieves this is by integrating his love for fashion into his photographs. Jason prefers to work in a studio environment where he can control almost every detail of the imagemaking process. When creating a portrait, the relationship between the model and photographer is incredibly significant and it is his goal to capture that energy, whether it be positive or negative. Although this process takes place indoors, a lot of his visual inspiration is drawn from colour palettes found in nature.

Series showcasing the designs of Monika Leokadija.

DESIGNER MONIKA LEOKADIJA PHOTOGRAPHER JASON PERREAULT HAIR AND MUA RACHEL LAURA LEE MODEL DIANA EDELMAN

@jasonperreault

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alec hildebrand ALEC HILDEBRAND Alec Hildebrand was born and raised in Winnipeg, Manitoba, as a non-traditionalist Mennonite. No longer identifying as Christian, he finds that his roots within the pacifist denomination influences his perspective of how to accept and love the world. After moving to Toronto in 2012 to study Fashion Design at Ryerson, his passion for sustainability grew exponentially, particularly after visiting Haiti for a class, to learn how some businesses are reusing waste for clothing, and what is required for a business to be both profitable and fair trade. Currently he is experimenting with bio-synthetic materials, and using bacteria and fungi to grow fabrics. Alec identifies as gay, and is also currently working with film and photography, to investigate queer theory and posthumanism.

The collection for Mass Exodus is a sustainable and androgynous casual wear line for men. There were a couple of influences that inspired the collection. The first influence was this dystopian idea of our how our environment will be in the future, where the air and atmosphere are highly polluted with gases, and the earth and sediment eroding away. This idea brought forward the use of several airy and flowing garments, whilst others looked as if they were deterring away. The

garments themselves are either made from organic materials or from recycled plastics, specifically a recycled Tyvek that after use can be shipped back to the company to be made into new Tyvek, and then a material the designer made by melting used grocery bags to empty chip bags. The second influence was this inclining to destigmatize sex workers and bring forward positive embracements of ones sexuality and sexual energy.

PRODUCER GRAEME MONTGOMERY PHOTOGRAPHER SEBASTIAN BLACK ASSISTANTS SASHA DOWNIE-ROSS, KELLY ANN NGUYEN MUA NATHAN PALACIOS MODEL DAX DONNELLY MODEL TOMAS MATURANA MODELRONEY LEWIS, alec.hildebrand@ryerson.ca @alec_hildebrand

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Fall ‘16 Issue 05

FAll ‘16 Issue 05 Ryerson Arts & Design Magazine //FASHION //PHOTOGRAPHY //DESIGN

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